(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Thief River Falls (MN) Tribune"

THIEF RIVER FALLS 



VI g 1 

H o 


29 


1926 R U 


192( 



Thief River Falls TRIBUNE 



25:43 - 26:42 



Inclusive 
Dates: I Jan 6 



Dec 29 



1926 



1926 



"THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE" 



291-12-1990 



Originals held by: MHS X Other 



Prepared by: 

N. Q. Cristobal 



4> 



Date: 
Dec 15, 1989 



Filmed by: 



U>&i 



:^r\rwi 



Date: 



Reduction Ratio: 



H 



Voltmeter 



Prelim. Inspection by: 



Target Resolution: 
/mm 



O.K. 

Reject 



Format: 
1A. X 
2B 



Camera No. 



No. E>:pos. 



Density: 



Length: 



The Minnesota Historical Society has 
reproduced the material in this microfilm 
without any purpose of direct or indirect 
commercial advantage in order to preserve 
& to. secure it for private study, scholar- 
ship, and research. 

The material reproduced may be protected 
by copyright law. Any person engaging in 
further reproduction of this material may 
be liable for infringement. 







SI SB ;E 

EZH i-3 iS3 



O — 



CN 







Vol. 25 No. 43. 



THIEF RIVERFALLS, MINNESQTA.WEDNESQAY, JANUARY, 6> 1926 



LOOra 'Year mjislvani&, 




Prominent Speakers to Feature Alfalfa Day Celebration 



POULTRY SHOW 
"BEST EVER" IS 
VERDKTOFALL 

Officials Pleased With Im- 
proved Quality of: 
Exhibits. 



Indicates Growth Of 
Industry Here Is 
Feeling 



The 



Feeling decidedly chesty about that 
S45..000 check the turkeys at the an- 
nual Pennington county poultry show- 
now being held, at theauditorium, are 
trying to lord it over the cousins in 
the poultry classes. But with only, 
partial success, for the various breeds 
of poultry are strongly represented. 

The eighth annual exhibition of the 
Pennington county poultry associa- 
tion is of high standard, observers 
-all agree, both in quality of entries 
and in the 1 number of birds shown. 
Opening Tuesday as entry day the 
show had taken form today, with all 
pens filled, grain entries placed, eggs 
on display and booths of co-operative 
creameries lending a touch of varied 
color along the north wall of the 
auditorium. 

Judging began this morning, with' 
A. M. Pilkey, professor of poultry 
husbandry at the Northwest School 
of Agriculture, Crookston, doing the 
rating. It was expected winnings 
will be listed by the. last day of the 
show. 

Attractive booths have been erected 
by the Hazel, Holt and St. Hilaire 
creameries "in response to the invita- 
tion of the local committee. There is 
also a booth erected by the 



Speaks Tomorrow at 
Alfalfa Celebration 



A resolution urging the congre- 
gation to proceed at once in the 
building, program which has been* 
contemplated for several years was 
passed by an unanimous vote of the 

j ww Thief I deacons ^ trustees of the Trinity 

River co-operative creamery associa- Lutheran 'church of this city, and was 
tion, but it is not entered in the read by Lars Backe at the New Year's 
competition. The booths are filled ' Wake services in the church on New 
with quality exhibits by individual Year'? eve. - With this 
faiTi^rfc. " • 




dOL. RALPH WEBB 
Mayor of Winnipeg 

NEW CHURCH 
MAOE BUILT 

Officers of The Trinity 
Lutheran Recommend 
Quick Action. 



unanimous 



C. D. Gustafson, president .of the 



support of the officers of the church 



poultry association, states the show t ? e matter will be given serious con- 
has the usual number of entries and sideration at the annual meeting of 
in ppint of quality is the best that the congregation to be held Tuesday 
has been held in the history of the evening, January 19, and according 
association. He points out that with «■„ n,« a: „ *i. • _,• *.• 
the exception of two exhibitors from '° the ° fflceR5 the "> d "*t">ns «* 
Warren all the entrants are from faTOr abIe to immediate action. The 
the Thief River Falls region.' This is] Present quarters have long been in- 
a striking demonstration of the nro- i adequate to care for the needs of the 
gress made m poultry raising in this 'powing congregation, 126 new 'mem- 
section in recent years, Mr. Gustaf- , . ? na ™£ be™ added to the role 
son says. | aurmg the past year. 

Hagbarth Bue, Northfield, : presi- I .Jf 6 W $S s «™e program opened 
dent of the Minnesota Co-Operative ' ™ a children s hour during which 
egg and poultry exchange, is in the K^TLwl^TV 6 ? e P oyo ( d - 

«* a. ew ~a SSSSSSfifi 

and ex-pressed genuine admiration of the wome „, Dr. 0. F. Mellby repre? 

the show. Tnis afternoon he spoke anting the men and Mrs. S. L. Tal- 

m the Commercial Club rooms at 2:30 lakson representing the Friday 

on co-operative marketing problems, school. Musical numbers were then 

Mr. Bue is spending several days in rendered by Miss Pearl Weeks and 

this part of the state, being booked Mrs. H. L. Sande. Refreshments 



BREDESOJWt 

PRESIDENT OK 

CITY COUNCa 

. — - : '!■ 
P. 6. Pederson Unanimous- 
ly Re-named as City 
Clerk. \ 



Mayor Compliments OJd 

Council and Make Rec-i 

ommendations. 



The council chambers were wjell 
filled last night at the adjourned 
meeting of the retiring city council, 
and the first meeting of the newly 
elected incumbents, many of them Be- 
ing applicants for various city posi- 
tions, with a few disinterested specta- 
tors. Little business of importance 
came before either the old 'or new or- 
ganizations, the appointments being 
laid over to the next regular meeting, 
Tuesday, Jan. 12: » 

Alfred Bredeson was unanimously 
selected as chairman for the coming 
year, while Oscar Paulson was chosen 
as his assistant without any opposi- 
tion and Peter G. Pederson -was re- 
named clerk. The retiring aldermen, 
all of whom were present except 
Christ^Porter, made short- talks, all 
voicing the idea of harmony during 
the past two years, the result having 
been-the accomplishment of many un- 
dertakings for the benefit of the com- 
munity. ] 

More applications for various city 
positions were received than at any 
time for several years, but all were 
held up pending consideration by the 
new council. There were.fiye appli- 
cants for the position of janitor -of 
the city auditorium, three for street 
commissioner, two for. -tender *of 
the incinerator and one each for city 
physician and health officer, driver 
of the fire team/cliy. attorney* 
pffor ^m^trdhT^'Tn^jrily^dhe'iifi 
had applications been made by • the 
: . (Continued on page 8) 



PAULSON SPEAKS 



$30,000 ADDITION fe° p xSsav«Ws PRflfiR AM 

Paid From First National Uni OI UUUIUlffl 

TO BE DIVIDED 
INTO* 



TO SANATORIUM 
GOINGJPSOON 

Representatives of Counties 

Passed on Project Last 

Night 



Addition Has Been Long 

Felt Need of Institution, 

Claim. 



"Duties of the . Alderman? 

■ Are Explained by ' 

City Official 



to speak Friday morning at 11:00 in 
Goodridge and at 2:00 p. m. in St. 
Hilaire. Mr. Bue is a youne: farmer 
living west of Northfield, in Kice 
county, where he is a successful 



were served at 10:00 o'clock by Mrs. 
M. Evenson and Mrs. O.' G. Storholm. 
An aridress of welcome to the new 
members was delivered by I. T. Sim- 
ley, and was responded to in behalf 



farmer." He' is a student of co-opera- 0I " the new members by Mrs. T. Reep. 
tive marketing and an able public A balance of 5600.00 in the general 
speaker. In addition to his work f una " s at lne end of the year was an- 
with the poultry marketing associa- ■ n °™ced by J. J. Weeks, president of 
tion he is a state vice oresident of the • '"^ board, of trustees and the congre- 
Farm Bureau ' ! station voted t turn $500.00 of this 

As a closing feature of the poultry i am0 ™ t ™to the building fund.; The 
show Friday there will be an auction I f™ C t" t°f ^S I men, ° n ^ ? d ' 
sale of poultry. It is limited to «-,£ X?«: o ?' v""^ 6 a ". d clo 5, n! ; 

S£3.£ £ SMt^iSS- MJtf* £«£ 

is an unusual opportunity, President 
Gustafson states, to get good breed- 



ing stock at attractive prices. 



N 
V 



Lyceum to Screen Special 
Comedy Teday, Thursday 

Announcement was made today by 
the Lyceum theatre management of 
the screening today . and tomorrow 
^(Thursday) ol a special comedy film, 
•Til Show You the Town". 

Like most farces, says Mr Brum- 
und, manager, the film has a slim 
plot that is jabsurd, but it is full of 
hilarious entertainment from begin- 
ning to end. 

The production is lavishly staged 
and expertly managed, and Mr. 
Brumund7especially recommends it to 
those who need the tonic of a hun- 
dred hearty laughs. . j 

* — . " — — i — : fr 

I TOM ATTRACTS ATTENTION I 



The large Mammbuth j Bronze 
turkey torn belonging to C. H. 
Fuller of Mavie was the 'biggest 
attraction at the poultry Show, 
llast night, not because of 
f his . grace of beauty, i ■ b u t 
i due to his enormous!', size; 
Tom weight 50 pounds, and 
is thin-as a rail at that; Sev- 
eral poultry men who looked him 
over stated, that he probably 
would tip the scales at more than 
75 pounds if he were fattened. 
If it is as hard on Tom to be 
handled and passed around as it 
iis a baby, he will have to eat well 
for a few weeks to regain what 
he lost at the show. , 



gation who have Dassed awav during 
the vear 1925 were. Charles Raymond 
Stadum. infant s«n of- Mr. and Mrs. 
Oscar Rtsdum; Reier Braflten: Luth- 
er R. Carlson; Mrs. G. L. Steenerson; 
Bertha Gullinffsrud: A. E. Anderson: 
Mrs. E. P. Bnrstad; R K. A a sen: 
Oscar Mosleth: Mrs. E..L. Helgeland 
and Mrs. IJohn-GuIlingsrud. 

Schools Fe-onen Thur«!dav 
After Two Weeks of Rest. 

Thief River Falls public schools 
will re-open tomorrow (Thursday) 
morning afterhaving been closed two 
weeks for the regular holiday vaca- 
tion. ; ■'""'■ 

Many teachers and out-of-town pu-; 
pils took ; the opportunity of visiting 
their homes while city, students and 
faculty members have been making 
the best of the time combining work 
and recreation. 

There are still two weeks left of 
the first - semester, according to 
Superintendent I. T. Simley, who 
stated today that he knows from past 
experience that all pupils will be in 
better condition .both physically and 
-mentally i to resume. -.their school.! 
activities./ •„,-, .- 



Alderman Oscar Paulson was; the 
speaker of the day at the first regu- 
lar post-holiday meeting of the Wo- 
man's club at the Commercial club 
rooms Monday afternoon, the subject 
he discussed being, "Duties of the Al- 
derman". His talks, which was a de-. 
tailed report of the purposes of the 
council, the part it plays in the city 
government and the duties of the al- 
dermen who make up its various 
committees, was exceedingly inter- 
esting and instructive to', those who 
heard him. - 

Following his talk Miss Ariel King- 
horn rendered a vocal solo accompan- 
ied by Miss Mildred Engen which was 
well received. The discussion of the 
topic of the day was led by Mrs. J. 
Fulton and was entered into by many 
of those present. Mrs. William Kor- 
stad gave an interesting talk on city 
government, emphasizing the need 
in Thief River Falls of a police ma- 
tron. It was decided that a commit- 
tee should be formed to compile the 
history of the local unit for the rec- 
ords of the general federation. The 
swimming pool committee reported 
that plans were being completed for 
ways and means of carrying out the 
project which they had in charge and 
stated that an announcement would 
be made to the public in the near fu- 
ture. 



A §30,000 addition to Oakland- Park 
Sanatorium will be built in the very 
near future, a full representation of 
Pennington, Marshall, Roseau and 
Red Lake counties having met at the 
sanatorium last, night and passed on 
the project. 

The institution which is owned by 
the four counties has been long in 
need -of .additional space, the hall 
ways having been used for extra 
beds to the inconvenience of those 
managing its affairs. 

The addition as planned calls for a 
brick structure at the east end of the 
present building. It will be separate 
from the main building but will be 
connected .by a hall way the same 
size as that which runs east and 
west within the old building. 

The four counties controlling the 
institution support it according to the 
assessed valuation of property, the 
present- ratio being, Marshall 37 per 
cent, Roseau 26 per cent, Pennington, 
22 per cent and Red Lake 15 per 
cent. It is estimated that. a levy of 
one mill in each of the four counties 
will take care of the expense of the 
addition. 

■■ The- board will call forbids im- 
mediately and construction will begin 
just as soon as weather permits. 
! Dr. B. C Bernard, head of the San- 
atorium for the. last two years, stated 
^day^tihat.seyer^pati^ts'ihaT^^had, 
to be turned down because of limited 
quarters. The new addition will pro- 
vide room for 22 more beds. 



DMLAND SUBMITS 



B. O. Norby, manager of the 
. Thiaf River Valley ^.-operative 
Poultry association yeaterday -re- 
ceived . from . the Minnesota Ex- 
change, a. cheek for $44,858.99, 
representing payment to farmers 
of the local .association for tur- 
keys shipped for the Christmas 
market. The check was deposited 
at therffrst^tfatinnal bank and 
iriltebe"T)aia out o faremrs ini= 
mediately.' 

The. payment is. said to be the 
largest ever made to any poultry 
association : in the state. 
.The, amount/received for the 
Thanksgiving: shipment from the 
local plant was $18,457.34, ac- 
. cording to Mr. Norby, making a 
total, for the two shipments of 
$63,316,33. ' : 



WBIRUS GETS $150 and 30 DAYS. 
Joseph Weirus, Jr.. who was arrest- 
ed two weeks ago for .violating of 
the liquor laws plead guilty before 
Judge William Watts at Crookston, 
December .31 and was sentenced to 
pay a $150 fine and spend SO day^in 
the county jail. 



STEPHEN PLAYS 
LOCALSFRIDAY 

High School Yells and Spec- : 

ial Orchestra Music 

Features. 



Total of $48,309.27 Spent for 
Construction and Main- 
tenance. 



Soo Officials Here. 

Twenty-five officials of the Soo 
line were present at a series of meet- 
ings in Thief River Falls yesterday 
at which various phases of railroad 
problems of interest to the employees 
and the public were discussed. Among 
other subjects considered were 
"Claim Prevention," ''Fire Preven- 
tion" and "Safety First." . 



Will Open New Garage. 

Clayton and Alfred .SteeneVson, loc- 
al young men, last week announced 
their intention of opening. a garage in 
the building formerly occupied by Gil- 
bertson- & Rogers. 



In compliance with a state regu- 
lation requiring, county highway en- 
gineers to submit an annual report of 
work, accomplished in the \, various 
counties for the year, Bert'F. Urn- 
land, Pennington county engineer, ast 
week submitted a complete outline of 
his activities during 1925 to the coun- 
ty commissioners and. the state high- 
way department. 

The report is very "comprehensive, 
itemizing every load of gravel used 
and the cost per yard, tractor work, 
culverts, supervision— in fact every 
item entering into the construction 
and maintenance of every road in the 
county. 

Construction on state aid roads for 
the year totaled $29,372.05, and on 
county roads $2,532.41. 

Maintenance on state roads in the 
county amounted to $31,904.46 and on 
county roads, $12,792.09. 

Engineering costs on state roads 
amounted to $2,100 and on county 
roads $676.20. 

The. total aniount of money handled 
for construction and maintenance of 
both county and state roads was $48,- 
309.27, all of these expenditures be- 
ing paid from Mr. Umland's office. 

The following general information 
is given in the report: 

Miles of state aid roads in county, 
123.5. 

Miles maintained in 1925, 118.5.- 

Average maintenance cost per mile. 
$138.37. 

Miles constructed in 1925, 20. 

Miles surfaced, 8. 

Mlies surveyed for 1926 construc- 
tion, 16. 

Percentage cost of engineering, 
7.47 per cent. 

The report shows that many im- 
provements were made both on state 
and county roads in Pennington coun- 
ty, but,- according to Mr. Umland, 
still greater prospects are held out 
* : - *™ il 'Hie work on the east El- 
well road has gone forward,- only a 
few miles remaining to complete 
the surfacing and .pTRvellng to . the 

nnington county line. 



. The second conference basketball 
game of the seaspn on the local floor 
will be played Friday night, Janu- 
arys, when the fighting Stephen loop 
shooters come to try conclusions- with 
Thune's galaxy of Stonewall Jack- 
sons. 

ihe local outfit has been whipped 
from a weak, untrained team to begin 
with intp one of .the strongest in this 
tiistri.ctju ;winning recently^from . Foss: 
ton, considered one of the very~best 
in this, part of the state. 

Two high school girls 1 teams will 
stage the preliminary contest. 

The event -Friday night will be fea- 
tured by special music, Snyder's six- 
piece orchestra having consented to 
pep up the entertainment between 
quarters. This with the variety 'of 
7'iricom high school yells should make 
the event a live one from start to 
finish. 



Rai^beck & Stone Join 
Gilbertson & Rogers 
to Form T. R. Motor Co. 



Afternoon and * Evening 
Programs To Be 
At Princess, _ 



Commercial Club Lunch 

Held at Club- Rooms 

At Noon. 



- One of the finest . speaking pro- 
grams ever heard in northwestern 
Minnesota will . be presented to the 
people .of this community, tomorrow, 
Ihursday, Jan. 7, when^'al dozen 
prominent men of Minnesota and 
Canada, specialists in the : farming 
and economic problems of the Norths 
west, will address audiences; at the 
Commercial Club- luncheon. at noon 
and at afternoon and evening pro- 
grams at the Princess.; theater. The 
quantity and the quality of the speak- 
ers who will* participate in. this Alfal- 
fa Day. celebration will present such 
a variety of valuable material for 
the consideration of the fa rm ers and 
business men. that this event is de- 
stined to be a most inspirational and 
educational Chautauqua. 

■; While there will doubtless be sev- 
eral changes in the schedule now ar- 
ranged to accomodate the convenience 
of the individual speakers,, the pre- 
sent tenative program is as follows: 
Commercial Club Noon Luncheon, 
W. McCurdy, managing. editor 
Winnipeg Tribune 

E. C. Leedy, general agricultural 
development agent of the Great 
Northern. 
Afternoon Program princess Theater 

W. W. Pricharrf, Jr. Mayor of Thief 
River Falls. " 

. A. Ellis, .professor of .field" husban- 
dly at University of Manitoba. 

Dr. F. J. Alway, head of soils de- 
^artmerrt^^niversity-orJiinnesota.:^. 

J. G. Haney, District manager In- 
ternational Harvester Go. 

C. J.Selvfg; president of the North- 
west School of Agriculture. 

Ole Sageng, head of the Rural 
Credits department of the State of 
T.f'tmesota. • 
Evening Program Princess Theater. 

RaTph Webfr, Mayor of Wmmpeg. 

H. S. Funstoir. Soo Line Immigra- 
tion agent. 

F. E. Balmer, state county agent 
lepder. 

Edward Barr, agricultural secre- 
tarv of the St. Paul Association. 

Several musical numbers have been 
arranged to intersperse this speaking 
program and 1 arrangements have al- 
. So been made for overflow meetings 

Announcement was made last week; if the capacity of the Princess Thea- 
°l ™ e . consolidation under the name ter is not sufficient to handle the . 



,:■■: iLridvigRoe in G,ty. 

LuQViff-}I..:Roe,;publiaher of :the 
Montevideo News, arrived in' ■. Thief 
River Falls. Tuesday morning -.to 
spend a few -days in the city looking 
after his [newspaper interests; here. 
Mr. Roe several -months: ago became 
interested). in the, Thief River Falls 
Trihune, which: he" .. purchased from 
the Empire Farnis : company. Win. E. 
Dahlquistjis a partner of Mr. Roe, 



CAN YOtJ BEAT IT? 

Rollis: -TOwnsWp ; ' in - Marshall ' 
county, ! -25v mtfesHnortherist": . of ' 
Thief Rivet '■ ^Falls', - Ttaore^ than 
doubled its 'alfalfa" acreage - in- 
1926. In ,i924 f ' there ' were ;725 j 
;acres of alfalfa" "iri the tdwij'ship 
arid durmg th^'p^r)9tear"';*nis: 
amount was iherelsea/' to: £485. 



$50.00 Boosts Endowment Fond. -^ : 
The.! American>Legion . .Endowment- 
'Fund drive, in this city \ received a 
healthy, boost, this week wbenrthe J;- 
C'penney comfiany store turned over 
to this •fun<$-;the;$50 check, which it 
rhad> received ;from the. local post as 
second prize : in the window, display 
contest staged by the "post daring the 
state Legion convention alst summer. 



of Thief River Motor Company, of 
Rambeck and. Stone company of this 
city, implement and farm machinery 
firm, and Gilbertson & Rogers Gar- 
age, 'local Overland and Dodge auto- 
mobile distributors. The merger be- 
came effective January 1. Members 
of the company are' O. A. and Arthur 
Rambeck, G. A. Gilbertson, V. C. Rog- 
ers of this city, and W. P. and Willi- 
am Stone of Crookston. 

Rambeck & Stone have been in busi- 
ness in Thief River Falls for many 
years, and Gilbertson & Rogers have 
operated a garage in the ePoples Au- 
to company building for the last two 
vears. Remodeling of the Rambeck 
building, is rapidly nearing comple- 
tion. The office is being enlarged to 
28x40 permitting a show room for 
three cars besides the 'regular office 
fixtures! 



crowds. Dan Shaw will preside 
the afternoon program and I. 
Simley at the evening event. 



6,600 Volts Fafl To ; 

Kill lineman at Holt 



Change in Bus Schedule 
Put in Effect This Week 



A change in the schedule of the 
Crookstomr-Thief River Falls bus was 
made effective. 'this week according to 
an announcement of the company. 
The roads are in such condition at this 
time that the. busses can make the 

: in 15 minutes less time. 

The present schedule follows: 

Leave Thief River Falls 8a.ii. and 
2:15 p. m. week days, and arrive 
Crookston 9:45 a. m. and 4 p. m. > 

Leave Crookston 12:15 and 6:15 p. 
m. and arrive Thief River Falls 2 p. 
m. and 7 p. m. 

On Sundays the bus leaves here at 
9:15 instead of 9 a. m. and leaves 
Crookston, at 6:30, arriving here at 
8:15 p. mJ 



Bagley Independents to 
Clash With Legion Team 
at Auditorium Jan. 14th: 




Bagley'a Independent basketball 
team is scheduled to play 'the' strong; 
Legion outfit .at the city: auditorium 
in this city Thursday* January 14, ac- 
cording td' Dr. •C.'M. Haug, manager. 

The 'locd'.- aggregation ■'went to 
Bagley a couple weeks ago and hand- 
ed out; a 19 to 23 defeat, and the 
dopsters agree - that Bagley's heart 
wiil be full of revenge when the game 
is called here (next week Thursday. 

Lars Thine; local coach, both for 
the high school and Legion teams, 
is expected ;to don. his uniform for' 
the Legion that- night 



fc*fcvS-' 



A. G. Ackerman of Hoffman, MiniL, 
employed as a lineman by the Minne- 
sota Electric Distributing Co., 
narrowly escaped death at 10:00 
o'clock this morning when he contact- 
ed with a live wire carryine 6,600 
volts while working on top of a pole 
at the sub-station on the outskirts of 
Hojt. He was rushed to the Physi- 
cians hospital here and ^us condition 
is said not to be serious although if 
will perhaps require many months 
for him" to recover from -the' bums 
received. Ackerman had just mount- 
ed the pole and. adjusted his safety 
belt when his foot came in contact 
with the wire. The current passed 
thru his leg coming but at" the thigh, 
the fact which perhaps saved him 
from instant death. 



Larson Chairman County Board. 
Emil Larson, was named chairman 
of the Pennington county board -of 
commissioners at the annual meeting 
yesterday afternoon, and J. S. Roy, 
former chairman,.. was named vice 
chairman. The board is still in session 
as The Tribune goes to press, going 
over in detail the reports of last' 
year's activities. 



DO THE CHARLESTON 

The ^Charleston" was pre- 
sented iwliis.llajj-xgonv.vetsion 
to local! wbishWpete at {he Juu-nie; 
of. Terpsichore Tor" fHe first' time 
, ati the-' 'KiisineVs.'.'New.v.Year. 
darice. St.". the •' 4udftdrium /^JArs-' 
day night It was evident Uy'tHe" 
dexterity of the performers that 
•there: had- T>een many secret re- 
hearsals in preparation for the 
flrsti'public' appearance and the 
results: were :. very interesting. 
The dance is a 'cross between the 
Irish jig^anaa: rapid repe: jump- 
ing contest: and will' doubtless 
prove distressing to .'a few of the 
flippers andflappers who; have 
a failing for that peculiar type of 
ball room calisthentics which, 
calls for no movement of the 
feet. 








:j - 




PAGE TWO 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



.. i 



WEDNESDAY 1 , JANUARY 6, 1926. 




Miss Thea Johnson returned to Holt 
Monday after spending the week-end 
in this city visiting with friends and 
relatives. 

Herman Aakre of Goodridge, spent 
Monday in this, city visiting with 
friends and attending to matters of 
business. 

Clive Borgen and 0. E. Sovde of 
Holt, motored to this city Saturday 
anil spent the day attending to mat- 
ters of business. 

Harry Campson arrived in this city 
i-om his home at Mcintosh, and will 
■spend a week here visiting with 
friends and relatives. 
- Big dance at the Elk's hall Friday 
night after the basketball game. 
Music by Snyder's six piece orchestra. 

Miss Elnore Toms left Sunday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis, where she will 
spend a few days visiting I at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. Guy Davis. 

M. Bothman of St. Hilaire motored 
to this city Monday, and spent the 
day shopping and attending to mat- 
ters of business. 

Miss Grace Craig returned to hei 
home in this city Saturday after 
spending a few days in Roseau as a 
guest of Miss Aneta Dahlquist. 

Miss Agnes Sands will arrive from 
her home at Alvarado this evening, 
and will resume her duties as instruct- 
ress in the schools to-morrow. 

John N. Gordon arrived in this city 
Saturday from his home in Euclid, 
and will spend a few days here as 
the guest of friends and relatives. 

H. Cooper of Plummer motored to 
this city Saturday and spent the day 
attending to matters of business and 
visiting with friends. 

Mrs. John Aase arrived in this city 
Monday from her home at Gatzke, 
and will spend a few days here as the 
guest of friends and relatives. 

Miss Aneta Dahlquist will return to 
this city to-day to resume her duties 
as instructress at the Washington 
school. She has spent a two weeks 
vacation at the home of her parents 
at Koseau. 

Miss Katie Jonas of this city left 
last Wednesday evening for \ Minne- 
apolis, where she will spend a period 
of two weeks visiting with ; friends 
and relatives. 

Miss Bernice Boyer, instructress in 
the Washington .5011001, who has spent 
the Christmas vacation at the home of 
her parents at Crookstori will arrive 
in this city to-night, to resume her 
duties. ! 

Miss Millie Ness arrived in' this 
city from her home in Fertile Satur- 
day evening, and will spend the 
week-end here as the gueotsftsa a 
week-end here as. the guest of friends 
.and relatives. 

•Mi 1 ^ Loretta Dietz arrived in this 
city Monday morning from her home 
at Wahpeton, N. Dak., and for la few 
days will be the guest of Miss Har- 
riet Anderson. 

Miss Maxine Johnson returned to 
Fargo, N. D., Tuesday afternoon, af- 
ter spending a few days in this city 
as a guest at the home of her mother 
Mrs. Lucile Johnson. 

Mrs. M. D. Chatterton, who i has 
spem the holiday season in this city 
sis a guest at the home of her sister, 
Mrs. Ed. Lacy, returned to her home 
in Pine River Monday. 

. Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Sagmoen and 
"Mr. and Mrs. S. Benson of this city 
motored to Rosewood Sunday and 
:spent the day as guests at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Sagmoen. 

Miss Rose Costelle. who has spent 
-the two weeks vacation in this city as 
the guest of her sister, Mrs. Ed Lacy, 
1 and of her mother, Mrs. Julia Costel- 
le, returned to Minneapolis Sunday 
evening. 

Miss Lucile Peterson, who has been 
a guest at the A. J. Odin home for 
the past months, left last night for 
her "home in Minneapolis. She will al- 
-so be employed in that city- 
Miss Annie Sunderland arrived in 
this city Saturday afternoon, and 
spent a brief time visiting friends 
cnroute to Branson, where fche is em- 
ployed as instructress in the school. 

Mrs. J.- L. Herrick and two children 
spent a few days in this city last 
week as guests at the home of the 
formers' sister, Mrs.R. McGinn. They 
returned to their home in Warren on 
Thursday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Arneson and 
little daughter. Betty Lou, who spent 
the holiday season in Minneapolis as 
;p-ue=ts at the hon-e of the former's 
narents. Mr. and. Mrs. J. S. ^inesnn. 
returned to "heir hrnne in this city 
Jast Wednesday morning. 

■' il.s: Esther Bennes returned Mon- 
day afternoon >? Mrorherd, vhere 
-fhe atends the State Teachers college. 
She hns spent the Christiras vacation 
in this city as a guest at tV"> home of 
her parents, Mr, and Mrs. E. M. Ben- 
nes. . 1 j ..... j 

Robert Halvor?r.n. who \k\* spent 
the past tw weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of h'= parents. Mr. 
:....'.'• "\ TTn'vcmn. loft MnoJay 
r - -lipfr ".-!-. iJason City. la., where 'he 
:vil' bo emnloyed. 

Mr. an.'.MiT. L. 0. Cc'eman. who 
'have Fpent the past week in th's c"t". 
as guests at thf home r f the letter's 
parent- ••Mr» , cr/;i 3 Ws. Kre:i' tVillJ re- 
turned, to*, thfih'^honis-'-in. IJfil'utK -last 
"Friday ivfcnmg. " ,.',.. 

! '^ejraifi-jKfctssnn 'ett. MqjWb^;' eve-* 
njp^:fo.? Chii'itto.'vVre ho .Wfit s-tfp«d* 
:a few days attending a convention 
nric. to leaving for Lincoln. Neb.- 

""■where he will resume his work. He 

has spent a few days in this city as 

a guest at the ho^e of his parents, 

Mr. and Mrs, RMcGinn. 

'Miss Mary Wistad, who has spent 

'the past tw weeks visiting with 
-friends and relatives at Lake Park 
-and Detroit, arrived in this city Suh- 

-iday, and for a brief time was the 
guest of Mrs. C. G. Hillard. She left 
Monday morning for her home at 
.Williams. 



Miss Lucile Bums returned to Gil- 
bert,.- to resume her work as instruct- 
ress ( in the schools Saturday. . She has 
spent. the; past two weeks in this city 
as a guest at the home of her parents 
Mr, and Mrs. M. C. Burns. 

Arthur jPenney, who has spent the 
past two ; weeks here as a guest at 
the home ;of his parents, Dr. and Mrs. 
G. A. Penney, returned to Minnea- 
polis Sunday evening to resume his 
work at the University of Minnesota. 
Mrs. W- Kezal returned to . her 
home in Middle River, Saturday, after 
spending a few days as the guest of 
her daughter, Mrs. Walter Thompson. 
She was accompanied by her little 
grandsonj Lawrence Thompson, who 
will spend a few days visiting there. 
Miss Ruth Mellby, daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. 10 .F. Mellby, returned to 
Northfield Sunday evening to resume 
her work at St. Olaf College. She has 
spent the! past two weeks in this city 
as a guest at the home of her parents. 
Elmer Tandberg will return to-day 
" : .idle River to resume his duties 
as Superintendent of the schools af- 
t°r spending a two weeks vacation in 
this city [as a gusct at the home of 
mother; Mrs. Julia Tandberg. 
Miss Elizabeth Keating, who has 
spent the- past two weeks in this city 
as a guest of her parents, Mr. and i 
Mrs. P. J. Keating, left Tuesday af- 1 
ternoon for Grand Forks, where she 
will continue her work as a student at 
the Union Commercial college. 

Miss Alma Sevig, who' has spent 
the past -two weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs; L. Sevig, returned to St. 
Cloud, where she is employed Satur- 
day evening. 

Miss Georgia Frissell, who has 
spent the holiday season in this city 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. H. Frissell, left Monday eve- 
ning for St Paul, where she will re- 
sume her work at Hamline University. 
"Miss Lucile Curtis, who has spent 
the past two weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. P. Curtis left Sunday eve- 
ning for iMinneapolis where she will 
resume her work at the University of 
Minnesota. 

Miss Vivian Thoreson arrived in 
this city . Saturday evening from her 
home at Goodridge, and spent a brief 
time at the E. M. Bennes home?. She 
left Sunday evening for Northfield, 
where she will resume her studis at 
St. Olaf college. 

Mrs. Hovind J. Lindberg spent a 



Miss Helen Wagner arrived in this 
city Saturday from her home in 
Stephen, and will spend the 'week-end 
here visiting with friends and rela- 
tives. ' 

Mrs. A. Johnson and little son, re- 
turned to their home in Baudette 
Monday morning, after spending the 
week-end in this city visiting with 
friends and relatives. 

Mrs. Oliver Nohre'and daughters, 
Ethel, and Gertrude, who have spent 
a week in this city : visiting friends 
and relatives, returned to their home 
in Holt Monday morning. 

-Karl Krogstad and son Oliver, ar- 
rived in this city Wednesday evening 
from Rosewood, where they have been 
the guest of the former's father, Iver 
L. Krogstad. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Poston and 
little son, who for the past ten days 
have been guests at the S. M. Poston 
home in this city returned Monday 
evening to their horhe in Hibbing. 

Miss Emma Roodj of Warren, visit- 
ed with friends in this city Saturday, 
enroute to Middle iRiver, where she 
will resume her duties as instructress 
in the school. ; 

Miss Elsie Granum, who has spent 
the past two weeks in this city visit- 
ing with friends arid relatives, left 
Monday afternoon for Badger, where 

she will resume her duties as in- 
structress in the school. 
Miss Alpha Bishop, who has spent 

the past two weeks in this city as a 

guest at the home of her parents, Mr. 

and Mrs.-W. A. Bisftop, left Monday 

afternoon by car for Fosston, whtre 

she is employed as instructress in me 

school. • * 

Miss Julia Brudvick, who has spent 

the past two weeks in this city as a 

guest at the home of her mother, Mrs. 

Christine Brudvick, left Monday 

morning for Warrbad, where she is 

employed as instructress in the 

school. 
Miss Marie Fainian, who has spent 

the past few days in this city as the 

guest of Mrs. A. J. Aaland, left Sat- 
urday morning for. "Warroad, where 

she is employed as, instructress in the 

school. 
Miss Alice Paulson arrived in this 

city Saturday morning to spend a 

short. time visiting! with friends and 

relatives. She returned Sunday eve- 
ning to ■ Milwaukee, where she is 

studying X-ray work. 

Mrs. C. 0. Erickson of this city left 

Monday morning ; for Strathcona, 

where she will spend an indefinite Miut „.„,„.„ „. „„„«*.., 

period of time visiting at the home of briTrtim^^la^wVek^'lhis^ity visit 



Miss Mildred Remmen, who has 
spent the vacation in this city as .a 
guest at the home of her mother, Mrs. 
A. B. Remmen, left Monday afternoon 
for Moorhead, where she will resume 
her studies at Concordia college. 

Miss Harriet Morgan, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. John Morgan, who has 
spent the Christmas holidays in this 
city at the home of her parents, left 
Monday afternoon for Moorhead, 
where she will resume her duties at 
the State Teacher's College. 

Miss Bonnie Bamett, who has spent 
the past two weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. S. Barnett, left Monday 
for Moorhead, where she will resume 
her work at the State Teacher's col- 
lege. 

, W. C. Hartje of St. Hilaire was a 
business visitor to this city Monday. 

Theodore Prichard, left Thursday 
evening .for Minneapolis where he. is 
employed. He has spent a few days 
in this city as a guest at the home 
of his parents, Mr.and Mrs. W. W. 
Prichard, Sr. 



Ministerial Association. 

The Pastors of Thief River Falls 
met. on Monday afternoon in the 
Methodist parsonage. 

Owing to the recent removal of the 
Rev. Albin Larson and Rev. Chas. 
Gerlinger, president ■ and secretary, 
respectively, it was necessary to ap- 
point successors to these 'offices. A 
unaaimous vote favored Rev, T. S. 
Tallakson, as president arid the Rev. 
J. Thomas Dixon as secretary. 

It was further agreed that the as- 
sociation meet regularly in the future 
on the second Monday of each month. 

Star Installation. 

The new officers of the Eastern 
Star were installed Monday evening. 
Mrs. Bessie Robinson was the install- 
ing officer and Mrs. Tena Rayson the 
ceremonial marshall. The officers in- 
stalled were: Mrs. Helen Brink, 
worthy matron; Frank Christenson, 
Worthy patron; Mrs. Adeline Heggen, 
associate matron; Mrs. Abbie Wass- 
gren, secretary; Mrs. Lillian Cronk- 
hite, treasurer; Mrs. Marie Tandberg, 



conductress; Thelma Holm Erickson, 
assistant conductress;' Mrs. Edith 
Haynes, chaplain; Mrs. Minnie Mog- 
ensen; Marshall; Mrs. Mary Smith 
brganist;Miss Esther Gjertson, Adah; 
Mrs. Olga Nelson, Ruth; Mrs. Gladys 
Lajnbert, Esther; Mrs. Ida Bye, Mar- 
tha; Mrs. Anna Robinson, Electra, 
Mrs. Orpha White, warden; Clarence- 
Erickson sentinal. 

Following the installation the re- 
mainder of the evening was spent at 
cards and dancing. A delicious lunch 
was served at mid-night. 



I. M. P. Entertained. 

Miss Lillian Johnston entertained 
the members of I. M. P. S. at her 
home yesterday afternoon. The af- 
ternoon* was spent informally, and at 
5:30 a delicious lunch was served. 
The guests were Misses Maverette 
Hilson, Dorothy Swedenburg, Sania 
Erickson, Mary Alexander. Lillian 
Krohn, Birdie Pierson, Margaret 
Brown, -Altha Gabrielson, and Elmy- 
ra Langseth. 



her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 0. R. 
Christensen. 

Miss Mildren Engen, who has spent 
the past two weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of her 'parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Albert Engen, left Monday 
evening for Minneapolis where she 
will resume her work at the McPhail 
School of Music. * 

Misses Esther and Emma Tandberg 
who have spent the vacation in this 
city at the home;of their mother, 
Mrs. Julia Tandberg, left Monday af- 
ternoon for Moorhead where they will 
continue their work at the St. Teach- 
ers college. < 

Miss Ann .Amoi: returned to 
Moorhead Monday afternoon and will 
resume her work at the State Teach- 
ers college, after spending a two 
weeks vacation in this city as a guest 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Phil Amon. \ 

Miss Katharine Barzen, who has 
spent the past two weeks in this city 
as a guest at the home of her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Math Barzen, Sr.. left 
Sunday evening for St Paul. She is 
a student of St. Katherine's college 
at that place. 



ing at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs.iT. T. Roland. She returned 
to her home in Mahnomen Wednes- 
day evening. 

Henry T. Vorlicky, who has spent 
one month in this city as a guest at 
the home! of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Vorlicky, left Friday evening 
for Chicago where he will attend . a 
school of ; dentistry. 

Miss Beatrice Erickson, who has 
spent the past three weeks in this 
city as the guest of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. 1 Ben Erickson, left last eve- 
ning for > Minneapolis where she is 
employed. 

H. H. Harding of Hazel was a busi- 
ness visitor to this city Monday. 

W. P. Wilson motored to this city 
from St. iHilaire. Saturday and spent 
the day transacting matters of busi- 
ness, and shopping. 

Mr. and Mrs. K. Krogstad, daughler 
Elsie and son Oliver, left Wednesday 
evening for their home, at Smiley, 
Sask., Canada, They have spent sev- 
eral weeks visiting with friends and 
relatives here, and in the vicinity, and 
will visit for a short time in Winni- 
peg prior to leaving for their home. 



LA VOGUE 

ANNUAli 

Clearance Sale 

WINTER COATS 

REDUCED 



ORIGINAL PRICE 



DRESSES 

VALUES to $45.00 REDUCED to $29.75 
VALUES to $39.75 REDUCED to $27.50 
VALUES' to $35.00 REDUCED to $24.75 
VALUES to $29.75 REDUCED to $19.75 
VALUES to $22.50 REDUCED to $14.75 



DRESS SPECIALS 

$6.95 $9.75 $10.75 



One Lot of SWEATERS $1.59 

LA VOGUE FOR HOSIERY 
We Give "S & H" Green Trading Stamps' 

LA VOGUE GARMENT SHOP 

i H. 0. MBLBT, Prop. 



Safety to Our Depositors 

The detailed report of the Financial Statement of "The First Na* 
tional" as given herein is for the benefit of the Public that they might 
better be able to judge the true condition of the bank. 

The first requisite of this bank is — The Protection to its depositors. 
This is a sacred duty of our Officers and Directors. The Loans are con- 
servatively made and well secured. A large liquid reserve is always a 
feature of this bank. We have no rediscounts, borrowed money, nor over- 
drafts. 

We stand ready to co-operate with you in any way which is consistent 
with good common- sense banking. 

May we add you to our many satisfied customers. 

It is our wish that 1926 will bring you much good. 



STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

of Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Condensed Statement as Reported to the Comptroller of the Currency 
At the Close of Business December 31, 1925. 



LIABILITIES 
DEPOSITS: 

The amount deposited by our many good customers — Farmers, Busi- 
nessmen, Individuals, Firms and Corporations. A true reflection of the 

confidence reposed in this bank by the people of this community 

Subject to check r ... .._ $173,190.30 

Cashier's Checks and Certified Checks 7,953.05 

Time Certificates „ ., _ _ 292,647.39 

Savings Deposits _..'._ _ __ 95,521.53 

U. S. Government Deposits ,..._ 35,000.00 

"Postal Savings Deposits .._. _ 30.152.24 

By Banks — _ _ 22,219.87 

CIRCULATION: 

The amount of National Bank Currency issued by this bank and now 

in circulation „ „ „ 

UNEARNED COSUIISSIONS: 

Represents commission notes to be collected „ 

CAPITAL STOCK: 

The investment of our stockholders, which is a fund protecting every 

customer ~ - _ „ _ f 

SURPLUS, UNDIVIDED PROFITS AND RESERVES: " 

Set aside from the profits of the past as an additional protection to 
our depositors . 



$656,684.38 



BILLS PAYABLE AND REDISCOUNTS 

Representing money borrowed by bank . 



NONE 



Total Liabilities 



RESOURCES 
LOANS AND DISCOUNTS: 

Money loaned to the customers of this bank, supported by financial 

statements, first class securities and "mortgages „ 
OVERDRAFTS: " r 

This bank does not permit overdrafts except in very special instances 
BANKING HOUSE, FURNITURE AND FIXTURES: 

This represents our banking home and the adjoining: building 
OTHER REAL ESTATE: » "t s 

Real Estate owned and controlled by this bank 

STOCK IN FEDERAL RESERVE BANK: 

Our investment in the strongest banking system known 
UNITED STATES BONDS,!.- 

Deposited with the U. S. Treasurer to secure our circulating currency. 
COMMISSION NOTES: 

Represents earnings which are credited only when actual payment Is 

made ...*._ _ 

CASH ON HAND AND DUE FROM BANKS: ~ 

Cash in our vaults and amounts deposited with Federal Reserve Bank 

and National Banks in the Twin Cities and Chicago '.. 

BONDS AND SECURITIES: 

Our quick assets, all of which can be sold on a few hours notice 

Total Resources „ „._. 



Amount of Cash and due from Banks . ?146,766.14 

Amount of quick assets „.._ 158,268.12 



50,000.00 
5,497.10 

50,000.00 

28,428.53 

C 

_?790,610.01 ' 

..$328,180.80 
NONE 
.. 73,972.40 
.. 25,624.24 
- 2,550.00 
.. 60,000.00 

„ 5,497.10 

'.. 146,617.35 

.. 158,268.12 
..$790,610.01 



Total available reserve 



Amount of Reserve required by law 



..$305,034.26 
._$ 26,404.00 



The First National Bank 

of Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



' OFFICERS: 
J. W. Black, President 
Rasmus Oen, Vice President 
E. M. Bennes, Vice President 
Theo. M. Tbxonson, Vice President 
Robert J. Lund, Cashier 
George W. Werstleui, Asst Cashier 
Verner Nelson, Asst. Cashier 



DIRECTORS: 

J. W. Black 
Rasmus ; Oen 
E. M. Bennes 
O. D. Ostby 
Paul J. Wedge 
Theo M. Thronson 



i 

i 
| 






■€§m&? 



ivj 88$. 






^te^fipi^M® 








f 



I :____. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1926. 



'-■•'"' 'j.'.' 1 - •■-■^■'-'■* TttfeFftpV-.^^ i**C?: 



; Personal Property j 

Tax list For 1925 i 

Pennington Co., Minn.; 

TOWN OF BBA'Y •'. 

Total Tux Bate By School Dlatrlcti. 

Including State. County. Town or Village and; 

School District! Levies. I 

School District No. 7. Mills 47.1 j 

School District No. (19, Mills 35.4 I 

School District No. 98, Mills 41.L 

School District No. 14B, Mills 39.1 

School District No. ISO, Mills 35.3 j 

.(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits : 

30 cents per $100) I 

Assessed 

Value Money 
Personal and ~ 
Property Credits 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation- 
Anderson, V. P. 
Akerlund Bros A Hildur 

Ault, ilike _-__ 

Akerlund, K. J. 

Behnke, J. F. — — _ 

Dahlln, August 

Hanson, Halvor 

Hawklnson, Harry _ 

Hogstron), A. P. 

Johnson, Iver A. H. . 
Larson, Emit . 



-* B2 *. 



601 

"55 
153 
SU7 
204 



Larson, Emil et al 
LJndquist, Q. A. _ 

Undqulst, C. A. 

Ldndbloov Peter — 
Lindblora, Henry _ 
Lindblom, Arthur 

Luttmee Bros. 

Nelson, c. A. 

Odelln. Halvor 

Olson, Selmer 

Olson, Carolina __ 

Olson, John _ 

Osgood, Ed 



Person, Christ \ 

Rux. Rueben R. 

Sandry, D D. ______ 

Scholin, John — 

Scholln, August 

Scholin, Victor . . — - 

Scholtz. N. P. 

Slack. G. 



Stomberg, John 

Swanson. John O. 

Wood Melvln H. 

Scholin. Swan , _ 

Swanson, "Johanna 

"Estate" , 

Hanson, George 



110 
750 
3113 

01 
128 
509 
341 

29 
254 

91 

75 
345 
291! 
IGTi 
501 
249! 
239 
225 
395 
224 
139 



GOO 
800 



Amt. 

of . 

Tax. 

3.78 
21.22, 
10.79' 
10.50. 

9.28 

5.59 : 

13.70 : 

7.20! 
12.97 
14.05 
20.301 

L00. 

6.82 
20.55 : 
15.81 j 

3.21' 

4.52 ! 
18.02 
10.10 . 

1.13 : 

8.07' 
' 3.74 : 

3.08' 
10.25 
22.30 

5.90 ! 
20.43 

8.82 

8.40 ■ 

9.46 : 

13.94 
10.55 
4.01 
7.59 
12.04 

5.25 ; 

1.80 : 
2.10 : 



TOIVS OP BLACK B1VEB 
Total Tax Kate By School District*. 
Including State. County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 1. Mills 50.8 
School District No. 43, Mills 48.5 
. School District No. 94, Mills 39.4 
School District No. 102, Mills 108.7 
School District No. 108, Mills 48.5 
School District No. 227. Mills 50.5 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per S10U) ; 

Assessed. 

Value ; Money Amt. 

Personal i and of 

Property! Credits Tax 

* 171,*. J "-■ 



Name of Person, 
Firm of*' 
Corporation- 
Anderson Albert _ 

Anderson, Felix 

AlniQuist, Jens . 

Adolphson, Claus _ 

Brink, Maurltz 

Brandt, Win. 

Dreelan, James 

Erickson, Andrew . 

Etickson Bros. 

Gllmet, Ernest 

GIgstud, Oscar 

Hallstrom, Alfred . 

Harbott. Dan . 

Hartje. Will C. 

Holmes, Edith 

Holmes, Ole A. 

Jacobsoh, Henry _ 
Landman, Fred ■ 

Leach. Fred 

Lorentson, Sam 

Lundberg, Peter . 

McKercher, R. J. _ 

Moreen, Edw. 

Novak, Wm. 

Person, Eniil 

Rotzler. Chas. _ 

Smith. George 

Sauer. Arthur 

Schreider, Chas. 

Schmltz. Crispen _ 
Stark. Axel . 



Swenson, Mons 

Swanson, Alex 

Wahlbeck. Selmer . 

Erickson. Axel 

Johnson, Johanna . 



224 



109 : 

2S0 

205 

29.") 

314 : 

136 

206 

157 

218 



211 
207 . 
736 
219 



66 
352 
139 
253 
120 
104. 
228 
330 



200 
500 



8.83 : 

10.53 

10.17 

2.73 ( 

5.79 
14.22 

8.08 : 

21.22 : 

15.23 ;. 
14.78 ■■; 

8.12 

7.61 : 
23.70 
35.54 . 
22.50 ! 
15.14 ! 
18.68 
14.35 , 

8.31 ; 
22.50 
80.00 

8.63 
40.10 

5.99 ' 
15.09 

3.20 
17.07 , 

0.03 
12.28 
13.04 : 
11.31 ' 

8.98 
16.01 
.00 < 

L50 



TOWN OF CLOVEK LEAF 
Total Tax Kate By School Districts. 
Including State, County, Town or Village and ; 
School District Levies. '■ 

School District No. 8, Mills 90.2 
School .District No. 15, Mills 01.0 
School District No. 44. Mills 51.4 
School District No. 46, Mills 34.1 
School District No. 60, Mills 48.7 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits ' 
30 cents per S1O0) 

Assessed 
Value Money 
"Personal and 
Property Credits 

* 127 ? f 

.424 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation- 
Anderson, Iver 

Anderson, Gus 

Aarnes. Burton 

Brounlle. D. G. 

DuChamp, Lina 

Fuller. C. H. 

Hruby, Franclska 

Hruby, Joe 

Hruby. J. E. 

Holmen, Ole . 



36 
239 



Hanson & Barzen Mill- 
ing Co., 

Holten. Edward 

Kotlan. Anton 

Kotlan. Edward 

McLeod. Stuart 

Miller. E. " 



Mavie Trading Post . 

Nelson. Oscar ". 

Oski, Joe 



Pomerenke, E. H. 

Peterson, Elmer 

Ptacek, Joseph 

Philips, Frank . 



Siageberg, Oscar _ 
Svensgaard, Karen 

Smith. Thos. H. 

Skaar. T. X. 

Shanley. w. J. 

Sabo. Peder 

Sabo. Emil 



: S7 
205 
200 
158 
244 
230 
188 
212 



Sanders. Sigrid Mrs. 

Sceeler, J. J. 

Sandum, Gilbert _ 

Thorsten. Peter 

Thompson, C. T. . 

Thorson, Henry : 

Vatova. Frank _ 

Wahlberg, Olof 

Winton Nichols" Lmnber 



182 
210 
63 
218 
201 
908 
328 



Co. 



Hlncik. Lillian ... 
HIncik. Josle Mrs. 
Schle, J. M. 



445 
100 
500 



Amt. 
of 
Tax 
' 0.53 : 
26.12 ; 
1.75 : 
14.72 . 
2.28 • 



4.80 
1.00 
4.90 

109.57 
1.97 
8.91 
8.25 
35.54 
■ 4.77 
2.77 
7.85 
15.03 
12.32 
14.25 
8.32 
1L82 
11.58 
7.23- 
2.34 
5.25 
■10.42 
10.23 
3.07 
13.43 
12.38 
55.93 
20.50 
21.74 
12.34 
1.70 
7.94 

27.60 
1.34 
.30 
L50 



-. . . - OW 2 OP DEEB P'»BK 

Total Tax Kate By School Districts 

Including State, County Town or Village and 

School District Levies 

School District No. 10. Mills 66 1 

School District No. 34, Mills 44 9 

■ School District: No. 47, Mills 43 3 

School District '.No. 52, Mills 358 

School District No. 58. Mills 403 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per »100) ™"" 

'Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money 

Firm or 'Personal and 

Corporation— .Property Credits 



Anderson, Gunder . 
Bammerud, John _. 
Bolestad. Jens Mrs. 
Dahle. Ole J. _ 
Eisbemer, John 



GIsselqulst, Emma Mrs— 

Gunderson. John . 

Gustafson, Pete ______ 

Haartvet, Vraal __ 

Helle, Daniel ~^ 

Hovstad, Gunder _____ 
Hbhn, Sever S. ■ 
Johnson, • Anton _______ 

Kazmasek, Max 

Langhle. T. A. , __ 

Lef^fild. Ole ■ 

J-lntvet. Knut 



181 

209 

127 ■ 

158 

162 

231 



207 
107 



28 
20J 



Amt 
of 
Tax 
7.59 
8.38 
9.68 
5.88 
6.24 
5.80 
8.27 

13.00 
7.27 
3.98 
7.40 

14.57 
MB 
2.72 
2.10 
.93' 
7.27 



Untvet, Tallak O. 

Lund, Eddie 

Lundeen, Frank ; 

Lunden; O. T. ; 

Mandt, O. M. - 

Nesland, Ole _ 

Olson, Knut . 



Rensia, Erick — 
Rustan, Ed ___ 
Rednicld,- John 
Rodman, M. L. . 
Rodman, J; 



Singer, George 

Stolaas, Bernt 

Stolaas, Berget I_ Mrs. 
Syrtvet, Ole J. -__ — _— 
Syverarud, Elizabeth 

Mrs. i 

' Stucy, Otto R. __________ 

SxymanskJ, Ben 

Lofthus, Tom 

Norstog, Augond 



435 
18 
417 
104 
151 
270 
84 
218 



132 
525 



248 
284 



231 
255 



300 
1500 
1000 



4.77 
1.72 

15.57 
.81 

19.71 
8.98 
6.78 
.9.70 
8.77 
7.80 
3.70 
9.88 

12.41 
0.11 

23.67 
2.33 

11.14 

13.13 

10.37 
11.04 
9.34 
4.50 
3.00 



TOWN OF QOODBID-- 

Total Tax Bate By 8chool Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 

School District Levies. 

School District No. 8, Mills 90.4 

School District No. 60, Mills 48.9 

School District No. 228. Mills 05.7 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per $100) 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value . Money 

Firm or Personal and 

Corporation— Property Credits 

Besanson, E. H. I 144 % I 

Brown, Roy A. 



Erickson. Gunder — __ 
Goodridge State Bank . 

Gunderson. Gilbert 

Hay. J. H. _________ 

Harms. Tom 

Hanson. Edwin. 

Haivorson. Albert ____ 

Iverson. Casper 

Kuemak, John 

Lien, Henry . — . __ 

Lovely, Peter ________ 

Mutnansky, M. A. . 

Markuson, Betsy 

Markuson, John 

Markuson, Julian 

McCabe, Joseph 

McLeod, V. C. 

Nelson, Cathrine 

Nelson, Theo. 

Olson, Sygurd 

Stomllen, Lars . 

Urdahl. O. N. 

Urdahl. Noble 

Urdahl, Ludolpn 

Urdahl. Christ 

Urdahl, Nlcoly . 



Vaughan, Morgan . 



140 

25 
133 
350 
328 
142 

70 
151 
254 
291 . 
110 
166 

76 
118 
115 
144 



114 . 
103 
230 
209. 

58 

10 

60 
258 
376 



Amt. 
of 

Tax 
13.02 
20.07 
12.06 

2.26 
12.02 
31.64 
29.64 
12.84 

6.S3 
13.65 
22.96 
19.12 

9.94 
15.01 

0.87 
10.67 
10.40 
13.01 

0.15 

2.71 
10.31 

S.04 
21.33 
18.90 

5.24 
.90 

5.42 
23.3* 
33.99 



PAGE T-EtilEB. 



Josefeon, Arne '-— 
Kniitson, Martin — 

Kortipp; L. 'H/; __. 

Kvale, Olof — _, 

I_arson Bros. -.---— 
Martinson, R&amUB ■. 
Mofltrom, Alfred -— 
Moatrom, Cora '—___ 

Mbstrom, John 

MoGtrom, "Willie 

Mostrom, Gust - 

Nllaon, Olof — 



Rendahl, Ben . 
Rendahl, Ole . 
Rue, Osmund . 



Sannes, Sarah Mrs. 

Savage, Frank 

SkomedaJ, T. T. . 

Stenvick, . Oscar , , 

Stucy, Ed — ; 

Sordahl, John O. __. 

Swanson, S. B, 

Thompson, Christ _ 
Thompson, T. B. -__ 

TvelttoJck, BJom 

Tvelten, ' Staale _____ 

Dahl, Hel^te S. 

Lund, Frank 



201 
200 
342 ' 



41 

138 

40 
197 
204 

60 

140 

' 19 . 

09 
-123 
122 
149 
137 , 

55 
129 
138 
174 
3S6 
109 
202 
137 



400 

1000 



18. W 
15.44 

18.83 

1473 

88.02. 

3.19 

10.89 

8.01 

14.83 

16.30 

5.33 

. 12:47 

1.53 

5.20 

8.78 

9.49 

12.03 

10.15 

4.44 

9.H 

10.74 

14.04 

31.90 

8.80 

19.96 

10.15 

20.26 

25,34 

1.20 

3.00 



TOWN OF HIGHLANDING 

Total -rax Bate By School District)). 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 

School District levies. 

School District No. 34, Mills 43.0 

School District No. 37, Mills 43.0 

School District No. _.Mi!!s 44.2 

School District No. 47, Mills 42. 

School District No. 50. Mills 38.2 

School District No. 60, Milts 45.3 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per $100) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt 
Personal and . of 

Property Credits 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation— 

Aubol, Alfred 

Appeiman. M. 

Bakken, Sjnova 

Baird, Arthur 

Baird. Floyd 

Baird, George 

Bly, Elmar 

Crampton, H. H. 

Davis. Edon 

Dahle, Telma 

Dahle,' Knute 

Ellin eson, A. . 

Eliason. Henry 

Erickson, Mat . 

Fimrit, A. „ 

Froland. Carl 

Forst, John 

Giving, Amt 

Giving, Ole 

Hemmersten, A. _ 
Han_on, Oscar __. 

Hjelle Christ 

Homme, John _„ 
Howard, Sophie - 
Haivorson, P. C. , 

Hamm, Theo. „ 

Hedin, Emest . 



_? 40 ?. 



Hanson, Justice _ 
Horachek, Anton , 
Hanson, A. W. 



Haivorson, Oscar . 

Highlanding C o - O p 

Threshing Ass'n 

Highlanding Creamery 

Ass'n . :: 

Johnson, John M. 

Johnson, Andrew _: 

Johnson, Anton 

Jenson, Einer 

Kolestrand, D. A. 

Kveste, B. K. 

Kruger, Arthur , , , 

Korstad, " Peter 

I-Jos, Carl _______________ 

Krecheck, John 

Lee, O. G. 



Nelson, Raymond T. . 

Nelson, A_ T. 

Nelson, Ole- 

Nelson, Lovise , • 

Overwold. Gilbert 

Overwold, Ole ,, , , 

Olson, A. T. 

Prestebak, Ole 

Pederson, Clarence 

Rime. E. K. 

Rustad, Ben ' , , 

Rustad. Julia 

Rustad, Theo. .,, 

Ramsey, James 

Svunajord, Aslak 

Sanders, Eio 

Sy\ersrud, Edwin _. 

SIgurdson, Halvor 

Si-nskj-, Alvts - 



Swanson. John N. 
Sundsdahl, O.-O. _ 
Skatberg, Tenues . 

Sund, Even 

Singer, Stephen 



Schultz and Anderson _. 
Thoreson, T. M. , , , 

Thoreson, Oscar 

Tanner, Eugene 

Tharaldson. Oscar 

Urdahl, F. N. ^ 

Urdahl, Selmer 

U and I Threshing Ma- 
chine Ass'n , ,, 

Vaughan, William 

Vorlicky, Joseph : 

Vettelson ■Willie 

Vad, Christ 

Wold, August 

Wold. P. C. . 

Zavoral,' Frank 

Rustad, John ■ ' ■ , , 



310 

48 ■ 

86 

46 
180 
215 
127 
169 

42 
202 
271 
287 

59 
248 



435 
146 
203 



183 
249 
120 



432 
220 
175 
208 
84 
23. 
221 
89 
93 
355 
238- 
167 
102 
12 



115 
140 
212 
172 
" 4 

27 
219 
135 
192 
146 

63 
328 
327 
232 



234 
316 
97 
175 



280 
243 
231 
367 
73 
74 
125 



:> 



1200 



Tax 

1.6S 
14.00 
2.00 
3.29 
1.70 
6.88 
9.50 
5.57 
7.42 
3.78 
12.20 
11.90 
10.90 
2.59 
10.42 
2.50 
7.98 
2.87 
13.17 
9.81 
5.75 
11.69 
28.56 
18.27 
5.58 
8.91 
4.03 
1.95 
6.99 
9.54- 
4.58 

3.54 

17.5U 
11.23 
14.32 
18.96 
9.62 
7.35 
8.74 
3.71 
1.01 
9.28 
3.70 
3.91 
14.91 
10.00 
7.38 
4.33 
.53 



5.05 
0.19 
8.10 
8.72 
.17 
5.13 
8.37 
5.87 
8.49 
6.37 
2.77 

12.53 

14.45 
8.86 

13.44 
6.54 

25,10 

lo!27 
.16.27 
4.07 
7.74 
4.38 
6.41 

3.51 
14.69 
9.28 
9.70 
15.41 
3.21 
3.25 
4.78 
3.00 



TOWN OF HICKORY 
, J T <,,n, T ** *""* B T School Dlitricta. 

Including State, County. Town or Village and 
School District levies. 
School DIctrict No. 3, Mills 75.3 
School District No. 9, Mills 74.1 
School District No. 10. Mills 76.2 
School District No. 65, Mills 77 8 
School District No" 67, Mills 80.7 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per S100) 

Assesse. 

Name of Person, Value Money 

Firm or Personal and 

Corporation— Property Credits 

Albu, Halvor * — - 

Arntson, John 

Arveson, Albtn . 

Arveson, Arthur 

Arveson, Eddie _ 

Bakken, Peder O. 

BJerkll, Henry C. 

BJerkll, P. E. 

BJomaraa, BJ. 

Boe, Lidvor T. 

ChrlstJanson, Olive 

Clemenson, Carl 

Coan, John T. _ 

Dahl, Joseph A. 

Fore, Martin 

Haivorson. Ellck 

Haivorson, H. C. __ 

Hanson, Anlaug Mrs. 

Hanson, Bennle 

Hanson, H. T. . 

Haugen, Halvor 

Hango, Severt . 

Hendrum, Ole 

Johnson, Ertck 




Johnson, John O, . 



242 
252 
100 
43 



Amt. 
of 
Tax 
8.08 
25.64 
12.14 
8.21 
7.65 
1.09 
7.04 
14.00 
24.30 
5.85 
16.26 
2.26 
14.24 
11.82 
14.83 
11.90 
88.29 
9:6B 
21.04 
28.31 
8.70 
18.82 
18.07 
7.71 
3.24 



TOWN OP KBATKA 

Total Tux Bate By 8chool Dl.rrlrt.. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and' 

School District Levies. 

School DfBtrict No. 11, Mills 46.2 

School District No. 13, Mills 43.4 

School District No. 35, MIHb 45.6 

School District No. 41, Mills 35,6 

School District No. 44, Mills 48.2 

School District No. 60, Mills 46. 

School District No. 06, Mills 43,5 

School District No. 68, Mills 36. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per S100) 

Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation— 
Anenson, Anders . 

Austin, K. K. 

Brevlk, Olof . 



Brelland, Andrew 

Brelland, Ole S. 

Causln. William 

Chri8ton*eE8on, Ole 

Evenson. ^Igna Mrs. . 

Elefson, Tosten 

Gemmestad, Christ 

GralUnger. M. J. 

Gulllngsrud, Andrew . 

Gunderson. Arne . 

Haivorson, Theodore . 

Hanson, Albert 

Hanson, Julius 

Hofdal, Ole O. 



Value 

Personal 

Property 

__S 95 

178 

—_ 57 



Hofdal. O. O. Mrs. 

Hedeen, Clifford 

Hemmestvedt Torjus, 

Jr. . 

Hemmestvedt Torjus, 

Sr. _. 

Hesby, Jacob R. , 

Holdahl. Ole A. ______ 

Johnson, Hans 

Johnson. Newton O. 

Johnson, R. M. 

Kllen, Joe . 



Klemmetson, Elllng . 
Knutson. Sarah 



Kongelf, Louis O. 

Kongolf, Louis O. Mrs. 

Larson, Oluf 

Larson, Torjus - 

Lindeboja, Peter 

O'Brien, James 

Ofte, Lars E. 

Peterson, Charles ' 

Quirk; W. H. . 

Rehm, Otto . 



Robinson, Frank B. 

Holsland, Ole O. 

Rolsland, Bert 

Olson, Gunder 

Roifson, Gilbert . 



255 
290 
SO- 
BS 



78 
106 
271 



48 
87. 
307 
224 
210 
184 
31 
128 
149 
131 
217 
105 



323 
461 
90 



Money 


Amt. 


and 


of 


Credlta 


Tax 


_ | 


4.58 




6.41 




2.03 


. 


3.19 


1000 


14.78 




12.59 




13.93 


1 . 


2.99 




.18 


8000 


25.94 




6.02 





1.15 



Rolsland, Dreng O. 

Rolsland, Mable Mrs. 

Aamen. Evenson . 

Sedig, Carl 

Singer, Stephen . 



700 
"900 



Teiman, Barney E. 

Thompson, Tom 

Waale, Halvor T. _ 

Wright, P. H. . 

Brelland Simon 

Hanson, Emma 

Hoven, Carl - 

Johnson, John S. 

Johnson, Mary . 



221 
346 
142 



Hemmestvedt, Sidny 
Johnson, Grace - 



1600 

2000 
2200 
500 
1500 



4.60 
9.65 
4.95 
4.44 
1.52 
5.73 



7.37 
3.88 
3.04 
1.71 
3.95 
14.11 
8.03 
9.11 
0.62 
1.43 
5.91 
0.88 
5.96 
7.73 
4.54 
.74 
8.80 
14.02 
21.30 
3.24 
3.60 
..23 
6.05 
4.30 
.09 
3.96 



6.52 
3.20 
10.06 
12.46 
5.06 
1.50 
9.00 
4.80 
6.00 
6.60 
1.50 
4.50 



TOWN OF HAYTIELD 
• Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 
Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. -13, Mills 48.8 
School District No. 16, Mills 55.3 
School District No. 33, Mills 42.2 
School District No. 35, Mills 50.9 
School District No. 39, Mills 64.4 
School District No. 60. Mills 51:4 . 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per 3100) 

Name of Person, Value Money Amt 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 

" * 19.89 

21.70 
17.52 

(1.21 

3.38 
17:22 

7.48 

7.79 

9.01 
23.00 

9.02 

7.08 
25.44 
14.01 

6.94 
17.71 

9.92 
14.04 

1.53 
10.33 

2.10 
15.01 
18.95 
11.53 
10.30 

5.21 
13.14 

7.38 

12.20 

17.41 

.87 

8.02 
15.78 
10.55 

(1.01 
13.33 

8.48 

8.40 



Asp, .T P . ■ $ 


38T 


Asbjornson, Gunder 


3»7 


Austad. (rrundft 


272 






Rprp-, iVof-f 


80 




33.1 


Cni-Tnmi, -John , „ 


1+7 


Tlflhl*., ■K-ni.to 


121 


'Fryi.f»i.ti.»r K '. Jfflri , 


163 


Heglnnd, OIp 


am 


Hc.iT.n.p, R TT 


140 


Hnnnn, Mnrt.ii 


IS? 


JohnRnn, .Tnhn P, lf , 


460 


JpJiflftn, Kni-un H, 


8SR 


Jnhnnnn, P W, 


108 


Jesperson, Hans C. 


348 


Tflnvd, Ijiy-b 


193 


I-niiR.*, TO 


■J 18 


Larson John L. &. Hill 


30 


T-ni-Rnn, .Tntin T. 


WW 


Myrum, S. T. "Estate" _ 


9H 


Mymim, rt]n 


?83 


Mflfinn, Spvoj. , 


WW 






Olsmn, Mnf^iiiR 


tm 






Pederson, Andrew 


?M 


PA.pnM.ri, .Tnhn 


Ka 






StpntiPi, A .1, ,, 


34? 


Snlh^rR-, Artnlph 


17 


Sknlpf, Arthur 


14o 






Tv-prlton, Rnt^r{» 


250 


TplfTPn, Hun, M, , , , 


117 


WlHi. W H 


i!07 


WPflnl, nio 


16.1 


NplRfin, Tnrin 





2800 



TOWN OF NORTH 

Total Tax Rate By School DUti-lr.*. 

Including State. County, Town or Village and 

School District Levies. 

School District No. 18. Mills 83.4 

School District No. iV MIll.i 30.5 

School District No. 26, Mills 30.1 

School District No. 29, Mills 37.4 

School District No. 42. Mills 43.5 

School District No. 135, Mills 41.4 

School District No. 219, Mills 44.8 

(Rates of. Taxation on Money and Credits 

30 cents per $100) 

Assessed 

Value _Ioney 
Personal and 
Property Credits 



Name of Person. 

Firm or 

Corporation— 
Adolps, G. 



Amren, Carl 

Anderson, J. "W. — _. 
Austinson.- August ; 
Bothun, M. . 



-* 



f 000 f 



Ballangrud, M. H. 

Bamford, J. L. Mrs. 

Bergland, Steiner 

Bjreke, T. H. . 

Christensen, "Waldle 

Bartleson, Arthur -j 

Coop, Vivian -__ 

Correll, Charles _. 

Conklln, P. B. . 

DeVelling, Hilda . . 

Dokken, OOa 

Eggerud, Ole _, 

Bide, 'Jorgen . 

Engen, Christ — 

Engen, Gunda, 

Erickson, H. P. 

FevlR Ole ^ 

Flattmn; Alfred . 



Gllbertaon, Oscar P. 

Orelbstein, EmU _. . 

Grew, a O. 



28 
148 

18 

138 ____ 

69 800 

247 

4 

■28 

18 

572 : 

60 ._.___. 

317 ■_ 

634 

668 



170 
410 
75 
06 
70 
111 
68 



Amt 
of 
Tax 
4.14 
12.34 
1.33 
B.0fl 
8.15 
9.24 
.33 
2.34 
.67 
:2_.B» 
2.37 
14.20 
44.54 
46.54 
5.75 
.17 
1.00 
6.30 
16.20 
2.S6 
5.75 
5.84 
9.26 
2.17 
15.76 
28.19 



Gran and Hennanaoh^L 
HaavJ, G. K. " m4 " vw »t- 
HaJ-SOn, MnT..' i- - 

Hanson, Kerii ■ " ,, ■ , ■„ „ "•__" 

. .Hayes. R. :p, 

Hillard, C. G. ■■ _ 
Houim, Blanch , 

Houfek, j. p. . 

Holmes, J. 



Hoverstad, ' c, k. ....... Z ) 

Hovland, CapUn A. ^ ■ 

Hoverstad; Andrea* . . 

Hannanson, L. I. . 

Isaacson,' Ole Q. • 

Jacobson. (Pete 

Jacob-son, Thomas . ._ j 

Jensen, Anton -__i______ ; 

Johnson, Renold r . > 

Johnson Bros. .-_ j 

Johnson, Andrew ■ 
Jorde, A. If. ■ j 

Jorde, K. M. -■ ■ j 

Jorde, Mlkkel a. ] 

Joyce, Mary 



Kauahagen, Henry . 
Kinsela, T. A.*. , 
Klrby, Gust . 



Klappenback. Conrad Zl 
Lane, I. G. . 

LaBree, W, J. „_.. 

Lawson, Louis O. 

L!an, Tom _ 

Longren, Alfred ■■ ,.,- _ 

Locken, R. E. ■ , 

Loyland, K. O; 

Lovstad. Carl , 

Lund, Ole O. ■ 

Maland, H. J. :__ 

Moe, Halvor ' 
Murphy, Wm. , 

Mulhall. James 

Myrom, Anton *_ 

Nelson, Tora 

Noper, V; C . 

Norquist, Emil , , . . , 

Opland, C. J. .. 

Olsen, Martin J. 

Olson: Albert . 



Oftelie, Ole K. 

Ostvolden. Nels 

Paulson, Amelia — 
Pederson, A. E. __ 

Poston, S. M. 

Price, V.' J. 

Rude, Roy J. 

Rustad, Christ __ 

Rynestad, T. EC. 

Sande, Hans L. 

Sanden, A. J. 

Siems, Herbert _ 
Sorlom, Peter O. _ 
Stein. ChrisUan __ 
Stenerson, G. L. „ 
Stenberg, Alfred B. 
SUgen, Theodore ~ 

Smith Bros. 

Tessum, Miller ___ 

Vevea, Lewis 

Weirus, . Joseph - 
Williams, W. W. 



Williamson, Adolph 

Wold, Roy 

Eklund, ' Anton 



Hoverstad Christofer . 

Lamb, Percy 

Monson, Anna Mrs. _ 

Monson, Myrtle 

Odegaard, Paul 

Smith, Oscar 



450 

ioSB 

~50 

"loo 

2200 

~100 
"350 

1500 

~400 
400 

2000 
500 
278 

1000 



'- 1M 

IMS 

B.17 

447, 

4.71' 

0.08 

4.42 

- .02 

1.17 

54.04 

.68 

24JM 

2.06 

3.00 

.67 

17.14 

25.35 

0.91 

27.27 

.33- 

8.71 

8.00 

7.14 

4.54 

8.23 

4.34 

7.17 

2.08 

4.67 

7.85 

2.77 



9.78 
6.25 

13.07 
1.58 
8.60 

16.35 
7.67 
4,00 
8.17 
3.53 

62.38 
5.77 
8.25 

10.43 
S.43 
1.60 
3.75 
2.46 
9.24 
3.17 
.12 

: 4.77 
1.27 

10.07 

18.35 
7.43 

12.18 
6.34 

11.67 

18.18 
.63 
2.51 
'23.80 
2.50 
2.50 
1.42 
1.57 
7.50 
1.87 
1.20 
1.20 
.08 
6.00 
1.50 
.83 
3.00 



TOWN OP NOBDEN 
r i 1 T ot H. Tax Bate B ^ School DlntrlctH. 
including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 2, Mills 52.6 ' 
School District No.. 25. Mills 41.7 
School District No. 127, Mills 43.9 
School District No. 135, Mills 43.6 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per S100) 

Name of Person 

Firm or 

Corporation— 
Aaaeby, Lewis 

Aas, Martin 

Ayers, D. W. 

Berg, Cart 



Bergquist, J. A. Mrs, 
Brating. John _ 
Brooten, Ole R. 

Bloom, John 

Dimmen, Louis 
Dimmen, Sivert 
.Dols, Fred G. 



Feragen, Andrew 

Feragen, Andrew, Jr. 
Funnesdahl, A. J. 
Feragen, Lewis R 
Hanson. Gerhard 

Hollander, Fred 

Howiclj/ Sophia Mrs. 
IverBon, Knut P. 
Johnson, Albert 
Johnson. August . 

Johnson, Carrie- Mrs. . 

Johnson, Charlie A. . 

Johnson, Emil 

Johnson. Lewie Mj 
Klerk, Jens 




Knox, W. C. 

Knutseth, Knut 

Kron, Axel 

Lappegaard, Albert 

Lappegaard, Ole 

Mead, F. M. 

Mossestad, Julius , .__ 

Mossestad, Peter 
MiTom, Harry _ 

Ness, EmU 

Nora, Nels 

Nordhagen, G. J. 
Nordhagen, Olaf 

Olson, Albert 

Olson. Gordon M. 
Ordahl, Olaus _ 
Peterson, Bengt 
Peterson, P. M. 
Rodegaard, Nels 
Rust, Martlnus 
Sagmoen, Chas. 
Samuelson, Nels . 
Schnabel, Chas. H. 
SJolsvold, John 

Skaar, Ole 

Sllnger. C. T. 

Sorenaon, Soren L. 

Sorenson. Soren 

Strandvold. Halvor 
Swanson. N. 

Tessum, A. B. 

Voldness, Peter A. 

Rodegaard, Anna Mrs. 
Rust, Martin M. 

TOWN OF NUMBDAZ. 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State. County. Town or Village and 

School District Levi'is. 

School District No. 7, Mills 48.2 

School District No. 0*. Mills 39.3 

School District No. 147. Mills 44.0 

(Rates of Taxation on Money ami Credits 

30 cents per $100) 



Name of Person," 

Firm or 

Corporation— 

Atwood, Arthur 

Baker, W. E., 

Bugge, John J. 

Bugrge. Petrina __ 
Christianson, John . 
Duis, Carl 



Elden. Peter 

Forsluncl, Albert C. 
Forr.lund. Alfred ... 

Forslund, Cart 

Johnson, Chas. J. ._ 

Joringdal, Ellas 

Joringdfll, Joseph „ 
Knutson, Soren . 



Value Money 

Personal and 

Property Credits 

— ..$ 234 . S i 

20 ' 

— - 264 

— - 443 _ 

— 237 

527 



Loftaas. K. T. (Estate) 

Lardy. Ben ; _.„ 

Larson, Olaf 

Martinson, Betay 

McCracken, C. E. 

Olson, Halvor ___________ 

Olson, Marit *_ 



Osness, Joseph 

Peterson, Oscar 

Roos, Emma 

Rod, John A. _____ 
Running, Conrad _ 
Running, Gertrude . 
Swanson, P. P. . 



Thompson, Henry _____ 
Atwood, Blanche. Mrs. . 

Waslie, John Q. 

Waslie, Tnorvald 

BaardBon, Hans . 



210 
350 
182 
592 
358 

38 
430 
107 
270 

33 

39 
170 

59 
126 
116 

82 



■ 78 
178 



Halbach, Theo. C. . 

Hanson, Severt 

Running, John' , 



Oak: Ridge Congregation. 

(Ladles Aid) . 

Sainuelson, David 



500 
200 
1200 
6M 

800 
610 



Amt. 
of 
Tax 

11.28 
.s9 

10.37 

19.70 

10.57 

20.71 
3.77 
9.83 

19.01) 
2. 28 
9.37 

13.70 
7.75 

23.27 

15.97 
1.09 

10.90 
7.45 

12.04 
1.47 
1-74 

■6.68 
2.63 
5.62 
5.10 
3.60. 
2.63 
3.70 
2.63 
3.00 
3.48 
7.9* 
1.50 
.60 



1.53 



TOWN. OF'POUK C-BNTB__ 

,~P*«I ~~» •«•*• B* Aflhewl DiitrietB. 

Includir? S'ntn. County. Town- or Village and 

School District Levies. 

.p«hfv>! Diirtrtct No. L MlUa 43,8 






School DUtrict No. 17, Mills 46.5 
School District No. 94, Mills 82.4 . . 
School District No. 99, Mills 39.5 
School District No. 124, Mills 36.5 
. (Rates of Taxation on Money and Credlta- 
30 cents per H00) 

Assessed 

Value Money 
Personal , and 
Property Credits 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 

Corporation—' 



A«"-*hy, •«-* ■ ■ | 
Boutaln, Albert P. -^ 


40 

am 


Rnnlntn, TrVm, 


275 


LaCouselre, Grace 


90 


Erickson, Martin * _. 


230 


Won -wi. M. J. .,- ,m, 


300 






FTnllixtriitt., Wunry , 


259 


Hnllntrr .m, Harold 


260 


Jflhicwn, Worry 


410 


.Tnhi.nnn T, p; 


im 


Jfmntmf .T*n« 


34ft 


TTlMiPr, nttn 


?3fl 


Kruse, Christ Jr. ______ 


125 


TTrti^fl, Phrtnf. R-. , 


4tw 


T_.nrlfl, T_*_rf« 


7 


WpII-, H R 


822 


Ifplln, n A 


347 






WnnWlr, ninr 


349 


Mr.lHirt.Piui, .Tnhr. 




Nnplin, .Ti>bn 


463 


Woplli., f-. F, , , 


321 






Ppi-1-.n, C»ri 


100 


Peterson, John P. 


4?. 


Swanson Bros. (C. J. _ 




A Wl 




Hnrvf ffl AM 


203 


St. .Tnh-,, V T. 


199 


Wnt*, T^i-,.1 c. , ., 


243 


KHr(r~in, '"'f.r. A 




"Woplin, H. ,7 




Vnplln, fiii«t 


— 




Amt. : 
of 

Tax. 
L80- 

18.64 

j_.79- 

— - ' 3.5ft 

200 9.6S 

15.77 

___ 9.6ff! 
_ 10.24i , 

10.01.'. 

500 14.78- 

200 5.72.*^ 

13.6* 

9.82. 

_ 4.05- 

15.10- 

, *^S, 

_ i2.T» 

— _ 13.7_ 

5.25- 

■ 13.T9- . 

"TOO 2b!3» 

10.40 -. 

. 12.48-; 

; .U.95-*. 

; ' •-• _86j 

10.55- 

_ 8.02- 

* 6.45- 

10.64 

300 JJ0- 

500 L50' 

3000 . 9.0» 



.TOWN OF BOCK8BCBY 
Total Tax Bate "By Schoal Dlitricts. 
Including State, County, Town or Village a— J 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 12. Mills 46.1 
School District No. 18, Mills 82.8. 
School District No. 20, Mills 38.5 
School District No. 54, Mills 37.5 
School District- No. 73. Mills 33.9 . - 

School District No. 102, Mills 101.2 
School DistrieTNo. 154, Mills 38.1 
School District No. 165, Mills 37.5 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credit* 
30 cents per $100) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt- 
Personal and of 

Property Credits Tax- 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation- 
Anderson, A. E. 

Anderson, Edwin A. 

Aubol, Ed. A : 

Aubol, Mary Mrs. 

Aubol. Walter . 



Anderson. Andrew . 

Borgen, A. O. 

Buck,- Huher 

Bothman, W. 

Beebe, N. E. __ 

Crown, Lloyd 

Correll, Charles 

DIcken, C. A. ... 
Engelbert, John . 



Engelstad, Peter 

Erickson, Carl 

Erickson, J. Arthur . 

Foster, Lester . 

Fallman, E. H." 

Finstad, Knut 

Groundhouse, Ed 

Geske, Gust . 

Gunderson. O. B. 

Gunstad, Arthur 

Geske, Albert . 



Haivorson, Halvor . 

Hogenson. Ed 

Hanson. G. H. 

Hunt S. E. 

Heinze, C. L. 

Husby, Andrew 

Hagglund. E. O. 

Harder, Mark 

Hauske, Ed 

Iverson, Iver 

Johnson, John 

Johnson, Magnus _ 

Jaranson, Ole 

Johnson, Daniel 

Jenson, E. D. 

Johnson, Albert , 

Johnson, Ben 



113 | . 

114 
291 
203 
123 

81 
147 
126 
237 
630 
4M 

90 
154 
110 
12S6 
232 

08. 

72 

27 
400 
443 
158 
203, 

05 
298 

95 
118 
224 
473 
120 
204 
195 

212 
95 
304 



101 
717 



Johnson, Anton 

Johnson, B. Theodore . 
Johnson, Swan • 

Kittelson, Erick . 

Koop, Fred . 

Koop, Henry, 'Sr. 

Kline, Alex ■ 

Kvall, John 

Kirby. S. R. 

King, Joe , 

LIden. C. E. 

Lien, Ole . 



Lindstrom, Charles . 

Lee, C. M. 

Loken, Lars 

Loberg, Arnt 

Loberg, Ole 

Luhe, Fred 



473 
48 
107 



228 
110 



McAndress, Martin . 

Merhkens, H. W. 

Mathews, H. A. 

Mickelson, Martin _ 

Moe, Christ 

Marston, M. P. 

Mathson, Martin 

Netteland, Otto 



Netteland, Anna Mrs. __ 

Norby, Bert ^ 

Nelson, Nels _: , 

Olson. O. N. 

Olson. Halvor H. 

Oen, Henry .- 

Oen, Rasmus _1_ 

Olson, Paul 

Oien, C. E. ■ 

Pope, Henry 

Pelrson. B. H. 

Rockstad. Martin 

Rundorf, Anna Mrs. 

Reoerson &. Nohre 

Reierson, P. p. 

Rikenberger. -Will 

Rosette, Lars 



204 

234 
49 



Rundorf. Willie 

Shoopman. A. A. 

Stroherg, John 

Stebbins. F. J. 

Storberg, Herman 

Swanson, Robert 

Sat re. 



3.80 

12_0 
7.61 

. 4.61. 
3.04 
5.50 
4.73 
8.54 

70.13 

15.53 
3.tfi 
5.22 
4.12 

48.23 
S.3S 
6.54 
2.44 
1.01 

14.44 

18.11 
5™6' 
7.33 
3.00 
"10.10 
3.54 
4.43 
8.40 

17.74 
4.50. 
7.38 
7.31 * 

11.32. 
7.65 
3.43 

16.-0 
3.19 
3.15 
.08 
3.79 

26.88 
5.34 
8.95 
3.60 

47.87 
-.63- 
3.63 

15.27 
l.«9 
4.93 
3.00 
5.66 
8.55 
4.13 
.20 
2.59 
2.89 
.75 
.38 
2.07 
2.3G 
7.93 
4.24 
1.95 
3.97 

11.14 

14.04 
1.14 
4.40 
3.51 
4.01 
8.20- 

13.80 

13.58 
1.98 



7.93 

1.84 
1.93 
12.30 
13. 09 
1.95 
3.25 
2.(W 



Satre. Schuyler & Elmer 

Skotten. Sever 

Turnquist Fred - 

TImm, Ed . 



103 
200 



Torstvedt Martha 

Vinge. Olders 

Wilkens, Gust 



Weberg, Albert & Karl . 

Weberg, Su-an 

Westphall, L. A. 

Testesund. Knut 

Zinter. Karl ___._ 

Zinter, Karl M. .„ 

Zinter, Emil 

Elgsten, C. .__ _._ 

Erickson, Karl 

Hanson, Hans J. 

Lee, S. O. 

Nelson. John P. 



Nelson^ John P. Mrs. 

Paulson, Pet Mr. and 
Mrs. ____. 



600 

1500 

G00 

. 5000 



3.S« 



10.04 
17.20 
1.34 



8.48 
7.01 
8.48 

10,35 
1.40 
-2.S9 
4.50 
1.50 

.1.50 
1.80 
4.50 
1.80 

15.00 



TOWN OK HIVI-R FALLS 
r , Jf otal Tax Ral * B 5" School Districts. 
Including State. County, Town or Village" and 
■ School District Levies. 
School District <No. 0, Milts 41.4 
School District No. 12, Mills 48 
School District No. 19, Mills 51. 
School District No. 102, Mills 103 1 
School District No. 133, Mills 36.9 
School District No. 178, Mills 42 6 
School District No. 227. Mills 44.9 
-« (Ra l ea of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100) . ■ 

m _ Assessed. . 

Name of Person, Value Money 

■Finn or Personal and 

■ Corporation— Property . Credits 

Aiberg, Carl.E. -._._- 

Aldrich, C. E. 




•Anderson. Anton E> ___. 
Adams, Washington .... 
Anderson, A. P.Mrs. 
Bumquist Andrew 
Bothmann, Fnuik 
Bruce, Wm. __ 
Benson. Alfred 
ClUzena State 

Hasel 
Dalager, K. T. 
Dobson, Fred 
— tobson. Lemly 
Denhart, J. W. 
Erickson, Gust 



(Continued on Page 6) 




V. 





Thief River Falls Tribune 



Published Every Wednesday 
Established 1001 



_UDWIG I. ROE - - ■'- President 
WILLIAM E. DAHLQUIST ' ■ Editor 
B- S.SNYDER -' "-' '- City Editor 



Official Paper of Pennington County. . , 
.Entered aB Becond-claaa matter at ■■ the 
postoHice at Thief River Falls, MinuU 
under the Act of March 8. 1878. ->'■■ '•' 



SUBSCBIFT10N *2.00 PEK YEAB 



.WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1926. 



' , WELCOME 

Thief Rjver Falls is host this week 
to a distinguished group of men — 
prominent men of the Northwest and 
■ specialists in their various fields of 
endeavor. The city is indebted to 
them for the time they are spending 
here, contributing to the success of 
our Alfalfa and Poultry Shows. The 
community is indebted to them for 
the knowledge and encouragement 
which they bring. In behalf 'of the 
city and the community the Tribune 
bids them welcome, expresses sincere 
thanks -for the part they play in our 
program, and hopes their visit here 
may be pleasant. 



. POVLTRY AND ALFALFA 

While the poultry and alfalfa 
shows, held here this week, indicate 
to a certain extent that these ' divi- 
sions of agricultural production are 
well established in i northwestern 
Minnesota, the evidence they offer is 
not nearly so conclusive of their 
value to the community as the actual 
results measured in dollars and cents. 
Poultry alone this year has brought 
hundreds of thousands of dollars to 
the farmers of this section of the 
state, and while the results of alfal- 
fa are not so easily measured perhaps 
its value is certainly charted in plain 
figures in the growth of stock raising 
and dairying and the improved finan- 
cial condition of those who have 
grown it over a period of years. 

The fact that there has been a 
healthy liquidation of debts can be 
traced directly to these i departments 
of the farm. And the fact that east- 
ern loan companies are placing plenty 
of money at the disposal of local 
banks for loans on improved farms 



operated by the owners, is convincing 
proof that the future of this section 
of the state is no longer, a gambled 
The only farmers in the oldest InY} 
best established communities in 'the 
state who are!making\a+good living 
and a little besides are those who art' 
milking cows and rafting; .'. pbul'tfy,' 
hogs, sheep or jbeef. There is nothing. 
in' this form of agriculture thati-.can- 
not ; ,be done as well in Pennington 
county as on the choicest farms 'of 
southern 'Mirinfesp'ta 'and wifH^j' 'con- 
siderably less expense. While 
southern Minnesota farmers are 
spending many dollars per acre in 
giving the soil those ingredients 
which are necessary for the growth 
of Alfalfa, the crop grows' here like 
a weed. 

The future prosperity of this coun- 
try is assured. Every indication 
points to a gradual improvement of 
conditions in this locality. The foun- 
dation of that prosperity has already 
been laid. On ' the cornerstone will 
be engraved the words, "Alfalfa and 
Poultry." 



OUR BANKS 

Very encouraging indeed are the 
statements of the Thief River Palls' 
banks published in this issue of the 
Tribune. Both' banks'- have a -.liquid 
reserve on hand more'' : than' four 
times greater than that required by 
law, and neither *bank has any bills 
payable or rediscounts..^;,.' :. ; 

But the onei.thing which 'is most 
satisfactory in these statements from 
the standpoint of the community is 
the fact that in spite of the uncertain 
conditions of the past few months, 
the total deposits of these banks have 
been maintained. While the fact 
that there has been no shrinkage in 
the footings of these banks indicates 
to a certain extent that the manage- 
ments of these institutions enjoy the 
confidence of the people of this com- 
munity, it indicates more definitely 
the confidence of the people in the 
future of this country as a whole. 

The people of this community are 
to be congratulated for the calm, sen- 
sible manner in which they have con- 
ducted themselves through a crisis 
which, without their balanced con- 
sideration, could easily have develop- 
ed into a panic that would have 
swept away every bank and further 
delayed the reconstruction of this sec- 
tion of the state. 



CRIME PREVENTATIVES:' 
At a state convention of sheriff, 
held in the Twin- CitietTast -week, 
ihe , county;;law"t enfdrranjent-ufft^ls 
outlined plans' 'fojr. a 'unif jecksf/oi^o 
check the criirle ..-. wave ■; within the 
.state [during -the: coming yearvi'Ih u'ni : 
tyt, there is strength and if th'e^he'riffs 
oi MinnesQtV'cah.'jvqld' themselves 
'lnto.an organization that. will operate 
ill' a straight line; if the sheriffs can 
co-operate. to such an extent that the 
criminal! instead of being forced to 
elude only one sheriff, will have 
eighty-seven sheriffs and their de- 
puties at his heels; then the people of 
this state may expect to see this wave 
of crime recede. Considering the 
fact that in general the first neces- 
sary qualification of a sheriff is the 
ability to get himself elected, it 
doubtful that an organization of 
sheriffs can be made as centralized a 
unit as might be desired but the ef- 
fort on their part to bring about this 
centralization is laudable and the 
movement should be given universal, 
support. 

Another act of this convention 
which is of general interest is the en- 
dorsement of capital punishment. 
This sheriffs organization went on 
record as being in favor' of it and the 
next Legislature will be asked to re- 
establish the ancient custom. It is 
not likely that the people will submit 
to this request. It is a fact that the 
tendancy has been to make martys of 
criminals arid very often the' heroic 
work of officers in capturing despera- 
does at the risk of their own lives has 
been undone by. pardon and parole 
boards. But the remedy for this 
situation is not to revert to a custom 
which is itself as revolting as the most 
horrid crime, but rather to curb the 
activities of sob-sister organizations 
which measure their accomplishments 
by the number of criminals they have 
set free, rather than by the actual 
good they confer upon society as a 
whole. 

The theory of capital punishment 
ii.- not only inconsistent with the 
ethics of civilization and the teach- 
ings of Christianity, but as it is 
practiced today, it is even inconsis- 
tent with itself. In cannot be argued 
that aSsjangerous criminal is put to 
death because he is a menace- to his 
fellow men. A person adjudged in- 
sane is. often a greater menace but he 
is kept in confinement and no one 
dares suggest that he should be killed. 



The 'only argument that can be pre- 
sented in favor of capital punishment 
is that.lt ugpireS; in. the. ,. minds pf 
potential crunjrigjs. a grfaitjfear ot.thi 
result of.cbrnmit_ng a crime. If this, 
then, is, the'orily' reason,' why are 
public execuSphs','cbnfiri'ed tb'a',srriall ; 
'enclosure where only'aiew can wit- 
ness the event and profit' by the ex- 
ample. If this theory is to' be made 
consistent with itself then these purjl 
lie executions will be performed in, 
the public square, the school children 
-will.be paraded out to view the spec- 
tacle and the body of the culprit will 
be allowed to swing from the gallows 
for weeks and months in order that 
-a> greater number of people can be- 
come-properly impressed with the 
terrible consequences of evil. If we 
are to re-establish this system let us 
not do it in a half-hearted manner. 

Following the French revolution 
Napoleon was confronted with a 
crime wave very similar to the one 
this nation is experiencing today. He 
stamped it out by establishing a court 
on horseback, which travelled rapidly 
over the country disposing of cases 
without any delays. It is safe to say 
that the swiftness with which this 
court acted and the certainty with 
which it meted out punishment was 
a big factor in restoring order. Many 
of the courts in this country today 
are nine months behind in their sche- 
dule. In the course of nine months 
the memory of man-becomes vague, 
witnesses disappear and justice be- 
comes a farce. 

There are perhaps two chief rea- 
sons for the present crime wave. One 
is the heavy odds in favor of the 
criminal getting away without arrest. 
If it's only a twenty to one shot that 
he is going to be caught it almost 
ceases to become a gamble. It's very 
nearly a sure thing. The other rea- 
son is that if a criminal is apprehend- 
ed he still has a good chance to evade 
conviction. Few men would gamble 
with a prison cell or even with a re- 
cord of having been arrested if. the 
odds were not so overwhelmingly in 
their favor. 

The matter of equalizing the 
chances a little more for the arrest of 
the law breaker should be the chief 
concern of the sheriffs and other law 
enforcement officials. If' they will 
accomplish' an improvement in that 
field then they will have' rendered 
society a signal service. And if the 
lawyers and legislators of the country 



Miss Ruth Hojpa left Wednesday 
evening for Minneapolis where she 
will spend a few days visiting with 
friends and relatives. - 



could effect a few reforms in.the ad- 
ministration of justice, cause it to 
fflWP wif_,.j,iist a little more speed 
and:aocuracy, they, too, vWll render a 
imightyi'se'rvice.'; If-'-isn't so much a 
raap^'p^.talurig'care'p'f' the murder- 
ers of today, as it is to.'strike swiftly 
and surely at that vast : army ' . of 
thieves and vagrants who are the 
gunmen and murderers of .tomorrow, 
and.instill in their minis,' '.'not,, .the 
fear that if by some strange freak, of 
'circumstances they should get -caught 
they will pay with their .life;' but 
rather the assurance that if they do 
commit a crime the chances of their 
getting away are small. 

Miss Mary Von Prichard, who has 
spent the Christinas holidays in this 
city as a guest at the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Prich- 
ard, Sr. left Saturday evening for 
■ Rapids. She is instructress in ' 
the high school at that place. 



Fat Men Organize Basket 
Ball Quint; Pairing; Fonji ! /.f^ 

A fat mens' basket bill team is 'a-' *' 
reality in Thief River Falls, steps?;,,,, 
having been taken recently -to get five SM 
or six fat ones together, and make 
them do some practicing '' '' 

According to r the very latest -press ''' 
dispatch- Doc Copeland is the captain, ' - 
and other members are E: O. Mogen- >' 
sen, "Tony">Dorn, Adolph- Olander, 
and Kern Olson. Cope has consider- 
able^ basketball 'in his head* -so -the- 
dope goes, and -if..he can'; make air- ' '' 
rangements. for his 'fatties to stand on 
their ;feet long enough the prospects 
for winning a game' from some other 
fat team are considered good. 

Rumor has it that a slim men's ' 
team is in the process of Organiza- 
tion. 



Miss Loretta Dietz, who spent the 
past few days in this city as a shiest 
of _ Miss Harriet Anderson, will teave 
this afternoon for her homer at 
Wahpeton, N. Dak. 



Miss Myrtle Helgeland left Mon- 
day morning for Newfolden, where 
she will resume her duties as in- 
structress in one of the rural schools. 



Poultry Pays Big 
Dividends 

The ninth annual Pennington County 
Poultry show brings home more forcefully 
than ever the importance of poultry as one 
of the chief revenue producers on our 
farms today. 

Nearly $500,000 for poultry and eggs has 
• been distributed to the farmers of this 
section by the buyers in Thief River Falls 
the past year. 

This amount will steadily increase as the 
facilities of the farmer for the care of the 
flocks are improved. . 

Better buildings are essential. Plan now 
for the coming year. 

The Prichard Company 




First and Peonies State Bank 

$i i: .:,".'-,■■ ' ■>.-- .,,..,--.■ 

$ "'- ; ' .' • •; ' : : ; 



Our Statement 



In the adjoining. column appears the published statement of 
the condition of this bank at the close of business on December 
31st, 1925. 

It is with confidence that we ask the readers of this paper to 
carefully study this statement. It is published by order of the 
Banking Department of the State of Minnesota in order that the 
depositors may see for themselves the true condition of the bank 
and the policy of the men who manage its affairs. Consider our 
cash reserve which is practically three times the amount re- 
quired by law, indicating that we are able to care for the financi- 
al needs of our customers. ' 

In this connection the officers and directors of the First and 
Peoples State Bank express to their customers, large and small, 
their personal appreciation for the confidence reposed in this in- 
stitution, for the business given it and for the kind words spoken 
for it. We feel that the bank owes its customers and community 
the best service and protection possible to render, consistent with 
sound banking, and it is to this end that we dedicate the bank's 
efforts through the year before us. 

H. S. DAHLEN, Vice President 
L. H. IRGENS, Cashier. 

FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 



DHtECTORS : 



Math Barzen 
Perl W. Mabey 
Carl B. Larson 



HansA_iton_ 
F.J.Stebbins 



:<F. P. Sheldon 
:. Bernhard Knudsen 
Halvor A. Loken ■ 



AG. Loftnes 
H. S. Dahlen 



Bank No. 1395 

Statement of the condition of 
FD2ST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 

Thief River Falls, Minn., at close of business on December 31st. 
1925. 

RESOURCES. 

Loans and discounts, including rediscounts 

Overdrafts ■ l_ 



U. S., State and Other Bonds 

Banking house, Furniture and Fixtures . 
Other real estate owned : 



Checks and drafts in transit 

Due from other banks and cash on hand . 
Cash items and checks 



Total 



Capital Stock . 
Surplus fund . 



LIABILITIES. 



Undivided profits, net 
Reserved for depreciation . 



Bills payable'with War Finance Corporation ______ 

Bills payable— other than with War Finance Corpor- 
ation (including certificates for borrowed money) 

Notes and bills rediscounted 

Bonds borrowed „. 

Savings deposits ~_ _! ■ _•__ ____ 

Time certificates (other than for money borrowed). 
Cashier's Checks •. . : 



_$336,214.10 
53.33 
_ 105,165.17 
_ 50,000.00 
_ 75,921.35 
_ 3,271.35 
_ 134,739.67 
_ 3,722.40 

4709,087.37 

_$ 75,000.00 

_ 15,000.00 

_ 2,600.00 

900.00 

. NONE 



Due to banks 

Deposits subject to check 

Total 



NONE 
NONE 
. NONE 
_ 86,324.86 
_ .206,455.18 
_ 2,457.69 
_ 5,824.06 
- 314,525.58 

-$709,087.37 



Amount of Reserve on hand $l3g,_65.00 

Amount of Reserve Required by Law -$53,375.87 



r™T E ^P^SS-™' We - H - S ' DaUcn ' Vice President and L. H. Irgens, 

County of Peniungton-ss. Cashier of the above named Bank, do solernrdy 

swear that the above statement is true of our knowledge and belief. 

H. S. DAHLEN, Vice President. 
L.H. IRGENS, Cashier. 
, Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January, 1926.- - 
(SEAL) S. E. DAHLEN, Notary Public,. Pennington Cto_iry. Minnesota. 
My Commission expires October 27, 1930.' Correct Attest: tEKL W. MABEY. 
'-""•- Two Directors CARL B. LARSON. 




- 







': -v.! 

WEDNESDAY> JANUARY 6, 1926.': 



1 



W 



^Ti^fli? 



:«>$gm!$$$m 




Dinner Party. 
; Mrs. D. LeSage was hostess last 
Sunday evening: when she entertain- 
ed a group. of her friends at a 'five 
o'clock dinner. The guest list includ- 
ed, Mr. andjMrs. Gust Crown. . and; 
children, Mr. aiid Mrs. Ole Granum 
Sania Erickson Entertains. and children, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Monday evening Miss Sania Erick- Swanson and Mr. and Mr*. J. L; Mag- 
son entertained a group of . her nuson and children. .•...-.. 
friends at her home on Conely Ave.*. ... ;*** .,!.'. 

The evening was spent at - playing ; s Choral Society, 

cards and dancing and at 11:30 a de-'J ..The Lutheran; -Choral Society will 
licious lunch was served by the hos- hold a business meeting and rehears- 
tess. Twenty four guests were pre- 81; at the Trinity Lutheran church 
sent. *«---i~~ .■__-»■__ 



Miss Barzen Hostess. 

Miss Katherine Barzen was hostess 

last Wednesday afternoon when she 



ronday evening; Jan. 11 at 7:30. 
. ';**• 
, Surprise Party. 

Miss Nettie Ove was pleasantly 
] surprised last evening when a group Dinner Party. 

entertained a group of her friends at ; of her friends gathered at her home Mr. an'd Mrs. Oscar A. Naplin en 
her home. . Whist was played at four ' to help celebrate her birthday. The tertained at a six o'clock dinner last 
tables. The high prize wasiawarded . evening was spent in a social way, ! Sunday evening. Covers were laid 
to Miss Elizabeth Keating, and Fay- 1 and at 10:30 a delicious lunch' was for ten. 



Daughters of Norway. . ± -, 
. The Daughters of Noway, held 
their ;regular meeting at' the'Sbns of 
'Norway hall Monday 1 ' eveHfiig 1 . Fol-' 
lowing the business meeting-refresh 
ments were served by the v following, 
Mesdam^s Louis. Vevea, Ed. Erickson, 
Lars Ehokson, and 'Carl' Melby. ' 

., .. ' ... (.'Auxiliary Met., 
■The yVomen!s Auxiliary of the 
American- -Legion held their regular 
meeting at the Legion club rooms last 
evening. Misses Alvina and Katie 
Janos, Borgit Iverson and. Mrs. Ed. 
Iverson were hostesses for the eve- 
ning. 

••• 



•1:1 THE CHURCHES 



...Scandinavian By.: Free: Church. 

I J. 0- JaaBbson, Pastor. 
•SundasP'scSool 1 at-lfl a. m. -■'■■■ 
Mojming warship at*! a.nt! . 
.Yflungf Popples. meeting at!4.p-,; mil 
English ' — ' ■ 



the Warner was given the low one. ; served. The guests were Misses Net- 
A delicious luncheon was served at ! tie Ove, honor guest, Alvina Jonas, 
fi:30. The guest list included, Misses! Lulu Cook, Jeanette Oftedahl, Esther 
Faythe^and Camile Warner, EI- Gjertson, Ruth and Olive Wold^Ag- 



Community Club. 
The next meeting of the Girls 
Community club will be held in tie 



nora Toms, Marjorie Hoppa, Eliza- nes Oftedahl, and Mesdames A. Dorn, Legion club rooms next Monday eve^ 



belh Keating, Harriet Morgan, Mil- i Ole Granum: and Harold Eide, 

dred Engen. Lyliari Arnold, Dorothy 

Swedenburg, Ariel Kinghbm, Elray- 

ra Langseth, Ruth Mellby, 1 Thelma 

Christenson of Minneapolis, and 

Ersyle Anderson. 



Mildred Engen Hostess. 

Miss Mildred Engen was hostess 
last Saturday afternoon when she en- 
tertained a group of her friends at 
her home. Cards formed the diver- 
sion for the afternoon, and the high 
prize was won by Miss Katherine 
Barzen, Miss Elnora Toms winning 
the low prize. A delicious luncheon 
was served to the guests by Mrs. En- 
gen at 5:30. Those present were, 
Misses Esther and Ruby Behnes, Ly- 
lian ArnoM, Marjorie Hoppa, Doro- 
thy Swedenburg", Elnora Toms, Ariel 
Kinghorn, Harriet Morgan, Katherine 
Barzen, Elizabeth Keating and Ersy- 
le Anderson. 

*** 

For Music Class. 
Miss Frances Wengeler entertained 
the members of her music classes last 
Thursday evening. The' hours were 
spent in playing games, and ' there 
was a short musical program. A de- 
licious luncheon was served to the 
guests at 10:30. 

*#* 

Dancing Party. 

Miss Ariel Kinghorn entertained 
the members f the T. N. T. and their 
friends at a dancing party given at 
her home last Saturday evening. A 
delicious lunch was served at 11. The 
invited guests were Misses Elizabeth 
Keating, Lylian Arnold, Esther Ben- 
nes, Ruth Mellby, Ersyle Anderson, 



; Willing Woorkers. 

; The Willing Workers will, hold 
their next regular meeting in the 



ning, Jan. 11. 

Miss Prichard Entertains. 

Miss Mary.Pricnard' , ejifettaihed a 
number of friends'-' at heir home last 



parlors of the Trinity Lutheran [Wednesday afternoon.. -The - r hours 
Church on Saturday, Jan. 9th. Mrs.. ; were spent informally, 1 and. at 5:30 a 
Carl Hillard will be the hostess for , delicious lunch was served. ' The 



rening servfces,al t:30 p. m. 
Prayer meetings to be -■ 'continued 
every evening this week."' :j- :- ; .; 
Religious instruction on Friday af- 
ternoon. ..,,,. 
Annual business meeting on Mon- 
ty evening, January 11. 
. j .'#*• 

Christian Science. 

Regular Sunday services are held 
at 11 a. m. in the church at LaBree 
Ave. and First St. Subject Sunday, 
Jan. 10th. "Sacrament." 

Sunday school at 10 a. m. 

Wednesday evening services are 
held at 7:45. The public is cordially 
invited to these services. 



the afternoon. 
I •" 

Dinner Party. 

Last Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Arneson entertained a group of their 
friends at dinner. The guest were 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Dostal and children, 



guests were Mesdames Ernest Zeh, ' 
H. O. Melby, Roy Storvik*and. Misses 
■Miriam Bishop and Phyllis - and Lu- 
die Curtis. 

«•• ■ ■ 

Theatre Party. 

Miss Elizabeth Keating and 



- -- t - . „ „..„ Miss 

Miss Camille Warner, Charles Dostal Marjorie Hoppa were joint hostesses 
and Charles > Herron. last Friday evening when they enter- 

*** tained the members jf the T. N. T. at 

I *** a theater party. Following the show 

! Miss Robarge .Entertains. the party adjourned to Thompson's 

l Miss Evangeline Robarge pleasant- i where they were seated at tables 
ly entertained a few of her friends at : prettily decorated with cut flowers 
her home Saturday evening. The and candles. A tw course luncheon 
hours were spent in music and danc- ; was served. The members present 
ing. At ten o'clock a delicious lunch , we re, Misses Ersyle Anderson, Elnora 
was served. Those present were Anne Toms, Esther lerines, Lylian Arnold, 
Haney, Lucille Larson, Katherine Katherine' Barzen, and Ariel King- 
Mellby, Peergy Shaw, Luella Hams. , horn'. 
Marie Dablow, • Agnes Quinlog, Mar- 
garet Bjorkman. Ruby Ihle, Graee 
Robarge and Sally Vaughan of Good- 
ridge. 

I *** 

I Macabees to Meet. 

i The Macabbees will hold. their reg- 
ular meeting next Tuesday evening, 
January 12. All members are request- 
ed to be present. 



Mrs. .Erickson Hostess. 



Trinity Aid. 

The Ladies aid of the Trinity Luth- 
eran church will hold their next regu- 
lar meeting at the church parlors, 
; Thursday afternoon, Jan. 13 at -3. It 
is requested that every member, will 
be present. A cordial invitation is^ex- 
; tended to the public. The hostesses 
jfor the day will be Mesdames E. B. 
'Bakke, Oscar Williams, Olaf Tessum 



Mrs. Sr^SrTcLoTS-rtainedl- 4 *»*» B «™!^- 



few of her friends at her 
Monday evening. The hours 



home 
were 



Country Ladies Aid of St. John's. 

The country ladies aid of St. John's 



Elnora Tom7, Marjorie Hoppa and | spent at needlework, and at 10:30 ^ h ^ZSrATJ^-?kn^Tlt 
Messrs. Leigh Anderson, Ll^dBeni delicious two course ^'he™ was &*££ *£*& fTte ""Let! 



Melvin Peterson ani Lloyd Lonson. |?on, Boy Erickson, Leonard Hanson, 
**« i Clarence Pope, Francis Bums and 

St. Bernard's Guild. | Miss Carolyn Melby. 

St. Bernard's Guild will meet Thurs- 
day afternoon, January 7th. at 3 p. 
m. in the parlors of the St. Bernard's 



Rebekahs to Install 
The Lyon Rebekah lodge will hold 



church. The hostesses for the day ' ^^ installation next Thursday eye- 
will be Mesdames E<1. Lacv. George I n . m 8 J an - ! 4th - A { ter the mstella- 
Streeter, Joe Zavoral and Ben Kiewel. t f°?.. th< : "f 1 ™ 15 »J l? st y^ Y m S 1 " 
A cordial invitation is extended toi'frt? 1 " m honor of tne ones for the 
the pubUc. .coming year. 

*** I *■* 

Miss Anderson Entertains. : i j Dancing Party. 

Miss Ersyle Anderson was hostess] | The Sons and Daughters of Nor- 
to a group of her friends Sunday af- way had a joint dancing' party at 
temoon. The hours were spent'ln a; their hall last Wednesday evening, 
social way, and at 5:00 lunch w?s j Preceding the dancing a very enjoy- 
servp-i Tfc e iruests were Misses Mil- aM* program was given which con- 
dred Engen, Liv Vistaunet. Dorothv ! sisted of several vocal ' selections 
Swedenburg, Elizabeth DeCremer, sung by Mrs.T. Reep, and Mrs. O. F. 
Rubv Bennes, Lvlian Arnold. Esther Mellby played a number of piano 
Bennes, Elizabeth Keating, Mariorie solos tnat we £S written by Norwegian 
Hopna. Vi\-ipp Thorp>on of Gnod- 
ridge, Elnora Toms and -Harriet Mor- 
gan. 



Slumber Party. 
Miss Grace Provencher entertain- 
ed a group of her friends at a slum- 



composers. Theo, Quale addressed 
the assembly; A delicious lunch was 
served at mid-night. 
«*« 

Kenneth Streeter Entertains. 
Kenneth Streeter was host to a 
number of his friends last Wednes- 



ber T>arty New Vpars Eve. The eve- ! day afternoon, when he entertained 
ning was spent at games and music, (them at his home. The hours were 
The next morning after a long hike j spent in a social manner, and at 5:00 
the guests sat down t^. a breakfast ■ a delicious lunch was served by Mrs. 
table that was nrettily decorated witfe ! Streeter. The guests were Misses 
red bell shaped baskets and tall red Maverette Hilson, Elizabeth Keating, 



candles. Covers were laid for six. 

Card Partv. 
Miss Elnora Toms entertained her 
friends at a card party at tier home 
last Thursday afternoon. Whist was 
played at three' tables. Miss Rubv 
Bennes was awarded hie-h prize, and 
the low one was given to Mi'dred 
Engen. The guests were Misses 
Ersyle .Anderson. Rubv Bennes. Es- 
ther Bennes. Lvlian Arnold. Ma.iorie 
Honna. >r-*el KInchorn. Elizabeth 
Keating. Harriet Morgan. Mildred 
Engen, Elizabeth DeCremer, Liv 
Vistaunet, and Dorothy Swedenburg. 
... 

Birthday Party. 
Miss Wandabelle Semisch enter- 
tained a few little friends Sunday 
afternoon. The occasion was her 9th 
birthday. The hours wore spent play- 
ing e-ames, and at 5:30 lunch was, 
served. 

For Miss Dietz. ; j 

In compliment to Miss. Loretta • 
Dietz of Wahpetr-n, who is her guest, [ 
Miss Harriet Anderson . entertained 1 
•a group of her friends pt her home I 
Monday evening. The hours were 
spent playing whist. Miss Lylian Ar- 
nold winning high honors while the 
consolation prize was awarded to 
Miss Agnes Tandberg. A two course 
.luncheon was served at 10:30. The 
guest list included. Miss Loretta 
Dietz, honor guest. Misses Marguer- 
ite Burns. Marguerite DeCremer; Ag- 
nes Tandberg, Lylian Arnold and 
Ruby Bennes. 

*** 
Degree of Honor. 
The Degree of Honor will meet 
next Friday evening, Jan. 8th at the 
Masonic Hall. Officers will be install- 
ed^ and a class will he initiated, after 
which refreshments will be served. . 



Lillian Johnston and Sania Erickson, 
and Messrs. Lester Rolland, Leigh 
Anderson, Maurice Holzkneckt. 
««. 
Joint Installation. 
The Sons and Daughters of Nor- 
way will have joint installation of 
officers at the Sons of Norway hall 
hall Thursday evening. Refreshments 
will be served following the cere- 
monies. 



M. E. Ladies Aid. 

The M. E. Ladies aid will entertain 
Wednesday, Jan. 13, in the church 
parlors. Lunch served by Mrs. C. A. 
Nason. F. L. - Christehson and Mrs; 
W. W. Prichard Jr. Everybody wel- 
come. 

.*» 

Annual Meeting. 

On Friday, January 8, at 3 p.m., 
the annual -meeting of the Women's 
society of the Presbyterian church 
will be' held in the church parlors. 
Reports of the- past year's work will, 
be given by the officers, chairmen ot- 
standing committees and'ehairmen of 
sections. 

Election of officers will be held af- 
ter which the women will be guests 
of the Men's club at a supper in the ' 
church dining room. A program of 
music and games will follow. Mem- 
bers are requested to be present and ! 
bring a new member if possible. j 



Mavie Lutheran Church. 
• r. E. O. Sabo, Pastor. 

Services Sunday, Jan. 10 in the 
Teleinarken church at 11 a. m. . 

Tjj« confirmation class meets im- 
mediiitely after the services Sunday. 

Services in Mavie at 3 p. m. 
•*• . 
' St. John's Lutheran Church. 
E. H. Kreidt, Pastor. 

Religious instruction Saturday at 
9:30 a. m. 

. • Confirmation Class Saturday 1:00 
P. m. ' J 

Sunday school 9:30 a. m.* German 
service 10:30 a. m. English Bible Lec- 
ture 7:45 p. m. Topic "Elijah on 
Mount Carmel.'" 

Tuesday evening at 7:45 Rev. C. F. 
Knauft will lecture for the Temple 
Guild on "Tithing". A cordial invita- 
tion is extended to all. Lunch will be 
served after the lecture. Annual meet- 
ing of the congregation takes place 
Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock. All 
voting members are urged to attend. 



Methodist Ep. Church. 
(Key, Thomas Dlxon r Pastor 
Sunday activities; 

.1,0:00 'X m. School arid adult bible 
class. •'-■' - •!.!-.. - 
•.'6^ft,Epworth League. '■■'■ 
i :.:DiVins. ssrviee. ,ja a^.m. ■■■ Subject: 
!,'Condltipn ,pf. Revelation/' . 
; , 7:80 p. m. ■ Subject: "Methodism 
'Awak^''-''' 1 '- ■•' -•''-' : ' '■-■ ■■■■■".■■■■■_■- 
'- Sptcial>duefcby.>MesdaTne8 Nason 
and 'Gustajfeoni . t. .•: , ..ub . 

Weajusgdayij,,, . . ;. . ... ..,-.,,,.. ; .. 

... 8:00' p. m. Class meeting anq r Bio}e' 
study! ': ( Dahiel's Prophecy.)' ' \ 
Friday: .. ,:— . :'■■' 

7:00 p. m. Scout Cubs meet in the 
Church Dasement. 

*•* 
The Presbyterian Church. 
Edward H. Lorenz, Pastor. 
The Men's Bible class will meet 
with the Sunday school at 9:45 a. m. 
The topic for the 'morning service 
will be "The Breadth of Christ's 
;ge. The.^opic in the evening 
will be "The PatWm In the Mount." 
Christian Endeavor meets at 7 p. 
m. with Dorothy Sullivan as leader. 
Wednesday evening at 7:30 we be- 
gin our School of Missions. The first 
period will be taken no with book 
Peasant. Pioneers." The second half 



Swedish Ev. Mission Church 
O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a. m. Morning 
services at 11 a. m. Evening services 
at 7:30. Prayer meeting every eve- 
ning this week. Bible study and 
prayer meeting Tuesday at 7:30 p. 
m. All Welcome. 

s*. - 

Trinity Lutheran Church. 
S. L. Jallakson, Pastor. 
Sunday school, all grades 9:46. 
Morning worship in Norwegian 
with sermon topic "My Father's 
House" at 11 a. m. 
. English services with sermon, sub- 
ject: "Our • Reasonable Service," at 
'7!45 p. m. 
' Dorcas Tuesday, 12th, 

Bible- hour Wednesday at 7:4'5. Aid 
annual meeting and Junior L. L. 
Social Thursday the 14. 
*** 
Call to Prayer. 
The W. C. T. U. is issuing a call to 
Srayer, a t the (Presbyterian church 
Thursday evening at 7:30. 
,T-' l If ye shall ask anything in my 
name, I will do it," St. John 14, 14. 
Let us therefore gather in the 
House of the Lord. This prayer meet- 
ing is for every Christian. Come. . 
-22. 



will be a steropHeani.tecti 
Keep America- ;<3&}«tiaa^ 

Goodridge iithsi«ouCj(iffi. S 
V. O. Aakejv Pastor; - .;.,. . 
Sunday, January 107. Norse.^rjdce 
at Jelle at 11 a, m. , v Annual Dullness. 
meeting, .ladies aid meeting 'and the- 
confirmants and Sunday v schooL&'the 
afternoon. '"" "" , T'.-.-"".' 
'.' ' 4 LutefisK' ; supjier in Gbodridg^SSunr 
day 1 evefldng) tiegihnnjg at 5 ip.Y m: 
Goodridge Ladies aid meets Thursday 
,0an.. 14. . .. . -Jk . 




■•: ~Midderigh" to"Leave. 
Francis Midderigh, son of i;Paul 
Midderigh, who arrived, in 'this ;dty a 
short time ago from Los Angeles 
and Sacrimento, Cal., to spenoV^ two', 
week's vacation with his father,' ex- 
pects to leave the latter part of ^ext 
week for International .Fallsijwnere 
he will visit friends. Mr. Midderigh 
was formerly with the PacifiCjTele-. 
phone and Telegraph company.thold- 
ing a position of cable 7 splicer.; , '■"' 



«ii 



Big dance at the Elk's ha'il ! Rida'y-' 
night after the basketball ' -Same. 
Music by SnyderVsuc piece orchestra:! ;' 




riMte 




BLUE MONDAY 

is now 

Sunny Monday 

Old wash day, with its hours of back-break- 
ing rubbing, over steamy tubs of soapy clothes 
is gone forever— thanks to our modern laundry 
service. ■'■ 

Model Steam Laundry 

Phone 118 
We Collect and Deliver to Your Door 



( Advertisement) 

Gall Stones 

New booklet, written by Gall Stone 
Specialist, explains scientific home 
treatment prescribed for over 80 
years. Before risking operation — read 
about success of this method for 
catarrhal inflamation and infections 
of Liver, Gall Bladder and Gall Ducts 
as associated with Gall Stones! Sent 
free to anyone who writes. 

Da E. E. PADDOCK, 
Desk 106, Kansas City, Missouri. 
(Dec 21- Jan 6-20) 




Start thelqyiiuj 

Now's the time to'start your pullets 
and moulted hens to laying — and cash 
in on eggs. Moulting puts the egg 
organs out of gear. Go after these 
dormant organs with the old reliable 

Dr. Hess Poultry 
PAN-A-CE-A 

It puts the egg organs to work. 
It starts the feed the egg' way. 
It gives red combs and red wattles. 
It brings back the song and scratch and cackle. 
Pan-a-ce-a gives hens pep and makes music in the poultry 
yard. . "> 

That^M when the egg* come 

Lambert's Drug Store 

We haem a right-aim package for aotr'y Hack 



Dr.Hess Instant Louse Killer Kills Lice 







RESOLVE 

TO EAT 

THE BEST BREAD 

IN 1926 
BY USING 

THE BEST FLOUR g 

VIVO 

For Sale at All Grocers 

Hanson & Barzen Milling Co. 



■ ^ ;";."" ■ ">"•" ! , ,"HMM„_„M , M , , ;i n.„ , „ J , „ i , , , „„ , ,„:,„„„,„,, „„, :„.,;,;., Tll ^ ^ 

Call for JUN Gia ^Via^aR¥'- BRE A T> 

1 1 1 ■■■»♦♦♦ t m h i , ui - 1 ~ ■ i Ti y j n 1 1 '; r£ 






M. 



PAGE SIX 



Erickson, Aug. A, 
GHbertaon, Paul 
Gunstad, John' 



(Continued fromJPage 8) 



^^y^ ^^v^^j^ -g|p | fpK-^p'^f p; ^ 






Hazel Co-Op . Creamery 

Aaa'n j. ■ 

Halla_meck. Emery 

Haugen,' Oscar T. _ _. 

Froehllch. H. W. Dr. _ 

Hanson,! H. L. 

Hedlund. John 

Hanson • & Barzen Min- 
ing Co. _^„ 

Grain Tax, if2.79 
Johnson, Peter . 



Johnson! Dan A. - — 
Johnson David J. - 
Johnson, Otto J. J. 
Jefson, H. 



I Johnson; Bennle E. . 
! Lundber_g, John — ^ 

i Housley. Guy ___ 

j Maakrud, John 

. Nyhagen, Adolph _ 

! Norman', John 

i Odeguai*d, Ole 

i Peterson, G. B. 



Palmqulst, John Mrs. 
Roese, Clarence A. . — 

Swanson, C. A. „„ 

Sumpter 1 , T. J. 

Soderbe^s, Fred . 



j.Sigurdson, Sigrud 
Santlberg-, A, 



] Swenson, August" 

; Stephens, E. H. „_™__. 

j SJoberg,' John . , . 

i Tojstveit. Arthur 

1 VH, Arne . 
1 Wilton, 

Wj lton, 

W Iseth 

1 WHson, 

', W nton 

Co. 1 



Frank _ 
Charley 



Nichols Lumber 



15fl. 
234 

400 
480 
IDS' 
244' 



139, 
279: 
178 
231- 
203; 
172 
106 
104: 
196 
100: 
281 
932 
127, 
201! 
22U 
171 : 
430 
179 



310 



38 
214 
271 



Haugen, Gunhild Mrs. 
Petersoi}, Ole . 



D.59 
7.49 
9.97 

19.20 
21.55, 

8.43 
9.00. 
5.07 
0.70 

71.91 

0.92 
11.88 
9.03 
9.81 
10.46 
7.38 
4.73 
4.43 
20.21 
4.S0 
12.62 
45.14 
4.09 
7.42 
10.85 
6.31 
18.03 
18.43 
1.63 
13.01 
' 13.46 
2L52 
7.71 
12.91 
35.78 
1.03 
1.40 
10.91 
11.54 

12.31 

12.00 
3.00 



TOWN OF BEIKER 
Total Tax Bate Br School District... 

i Including State, County, Town or Village and 
i_.il School District Levies. 

School District No. 8, Mills 80.4 
School District No. 48, Mills 34.7 
School District No. 57, Mills 41.0 
School District No. 70, Mills 43.3 
School District No. 228, Mills 61.7 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
i 30 cents per (100) 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 

Corporation— 
Amtson, Albert . 
Aakre, Richard . 

Aakre, Elev 

Belland, Tom 

Berg. T. O. 



Value Money 
Personal - and 
Property ; Credits 



| Berg. Hulda Miss _ 

.Brekken, E. H. 

! Berg. T. O. Mrs. ______ 

| Citizens State Bank - 

; Dahlen, John 

' Erickson, John , 

! Feragen, And O. 

', Grimley, Even 

I Holen, Halvor M. . 

Hermanson, Soren __ 

! Helle. T. G. 

i Hoppy, John 



128 
123 
51 
177 



| Halvorson, Torjus 

; Iverson, Andreas 

i Johnsrud, Reinhart . 

; Johnsrud, Amt 

■ Johnson, P. O. 

: Johnsrud, Benett 

Kaa_sa, Stephen 

McEnelly. J. A. 

i McEnelly, Gay 

.' Milliander, Victor 

; Moen. Martin O. 

: Miller, John S. 

Olson. Ole A. . 



: Olson, Peder M. 

[ Quam, Clara 

; Race, Frank 

■ Race, Jerry A. „ 

; Rye, Hcniy 

i Stenvik, John J. 

: Sigurd, Emil 

i Singer, Stephen 

; Tangen, C. O. 

i Tanner, G. M. 

: Tollefson. Ellef 

i Uglem, Oliander 

; Vraa. Gilbert O. 

Vraa, Elmer O. . 

Wahlln, Carl O. 

j Grinde, Lars . 

Dahlen, Edwin G. . 



93 
48 
201 
210 



Amt 
of 
Tax 
2.07 
5.01 
5.74 
3.89 
.83 
1.28 
2.03 
3.37 
5 .54 

10.03 
1.77 

10.92 
0.14 
2.40 
0.25 
4.58 
5.07 
3.S2 
.73 
4.51 
1.40 

13.81 
1.55 
9.00 
3.12 
3.40 
5.03 
1.48 
0.14 
5.03 
■■ 5.20 
3.60 
4.23 
3.90 
2.08 

10.94 
7.50 
0.12 
5.57 
. 1.00 
3.90' 
3.82 
2.10 
7-08 
5.45 
5.10 
4.26 



CITY OF THIEF RIVER FALLS 

Total Tax Rate By Sely.nl Districts 

School District, No. 18, 109.9 MIIIb 

Name of Person, Value : Money 



Firm or Per 


sonal 






Corporation Property 


Credits 


'Tax 




14 !■ S 






18 








24 








416 




45.71 


Aasen, E. K 


Abbott, E. J 


23 








80 
400 




9.45 
43.96 




Akre, A. H 


90 




9.89 


Akre. W. H. 


41 








235 




25.83 


Aliustedt A. B 






5.82 


Amann Clothing Co. ... 


2021 


220 


288.70 




39 




4_29 


AmutidHon, Blondie Miss 


31) 




3.30 




105 


2270 




Anderson, Nels K. ... 


.1.20 




31 




3.41 


Anderson, A. G 


36 




3.94 




33 




3.03 


Anderson. N. J 


32 




3.52 


Arhurt, H. H 


132 




14.50 


Arnoson, J. S 


153 




16.80 




108 
537 






Arnold. Randolph Dr. .. 


59.02 


Austin & Elckhammer.. 


520 




57.81 


Anderson. T. P 


46 




5.0B 


Arnavig, Olivia Mrs. ... 


42 




4.02 


Barzen, Math 


833 




97.04 


Backe, Lars 


53 




5.82 


Balicock, L. A 


80 




9.4b 


Baker, John ■ 


50 




5.D0 


Baker, W. E 


31 




n.-a 


Bakke. E. B 


29 




3.11 


Barnard, W. A 


277 


• 180 


30.08 


Batemao, Stanley A. ... 


1115 


118 


122.89 


Bnrnett. J. S 


93 




10.22 


Beckcn, M. P 


54 




5.93 




253 


175 


28.33 


Benson, M. X 


09 




7.58 




81 




12.23 


Berg. A. J 


82 




0.01 


Bergxtniin, H 


30 




3.30 


Bessler. Otlo H 


4h 




5.00 


Berg. Inga 


42 




4.62 


Biddick, G. L 


116 




12.75 


Blederman, -Tacoh Dr. . 


197 


200 


22.25 


Bi9hop. J. M 


272 




20.89 


Bishop, W. A 


543 




59.08 


Berve. H. O 




372 


1.12 




537 




■ 69.02 


Bltiomqitist, C. A 


30 




3.9C 


3Iotnctni»t. J. E 


90 




10.55 




00 




6.59 




127 




13.96 


Borry. A. J 


090 


1075 


79.06 


Borry, J 


198 


395 


22.94 


Bottntn. M 


43 




■J.73 




511 


250 


56.91 




087 




75 .50 




04 




7.03 


Brokfce, T. S .... 


41 




4.51 




15 




1.65 












1323 


2930 


154.19 




57 




6.26 




29 




3.19 




51 






Brtdgeman, Russell Co. 


80 




8.79 


Bnidvick. ChrlBtine 


56 




6.10 


Brumund, H. A. T. R. 










10.34 












8.13 
2.31 


Bnnel!. R. H 


21 






49 






Bnrstad, E. P 


72 




7.91 




13 
343 








S8.03 


Booren, G. W 


609 




S5.94 


Borden, C. W 


27 






Becker. Joe 


34 




3.74 


Bitnlethlc Paving Co .. 


1500 




164.84 


Burns. M. C. 


79 






Brendecke. Fred C 


155 




17.03 


CnrlBon. C. M 


42 






Campbell. A. M 


61 : 




6.70 


Carlson, A. H 


34 






Carlson, Henry 


20 






Carlson. J. G. Dr. 


264 






farlaon, Martin 


28: 






■Carlson, Nora 


111 






Carlson. O. W 


25 






Cane J. T. Threshing 








Mach. Co 


loo : 






Chittiek. Thoi-H 


40' 






Chommle. H. O 


61 i 






Christenson, *Agnea .... 


25! 






Chrlfltenson, F. L. 


2003, 


2480 


227.56 


ChriBto, Mary 


696: 


35 


76.59 



:*■• 



THIEF RIVER FAIXSTRIJBIINE 



ChrlstoSeraon, Ctrl .... 

City Barber Shop 

Claaicn, Christine 

Clauien, Jens 

Comatock, F. L. 

Conner, Charles B. ..... 

Conner, J.. B; 

Cook, Lulu A. 

Cook, R. G 

Cosgrove, James ....... " 

Cratk, Andy 

Cronklte, John 

Croustrom, O. S. Mrs. . 

Crown, Ed 

Curran, Geo 

Curtis, J. P 

Collins, John S. 

Carlson, August 

Cerny. L. J 

CbristianBon, Edna .... 

Dahl, Anton 

Dahl. K. E 

Dahle.'S. K 

Dahlen, H. S 

Dahlow. Lina 

DcCremer, Louis 

Dickey, Benj. H 

Dillon, L. C 

Dinner. 8. M 

Dolan, E. T 

Dorn, A. H 

Dudley. F. J 



1127 
378 
172 



Davidson, John C 

Douoet, Albina 

Dfthlquist, Ben 

Eberhart, Peter 

Elde, Henry 

Eklund, Adolf 

Engen, Albert 

ErickBon, 'A' 

ErickBon, Ben ' 

Erlckson, E, O 

Erlckson, Oscar 

Erlcson, Roy ' 

Erlekson, J. B 

■ ETenson, C. M • 

Even son, Dora 

; Evenson, M. V. 

i Elsenpetor, Joe 

Fahey, L. J. 

' Farmers Exchange Eleva- 
tor Co. 
I_. f .<_. — Grain tax 

: Farmers Meat Market . 

■ Favrow, Percy 

F*errlB. Win. S 

Fisher, Frank 

Fitterman, Chas 

Fladwed, Luella V 

Fossum, Lyman -.. 

Fox, A. P 

Fredrick. Eleanor . 

French, W. R 

FrissoU, G. H. Mra 

Froehllch, H. W. Dr. . . 

Frolsness, Tallack 

Froseth, Carl 

Frosetb, Perry 

Fry, Harry .*.... 

Fuller, Herbert 

. Faller. W. B. Mrs 

Fulton, J. H 

Furan, L. L 

Furatnau, ' Wm. ........ 

FoBSum. T. A. ...; 

Froseth, Henry 

Gahrlelson A. G 

' Gage, B. E 

Gamble, Robinson Co. . 

Gnrtlands Cash Store .. 

Glefer. Peter 

Gcrlli-Ecr,- Chas 

Giibertson & Rogers ... 

Gllhiiusen, L. E 

Gothe. H. G 

Graniim. O. G 

Qran, John 

Green. Carl M 

Greene. F. P 

Grelbsteln, Emll 

Gulrud. C. C 

Giistafson, Chas 

Gnstofson, C. D. 

GustafBon C. & 8on .... 

Gnstafson. H. G ; 

Gamble. William A 

Rullf ntrsrod. John 

Graniim C. 

Haeen. H. N 

Hall. W. L 

Halvorson. G 

Hance. Flora , 

Haney. Thos. C. Dr. .. 

Hanson. Arthur F 

Hansen, C. ■!_. 

.Hanson, Esther 

Hanson. Fred . . ." 

■ Hanson, G. R 

Hanson, H. H 

Hanson, Leonard 

Hnnson, O. C 

Hanson, S. A 

■ Hanson & Barren Milling 

Co. 

Hanson & Barzen Milling 

Co.- —Grain Tax . 

Hnneon & Hogmilst ... 

Hardisty. J.- H. 

Hnrlnw. M. C .- 

Harris. N. K 

Harris. Paul 

Hautr. C. M. ....' 

HayneB, F. F 

Hetrgcn. A. M 

H.».eeli.nd. R. L 

Hellnulst, C. E 

■ Helpeth, Isaac 

Hendry. Lester D 

Hendry. J. W 

HermnnBon. .T. H 

Herman Bon, 'L. A 

Hermanson, L. I 

Herrick. F. "H 

HTron; A. Sirs 

H'cka. H. M. Mrs 

Hicks Furniture & Und. 

Cn 

Huinrd. r. g 

Hilson, Ed 

HogqiiiBt Henry 

Holbronk. M. L 

Holmherg, Aug 

Holte. T. C 

Holsknecht, Fred 

Holzknecht, Hubert ... 

Hoppa. F. A •. 

Hornseth. T. C. 

Hostvet. HJalmar 

Howe Geo, C 

Halldin; O. T 

, Halvorson, L. C 

Hamm Brewing Co 

Holmes, Dora 

Hill, Ed 

Hlnton, G. P 

Ihle. O. L 

Ireland Lnmher Yard . 

Iverson. Elling 

Jacklln, Fred 

.Taranson. E. M. 

JenBon, O. E 

Johnson. Alfred M. .... 

Johnson, Algot 

Johnson, Arthur M 

Johnson, Carl E 

Johnson. G. M 

Jnhnson, Gustle 

Johnson. Leonard 

Johnson. Lucille E 

Johnson, M. M 

JolinBon M. SI. & Sons 

Johnson, Ole 

Johnston, I,. R 

Jung. C. Herbert 

Jung's Quality Bakery 

Jung, Walter 

Joringdal, Richard .... 

Jncohson. Peter J 

JomiB, Katberlne 

Keating. P. J 

Kelly, Edwnrd 

Kilty. John F 

Klewel Products Co. . . 

Kinghorn. H. W 

Kiland. T. T. Mrs 

Kline. W. H. Mrs 

Fntrrht. W. K 

Knndaen, Bernhard .... 

Knutsnn, Clarence 

Knntsnn. Rennrd 

Kohn & Fiterman 

Kolberg. T. M. Dr. .... 

Koretad, Edward 

Korstad, Wm ; 

Kreidt. E. H. Rev. 

KrntzBchmer, Anna .... 
KrinTsherg C. Mrs. ... 

Knecks. J. H 

Kongelf. L. O 

Karwand. Edwin 

La Bree. W. J 

Lncey, E. T ; 

Laird. Reott 

Lambert. Roy 

Langlett. A. D 

Langer. Chas 

Lanjrseth. A. M 

Larson, E. L 

Larson, Carl B 

Larson, Geo. Rev. 

Lareen, L. G 

Larson. H. L 

Larson, L. H. 

Larson. Nils 

Lcavitr. Minnie S 

Lee, Ed. .V. 

Lee. Theodore 

Leevold. Tneahorg 

LelmprH. Anna . . . . ; 

Lelmei-F Goo 



277 

42. 

1981 
94 

.695 
184 
14 

1350 
21 
25 
36 
08 
OS 
138 
69 
46 
01 
38 



'79 

106 
63 
64 

802 

471 

8216 

14 

403 
32 
46 
33 
47 



62 

7P05 
1005 

87 
480 
126 



85 
440 
420 



1768 
58 
141 



25 
35 
43 

409 
«n 

150 
57, 

660 
25 

156 
56 
2181 
. 53 
40 
22 



05 
504 
206 

28 



105 

6 
2671 
270 



121 

29 
128 
42 



,,. .:,!,.. j..- 



1000 

""306 



10121 


10525 


105 




28 




11 




118 




3P2 


200 






120 


102 


«5 




8« 


455 


136 




24 




67 




88 




54 




57 




57 


Til 


35 




5 




473 




221 


1O0 


45 




140 




58 




35 




44 




29 




80 




22 





T50 
'i-M 



2000 
'4460 



1000 
'280 



124.08 
41.M 

. iaoo 

2.15 

11.21 

8.B6 

6.37 

6.04 

7.14' 

68.Q1 

26.70 

10.55 

3.06 

3_J0 

15.01 

296.01 

2.20 

3.30 

30.44 

4.62 

217.71 

13.33 

73.89 

20.22 

1.54 

155.83 

.2.31 

2.75 

8.06 

10.86 

7.47 

16.17 

0.48 

5.00 

6.70 

4.18 

7.58 

2.09 

3.03 

16.67 

9.44 

4.18 

8.24 

6.06 

1.65 

2.08 

.88 

3.40 

8.52 

30.14 

6.04 

SSI 



10.07 
0.78 
8.02 
3.10 
R.74 

43.0S 
1.32 
8.08 

12.41 
7.47 
7.03 

36.19 

51.76 

354.34 

1.54 

44.84 
8.62 
5.08 
3.03 
5.18 
3.52 
1.10 
2.06 
6.59 
6.81 
807.88 
120.82 
o 49 
0.57 

54.85 

13.85 
0.15 
5.50 

32.00 
5.00 
6.34 
0.50 

13.10 
0.78 

13.52 
438.00 
3.06 
3.83 
8.70 
6.04 
4.28 

10.22 

24.40 
4.73 
2.97 
6.70 

13.74 
4.05 
4.18 
755 

22.12 
0.70 

11.42 
5.83 



10.80 
21.44 
3.08 
151 
20.06 
12.07 
42 58 
35.83 
13.78 
7.14 
10.81 
14.05 
204 
6.26 
9.45 
5.03 
6.26 
8 30 
. 3.85 
.55 



J 05 

15.31 
37 
3P5 
4.8» 
3.10 
0.78 
2.42 
3.03 
0.47 
0.34 

48.36 

46.16 
5.00 
4.05 
6.04 
0.04 
100.17 
0.37 

15.50 
0.38 

20.72 
3.08 
4.30 
2.T3 
1.6a 
4.73 

57.00 
2.20 

20.24 
6.2h 

72.53 
2.7B 

17.1. 
6.1.1 
248.83 
5.8b 
4.40 
2.4! 
4.PD 
4.83 
3.1 h 
0.02 
235.06 
5.TT 
5.40 
8.46 

10.«* 
7.69 
3."3 
7.14 

67.44 

22.64 
308 
6.38 
6.50- 
3.08 
3.30 

12.20 
6.70 

13.08 

12.20 

17.54 

.66 

308.74 

31.41 

4.07 

828.80 

2.04 

560.87 

16.90 
3.10 

13JS2 

7«2 

. 4.1» 

35.93 
6.03 
4.20 



3548 
998 



51 
24 
131 



227 
472 
28 



1702 



117 



78 
71 
161 



76 



Lelran,; J.hn & ,.,.:,... . 32- ; 

Lfdea..OKar 29 - 

Llebennan,--Clia«. J182 

Lln^berk^ NelB 77 

Loken, HklTor 36 

LOQ.OH, jUbert ...;.....- 76 

Loken, A. A Co 405 

Lufkln. A.: B. 87 

Lund, H. P 72 

Lund, J. L. 08 

Lundell, O. 1. 34 

Lundgren, C. J 78 

Lorentson, B*red D 18 

Mc Adam., L. D 107 

McCarty, J. j 74 

McClellnnd. J. H 82 

McDanleli C. W 57 

UcFarLand, M. T 269 

McParland Auto Co. ... 1420 

McGinn, Robert 248 

McRae, C. L 32 

Matey, Perl W 150 

Mabey ft Chommle .... 894 
MauBey-Harrla Barrester " 

Co 60 

Matbeaon, A. C. 46 

Mattson, A. B 24 

Mattson Bros .2510 

Mclby. C. J. 22 .... 

Melby, Henry 483 298 

Melby, Knut 68 

Melgaard. Mra. T. L... 328 

Mellby, Dr. O. F 258 

Mertb, Rby. A. T 59 . .... 

Mlchalaky, Stanley 23 

Miller, Mra. Betay 35 

Minneapolis Bridge Co. 2236 .... 

Moe, H. A. 142 

-MoKonaen, M. B 153 300 

Molin, H-Vmau" 36 .... 

Morgan, Jobn 1052 .... 

Morgan, Hey 85 .... 

Mosletb, Oacar B 20 

Moatne, E. A. 95 

Mnlry. W. H 2110 1885 

Myhrura, P. 99 

Myrland, Bather A 32 

Myrold, Chriat 33 

Myrom, Sigurd 73 1800 

MatBon. CO 54 

Mota. Roy 10 

Burrlngarud, A. O • 2500 

Eklund, Andrew 1500 

Empire Farma Co , .... 295 

Hanson, Amanda 1865 

Hanson, Hogen 800 

Hoff, Hans O. SOO 

HostTCt, Llna 1000 

Johnson, John A 5600 

Joslln, C. A 1000 

Jobnaon, Emll- 2000 

Klemmetson, Helgei 1700 

KrlngBberg. C. H. .i. 1500 

Legrold, OIb .... 1000 

MoilBon, O. L 3100 

Myrom, Mrs. Sigurd .... — SOO 

Nesja, Ole O. 800 

Naplln, O. A 430 

N.iaon, Chas 185 .... 

Nelson, Chas 130 

Nelson, C. \V 

Kelson, B. T ; 

Kelson, George 

KclHon, H. B 

Kelson, J. B 

Kelson, Kels A 

Kelson. K. S. 

NelBon, O. H 

Kelson, Verner 

Kcss, Andrew 

Kess, Ed'. 

Kesse, Dr. J. X 

Neset. Olaf 

Kewell. H. B 

NlckolBon, Geo.."W 

Nlelnl, F. C 

to KlelBon, Niels L 

8 Korby. Bertinus O 

Northern Woodwork Co. 

Nyhorg, K 

NoronlBt, Carl 

Northern Rock Island 

Plow Co. 

Oden, A. J. 

Oen, RasmnB 

Oen Merc. Co 

Otrcrdabl, Ole 

Oftednbl, John 

O'Hara, Ed 

O'Hara Dray & Fuel Co. 

Olson, A. E 

Olson, Edwin 

Olson, Emll 4a 

Olson, Hans B 43 

Olson, J. N. ■ 51 .... 

Olson, Mrs. Kern — 21 — 

Orme. T. C 72 800 

Ostby.-Ole D 163 

Overland, E. J. 100 .... 

Overum, Mrs. Barbara . 84 .... 

Ove, Nettle, M 83 

Olaon. Alfred K. 73 

Pnrbst, O. C. 35 

Patton. F. 8 322 500 

Paulson, M. C 44 

Paulson. Oscar 37 ..:. 

Paulson, Mrs. Peter.... 20 

Pechle. E. B 21 

Pederaon. P. G 66 600 

Penney. Dr. G. A 432 380 

Penney, J. C. Co 0336 1000 

Peoples Co.-op. Store .. 740 707 

Peterson-BIddlck Co. .. 3580 500 

Peterson. C. L. Mra. ... 240 ..... 

Physicians Hospital ... 710 .... 

Poirler. Wm 30 

Polman. V. B 34 300 

Pone. L. C 142 

Porter, Christ 304 

Pratt. H. A 159 

Prlchnrd, W. W. Jr. ... K6 465 

Prlchard. W. W. Sr. ... 03 

Prlchnrd Company, The 2*22 1410 

Prots. Fred F. 40 

Protsellor. H. W 361 

Provencher, H. A 41 .... 

Provencher, Jnllan A. . 33 .... 

Provencher, J. 1870 680 

Prytz, Roy M S3 

Pyramid Oils Co. "88" 1 50 
Pyramid Oil Company 

Bulk Sta. 2700 

Pillsbury Flour Mills 

Co -. 515 .... 

Palmer School of Chiro- 
practic 500 

Quale, Tbeo 297 

Queen City Bottling 

Works : 218 

Qulnlog, Paul 38 

Ralston. J. A 364 

Itnmbeck. O. A 45 

Rnmbeck. Stone it Co. 718 

Rnmstad, Olnf Mrs 121 

Rnvson. L. M 134 

Red Lake Falls Milling 

Co 1250 

Red Lake Falls Milling 

Co. — Groin tax 

Red Lake lee Co 981 

Red Owl Store 1307 

Relerson, T. J 83 

Reliable Motor Co 659 

Reinmen. A. B. Mra. ... 14 

Rhodegaard. Halvor ... 108 

Rhodegnard. H. N. S Co 958 

Richards. E. J 89 

Rlchter. J. J 40' 

RlBberg. Axel - 46 

Roark. P. W 180 

Robarge, V. F 58 

Roberts, H. B. A 50 

Robinson, J. B 40 

Romblldt, Henry 20 

Rolland. Ellas 1350 

Rossman, C. B 33 

Roth. Emma 20 

Runne. J. w 40. 

Rustad, E. J. 24 

Rustnd, Hana 32 

Rnstebakken, S. A. .... 70 

Ryer, W. N 47 

Safford, Herbert 77 

Snlveson. S 204 

Sandberg, Rowe' Co. ... 1801 
Snndberg, Rowe Co. — Grain Tax 

Sandnes, Ole 57 

Snndnm, Herman 22 

Schuster, C. C: 74 

Semfsch, H. N. 52 

Sether. J. 82 

Shanaban, F. M ' 74 

Shaw, Daniel 178 

Shaw Posting Seryice .. 400 

Sbeedy, Wm 432 

Shetler. R. B. Mra S3 

Shirley, Chas - 123 

Sholes. C. A 35 

Silk. N. J. 162 

Slmley. Irwin T. ...... . 143 

Skog. John M 05 

Smith. Walter B. .■ 74 

Smlthera. William 122 

Snyder. H. S 109 

Soderberg, August 32 

Soderberg, Brick 34 

Sorenson, Jobn , . - 40 

Sorenson, Melford -'39 

Sortland, Aug, 19 

Srageberg, TO. 101 

Standard On Co. "SS" 

No. 17 77 

Standard OR Co. Balk 

Station 

Stebblna. F. J. 

Steen, Janes 8 

Stenbenr, Marie 

stitt. j. u ;. 



3.61 

8.1k 

852.01 ' 

12.06 
0.44 
7.80 

43.31 
0.56 
7.91 
7.47 
3.74 
8.67 
3.03 

11.76 

15.48 
9.01 
6.20* 

28.40- 
157.35 

27.26 
3_B 

27.12 

40.30 

5.60 

5.06 

2.64 

2150 282.30 
2.42 
298 63.97 
6.37 
14.07 
28.13 
- .... 6.48 

3.08 

8.85 

245.74 

16.01 

300 17.71 



115.61 

0.34 

2.20 

10.44 

237.55 

10.88 

3.62 

3.63 

12.82 

6.03 

1.70 

7.50 

4.50 

.88 

5.60 

2.40 

2.40 

3.00 

18.80 

3.00 

6.00 

6.10 

4.50 

3.00 

0.30 

2.40 

2.40 

47.02 

20.33 

15.28 

15.39 

5.60 

2.04 

14.40 

8.24 

8.45 

24.05 

51.87 

3.08 

3.00 

20.03 

38.57 

302.90 

109.16 

8.88 

18.35 

7.03 

0.04 

192.46 

2.64 

4.40 

12.8h 

9.07 

20.66 

1581.58 

3.49 

8.58 

7.S0 

10.59 

9.12 

8.35 

4.62 

4.73 

5.80 

2.31 

8.81 

17.00 

11.98 

3.74 

9.12 

8.02 

3.85 

14.01 

4.84 

4.07 

2.20 

■ 2.81 

9.05 

48.62 

1020.02 

83.72 

305.00 

20.38 

79.01 

3.30 

4.61 

15.61 

11I43 

17.47 

10.85 

1052 

314.87 

5.08 

17.69 

4.51 

3.03 

207.90 

0.12 

5.50 

296.72 



Stokko. Edward ... 

Btorholm, !c. ..- 

Storholm. Olfc Q. ... 

Rtrnnd. H. Si 

Rtrwfer. Geo.- C. ... 
Strom M. r M.'" , 



7190 

2578 

80 

45 

26 

7 

116 

75 

1003 

34 



__. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUAEY 6," 1926. 





64.95 


600 


34.44 




23.96 




4.18 




1802 




4.95 




78.01 


3620 


24.16 




14.73 


800 


142.02 




3.15 


435 


109.11 


75 


121.89 


4600 


22 02 


300 


73.32 




1.54 




11.85 




111.28 




9.78 




4.40 


180 


5.00 




10.78 




6.37 




5-50 




4.40 




2.20 




148.35 




3.03 




2.20 




4.40 




2J74 




s.sa 




7.6U 




5.17 




8.40 








20052 




1.71 


500 


7.70 




2.42 




8.13 




5.71 


1100 


10.17 




8.13 




10.50 




43.00 




47.48 




3.63 




13.52 


3000 


12.85 




10.7m 




16.72 


500 


11.04 




8.13 


6347 


32.45 




I1J1S 




3.52 




3.74 




4.40 




4.2« 




2.09 


100 


11.40 


.... 


8.46 




790.18 


211 


283.30 




8.79 




4.95 




2.86 




.77 


141 


13.18 




854 


1900 


115 92 




3.74 




3.96 



Strubeek, Joe .../...,.. 260 

Strnpp, A. Mm. ........ 45 

SucfcBtorf, Lena Mrs. .. 55 ' 

Bnlllvan, B, D. 66 

Sundahl, K. A. 35 

Sawnson, Albert '. 7s 

_5warti; Chas. .. ._ 17 

BwedeDbcrgr, Axel V?i Dr. 582 

Swift & Co. j.... goo 

Syverson, NeU 43 

8c*mBter, Ben .,..- io 

Tallakson, S. L. Rev. ,, 108 

Tandberg, Jnlla 27 

Tandberg-, Theodore ... ■ 17 

Tarrant, N. W 52 

Taea, T. A 20 

Teasuin, Gynther ..,,.. 79 

Teaium, Olal 66 

TesHam & Co 1644 

TeBBum & Co. Grain Tar 

Thill. Gertrud 36 

T. R. Palls Co-Op. 

Cream. ABs'n 2290 

Thief River Grocery Co. 12010 

Thief River Iron Worka 2077 

Thief River MubIc Co. . 2400 
T. R. V. Co-Op Poultry 

ARB'n 893 

Thompson, "Walter 624 

Thoreson, A. W 00 

Thronaon, T. M 89 

Toma, J. C 119 

Traver. E. D ■ 55 

The Tribune Printing- 
Co. 1548 

Twete, L. R. Dr J29 

Thief River Clinic 452 

Umlnnd. Bert P 77 

Union Plumbing Co 331 

Vandred, Welford 29 

Vistaunet, P. L 345 

VnrnchPk. J. J ' 21 

Votava, Joe 40 

Waldorf, N. B 48 

Walker, Bert Mrs 42 

Wangenstein, A. A. & Son 1056 

Ward, GaBton 55 

Ward, John 46 

Warner. Charles 35 

Warner, Wm. E 29 

Wassgren, John A. .. . 30 

Wedee, Paul J.- 134 

Weeks, R. 58 

Wengler, John 52 

Werstlein, Geo. W 90 

White Eagle Oil * Refin- 
ing Co 2840 

Will, Fred 12 

Williams, Geo 820 

Williams. Oscar 196 

Wilson. Geo. M ' 90 

Wilson, H. W 35' 

Winger, Olaf G 717 

Wlnton-Kichols Lbr. Co. 00 

Wlnton-Nichols Lbr. Co. 2059 

Wold, Mrs. Elisabeth .. 23 

Yotter, J. 77 

Yager, Val ,.-,... 42 

Zassier. Wm 187 

Znvorai, Joe 121 

Zeh. E. T 1239 

Zeh, Delia B 67 

Zeh, Phil J ; . 94 

Zellmer, A. E 792 ' 

Peterson, Joseph 

Rlndal, And. J 

SuckBtorf, G. W .... 

Tliune, Peter 

Turner, P. P 



8000 


37.56 




6.06 




6.0, 




7_&i 




3.83 1 




8.67 


.... 


1.87 




63.96 


1500 


47.36 




4.73 




1.7b 


100 


12.17 




2D7 




1.87 




3.71' 




2.20 




8.69 




7.2b 


0020 


202.54 




3.80 




3:i» 




215.61 


43720 


1451.06 




228.26: 




263.77 




98.14 




57.60 




0_5k 




9.7b 




13:09 




6.0. 




170.12 




14.10 


4000 


63.47 


.... 


8.43 




38.38 




3.10 




37.02 


180 


2.79 




4.40 




5.28 


1000 


7.02 




116.04 




6.04 




5.06 




3.85 




3.19 




8.30 


800 


17.13 




0.37 




5.71 




9.89 




312.12 




1.32 


2000 


98.12 




21.54 




9.89 




3.85 




78.80 


2920 


15.35 


13917 


388.94 




2.53 


280 


0.30 




4.02 




20.55 




13.30 


237 


136.87 


1000 


10.36 




10.34 




87.04 


600 


1.80 


7000 


21.00 


1300 


3.90 


7600 


- 22.80 


1000 


3.00 



.TOWN OF SAXDERS 
Total Tax Rate Br School Districts 
School District No. 73, 41.8 MillB. 
School District No. 106, 45.6 Mills. 
School District No. 135, 48.7 Mills. 
School DlBtrict No. 149, 44.9 Mills. 
School DlBtrict So". 100, 51.4 Mills. 
School DlBtrict No. 194, 50.3 Mills. 



Assessed 

Name of Person, Valne Money 

Firm or Personal and 

Corporation Property Credits 

Anton, Hans S 616 .... 

Anderson, Aug-. N. K. 170 

Anderson, J. A 485 .... 

Anderson, Theo. G 201 .... 

Anderson, A. T. .... 

Anderson, Geo. and Alex 257 .... 

Anderson, Carl B. .... 07 .... 

Api-el. Peter 149 .... 

Bakke, Gilbert 191 

Borgen, C. G 109 

Brandnid. Mrs. Severine 85 .... 
Bmndvold, Hjalmer and 

John 163 .... 

BredeBen, B. A. 128 

Carlson, C. Aug. 223 800 

Dahlstrom, Alfred 151 .... 

Duffy. J. A 20 

Drake, Milo 104 

Fromm, John 06 

Hohner, William 231 .... 

JnblinBki, B. H 78 .... 

Jncohson. A. V 169 500 

Je'nsen, Car] ' 115 ...-. 

Johnson, Ivaf 89 .... 

Johnson, Gust 333 .... 

Rlnppenback, Wm S3 

Kllen, P. M. 239 

Krause, Mai 181 .... 

Larson. O. L 203 

Larson. Ole 205 .... 

Lockretn. A. K 113 .... 

Lind, Albert W 204 

Maland, Ot.O. :... 201 

■Meyer, Fred 89 .... 

Meyer, Henry 126 .... 

Morten son. Andrew .... 143 .... 

Mosbeck, John MrB 317 .... 

Mogen, T. 420 .... 

Newman, Elner & 

William ...i\ 154 .... 

Ness, Peter N 02 .... 

Ness, S. H 36 .... 

Olscn, Hans 176 .... 

Olson, Bros « , . . 168 

Olson, Alfred 216 

Olson, John 422 .... 

Olson. Arthur 38 .... 

Ortloff, Herman 299 .... 

OrtloiT, Andrew L. 256 .... 

Patton, J. V. 327 

Peterson, Nels'f 380 ■ 

Peterson, 'Oscar ■ 456, .... 

Riston, Henry and 

William \ ■ 93 

Rosette, R. S 93 

Rux. David D 187 .... 

Rux, Fred E 457 .... 

Sevre, Albert 151 

Sevre, O. K. 422 

Seavcrson, John 368 .... 

Swenson, Enock 192 .... 

Swnnaon, C. H 306 250 

Swanson, Herman T. ... 104 800 
Swanson, Geo. and 

Richard 413 .... 

SwanBon, Enno 30 .... 

Thorstad, Bert N 199 .... 

Thoratad, J. M 133 

Wilo. K. Mrs -.. 222 

Wold, Adolf 178 

Yonke, Will ^139 

Yonke, E. A 1215 600 

Anderson, H. P /.... 2500 

Anderson, Eric. E .... 600 

Carlson, Waif red '.... 700 

Erlckson, Andrew ,'. 600 



$25-75 
7.63 

22.12 
9.03 
.46 

13.21 
3.44 
6. 69 
9.64 
4.97 
3.82 



6.5S 

13.62 

6.89 

.91 

5.35 

4.03 

9.60 

3.50 

10.19 

5.60 

4.57 

15.18 

4.17 

12.02 

7.57 

10.43 

15.16 

5.07 

10.49 

10.33 

4.48 

6.34 



7.90 
8.45 
9.70 
18.95 
1.95 
13.04 
ll.ffi 
14.91 
17.60 
20.7V 



4.78 

8£3 
20. « 

6.89 
10.24 
16.52 

9.87 
10.14 

6,13 



8.32 
6.6U 
9.28 
9J5 
6.B9 
12.31 
7.50 
1.50 
2.10 
1.80 



TOWN OF SMILEY 
Totnl Tax Rate By School Districts 
School District No. 4, MIUb 47.6 
School District No. 26, MIUb 41.3 
School DlBtrict No. 30, Mills 40.1 
School DlBtrict No. 31, Mills 41. 
School District No. 51, MIUb 40.8 
, School District No. 221, Mills 47. 



> Assessed 

Name of Person, Value 

Firm or Personal 

Corporation Property 

Angel Ellas $ 62 

Allen Freeman 68 

AntonBon, Birger 65 

Anderson, Oscar M 208 

Anderson, J. W. 35 

Anfinson, Ole T 00 

Beerbower, Fred 411 

Brekke, Carrie 13 

Brckke, Annie 41 

Baker, Nick 209 

Benson, Carl 62 

Beiswinger, Carl 885 - 

BolBtad, Ole 70' 

Bolstad, Olaf 15 

BilBtad. Henry 89' 

Barstad, A. M. 85 

BJorke, Tbeo 223 

Burtness, Nels 148 

Conely Denis 4 

Cittxerir_8tnte Bank 115 

Culklns, P. W. 128 

Dahl, J. A.. Mrs 102. 

Dahl, Alven 30 

Erickson. Tollef 93 

Epsen; Nels 63 

Frederickson, Hani .... 127 

Gostafcon, G. O. ...,.,. 66 

Gilbertsqn, Carl . 99. 

Gnllingsrnd, B. O , 49 

Gnstafson, GnBt 67 

Hammer, B. B iqs 

Hardisty, F. J. 527 

Helgoland and Bkall ., 50 

Helgeland, Ole 418 

Helgerson. Martin 82 

Iverson, T. 8 8 



Money 




and 


Tntnl 


Credits 


Tax 


.... S 


2.54 




3.20 




2050 




8.50 


1700 


6.53 


100 


312 




10.97 




JS3 




1.68 




S_3S 




2.91 




15.79 




2.87 




.62 




3.66 




3.41 




8.84 




5.91 




J6 




5.48 




5.02 




4.79 




1.60 




4_!7 




2.58 




5.97 




8J0 




4.04 




2.02 


.... 


1115 

ties 




21.61 


■ ■ . 


109 




16.76 




3.35 


300 


i_a 



.^'■•■- ' :■ ' ' : >:' "'^ ' v '^->- '■■■ " : ~ ^'■^h^M^^ dM'^^s&^l^,^: ^ 



Johnson, N. E. 288 

Johnson, P. B. lib - 

JobffBon, L. E. '. _ 107 

Kvenlog, Anne ..,-. 37 

Kvalheim, Iver 190 

Lee, Lewis , 100 

Larson, Krlst 464 

Lokken, Martin 3 

Lindeboja, Walter 145 

Lanback, S. W 216 

McCrum, W. E 176 

Networth, Agnes . 168 

Ness, Albert- 40 

Nelson, L. A. 88 

Nelaon, Johnnie 33 

Nelaon, John S 69 

Nelson, S. 8 76 

Nelson, Peter '- 34 

Nelson & BolBtad 40 

Nordahl, Gertrude 22 

Newton, A. B 317 

Nelson, Geo, W 60 

Olson, Mike 201 

Olson, Carl 60 

OmundBon, Oscar 173 

Pederson, Christian .... 37. 

Peterson, Anton 220' 

Peterson, O. J 275 

Pederson, Ole M. 328 

SanderB, TboB 233 

Seeland, Wear IB 

StenBeth, LowIb, 330 

Skjerping, Carl 77 

Skjerping Tobias ...... 133 

Skjerping', Alfred 44 

Sturre, J. B 26 

Snettlng, Henry B 36 

Snetting, Olaf 75 

Shamway, M. G 233 

Solhelm. Knut 214 

Solomonson, J. E 193 

Stene, Tobias 515 

Syverson, Dan 170 

Thune, Emil 23 

Thune, Peter 49 

Toomcy, C. H 224 

Tbeige, J. M 61 

Turnwall, J. D. 139 

ValBvIk, O. J 83 

Vigen, E. 96 

Wlebe. H. A 230 

Weckworth, Owen ICO 

Wiken, Halvor 147 

Winer, Casper -301 

Welner, James 99 

Erlckson, Ulrick 

Gustafson, S. O 

Lofthus, KrlBt 

Magnuson, J. F. .... 



.•a/ 



300 
400 
700 
10O 



7.75 

4.10 . 
19,tK 
.1* 

090 
10.28 

8.88 

0.85 

1.84 

4.1. 

1.57 

3.6S 

3.19 

2.35 

1.88 



0.45 
2.3o 
0.94 
1.5S 



13.45 
9JS5 
.89 

15.03 
3.16 
5.45 
1.89 
1.22 
1.G9 
3.53 

11.00 
8.68 
7.8r 
4.7S 
7.18 
, .95 
' 5.30 
8.98. 
3.05 
5.74 
3.95 
4.57 

10.81 ' 
7.62 
0.01 

14.33 

4.71 

.90 



AflBessed 






Value 


Money 




Personal 






Property 


Credits 


Tar 


3127 


.... f 


5.12 


134 




5.40 



TOWN OF SILVERTON. 

lotal Tax Bate By Krlwol Districts 
School DlBtrict No. 28, Mills 42 
School District No. 30, Mills 40.1 
School District No. 42, Mills 45.7 
School District No. 53, MIUb 405 
School District No. 55, Mills 55.9 



Name of Person, 

Firm or 
Corporation 
Auderson, Anton 
Baner, Jobn ... 

Berggren, 1 Gust 175 

Boerger, Aug 217 

Bresney, Andro 305 

Brazney, John 100 

Brnzney, Pete 80 

Burdick, Fred 66 

Burrlngrud, Nels 298 

Carlson. Andrew 52 

Chrlstofferson, Nels .. 87. 

Cuiiucll, G. W 1CS 

Danda, Anton 131 

Fnlstad, Halvor 427 

Forthun, .Anton 25 

Grinde, Ole E 350 

Gordon, A. P 248 

Hanson & paraen Milling 

Co 17G0 

Hanson & Barzen Milling 

Co. — Grain Tax 

Forthun, Ole 230 

Hanson, Henry 178 

Hanson, Lars 303 

Hanson, Syvert 317 

Hergrenes, John 293 

Heleron, Edw. 235 

Homme, Ole 292 

Hniby, Ludvik 50 

Janda, W. J 214 

Kosojed, Anton 70 

Lerol,,0. K 117 

Let hob, J(-ns 312 

LIstol, Halvor 62 

Lund, B. T.' 216 

McCormick, Thos 28 

McMnhan 39 

Molstad, Albert 74 

Nellson. M 99 

North & -Silverton Horse 

Co ISO 

Omundson. Peder 286 

Ose, Ole T S53 

Ottum, Ole 146 

Panek, Stanley 113 

Peterson,' P. A 200 

Reller, J. B 213 

Rued, H. P 842 

Sennum, Geo 89 

Sorlom. P. O. .., 182 

Snndt, John A 193 

Svobodny, Frank 2.79 

Swanson, Victor. J 97 

Toplnka. JoBeph 14 

WooIboo, Harry ......... 347 



7.1.8 
3.22 
3.U9 

12.01 
2.3S 
3.9S- 
C77 
7.32 

19.43 
1.40 

21.r>5 

13.86 

Stf.10 



7.4S 

4.84 
13.31 
12.31 
10.74 
11.77 

2.02 

8.» 

3.91 

4.91 
13.10 

2.4* 

9.87 

l.'JO 

1.57 
2.9S 
3.9* . 

5.48 

11.47 

10.73 
6.1S 
6.32 
9.14 
8.54 

13.78 
4.07 
8.32 
8.82 

15.60 
4.43 
.56 

14.57 



n 



TOWN OF STAB 

Total Tax Rate lly School Dltitrlcts 
School District No. 5, MIUb 57.7 
School District No. 14, Mills 51.1 
School District No. 56, Mills 46.7 
School District No. 59, Mills 40.8 
School District No. 65, Mills 70. 

Name of Person, Value . Money 

Firm or Personal and 

Corporation Property Credits 

Anderson, M. J. .... S 156 .... $ 

Anderson, Fred 189 .... 

Bortsad, O. P 227 .... 

Bye. John 259 .... 

Bakken. Alvln 109 .... 

Coan, John T. Jr. 118 .... 

DanielBon, Knut 39 .... 

Danlelson, Berget 71 . ... 

Dahlen, H. A 72 

Elg, C. O. 263 

Ekwall, C. J 138 

Eldelbes, John 76 .... 

Fort. Anton .131 .... 

Fjeld, Hans H 269 

Folkedahl, Gurlne 77 

Hoffman, J. V 134 .... 

Hanson, Gilbert G 1&3 

Hyland Theodore 10 

Hovet, Tallcf 130 

Iverson, Gustav 234 

Iverson, Oust A ...'. 80 .... 

Johnsrud, Ole 207 .... . 

Jnhnsrnd, Cornelius .... 61 .... 

Johnson, Ltidvig 122 .... 

Kotrba., Martin 120 .... 

Kompen, G. A 195 .... 

Kompolien, Olnf 147 .... 

Kolstrand. Pete 199 .... 

Lokken, Ole S 198- .... 

Larson. F. Mrs 125 

Lien, Ole K. 13 

Larson. N. P 63 -.... 

Loyland. T. 77 ' .... 

Meyer. Nick * 101 . 

Mandernd. Gilbert 82 

Nestebo. Thorhjor 85 

Neorhns. Ole 60 .... 

Omlld, Olnf 275 

OlBon. G. G 109 .... 

Omlld. Salve 45 450 

Prestegaard, Severt ... 220 .... 

Parnow, O. E 152 

Ramsey. LoniB 7 6000 

Roysland, B HO 

RamBey. Elling 246 .... 

Royslnnd. Knut 73 .... 

BnoBch. John' 137 .... 

Srnsky. Frank 2ft.*. .... 

Skaaren. K. ..." 333 4550 

Solberg, Hans 140 .... 

SnndsdahL Henry 60 .... 

Sinlestnd. E 321 

Svare, Melvin 84 ..... 

Siebert, John 18S 

Tommerdahl. Oliver ... 115 

Tharaldson. Ole 119 .... 

Trontvedt. Ole N 167 .... 

Woldcn, K. H. Mrs 09 

Zavoral, Robert 143 

Larson, Ole 400 

TOWN OF WYANDOTTE. 
Total Tax Rate Hr Si-bool »l__trlrts 

School District No. 6. Mills 42.8. 
School District No. 35. Mnii 49.4 
School District No. 125. Mills 40:5 
School District No. 148. Mills 43.5 
Assessed 

Name of Person, Value ' Money 

Firm or Personal and 
Corporation Property Creditt 

Alb In. John ? 62 * 1000 «| 

Bergdahl. Torge O. ... 9 .... 

Brnirtreman, Henry .... 211 .... 

Berglond, Jobn 37 .... 

Berg. Martin H. 250 

Bowers,' J. T 535 

Bennett- Frank 104 .... _ 

Clark, Wm. T. 215 .... 

Orison. C F. 2*17 

Enderle. Hpnnr .T 171 .... 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Total 
Tar 
6.3d 

s.ra 

10.GO 

14.P4 

11. W 
4.81 
LOW 
3.0S 
3.6B 

10.7& 
6.44 
3.10 
5.34 

10.08 
3.03 
5.47 
6_21 
.58 
6.04 

10.a3 
4.3-.* 
9.07 
2.K> 
6_24 
4.0»t 
7.94 
6.00 

13.H3 



.66. 
4.41 
4.44 

802 
5.74 
3.97 
2.56 
12.R4 
5.09 



18.40 
6.X5 

10.04 
4.21 
7.90 
8.3R 

27.24 
5.71 
3.4H 

18.52 



6.0S 
9.64 
3-1W 
5. S3 
1.20 



Total 

Tnx 

5.51 

.30 

n.m 

1.50 

10.12 
23.27 
451 

8.71 
10 ?Z 
6.9A 



-s; i: .^„i 




•s TK* sgj; 






¥f*3a£=^ 



W 



VEDNESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1926. 



THIEF RTVER FALLS TRIBUNE ' 



Kipnaon, Louis 

Reason, Ed. .' 

FtQBtad, Holnier 

Vihr t Geo. & Leo 

Gerardy, Jobui 

Hulvoraon, Thuodore . 

HUffD60n, OIc ' 

' Helgenon, Alfred 

Hinaoa. Ni*ils 

Hpddelson. .1. K 

Hinson, 0. M. ' 

H»Ua, A. D. ..' 

Hiugen, David' 

«te n - Om-art 

Huffman. Johni 

Hanson. Sum .L 

Jasperaon, William .. 
Jofgenaon. .Tithn C. .. 
Kennedy. Sannu-1 

Kolaeth. I*t?ti>r ., 

KtJlHeth i: SumuDlsoii 

Larson. .1. n. .1 

Lqrlngor. E. «, , 

■Mqonen. Henry, 

Kt'lson. Iti.hori > 

Olson, Tht'tnlnre 

Peterson. E. A. i 

Peterson. Martin J. ... 

Peterson. John E 

Peterson. Anton 

Peterson, F. W. 

Rolstad. r. A 

Bnlstail, Alfred 

■Rockwell. Hoy 

Sehnnek Math J 

Suter. Henry .. : 

Schroeder, 
Saniutdsoif. 



13^ 
1CS 



Wilson. 



Otto : . . 
Charle: 
Isaac .. . . 



3.K1 

: 2.27 

S.SU 

7.0i 

S..1S 

5.58 

"LIS 

•2.70 

1. -s 

S.fitl 

ll.S? 

O.SO 

13.71 

14.3t» 

l.ltt 

-t.ili 

7.G0 

3.13 

0.15 

, 3.44 

- D.OD 

3.73 

11.00 

ij.on 

3.00 
l.ie 
ii. tm 

10.2.T 
11, tw 

S.IH 
1.42 
1.4*1 

13.57 

10. IH 

'U.-I8 

.(15 

i:t.4» 



Wllaon, O. B 

Wllacn. G, "A. , 

Bodln, Andrew 

EvenBon, Maria N. ... 
Nilfion, Andrew ■. 



3000 
800 
1080 



VILLAGE OF GOODRIDOE 
Total Tax Kute By School DlitrlotM 

School District No. 8, MlUa 141.2 
Aaaeflsed 

Value Money 
Personal ■ and 
Property Credits 
.. $1129 « — 



11.08 

. 10.81 
0.00 
2.40 
3.24 



Name of Parson, 
Firm or 
Corporation 
Auderson. Sever .... 

Bundhund, Nick _ 

QrJilgumiui & llussell ... 3U 

Christ tanson, Carl 44 

Christ inusoti H. & Son . 1302 

Chrlstianson. Halvor ... 50 

Edneth, Carl 60 

liuiiKeness, -Joi? " iu 

Gt)»dridKP Farmer'6 Mill 

& Elevator Co 2800 

Gpodriil^e Farmer's Mill 

i Elevator Co. — Grain Tax .. 

Gimderson. Gilbert 54 

OHIiertsmi. Thcu 27 

GoodrldRe Mercantile Co. 2420 

Gulmd, G. C. , 10 

floodrldye Co-Op Creamery 

Asb'u 410 

Halvorson, Albert no 

Huiiflim A- Rarzen Milling 

„ Co - ••'•• ■ 1740 

Hanson & Banen Milling 

Co.— Grain Tax 

JohnRon, George .12 

Jeimon. ,T. P HI 

Kirklle. O. S *.. 44 

Li nd stroni, C. P 273 



100 $ 159.71 
2.97 
. 4^4 
8.21 
107.78 
7.01 
10.04 
2.56 

410.80 

13.50 
7.(12 
4.11 
3W.22 
1.41 

57.89 



8.65 
7.52 
8.01 



McDonald, B. H. .; 

Mandt .- 

North American Creamery 
Co * 

Olson. Owen 

Payne. Jay 

Rod. Hans I 

He/mn, Oliver 

Stephenson, M. J. 

Stephenson, Chas 0. ... 

Bunduulst, John ....... ' 

Standard OH Co 

'Fvedt, P. O 

Tellcfaon, Henry 

Thoreaon. M. G 

TcRsiim Company 

Winton, Nichols Lumber 
Co 1 

Tvedt. A. C. & Son 

Hoppe, John ....' 

Hock ne, H. B 

Wold. George 

Farmers Elevator & Mill- 
ing Co 



38 
108 
240 
181 
-68 
768 
876 
101 
102 



200 
1329 
500 
100 
2000 



4.2-i 
1.41 

0.07 

lff.35 

33.8U 

25.50 

0.00 

107.03 

137.81 

1450 

.27.41 

^11.30 

22.50 

121.61 

3.08 
1.50 



PAGE SEVEN 



VILLAGE OF ST. II I LAI RE. 
Total Tim Knte ny School District. 
School DIst. 102; Mills 121.4 
Asses Bed 
Value 
Personal 
Property 
.. S 166 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation 

Allen. H. R 

llnkko, Geo 

llenolt, N 

Bergh. V, E. ... 

BJork. M. E 

Bohlen, .7. H. .. 
Brink. V. G. . 
Burkee, E. O. . 



28 



Money 




and 




Credits 


Tax 


.... | 


20.15 


500 


4.00 




0.08 


100 


144.70 




11.78 




33.09 




33.20 




5.71 



Carpenter, h, I , 

Chelln. H; Estate 

Corbet. W 

'Dotal, J. C. \,, 

Dann, P. B. 

DuChnrme. T. P , 

Emerson-Brand Ingham 

Machine Co 

Erlckson Bros , 

Erickson, Ed 

Fellman, G. I 

Fellman & Highland ... 

Pricker/ &I ..., 

Farmers State Bank ... 

Glmtad. K. O ;.,. 

Grlmsrud, C. M 

Gunstad, O. .-. 

Hall. A. P 

Hanson, J. A. ...1 

HanBon, H. P. ../ 

Hange. Oscar 

Hed. A. J 

Hendrlckson. ,Elhsa .... 

HofT, S. M. 

Hogstrom. P. 

H'llnis, E 

Hooper. G. W 

Huff, O. R 

I. O. O. F. Lodge 

Jackdon, H. O 

Jackaon, M. H 

Kolstntl. K. A 

Lnekore, Elizabeth 

■ Lanton Bros 

Loherg, L. A 

Nash. Albert 

Nnsh. Ole .., 

Neitzel, 
Nelson. 



184 
120 
IB 
45 
131 
05 

40 

48 

20 

100 

146 

43 

1410 

67 

38 

106 

65 

306 

38 

137 

100 

53 



300. 
7500 



Ernest 
A. F. 



510 
41 



• : crn tttt 1 ^^ * , MiSs Ruth R °y left Sunday for 

1 ; ol; HiLAIKE J her school east of Hazel, after spend- 

^r- 1 ; . . $ ing the holiday season at her parental 

. .... _,i home. 

rC if ! ^ nts . Victorious. Mi ss Esther Hovet, returned Mon- 

On. Tuesday evening the city basket day to Blackduck, to resume her 

riJTh^ ^k th D . ¥^ le d 1 uties ^ instructress in the schools 

Giants clashed with the Red Lake there. She was accompanied by 

Falls Independents on the local floor, Mrs. Harvey Aubol, who will visit 



-U 



20.81 
37.07 
1.82 
5.46 
15.00 
11.53 



2.43 

12.87 

17.72 

052 

171.00 

8.13 

4.01 

23.80 

7.80 

37.10 

4.61 

10.63 

. 14.00 

' 0.43 

2.55 

3.40 

4.01 

24.77 

22.23 

7.IH 

4.2ft 

8.S.J3 

s.fta 

0.43 
215.00 
7.10 
1.94 
8.5(i 
02.52 
4.08 



Mrs. 



Nelson, K. A. Estate 

Nyland, Hans 

Odeguard, A. A 

Olson, A. Mrs 

Olsen, Win 

Patterson, A. L. 
/Porter, J. D. .. 
Red Lake Palls Milling 

Red Lake" 'Fails' 'Milling 

Co. —Grain Tax ....".. 

OlBon/ H. A 

Northern States Power 

Co 

Roy. J. 8 

Roy, Paul 

Sandberg, Roe Elevator 

Co. .. ; ;.... 

Sandberg, Roe Elevator 

Co. — Grain Tax • 

Mtterberg, A. "... 
nverson, A 

Slmonson, P 

Singer Sewing Macta Co. 

Skatrud, T. M 

Standard Oil Co 

St. Hllalre Co. Cream 

Ass'n 

St. Hllalre Lumber Co.. 

Sundbolm, E, 

Werner, O. 8. Dr. 

tVJlBon, H 

Wllaon. L. S 

HallBrtom, P. A 

Lnrson. A. J. Mrs 

Nelson. C. B ^.. 

Satterberg, F ' 

Swanson, Peter ■ 

Pearson, Sam 

Merchants State Bant .. 



2128 
73 
7 



18 

65 

1207 

615 
2509 
7S0 
300 



2000 
1900 
300 
050 



1000 
3000 ' 
500 
1000 
1300 
1000 



264.34 
a 80 

.80. 
1.7* 
13.47 

5.93 
5.69 

138.82 

5.59 
41.CS 



0.05 
37.14 
10.92 
2.55 
2.10 
7.S9 
140. 77 



05.59 
38.37 
19.30 
72.48 
3.00 
0.00 
1.50 
3.00 
3.00 
3.00 
330.92 



Uoth the teams put up a good game 
■which proved exciting from start to 
finish. The filial score was 13-5 for 
the locals' favor. The line up for the 
locals was— Myles Jackson, Knute 
Odegaard, G.;orge Wilson, Nels Nel- 
son, Norman Holmes and Clifford 
JBilden. 



' New Year Wake. 

On Thursday evening, December 
31st, a New Year Wake social was 
held in the basement of the Norwe- 
gian Lutheran church. During the 
first part of the evening a program 
•was given consisting of the following 
numbers : 
Christmas Carol— Led by "Andy" 

.Dahl, 
Heading— Mrs. •. E. Jenson. 
Piano Solo — Myrtle Gigstad 
Song — Men's Quartette. 
Reading— Blanche Hoff. 
Song — Luther League Choir 
Piano Duet— Agnes * and Marie 

Grimsrud . j 

After the program a social 
consisting of games and contests 
was enjoyed. Refreshments were 
served by Mesdames Siminson, 
Grimsrud, and Misses Francis and 
.Esther Hovet. At 12 o'clock the New 
Year was summoned in by the sound- 
ing I of the church bell. The doxology 
■was; sung by the audience after which 
a happy new year was extended to 
all. ; ■ , 



hour 



Y. P. S. Held. 

"On Friday evening the Y. P. society 
of the Swedish I Lutheran church held 
a meeting at the Rev. Nelson home. 
A short program was first given and 
the remainder of the evening was 
spent in games and contests. 



If- 



Hans Rude of Thief, River Falls, 
was; a business! caller in this village 
Wednesday. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. L.' Han- 
son,: a baby girl Wednesday evening. 

Mr. Nels Nelson returned to St. 
Peter Saturday! to resume his work 
at the Gustavus Adolphus college, af- 
ter spending the holidays at his par- 
ental home. I 

Miss Gudrun: Grimsrud, returned 
Saturday to Glydon, where she is 
employed in the schools, after 
spending the holidays at the home of 
her iparents. j 

Miss Alice Flicker, who has spent 
the holidays at jthe home of her par- 
«nts[ returned to St.Cloud Saturday, 
to resume her duties in the library at 
the State Teacher's College. 

Miss Gretchen Glasgow, who has 
.spent the past week as a guest at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. T. Ducharme 
left Sunday for! her home at Barnes- 
-rillef 

Gordon Martzand Donald Patter- 
son who have spent the past weeks 
withl relatives and friends, returned 
to Minneapolis Sunday to. resume 
theirj work at the University. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Burkee and 
Mr. and Mr-s. Arthur Hanson were 
Thief Biver Falls shoppers Saturday. 

Miss Lucille Blaska, who has spent 
the holidays as a guest at the M. 
Flicker home, left Wednesday eve- 
ning I for her home at Anoka. 

Stanley Olsen, who has spent the 
holidays in this village at the home 
of his parents, ileft Friday for Fort 
Rice j to resume; his duties as in- 
structor in the i school there. 

Miss Effie Fredrickson arrived in 
this iVillage Thursday, after spending 
a wdek visiting: with relatives and 
friends at Virginia, 

Miss Agnes Grimsrud, who has 
spenp the past two weeks at her home 
returned to Moorhead Monday, t re- 
sume] her duties' at Concordia college 

Misses Gunhild Nelson and Mable 
Anderson, who have spent Christmas 
vacation as guests at the home of 
theirj parents, left Monday for Moor- 
head; to resume! their work at! the 
State Teachers college. 

Mips Hulda Gigstad who has spent 
the past two weeks at her home, re- 
turned to Moorhead Saturday to re- 
sume her duties} as instructress !in the 
school there. j ! 

: Mr. and Mrs. ;Oscar Borgie and 
daughter Pearl ; Elaine of Grand 
Forks, autoed to this village Sunday 
to spend the day visiting at the E. 
Peterson home. ; 

"Andy" Dahli left Monday for 
Moorhead, to resume his worjs at the 
State Teachers' : college, after spend- 
ing the holidays' at his home. : 

Erwin Reiersgord returned Sunday 
evening to this village t resume his 
duties as instructor in the! local 
school, after spending the holidays at 
his home at Ulen. 

The following teachers returned 
Monday, to this! village to resume 
their' duties as instructors in the local 
school: Lillian Ecklof, Cokota,, Ben- 
dikka Hagen, Fargo; Leta Bennett, 
Breckinridge; Rnby Susag, Glenwood; 
Cecelia Bartholet, Bird Island. I 



with relatives at Cass Lake. 

George Wilson left Monday for 
Crookston, where he. will attend the 
Agricultural school. 

Miss Laura Siminson, who has 
spent the holidays at her parental 
home, returned Sunday evening to 
Minneapolis, where: she is employed. 
Harvey Aubol left Sunday evening 
for Minneapolis, where he will take 
up 3, short course in butter-making 
at the University. 

Among the Thief River Falls 
shoppers, Thursday' were Alice and 
Hazel Fricker, Clarine Nelson and 
Nels Nelson. 

Mrs. Bert Pierson and daughter 
Birdie of Thief River Falls, came 
Wednesday evening to spend a few 
days at the Ordin Olson home, 

Mrs. Mary Sherva left Wednesday 
for Duluth where she will spend the 
winter months visiting with relatives 
and friends. Before returning, Mrs. 
Sherva will visit with friends at Min- 
neapolis at Brainard. 

Misses Olive Aaland and Berniee 
Erickson of Thief River Falls visited 
with friends in this village Friday. 

Ferdie Fredrickson, who has been 
employed at Virginia, Clara Schultze 
and Suzanne Brink,. of Thief Rivei 
Falls, spent New Year's day at the 
Victor Brink home.: Miss Schultze 
will leave in a short time for Glen- 
wood. 

Knute Odegaard left Sunday for 
his school at Wanke, after spending 
the holiday season at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Gullickson and 
children spent New Years' day with 
relatives and friends at Middle River. 

Ordean Olson returned Wednesday 
after spending a few days with 
friends at Thief River Falls. 

Harvey and Henry du Catheleaneau 
returned Monday to Willraar, where 
they are employed. They have spent 
the holidays at the home of their 
mother, Mrs..L. Catheleaneau. 

Miss Pearl Siminson returned Mon- 
day to Bemidji, where she attends 
the State Teacher's College. 



Legal Publications 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 
SALE 

NOTICE rs HEREBY GIVEN, That de- 
fault has occurred In the conditions of that 
certain mortgage, dated the third day of 
March 1919 executed by Bessie Scheld 
(formerly Bessie Babcock) and Joseph 
Scheld, her husband, as mortgagors, to 
Citizens. State Bank of Thief Blver FallB, 
as mortcagee, filed for record In the office 
of the Register of Deeds in and for Pen- 
nington County, State of Minnesota, on the 
31st day of July 1919, at eight o'clock and 
no minutes A. M.. and recorded in Book la 
of Mortgage Records, on page 490 thereof 
and on the 2flth day of September, 1919 Bala 
mortcuce was duly assigned by said 
[ mortgngee to Helen L. Purdy, Lake City 
Minn., that, pursuant to a provision of said 
mortgage, said mortgagee has elected to 
declare the whole debt secured thereby to 
be now due and payable; that there 1b due 
and payable, at the date of this notice, 
upon the debt Becured by said mortgage, 
the sum of Eight Hundred and no-100 
(?S00.00) Dollare. and that no action or I 
proceeding at law or otherwise baB Deeu 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default having been made In the naj 
ment of the sum of One Thousand Nine 
Hundred Thirty-two and 08-100 DoIIara 
which is claimed to be- due and 1b due at 
th.« date of this notice' upon a certain 
Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by 
Thorn M. Thorson and Clara Thoreon. his 
w } i %iu? l ? r XH aB0T ^ ,. to Ctti«M" state Bank 
of Thief River FalU (a corporation under 
the laws of the State of Minnesota). 
Mortgagee, bearing date the 14th day of 
January. 1920. and with a power of sale 
therein contained, daly recorded in the 
o/rire of the Register of Deeds In and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
, M j£ HC8 ° ta ' oa taB 20th &*y of January. 
1920. at 8:00 o'clock A. M., In Book 54 of 
Mortgages, on page 001, and no action or 
proceedings having been instltntert, at law 
or otherwise, io recover the debt secured 
b ^,5.'U rt Mortgage or any part thereof. 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE I S 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by -virtue of the 
power of sale contained In said Mortgage 
and pursuant to the statute in such case 
made and provided, the said Mortgage wtll 
be foreclosed by a sale of the premises de- 
scribed In and conveyed by said Mortgage, 
Vis: 

„ -.„.„«„,« uao ueen ,„, Lota numbered Nine (0), Ten (10) and 

instituted to recover said debt or any parr „; e a^.i (1 ^ i I i J E? helb /' 8 » R ^ ar ,? ncMn( ' nt 
thereof; that, by virtne of a oower of sale ? f SnUw'a Addition to Fairfield, accord- 
therein contained, said mortgage will be K^& ^mS"!*"^^ ?S ? le a ? d « of r™^ 1 
foreclosed and the land and preintoeTthere! !- A* _°S« £.?£ R . e ^I ter P f P«^ 



In described, lying and being in the Coun 
ty of Pennington, State" of Minnesota, de 
scribed us follows, to wit: The Northwest 
Quarter (NWfc) of Section Twenty-nve 
(2j) in Township One Hundred Fifty-three 
(153) North, of Range Thirty-nine (30) 
West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, con- 
taining 160 acres, more or less, according 
to the Government survey thereof, will be 
sold at public auction to the highes; bidder 
for cash by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
Connty, at the Front door of the Court 
House, In the city of Thief River FallB In 
the County of Pennington. State of Minne- 
sota, on the 11th day of March 1926;at ten 
o clock In the forenoon, to pay and Batisly 
££? ^f'l 6 secured by said mortgage. 
•Twenty-five Dollars attorney's fees therein 
provided for, and the costa and disnurse- 
ments allowed by law upon Bnch fore- 
closure and sale. 
Dated December 14th, 1925. 

HELEN L. PHRDY.. 
JOHN C. DECODRCY. Mortgagee. 

Attorney for Mortgagee. 

{ Dec. 23*30. Jan. 6-13-20-27)) 



STEINER 



Mrs. Bert Drealand visited at the J. 
Whitman home Tuesday. 

Carrie Austinson visited with Mrs. 
Solem, Tuesday afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Meyers and chil- 
dren, Mr. and Mrs. Copp and children 
and Mr. and Mrs. E. Roger and 
daughter visited at the R. Werner 
home Thursday evening. 

The Anton house on the Fuller and 
Anton place, was destroyed by fire 
Monday evening. 

Funeral services were held for Mrs. 
J. Swanson Wednesday afternoon. 

Nat Muzzy was a business caller 
in Thief River Falls; Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Art Simonson were 
business callers in Thief River Falls 
Wednesday. 

Rene Warner was a caller in Holt 
Monday. 

Everybody who attended the party 
at Russell's Monday, reported a good 
time. 

Judith Christenson of Thief River 
^Hs, visited a few days at' the G. 
Haugen home. 

Mrs. Bert Deraland returned to 
her home in Wylie after spending 2 
weeks at the Warring home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Muzzy and chil- 
dren visited at the L. Meyer home 
Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Rogers and daugh- 
ter, Pessie, visited at the Art Simon- 
son home Friday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Art Simonson visited 
at the Berg home Saturday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat Muzzy and chil- 
dren and Mr. and Mrs. Art Simonson 
;d at the A. EnppTecht home on 
Sunday. 

m.* 1 ^""* 1Irs - A* K °f? ] in visited at 
the Warring home Sunday. 

Mr. and. Mrs. Maleberg and family 
visited at the Kelberg'.s home Sunday 
evening. J 

Melvin Simonson, Felmoure Male- 
?t rff « and "Rayrnond Muzzy visited at 
the Saugen home Sunday. 

t Mrs. Louie Meyers and children 
visited at the J. Witman home Sun- 
day. . 

Goodridge Creamery Meeting. - 

The annual meeting of the .Good- 
ridge Co-operative Creamery Associ- 
ation will be held atthe Goodridge 
school house Saturday, Jan. 23, 1926 
at 1:00 o'clock p. m. sharp. The 
presence of all stockholders, patrons 
and their wives is desired. ' 

An amendment, to' article 6 f the 
Articles of Incorporation will be con- 
sidered by which the; terms of the 
Directors would not all expire ' at 
once. We expect Mr. (Leonard Houske 
to be with us at this' meeting. 

A light lunch will he served after 
the meeting. ; 

OTIS E. RONKEN, Sec'y. 42-2 



and for the Connty of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota and lving and being 
In said Pennington County and State of 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments and ap- 
purtenances: which Bale will be made by 
the Sheriff of said Pennington Connty at 
the front door of the Court House, in the 
City of Thief River Falls In said County 
and State, on tho 15th day of January, 
102n. at 10:00 o'clock A. M., nf that day, at 
public vendue, to the highest bidder for 
cash, to pay said debt of $1932.08, and In- 
terest, and the taxes. If any, on Bald 
premlBeB, and- Fifty Dollars, Attorney's 
fees, as stipulated In and by said Mortgage 
In citne <>f foreclosure, and the disburse- 
ments allowed by law; subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from the 
day of sale, ja provided "by law. ' 
~ " " ~ '*?Psr 3 Bt. A. D. 1925; 



Dated DecemB.. . 

CiTTZRN^ STATE BANK OF 
THD3F RIVER FALLS, 

Mortgagee. 
By A. J. VEIGEL, 
Commissioner of Banks of 
rhp State of Minnesota. 
H. O. CHOMMTB, 
Attorney for Mortgngee, 
Thief River Falls. Minnesota. 
(D-2-9-16-23-30-J-C) 



obdeb lihjtzng ttme to filb 
claimsTand fob bearing 

THEREON. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
COUNTY OF PENNINGTON— bb. 
IN PROBATE COURT 

m^'dX" "" Eaeat<! ■" A ™* 

Letters of Administration this day hay. 
ta ? h«n srantod to Joaef Moravec 

SSSL,S. U Qreditors "' "» "ho" nanwo 
decedent may present claims against her 

by Is limited to six months from and at- 
iSL"!, e ' ,at 2 lMr »": ""d that Tuesday, the 
15th day of June. 1926, at 10:00 o'clock A. 
M.. In the Probate Court Booms at the 
Court House at the City of Thlaf River 
Falls. In snld County, be. and the same 
hereby Is, fired and appointed as the time 
and place for hearing upon and the ex- 
amlnatlon. adjustment and allowance of 
such claims as shall be presented withm 
(he time aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the publi- 
cation of this order In the Thief Blver 
Falls Tribune aa provided by law. 

Dated December 11th, 1923. 
(COURT SEAL) 

LABS BACKB 

„ . Judge of Probate Court. 

PERL W. MABBY and 

H. (5. CHOMMIB, Attorneys, 

Thief River Falls. Minnesota. 

(Dec. 23-30-Jan. 6.) 



1.58 
1.S4 
1.52 
1.20 



LOCAL MARKETS 

GRAIN 

Wheat, dark northern .... 

Wehat No. 1 

Wheat No. 2 : 

.Durum, No. 1 iti ,^ 

Flax, per bu 2.26 

Barley, per bu 

Oats per bu... ;:„. 

Rye, per bu 

Buckwheat per 100 lbs 

Flour and Feed 

Flour, pen cwt 

Oil Meal 

Bran 

Shorts 



NOTICE OF BEAL KSTATJS MOBTGAGE 
>u- u «r.» ^OBECLOSOBE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagors in the conditions and cov- 
enants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Gustaf Edw/n Wah- 
Hn and I Anna Wahlln, his wife, mortgagorB 
to the State of Minnesota, mortgasee SW 
Lnfi d £<M the aBt t,ay oi September: 1923. 
and, with a power of sale therein con- 
talneji, duly riled for record in the office Sf 
the BegU«r of Deeds In and for the Coun- 
on ?L S2r n if n S ton a H State of Minnesota, 
«i„i,V be ? 5 , th , d,, ? r . ot Se Ptember, 1923, at 
eight o'clock thirty minutes A. M.. and 
duly recorded therein in Book "77" "f 
Mortgages, on page 18 thereof; 
i„ A A D WHEKEAS. Said default consists 
in the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual Installments of amortized 
Prfm-ipn. and Interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty^Sve Dollars ($125.00). 
W ,?, L '^ b ^ au \. e te ond P aval >ie on the 21st 
day of March. 1925, and the 21st day of 
September. 1925. in accordance with • the 
»£?£ ^- nd c ?nj l «ons of said mortgage, 
wl, *M , ix d S5l? It has continued to to Is date- 
f„ A » D WHEREAS, By reason of Baid de- 
i ai1 ? Pursuant to the terms and con- 
hl ?»» L 8ai & mort eage and as authorized 
«n i ^',* tbe . D »V pa X tnient oC llur a' Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage, baB exercised and doeB hereby 
exercise Us option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan securea 

forthwltl? l ° be d " e aild pn ^ abIe 

AND WHEREAS, There 1b actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
o„ y .', at . tl Vi ,late of tn,s n o««. by reason of 
Mia election, the sum of Three Thousand 

ln * e H iJ."^ ed S1 *teen Dollars and eighty 
cents (13.016.80). unamortized principal, 
together with Interest thereon from the 
21st day of*Bepteinber, 1925, at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (5%) per centum per 
a S> n £ tn A, aild Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 
(S250.00) amortized principal and Interest 
SL th *. , S. te J e V M . on ?1250 ° thereof from 
March 21 B t. 1925, at seven (7) per centum 
per annum, and Interest on $125.00 thereof 
trom September 21st. 1925, at Beven (7) per 
centum per annum. In all the sum of Foui 
Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-Beven 
D »l"™ ^."^ Bl *tr-aeven cents ($4,227.67) : 

, A u D .J VH ^? FAS * B ' refl8on « mM de- 
rail! t. the said power of sale contained In 
aald mortgage has become and is operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
Instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured bv said mortgage or any 
part thereof: 

NOW, THEREFORE. Notice is hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of Bale 
contained In said mortgage, and pursuant 
,J* statute In .such case made ana pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described In and 

and'befng^ t^e^oZt^fponSn^oo^n? «»«»« '" ■«« mortgage, and pnrsnam 

State s o" ' Mnneaota to-wlt- E d ' t0 the Btatute iin 8DCh «» made and pro. 

oraie or .Minnesota, to-wlt. rirle( j i the 8nI(J mortBa(re wm be forec ] 0Be( j 

by a sale of the premises described In and 
conveyed by snld mnrtjragel sltnate. lying 
and being in the Connty of Pennington and 
Stat. 1 of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Southeast Quarter (SEU> of Sec- 
tion TwePty!B,-»ven (27). Township One 
Hundred Fifty-four (1B41* North of 
Range Thirty-nine (39) West, contain- 
ing 160 nereB, more or less, according 
to the Government Snrvey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale win he made by the Sheriff of 
snld Pennlncton Connty. at the front door 
of the Conrt House In the City of Thief 
River Falls, in "Bald Coontyand State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day. of February. 1926, 
at eleven o'clock A. M. of that day. at pub- 
lic vendue to the highest bidder for cash, 
to nay nnd satisfy the debt then due on 
said mortjragei and the taxes, if any. on 
said premises. [ and the" costs and expenses 
allowed, by law: subject to redemption at 
any time within one yeat from the date 
of pale, as provided hy law. 
Dated Decpmher 22nd. 1025. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
„ - - . ' Mortgagee. 

By Department of Rural Credit. 
0LE .°-5 A0BNG - Chairman. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 
flWAW Secretary. ' 

fT.TFFORT) L. HILTON, 
Attorney General. 

i.rmvro gttltjIckson. 

Assistant 'Attorney General. . 
Attorneys for i Mortgagee. 
«10 Hnmm Bntldlng. 
St PauL Mlnneaota. 

(Dee 2S-S0 An. C-1S-20-27) 



NOTICE OP BEAL ESTATE MOBTGAOE 
FOBECLOSDBE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default bas been mude by 
the mortgagors In the conditions nnd cov-, 
ennnts of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by George Monroe Tan- 
ner and Lizzie Tanner, hla wife, mortgag- 
ors, to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, 
bearing date the 22nd day of August, 1924, 
and, with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly filed for record in the office of .the 
Register of Deeds In and for the Connty 
of Pennington and State of Minnesota on 
tbe 25th day of August. 1924, at eight 
o'clock A. M., and duly recorded therein in 
Book "77" of Mortgagee, on page 260 
thereof; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
in the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual installments of amortized 
principal and Interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-five Dollars ($125.00), 
which became due and payable on the 22nd 
day of February, 1925, and the 22nd day 
of August, 1925, In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of said mortgage, 
which default has continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorized 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage, bas exercised and doea hereby 
exercise Its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan necurua 
by said mortgage to be dne and payable 
forthwith - 

AND WHEREAS, There is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured there; 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason nf 
said election, the Bum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred Fifty-nine Dollars and for- 
ty-eight cents ($3,959.48). unamortized, 
principal, together *wlth Interest thereon 
from tbe 22nd day of AnguBt. 1025, at the 
rate of five and one-fourth (5%) per cent- 
um per annum, and Two Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($250.00) amortized principal and 
Interes't. with! interest on $125.00 thereof 
from February 22nd, 1925, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, and Interest on $125.0u 
thereof from August 22nd, 1925. at Beven 
(7) per centum per annnm, in all the sum 
of Four Thousand. Two Hundred Eighty- 
eight Dollars and ninety-six cents 
($4,288.96) : I 

AND WHEREAS. By reason of said de- 
fault, tbe Bald power of sale contained in 
said mortgngeihaa become and Is operative, 
and no action! or proceeding having been 
instituted at law or . otherwise to recover 
the debt Becured by said mortgage or any 
part thereof: I 

NOW. THEREFORE. Notice Is hereby 
given, that by ; virtue of the power of sale 
contained Mn_ said mortgage, and pnrsnanr 



lesota. to-wlt: 
The Northwest Quarter (NW«) of 
Section Seventeen (17). In Township 
One Hundred Flfty-fonr (154l North, 
of Rnngp Thirty-nine (39) West, ron- 
tainlng 160 acres, more or less, accord- 
ing to tbe Government Survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
sold Pennington County, at the front door 
of the Court House in the City nf Thief 
River Falls, In said Connty and State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day of February, 1920 
at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, at public 
vendue to the highest bidder » for cash, 
to njty and satisfy tbe debt then due on 
said mortgage, and the taxes. If any. on 
said premises, and the costs and expenses 
allowed by law: subject to redemption nt 
any time within one year from the date 
of sale, as provided by law. 
Dated December 22nd, 1925. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
„ „ Mortgagee, 

. By Department of Rnral Credit. 
OLE O. RAOENG. Chairman. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 

(SEAL) Secre,ary - , 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 
Attorney General. 
LTTDVIO GULLICKSON. 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
*H0 Hamm Building, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. ' 

(Dec 23-30 Jan. 8-13-20-27) 

The Tribune has a ; first class job 
department. Bring ns your work 






MOBTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That de- 
fault haB been made in the conditions of a 
mortgage executed by ElmefoKEolp and 
Mnry Kolp, hlB wife. Mortgagorsafo C. L fc 
Hansen, Mortgagee, dated the IsTaay of 
November, 1922, and recorded in the office 
of the Register of Deeds of Pennington 
Comity. Minnesota, on the 16th day of 
November. 1922, at 1:30 o'colck P. M., in 
Book 51 of Mortgages on Page 205 there- 
of; that on the 18th day of November, 1922, 
said mortgage was assigned by the said C. 
L. Hansen, Mortgagee, to The United 
Danish Societies of America, a corporation 
organized and existing under and by vir- 
tue of the Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 
and the Deed of Assignment recorded on 
the 15th day of December. 1922, at 9 o'clock 
A. M., in the office of the Register of Deeds 
of Pennington County, Minnesota, In Book 
65 of Mortgages on Page 200 thereof; thai 
such default consists in tbe failure to pay 
the sum of One Hundred Eighty ($180.00) 
Dollars Interest, which fell due on the note 
which said mortgage was given to Becnre 
on the 1st day or November. 1924, and a 
further payment of interest which fell due 
on eaid note on the 1st day of November, 
1925, and that tbe holder of said mortgage 
haB elected to declare and hereby doeB de- 
clare nil of the principal and accrued In- 
terest on said note and said mortgage to 
be due and payable according to the terms 
and stipulations thereof: that the amount 
claimed to be due and which Is due on said 
mortgage at this date. 1b the sum of Three 
Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-five and 
34-100 ($3395.34), Dollars. 

That the premises described in- and 
covered by said mortgage are situated in 
Pennington Connty. Minnesota, and are 
descrlhr-d as follows: Tbe Northeast Quar- 
ter (NEU) of Section Thirty (30). In 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North of Range Forty-two (42) West of 
the Fifth Princinal Meridian in Minnesota, 
containing One Hundred Sixty (100) acres, 
more or less, according to the United States 
Government Survey thereof. 

That by virtue of the power of sate con- 
tained In said mortgage and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, said mortgage will be foreclosed by 
the sale of said premises, at public vendue, 
to the highest bidder for' cashv-'by tbe 
Sheriff of Pennington County, Minnesota, 
at the East front door of the Pennington 
County Court House in tbe City of Thief 
River Falls. Pennington- Connty. Minne- 
sota, on Saturday, the flth day of February. 
1926.- at .ten o'clock A. M. of that day, to 
BaHsfy the amount then due on said mort- 
gage, together with the costs of such sale," 
and Seventy-five Dollars Attorney's fees 
stipulated In snld mortgace. 
Dated December 17. 1:125. 

THE UNITED DANISH SOCIETIES 
OF AMERICA, 

By THEO. QUALE. 
It's Attorney 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
THEO. QUALE. 

Attorney for Assignee of Mortgagee, 
Thief River Falls. Minnesota 

(Dec. 23-30 Jan. 0-13-20-27.) 



Poultry 

Hens, heavy 

Hens, light - . 

Heavy Springs 

Leghorn Springs 

Old Roosters 

Ducks , 

Geese 



.46 

.31 

.89 

1.25 

5.20 
2.75 
1.40 
1.40 

.20 
.11 
.20 
.10 
.07 
. .12 
.10 

.26 

.40 
.51 



PRODUCE 

Eggs, No. 1 

CREAMERY 

Cream, per qt. , 

Butter, per lb , 

WOOL AND HIDES 

Wool ™„_i , .32 

Wool *„. .36. and .37 

Cow Hides .07 

GRASS SEEDS 

Timothy, steady ? 4.20 to ?4.75 

Timothy and Alsike, mixed, 

weak $4.00 to ?4.75 

Sweet Clover W. B. weaker $3.00 to 
Sweet Clover, W. B. 

weaker _._. $3.00 to $5.00 

Sweet Clover, yel steady 3.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady.... $20 to $24. 
Mammoth Clover steady ....$20. to 24. 

Alrrike Clover, firm $16. to $18. 

Common Alfalfa, weak 16.00 

Grimm, Alfalfa, weak ....$20 to $25.00 
Cert. Grimm, firm 35.00 



I IHUMH II IIMH I II II IM 

I % We Want ;; 

| HIDES AND FURS :: 

I Northern Trading Co. ; : 

M M I H M I ! I M M » H M M M 




Young Pine Lod&re No. 221 
T. O O V 

Moet* «r«y Tueeday night at 8i0« 



THEO- QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice la All Courts and B«- 

, fore U. S. Land Office 

McGinn Building 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Surges? mm4 

the Diseases of Women and 

Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bid*. 

Phones: 
Office 128. Residence M. 



SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 405 Knigfrt Ave, N. 
* Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Pfcanes: 
Hospital & Office, 850. Res,, 488-J 

A. W. Swedenbnrs;, Ph. G, M. D, 
Physician and Surgeon 

Special attention Ear, Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses. 

BONA R. SWEDENBURG, R. N. 

Supt, Hospital and Anaestiietiea. 



Northern Lodge No. 236 
A. F.&A.M. 

Stated Communications 
Flrrt and Third Thursday. 



AUTO REPAIR AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMITfflNG 
Expert Work Guaranteed 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED EHB ALMaTB 
AND UNDERTAIBB 



Lama Furniture Ceafaar 
Tll«f Btret Falla 



Ph«M (1 



Mgki Oaa 141 



"IIMI I II I I I J IHIH 



DR. C. M. HAUG 
Dentist 

Office Over First & Peoples 

State Bank 

Telephone No. 14 



i i i im it iii i n i iii ii nn 



THIEF RIVER CLINIC 

DR. O. 9. MELLBT 

Kjrt, Bar, Now and Throa* 

DR. H. W. FBOEBUCH 

anrgwy and Obatetrki 

. OFFICE 

C1TIZENS~BANK BUILDING 







: -" : j^i§|#.- 



PAGEElgM 



r?n*fr-*; 



, ■ •=.,',«■ , .11..- ^..y, 1 . 1 ! " 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



PROPOSED DITCH 
TO RAISE LEVE 
OF MAPLE LAKE 



Hearing on Petition to 
Held at Crookston 
Soon. 



Be 



Benefits to Be Derived 

Greatly Exceed Cost, 

Report. 



A hearing on a petition for a ditch 
designed to raise the level of Maple 
Lakt; and give drainage! to the low 
country between Alaple jand Badger 
lakes will be heard in Crookston, be- 
fore Judgs William Watts, according 
to information received here. The 
report of County Engineer Steener 
Steeuerson who has appointed some 
time ago by Judge Watts to make a 
survey already. has been turned in. 

The estimated cost of the ditch 
petitiond for by interested owners is 
$14,392. The length of thi ditch pro- 
posed is about four miles. Consider- 
able opposition to the pre ject is ex- 
pected to develop at the hearing, ac- 
cording to reports. 

The survey shows that ■ he surface 
water elevation of Badge* lake is 
1172.5 feet above sea level and Maple 
lake elevation is 1163.5 and that the 
elevation of the crest at the outlet of 
Maple lake is 1166. I 

The flow of water along proposed 
Judicial Ditch No. 73 wouhjl be regu- 
lated by three dams having head 
gates or some other controlling de* 
vice. Location of the damsjwould be, 
one at the north end of Badger lake 
at its outlet into Badger Greek, one 
at the narrows which is just south of 
the point where the railroad crosses 
Badger lake, and the other dam at 
the outlet to Maple lake, known as 
Polk County Ditch No. 14. 1 

"Control of these lake levels will be 
of benefit to property holders along 
Badger creek, as both Badger and 
Maple lakes will act as ijeservoirs 
for flood waters, but more especially 
Maple lake on account of its larger 
size and higher and steeped banks," 
declares Engineer Steenerson. 

Badger creek, with a drainage area 
of 42 or 43 sections, is said to be in- 
adequate to take care of sudden flood, 
and several years ago a drainage pro- 
ject for the relief of Badger creek 
drainage territory was proposed. The 
excavation for this proposed relief is 
declared by Engineer Steene rson to 
be more than twice as much is neces- 
sary for the more recently proposed 
ditch which will, he says, practically 
serve the same purpose besides re- 
claiming lands along the ditch which 
now have no drainage' or very poor 
drainage into Badger lake. * 

Maple lake was declared in the sur- 
vey t be the most practical outlet 
for all the low land along the 'pro- 
posed ditch between Badger and 
Maple lakes and: the low lanes would 
therefore be benefitted by' reason of 
this improvement. 

Raising of the water in Maole lake 
two and one-half 'feet above tie pres- 
ent level would benefit owners of pro- 
perty around Maple lake, besides im- 
proving public health bv introducing 
fresh water into the lake, a ^cording 
to the survey report, -which a so stat- 
ed that no damage to the oi.tlet of 
Maole lake would result fr )m the 
change. 
Tf is prouosed to level off the snoil 
so that 
occuny 



to lower the water surface at-' this 
part reclaiming the low and marshy 
shores' of the lake here. ■; 

■ Depth of the proposed ditch would* 
be from 3 to ll/Ajet, .with the Bhal-j 
lowest: parts near-: Maple lake. The' 
fall would be 1 foot 4 inches to the! 
mile, f"' "'"•' '' *■■ : 



Bredeson New President 
; of City Council 



banks on the orqposed ditrh 
lands which the sdoiI banks 
rnn ho farmed. Excavated material 



from tlie d'tch would be used 



to build 



up and widen roads where the pro- 
posed 'i>tch fallows the road ; nd per- 
i^n^t croscinrrs wr.uld he pit in. 

CHh°r Ipnds benefited bv, tie pro- 
pose) ditrh. according to the survey 



rpn^rt. \vo"1d bp landc abuHirur 



tt-at nnvt of TtodTPr bite 



uth of 



flio railroad tracks, as it is proposed 



(Continued from page one.) 
present incumbents, they all being 
eligible for re-appointment. 

Applicants are: Jfred T. Scanlon, 
city attorney; Dr. J. T. Bowers, for 
city physician and health officer; 
John Holmgrin and Martin H. Owen, 
caring for the incinerator; E, O. 
Erickson," Andrew Smith, Gunder Lee, 
John Malafa and E. 0. Mostue, jani- 
tor of ,the auditorium; Thos. Moe, E. 
J. Bakken and J. Burrell, street com- 
missioner; Theo. Lee, driver of the 
fire truck, Mrs. A. Erickson, 305 
Bridge: street, matron of the poor 
farm. " 

Announcement was made by the 
city attorney of the payment in full 
of the $8,000 on deposit in the Citi- 
zens State bank when it closed two 
years ago, five tenths of the sdm be- 
ing paid by Rasih'iis.'Oen, three tenths 
by Christ Granum and two tenths' by 
Anton Langseth. 

A communication from L. P. Wolf 
asking for tha settlement- of his bill 
of $1,692.50 in connection with the 
building of the filtration, plant three 
years ago, was read to 'the council, 
and the bill rejected. 

Six milk licenses were granted to 
P. Jacobson, F. B. Conklln, John 
Hedlund. Gust Erickson, Ole R. Rev- 
dahl and A. Myrum. 

Seven dance permits were favor- 
ably acted upon. by ^the. new council, 
these being granted to the following 
for one or more dances during Janu- 
ary or 'February: Woodmen of the 
World, Daughters of Norway lodge, 
Yeomen, Odd Fellows, H. S. Snyder, 
John Malafa and the Night Hawks. 

Mayor W. W. Prichard, Jr., in his 
remarks took ocassion to highly com- 
pliment the old council for their ex- 
cellent service claiming that "their 
record wQl go down in onr city's 
history as being one of the foremost 
in economical administration.'' The 
mayor added, "They have at the 
same time accomplished much in the 
matter of improvements and better 
living conditions." 

The "mayor, however, made the fol- 
lowing recommendations: 

"I fail to find a curfew ordinance of 
record. 

■Sections of the ordinance pertain- 
ing to water connections beyond what 
is termed the curb box should be con- 
sidered.- 

"The i compiling in booklet form of 
the present ordinances should be con- 
sidered. 1 

"The; payment of city employees 
should be bi-monthly, on the first and 
fifteenth days. 

"Installation of modern turbines at 
the water power plant should be con- 
sidered. 

"Any. inequalities in the charge for 
light current should be adjusted. 
t "I predict for the new administra- 
tion the most, perfect harmony, and a 
term which will be devoted to the 
sen-ice of the tax-paying public, and 
assure you' now that ip ail measures, 
pertaining to be the beet interests of 
the city, you will have my most loyal 
support' V the mayor said in closing 
his remarks. 



Alfalfa ^ PayJ^Sfigaher 




-i — rrr7*WrWn • • •" 

, y .i : .: ? ^i V \ : i;. if •;!>.: -. ,. . 



WEDNESDAY! JANUARY 6, 1926. 



Prbyericher to Join'Tour 
;■ to New Orleans -Jan! '.'24" 

Julien Provencher, local hotel pro- 
prietor, expects to leave Thief River 
Falls with a carload of friends on the 
morning of January 24, . joining the 
tourists from Winnipe'g; ' A ' number! 
of cars will leave the Canadian city 
early January 23, and will spend that 
night in Thief River Falls, according 
to Mr. Provencher. 

Graveling of the Jefferson Highway 
was recently completed all the way to 
Winnipeg, and it is the intention of 
the northern tourists making the trip 
to show souther people that it is pos- 
sible for Northerners to visit the 
South in the winter time as it is for 
Southerners to tour the North in the 
summer time. 

The trip to New Orleans and return 
will require 28 days. 



Scouting 



vvY McCURDY 
Managing editor f the . 
Tribune, who will speak 
morrow. 



Winnipeg 
here to' 



By lieorge J. Johnson 
Deputy Scout juecuuve Uisi.. No 8. 
I un January. 1st. iheloiiowing ramus 
haa been attained by the tmryt-two 
bcouvs in Troop 3, registered at the 
8; Second class, 11; tixsi class, 4: 
Merit, 8; Star 1. 



..CLASSIFIED COLUMN 

FOR- SALE— Fordson Tractor: and 
^vHow and cedar posts and poles. W. 
E. Baker. 27-tf 



F 0R ,jSALE— Buidr Touring Car. six 
■_ cylinder, -in good order. Joseph Vor- 
Jickv, 107 Kneale Aye S. Thief River 
Falls.' -.;... - 8t 



FOR SALE — Bourbon Red Turkey 
Toms and single comb Rhode Is- 
land Reds cockerels. Mrs. Albert 
Johnson, Route 3, Thief River Falls. 
2-t-p. 



FOR SALE— pure bred Holstein 

bulls. Two big enough for service. 

Two ten months old. Will sell cheap 

if taken at once. C. Weiner, Route 3, 

41-P-3 



Thief River Falls Women 
on State Club Committees 



The name'of Mjs. Julian Proven- 
cher. of- this city as a member of the 
committee ..on the Division of Prob- 
lems of Delinquency, and that of 
Mrs. J. M. Bishop as chairman of the 
Division of Co-operation with War 
Veterans, appear in the directory of 
the Minnesota Federation of Wo- 
man's clubs published by that organ- 
ization recently. 

This year's directory is entirely 
different from any^ver issued by the 
Federation. It carries the list of 
clubs of the state, county organiza- 
tions, state officers, department 
chairmen, and committee chairmen 
and members, but omits officer" and 
chairmen reports. -v. . 

The Club has 1,000 more members 
this year than last, the directory 
showing a total at this time of -50,- 
918 members and 718 clubs. 



Rev. Geo. Larsons Leave. 

Rev. and Mrs. George Larson., and 
children leave tomorrow (Thursday) 
for Fairdale, N. D., where they will 
make their home, Rev. Larson having 
accepted a call to the Lutheran 
church -of that city. Mr. Larson 
served the local Zion church and 
three neighboring congregations for 

> last 10 years. He delivered h:s- 
farewell sermons in tne Goodridge 
and Norden churches Sunday, Decem- 
ber 20 and at Rosewood on Christmas 
day. 

The Larsons have . made many 
friends during their stay here who 
regret to see them, leave. Rev. Au- 
gust Bredeson has been named tem- 
porary pastor here. 




Our Duty to the Public 



IT is our rcsponsibili ;_ , _ 
believe, to furnish courte- 
ous and rcliahlo sen-ice 
lowest possible cost 
public. 

To do this,' we vise , 
toent of (he most improved 
typo consistent with jiroper 
economy and reasonablp ser- 
vice recfiurcmenta.''. / m> 

'-'■ We J also aim to pay! such 
wages as will maintain aiorce 



y, 

ou . 
at the 
o the 



_$quip- 



of carefully selected, ade- 
quately trained and happy 
employees. 

Moreover, we must earn a 
fair return on the value of 
our property. Only by doing 
so can we expect to attract- ; 
ctrQin investors the money re- 
quired u> extend our p!trattb" ;i 
meet the growing demands of 
the public for service. 



By Serving our employee* and investors fairlyy 
we are also serving the public wdL Their inter- 
ests ate the same.1 



Northwestern Bell 




Telephone Company i 



I. O. O. F. to Install 

Officers Friday Night 

The installation of officers of Riv- 
erside Encampment. No. 22, I. O, ; Q. 
F., will take place on Friday,. Jai^ 
uary 8, 1926, at 8 p.m. sharp. The 
installation will be conducted by Dis- 
trict Deputy Grand Patriarch Val'B. 
Chapin of, Roseau. 

The consolidation of Valley • Enr 
campment No. 9 of Red Lake Falls 
with_Eiverside Encampment No. 22 
of this city, which has been under 
consideration for some time, will also 
take place. The Patriarchal degree 
will be conferred on five candidates. 
Delegations from Red Lake P>Ilsi 
Warroad and Stephen are expected 
and possibly some of the Grand oraf 
cers. AH 1 members are urged to-afc 
tend. Refreshments wijl be served 
and a big time is promised. 

Miss Hulda. Fossun, who spent . a 
two "weeks vacation | n 'this city as 
the guest qf ffieprjq and. relatives, 
left Monday evening for Brainerd, 
where she will resume her duties as 
instructress in the school.' 



E. L. Helgeland left Monday morn- 
ing for St., Boniface, Man,, where^Jie 
will resume his duties as manager 
of the Kiewel Products Co. house. 



FOR SALE — 3-burner gasoline stove 
$5. A practically . new 12-gauge 
Winchester pump gun ?22. New 
violin and case $16. Good 17-23 Ford 
radiator $5. James Havel, 407 Arn- 
old Ave. So., C[ty. tf 



FOR SALE— Gumwood dresser, 

Biffells Carpet sweeper, Lloyd loom 

baby cart with "top, white wicker 



Several of the second class scouts SK e 3jH* G .£ d «? i ?. writ ? n8r 
tve nearly completed al« of th* ™>- i e *\. Med s "f e > ^f electric sewing 
machine, cabinet style. Mrs. F. C. Ni- 
clar, 603 Arnold Ave. N. 



have nearly completed all of the re- 
quirements for tne nrst class ranks, 
ihe Star scout rank will be attained 
soon by several of the Merit scouts. 
The next Court of Honor will be held 
during February a which time a re- 
port of those attaining the ranks of 
nrst, mem and star scouts will be 
published. In the future all scouts' 
desiring to take "Merit Badge exami- 
nations will be requested to have 
first completed all the first class re- 
quirements. 

The Patrol System. i 

After a troop has been going for 
made up of boys in different stages of 
made up ofboys in different stages of 
advancement. The instruction in the 
various phases of scout-craft such as 
knot tieing, signaling, compass, use 
of knife and hatchet, and first aid, 
may be most efficiently handled by 
group instruction, the more advanced 
scouts giving, this instruction both for 
the purpose -of review and training of 
the -new sctittts, ,v 

The groups into which a scout troop 
is divided are known as patrols, each 
under the leadership of a patrol 
leader and ah assistant The scout 
selected as a patrol leader niust be a 
leader in. his group, setting also a 
high scout standard of' word and 
action. The duties of the patrol 
leaders are . to lead his patrol in 
games, contests, hikes, and various 
scout < activities; to keep his patrol 
studying and passing the various re- 
quirements; to use his influence with 
the members of his patrol to improve 
their attendance and conduct. 

The new recuit is trained in the 
tenderfoot requirements, by a second 
class scout as' the last or 12th re- 
quirement in becoming a first class 
scout. The patrol leader or senior 
patrol leader examines him after 
which he is re-examined by the scout- 
master. The tenderfoot scout is as- 
signed to a patrol where he is trained' 
in the essentials of scout-craft. 

The troop meetings and programs 
should grow but of the needs of the 
patrols. After each troop meeting, a 
meeting, of the patrol leaders should 
be hejij, undej the direction of the 
scoutmaster, hut presided over by the 
senior patrol leader, tft discuss plans 
and m&e assignments for the next 
meeting. This by means of the pa- 
trol the troop meeting is not the, 
scoutmasters' meeting, but the troop 
meeting. 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Modem furnished room. 
801 Main Ave. No, Tele. 899. tf 



WANTED TO RENT— Improved 
farm, 160 acres. Apply G. Halvor- 
s °n- 2-t 43-44. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



GIRL WANTED ■ 
Bakery. 



-at the 



City 
1. 



FOUND— two long sleeved wool 

gloves, of different sizes and mate. 

Call at Tribune. S8-tt. 



Mrs. H. A. Pratt, Mrsi PerlW-'lftU 
bey, Mrs. Daniel Shaw, Mrs. U. W. 
Booren, and Mrs. L. G. Larsen. '-.... 

a separate photo oi Mrs. Froehlich 
with remarks nertaining . . to Idub 
matters aypeared-in^the Dispatch.. 

4«thaay- HGhurch. - 
i January 4, (s another red letter 
day in .tne history of Bethany Luther- 
an churcij,:EeV. V. O. Aaker's charge. 
It .was oh that day that the congre- 
gation -held its annual business, meet- 
ing ; and the Ladies aid met in the 
church basement, served by Miss 
Thora Homme. Never before have 
the church members come to the an- 
nual meeting without. dbts, but this 
year all debts were paid. The church 
has a property valuation sof about 
$7000,00. The parsonage in Goodridge 
was last summer put in fine shape to 
which Bethany church too}: her fair 
share. The congregation has had 
Sunday school and parochial school 
for the children, an active Luther 
League and a faithful Ladies aid. The 
word of God has been preached regu- 
larly and with blessing. "O thank 
the Lord from whom all blessing 
flow," is undoubtedly the sentiment 
of Bethany church. The Lord has - 
abundantly blessed. The resignation 
of Rev. V. O. Aaker was considered 
but not accepted. 

The following hold offices for the 
coming year: Secretary, Christ Lar- 
son; treasurer, O. M. Peterson; 
trustees, Tobias Sherping, B. E. Tie- 
man and Ole Homme; deacons, Bert 
Hammer and Ole Homme; sexton of 
the cemetery, Tobias Sherping; Sun- 
day school superintendent, Elias 
Angell and organist, Agnes AngelL 

Big dance at the Elk's hall Friday- 
night after the basketball game. 
Music by Snyder's six piece orchestra. 




WANTED— Girl for general house 

work. Apply 200 St. Pjml avenue 

North. Tel. 112. 43tf 



YOU WTLL MAKE no mistake if you 
call 783 Ireland's and give them 
your order for wood & CoaL 



WANTED— married couple on farm 

in Roseau county, will rent equip- 

ed farm, must be good hand with 

cows. Write C. B. G. care of Tribune. 

43-2-p. 



WANTED— Young man who wishes 
to learn trade — small salary to 
start, good future. High school gradu- 
ate or knowledge of typewriting pre- 
ferred. Apply at Western Union 
Telegraph office Hotel Evelyn. 43-2 



EXPERT ELECTRIC WORK— Re- 
member the telephone number is 
100 when you want real service on 
electric work. Always get the man 
that knows his business. He'll save 
you money. _ If yoa desire to have 
your house wired on monthly payment 
«lan we ran do it. vtfe pive prompt 
pervice on all calls. Alex Welch. 28th. 



Get Twin City Publicity. 

Last Sunday's Minneapolis Journal 
and St. Paul Dispatch gave liberallv 
of space to the. Thief RJver Falls 
Woman's club, publishing a lengthy 
article on the anticipated activities of 
the club and a photograph of mem- 
bers of the committee working on a 
swimming pool project for Thief 
River Falls. The committee consists 
of Mrs. H. W. Froehlich, chairman; 



OUR AIM: 
TO SERVE 
YOU WELL 
AND 

FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 




. MST/TUnON 



enney 

DEPARTMENT STORES 



Co 



WHERE 

SAVINGS 

ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUQDT 

THE TEAR 



Thief Riser Falls' Busiest Store 



SomeThrift 
Items 

Watch this column for sur- 
passing savings resulting from 
jour 676 Store Buying Power. ; 

Our "Pay-Day" 

Overalls for Less 

As a result of market con- 
ditions we are enabled to quote 
the New low price and still 
maintain the same high quality. ' 
Strictly Union Made! Cut 
extra full. Overall or jacket 
now — 

$1.29 

Boys' Overalls 

3 to-17-'..- - 1 ■ 

; •;:,; & |»8c: %- : 
are^gfeatestJff 5 ; 



We Seek to Get 
Better Acquainted ! 

Truth in Advertising is merely the Golden 
Eule applied in business. We have never 
knowingly permitted false or misleading 
statements to appear in either our advertise- 
ments or in the advertising salesmanship as 
it is practised in our Store. 

If nothing else, we aspire to be a believable 
Store — one that recognizes that Truth al- 
ways is the best policy. 

In a series of advertisements similar in size 
and appearance to this, we will set forth the 
activities of this Store and the Nation-wide 
institution of which it is a part. 

:"\ 'We ask you to read them for by getting ac; 

1 quajiited with;us, our policies and. our service 

;ypu ; will be serving yourself profitably; • •■ 



ra-?<.fr- 





SPECIAL 

Attractions 

At The 

[ yceum 



For Alfalfa and 
Poultry Show 

WEDNESDAY AND 

THURSDAY 

Reginald Denny 

in 

'TU Show You The Town" 

also 

Kinogram News 

and 

A Comedy 

, Matinee both days at 2:30 

" nun m » 

FRIDAY And SATURDAY 
"The White Outlaw" 

With 

Jack Hoxie 

"Scout" the Wild Horse and 

"Pal" 

An Australian Shepherd 
Dog 

also 



WILD BFASTSy BORNEO 



-.*..*- cu~ — SPECIAL. 

P<^juc<4 kr HmiHi>.U CHuU 

This picture is one of the best films 
depicting wild animals in the haunts 
in the jungles, you will find ft both 
interesting and educational. 

Matinee Saturday at 2:30 

Admission 10c and 25c 



«» M « MM I H I H II IH 

All exhibitors will be ad- 
mitted free. See Mr. McCan 
for particulars. 

M il I H I HH I I I HHMH I M 

SUNDAY ANDJMONDAY 

Corinne Griffith 

in 

"Classified" 

Supported by Charlie Mur- 
ray and Jack Mulhall 

"Classified 

Is a delightful story and the best 
picture that Corinne Griffith has ever 
appeared in. 

also 



'jLtti^'m&ijU:- >■■;■ "^tii-v^U ■^'^Jk^^l^jg^^jg-rfjSW;^'^ i&-x 





Vol. 25 No. 44. 



ALFALFA DAY 
PROGRAMS ARE 
WELL ATTENDED 

Lycetim Theatre Fillea 

By Afternoon 

Crowds 



Event Proves To Be 
Standpoint 



Big 



Alfalfa Day programs were well 
attended and comments from farm- 
ers, business men from neighboring 
towns and visiting speakers, indicat- 
ed that the event was a great 1.-CW.S 
from every standpoint. tA tne Com- 
mercial Club luncheon held at noon 
it was not possible to handle the 
crowd at one seating although ai- 
rangeme nts had been made for many 

f In behalf of the Commercial I 
i Club 1 wish to thank all those 
' Iwho contributed toward the suc- 
I cess of the Alfalfa Show . The 
i fact that it was successful was 
■ due to the splendid co-operatvon 
I which was received from every 
quarter. 



1 



F. J. STEBBINS 
Chairman, Alfalfa Committee. 



IEF RIVER FALLS. MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926 



!.00 a Year in Advances 



Has Served 15 Years as 
Fire Department Chief 




CLUB DISCUSSES 
POST OFFICE AT 
MONDAY MEET 

Stress Urgent -Need of Im- 
provements in Letters to 
' . Congressmen. 



NEW SEMESTER 
OFSCHOOLWORK 
OPENSJAN. 25 

School Board Adds Only One 

More Teacher to Cope 

With Situation. 



Championship For Norse • 
Wrestle Is Claimed By 
Thief River Rotarian 



Commend Light Department 

for Showing and Service 

During Past Year. 



New Classes in First Grade 

Also to be Organized 

Says Simley. 



PAUL I. MIDDEEIGH 



extra visitors. At the afternoon pro, 
cram the Lyceum Theatre was filled 
to capacity, mostly by farmers from 
this community; and the evening en- 
tertainment at the Lincoln High 
school assembly room drew a Iniga 
crowd of farmers and town people. | 
At the noon luncheon the speakers 
were W. McCurdy, managing editoj 
the Winnipeg Tribune, and E. t[. 
Leedy, general agricultural develop- 
ment agent of the Great Northern. 
Mr. McCurdy gave a very interesting 
talk on the "Pine to Palm' tour 
which his paper is promoting and 
which will bring a hundred Canadi- 
ans to Thief River Falls next week 
Saturdav. Mr. Leedy reviewed tlje 
efforts of the railroads in introducing 
diversified farming and especially 
The work of the Great Northern n 
the Roys and Girls Club work. I 

ine afternoon speakers were w.- 
W. Prichard, Jr., Mayor of ThiM 
Kiver- Falls; A. Ellis, professor bf 
field husbandry at the university pi 
Manitoba; Dr. F. J. Alway, head pi 
the soils department of the Univer- 
sity of Mini esota; J. Selvig, prcki- 
' dent of the Northwestern School of 
Agriculture at Ciookston; and J.|L,. 
Haney. district manager c the In- 
ternational Harvester Co. Majror 
Prichard extended greetings and vyel- 
come to the visitors and speakers, smil 
verv briefly summarized the develop- 
ment of diversification in this com- 
munity. Professor Ellis delivered an 
instructive lecture on Alfalfa, illus- 
trating his remarks with stenoptjeon 
views. Dr. Alway discussed the Soils 
of this county and the value of alfal- 
fa as a drainage crop. .Pennington 
countv has the best soil in the state 
for the growing of altalfa, he fcaid. 
A moving picture of what had been 
done in another part of the state in 
the wav of turning waste landl into 
profits 'was highly interesting. U J. 
Selvig reviewed the history of alfalfa 
in this part of the state and coinpli- 
meiited the farmers and business; men 



The postoffice situation came in for 
discussion at some length when the 
('ihlei River Falls Commercial club 
; met in special session in the club 
1 rooms, Monday afternoon. 
i H. A. Brumund brought to the at- 
' tention of ithe club that bills were 
. now before congress appropriating 
several millions of dollars for use in 
erecting post office buildings through- 
| out the country where better accom- 
! modations were needed, and that if 
Thief River Falls expected to receive 
any attention he believed it was ex- 
pedient for the club to take steps to 
bring the matter before the congress- 
( men f ron this district. 
J Daniel Shaw, postmaster, discussed 
the situation at some length. He 
I stated that at various times the mat- 
ter had been brought to the attention 
of the postmaster general and had 
been referred to the state commis- 
sion, -and that on at least one occasion 
j a representative had come here • to 
look over the situation. A represen- 
Paul Midderigh, Chief Since tative is expected at any time now, 

' not to recommend a new federal 



The second semester opens in the 
Thief River Falls public schoolsMon- 
day morning, January 26, according to 
an announcement made this week by 
I. T. Simley, superintendent. Much has 
been accomplished during the first 
half year's work, he says, and most 



"Mellie" Dunham may be a 
champion fiddler, but he would 
find himself way outclassed if he 
crossed fingers with Hokon Ol- 
son, manager of the men'B de- 
partment of the Oen Mercantile 
establishment, and a member of 
the local Rotary club, in a con- 
test known as the "Norwegian 
wrestle." This wrestle consists 
of locking fingers and pulling 
across a table stacked with caps 
and German socks. The one who 
keeps his finger attached to his 
hand the longest wins. 

"I wear a" 7y 2 glove", says Mr. 
Olson, "and I can pull any man 
in Pennington county with the 
same, size hand." * 

Who knows but what he too, 
will 1 hear from Henry Ford! 



REDLAKEROAD 
WILL BE BUILT 
COMINGSUMMER 



Work Will Be Started 
Once On 16'/* Mile 
Stretch. 



At 



GROWTH OF FIRE 
DEPARTMENT IS 
NOTEWORTHY 



1911, Was One of First 
Members. 



Many Old Timers Who Sign- 
ed Charter Still Residents 
of City. 



The growth of the Thief River 
Falls Fire department since its or- 
ganization March 8, 1894.to.the pre- 
sent time presents a * fascinating 
story. 

The honor of originating the de- 
partment, has been given by older 
members of the present organization 
to members of the first city council 
organized in 1893 who were - F. H. 
Kratka, Adam Zeh, H. O. Hanson, 
Hans Nelson, and C. A. Robbecke. 
The council ordered from the Wat- 
rous Engine company of St. Paul, 
one hook and ladder truck, and two 
five-gallon Habcock extinguishers, 
the whole costing $4.94. 

Forty-seven citizens offered their 
services in the first department, sev- 



new 
build but to provide at least . better 
accommodations if such are available. 
Mayor Prichard accepted the chiar- 
manship of a committee which is ex- 
pected to ascertain what buildings 
are available which would be an im- 
provement over the present post 
office quarters and have a list ready 
(Continued on page 8) 

BURSTAD GARAGE 
IS DISPOSED OE 

Thief River Motor Com- 
pany Buys Business and 
Part of Equipment. 



Attend Grand Lodge 
B. F. Umland will leave Sunday 
evening. for Minneapolis where he 
will attend the sessions of the Ma- 

„ . . . sonic Grand Lodge. He will be the 

students are satisfactorily equipped to ] representative of the local masonic 
enter upon the arduous mental tasks j chapter. 

which confront them. j - 

The school board at a regular meet- 
ing Monday night hired one more j 
teacher, Miss Borghild Berg of Mid- 
dle River. Miss Berg is a graduate 
of the Bemidji teahcers' college and 
taught two years in the Grand Rapids 
schools. Her services' will be used in 
the Knox school. 

New classes in first grade will be 
organized, when the semester opens, 
and children to be eligible for accept- 
ance must be six years old on or be- 
fore April 15 Mr. Simley said.- 

By properly reorganizing, some of 
the departments and making a shift in 
schedule of classes here and there Mr. 
Simley has worked out a plan whereby 
with the one additional teacher the 
present faculty will be able to take 
qare of the additional problems occa- 
sioned by the opening of the new se- 
mester and consequent increase in the 
number of pupils. 

There is no indication as yet as to 
the number of kiddies who will begin 
their schooling with this semestser. 



BAGLEY COMING 
TO MEET LEGION 
LOOP SHOOTERS 



The recently formed Thief River 



Locals Preparing to Present 

Bolstered Lineup, the 

Dope Says. 



Red Lake Falls and Local 
Legion to Stage Kiddie- 
Kar Battle. 



COUNCIL MAKES 
APPOINTMENTS 



City 



Positions Filled 
Meeting Held . 
Last Night. 



Local basketball fans are looking 
forward with increasing interest to 
the game at the auditorium tomor- 
row (Thursday) night, between the 
Bagley Independents and the Ameri- 
can Leigon team .of ihjs city,-and Doc 
Haug is somewhat "uneasy, realizing 
ras he does that the Bagley aggrega- 
tion is not going to-be a snap by any 
■ means. The Legion team won .from 
At | them some time ago at Bagley but the 
battle was hard fought and the score 
j close. This will be the first appear- 
l.ance of the Legion team on the home 
[floor. 

! Lars Thune, athletic coach in the 

I Thief River schools, will play center 

Prostenant . for the Legion. He is a former South 



- . A'request from the „_„.„_ _ . 

Motor company became the owners | ministers of tha city for Sunday clos- i Dakota college star and often has de 
last Thursday, January 7, of the Bur- j ng f tne moving picture houses was j monstrated that he has not forgotten 
stad & Westad garage building at t a t,i e( i i city officers were appointed j the nld tricks of the game 



Highway Department Will 
Pay For Job Through 
Two Counties 



Definite action providing for the 
completion of the road to Red Lake 
has been taken by the county boards 
of Pennington and Beltrami counties 
and the state highway department, 
and the grading of the sixteen and 
one-half mile stretch connecting the 
ten mile road already built west from 
the lake and the gravelled highway 
extending east from Thief River 
Falls, will be completed this summer. 
Gravelling of this road will probably 
be completed next fail or winter. 
The cost of this construction will be 
paia by funds, made available by the 
state highway department, the work 
to be let and supervised by the- Bel-, 
trami county board. 

The immediate completion of thifi 
road is the result of the efforts of 
the local Commercial Club extending 
over a period of several years. Dur- 
ing the past few months Lome John- 
ston, chairman and Matt Barzen, .a 
member, of n special conflnittee ap- 
pointed for this purpose, have devot- 
ed a great deal of time in presenting 
the. need of this development to the 
boards of neighboring counties and to 
the state department. • 

While it will doubtless take sever- 
al years before the full benefits from 
this road will be felt, there is no 
doubt as to the importance of the 
achievement to the people of the 
northwestern part of this state and 
Norh Dakota, as it opens up and 
makes available for the people to the 
north and west one of the largest 
and finest fresh water lakes in the 
United States. Action is being 
brought to have Congress set aside 
the "Narrows" as a National Park. 

The new road will not only provide 
beter driving ^ondWons . but will 
shorten the distance to the lake by 
about twenty miles, the present only 
passable road extending arcund by 
The he new road will extend 

fifteen miles straight east from the 
end of the Goodridge road, from 
where it will turn south "a mile and a 
half to connect up with that portion 
already constructed. Eventually a 
road will be built from the " ridge 
down around by the outlet to Bemidji. 
The officials of Red Lake and Marsh- 
all counties are entitled to credit for 



era! of them still being residents of Horace avenue and second stieet. and salaries fl^d at the regular] R usse ll Ohon, forward on last . the support they have given this por- 

Thicf River Falls. As far as the Only part of the Equipment was sold, .meeting of the city council last night, ; year's district championship team and - 

writer has been able to learn those The ilotor company was formed last attend j. d by a fairly representative ! all-regional forward, will be in the 

Yi"^* 1 !!. res l de ™.!! e £ ! ,. a ^ e ?,& week when IJambeck & Stone became | therjn - of taX p avers a nd others. | ii neu p as will Joe Holte, former star 

•'Nick" Tarrant Phil Zeh. Dennis Le- partners of Gilbertson & Rogers, the i The est for the closin of thei fthe Fargo Independents. Matt 

Sage, Edward Langevm, John Peder- latter moving their equipment to the,^,. m Sund was in , &e form, Barzen, all-district guard, and Maur- 

son, Chris Porter, Chris Paulson, Ole Rambeck quarters. „f a petition signed by all six. of the ! ice Holzknecht will appear for th» 

Peterson,. Lars Backe, Andy Smith The Bursted & Westad garage ad- 1 t 1 minj | ters „' £ thc dt Af_ Iocals ^ ^rds. "-,.„.-,. „ K ,» 

P. Smith. Ira C. Richardson, and Paul joined Rambeck & Stonesj business f _ iU J; t „,_ _.««„ A i j... ! 11 i„„„™ ™„, 



of this county for the co-operative 



ef- 



fort they have put forth to bring 
about the splendid results. Mr. I Han- 
ey spoke very briefly on the value of 
diversification, illustrating _ ma; re- 
marks by examples from Ins own ex- 
perience. L. 
The evenings speakers were|H._s>. 
Funston, Soo Line immigration 
agent;; E. C. Leedy, F. E. Balmer, 
state county agent leader; Col. I Ralph 
Webb, Mayor of Winnipeg and Ule 
Sageng, head of the rural credits de- 
partment of the state of Minnesota. 
Mr. Funston and Mr. Leedy | spoke 
briefly, extending greetings frbin the 
mayors of St. Paul and Minneapolis. 
The paper read by Mr. Balmer is 
reprinted in this issue. Ole Sageng 
was forced to make his remarks 
brief due to train connections but 
made an inspiring appeal in the few 
moments he was on the platform. 
Mayor Ralph Webb spoke atj length 
on the economic problems of (western 
Canada and the United tSates and 
gave an intensly interesting 
of the possibilities in the 



, Midderigh. j and was part of the Rambeck build- 

! H. E. Mussey, now publisher of the | ing. The purchase was made, it is 
! Grygla Eagle, was elected the first j understood, to provide more space for 
I chief, and other chiefs following him 1 the extensive operations the new 
' were Louis Lpjison who died in 1913; Thief River Motor company intends 
C. C. Jackson; Emil Zeh who died two to enter into. 

years ago; James Farr, G. D. LeSage, , Mr. Burstad is an old timer in 
Phil Zeh. and Paul Midderigh. 1 Thief River Falls. For many years 

Mr. Midderigh, the present chief, he was associated ' with Iver Aaseby 
has served in that capacity every | n the garage firm of Aaseby & Bur- 
year since 1911 with the exception of j s t a d at Horace and Third street until 
a little more than a year when Louis last year when he went into business 



Lonson was chief. He was unanimous- 
ly re-elected to the office at the an- 
nual meeting of the firemen last 
Wednesday evening, all members 
(Continued on Page five) 



occount 

levelop- 

inent of the Hudson Bay as in ocean 



outlet for the products of 
terior. 



the 



for himself in the Rambeck building 
where he was soon joined by Mr. 
Westad. 

Mr. Burstad is yet undecided as to 
his future activities. 



Their ability 
ter the reading of the petition Alder- j well known among fans here. t><? 
man Oscar Paulson, moved that the 'boys having appeared many times on 
same be laid on the table for consid- ! high school quints, 
eration at a later meeting, the Sig. Lefer, formerly of the Fargo 
same being seconded and carried. 'independents, teammate of Mr. Holte, 
All of the former city appointees ! has been working out with the team 
were renamed exept H. 0. Chommie, ! durin* *he week and may be forwaro 
Fred T. Scanlan being named as his I or ^ n » d .^ ^ be entertain> , d 
successor, as city attorney, «««>.. a I between halves by a kiddie-kar polo 
tie vote was cast for city physician I conte st between the Red Lake Falls 
and health officer. Dr. H. W. Froeh- and nie f jj; ver p a n s American 
lich and Dr. J. T. Bowers each re- 1 Legion teams. This is said to be a 
ceiving three votes on four ballots. | game which provides hilarity for the 
The position of city assessor was left on-lookersfhut a lot of humiliation 
unfilled temporarily. The following a nd abuse for the ones staging the 



ject 

School Board Reduces 
Insurance §29,000; Amount 
Now Carried Is §202,000 



(Continued on page eight.) 



SPEECH OF F. E. BALMER 

STATE COUNTY AGENT LEADER 

At the Alfalfa Celebration, Thief River Falls, 

Thursday, January 7. 



Lorentson to Minneapolis. 
Fred D. Lorentson, register of 
deeds, expects to leave Sunday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis, when* he will 
attend the Abstr actor's con vention. 

Charleston Artists Will 
Compete for Honoirfs At 
Lyceum Friday Evening 

The Lyceum theatre nfanage- 
ment announces a "Charleston" 
contest to take place at the 
theatre Friday night, January <u,~ 
in which all local people *hb-can 
"do the Charleston" are [eligible ' 
to compete. Those contemplat- 
ing entrance will be permitted tp 
us the Lyceum stage for iractice 
purposes at any time by calling 
198 for appointment. 

Two worth-while cash prizes 
will be given — and the public 
will be the judges. 



Johnson's Millinery Making 
Improvements in Building 

Extensive improvements are being | 
made on the building occupied by j 
Johnson's" Millinery on LaBree ave., 
the proprietors, Misses Gustie and ; 
Erma Johnson finding it necessary to ! 
provide for a new work room so that | 

the present space could all be used ■ . 

for display purposes. The adnition is Undoubtedly one of the most lm- 
being constructed on the rear of thelportant developments taking place in 
building ' i Minnesota agriculture at the present 

The interior of the shop is to be 'day is the growing of more alfalfa 
completely rearranged and re-decor- This important crop has increa led n 
„ t „i < Minnesota from only 2253 acres in 

axea ' 1 1910 to 312304 acres in 1925 and 

more> than five-sixths of that increase 
has taken place within the past five 



t event. 

From all appearances the lineup 
for tomorrow right is one which will 
stage a terrific battle, and the game 
promises to be a drawing card which 
will make it necessary for fans to 
come early if they want to get a seat. 



Waltonism Talks to Be 

Heard Over WCCO Jan. 19lyears'. . 

_ „ T . ,„ .. . .„ < The alfalfa crop, I am inclined to 

Talks on Izaak Waltonism will be : believe has increased the returns 

broadcast Tuesday evening, January from f arm ing in Minnesota by no 

19 at 9:30 p. -m. over radio station | less than from five to ten million dol- 



\V. C. CO. Minneapolis, according to: 
information received by Bert F. Um- 
lyand, president of the League in this 
city. 

George Selover, president of the 
state organization of the League, and 
F. J. Gould, state game commission- 
er, are slated to deliver addresses. 

Members of the Izaak Walton 
league everywhere are urged to send 
cards and telegrams expressing theriiT 
sehfes "favorably towards , the .'pro- 
grams so that these talks for Wal- 
tonism and the outdoors may be con- 
tinued indefinitely. 

"For the love of heavens, regard- 
less of whether you have done much 
or nothing, get behind this and show- 
er in your support," writes Fred H. 
Dollner,f secretary-treasurer of the 
Minnesota division of the ieajrue. 



lars a year. 

But you are most interested in 
what its future possibilities are, and 
what place it shall ocucpy in the 
agricultural scheme of the county. 

The Federal census for 1920 credit- 
ed Pennington County with 29,141 
acres of wild hay, yielding only 22,- 
586 tons. At that time the county 
was credited with only 3983 acres of 
all kinds- of legume crops, including 
alfalfa, the clovers and similar crops, 
or an average of. only three and one- 
fourth acres per farm, the average 
size farm at that time being 233.2 
acres with 169.3 acres as an average 
being improved and cropped. In 
other -words the per cent of improved 
farm acerage in legumes was slightly 
less than two and' one-half per cent: 

During the past five years agricul- 



ture generally has experienced a 
serious depression. One of the lead- 
ing economists of the country has re- 
cently declared that farming has ex- 
perienced the worst economic cyclone 
in history of American agriculture. 
While that statement may apply as 
a general proposition it is interest- 
ing to contemplate what has tran- 
spired in Pennington county during 
the past five years. 

From 1920 to 1925 Pennington 
County reduced the average of its 
poorest crop, namely wild hay, from 
29,141 to 16,656 acres or a reduction 
of only 27 pen cent. In other words, 
Pennington' County has progressed 
about one-third more rapidly in this 
important matter than the State of 
Minnesota taken as a whole during 
the past five years. 

I am dwelling on this wild hay 
matter- because I suspect that_ wild 
hay was very largely the principal 
forage crop in this county up . to 
about five, years ago. : Now ;let us 
consider what w happening with i al- 
falfa... : 

The State census credited Penning- 
ton County with just 817 acres of 
alfalfa, in 1920. In 1022 the acreage 
had grown to 1083^ In 1923 it grew 
to 1561 acres. Then in the. fall of 
that year you secured a carload of 
(Continued on Page five) 



100 Canadians To Invade 
U. S. In Great Auto Trip 



A regular meeting of the school 
board was held Monday night, Janu- 
ary ll t action being taken or various 

.atiers as -follows: 

The request of several ministers' re- 
presenting the cluavii-'w le" change the 
tiaie on which pupil* are" excused for 
leligious training iror.: Friday after- 
noon to Wednesdai af tamoim was vot- 
ed down. The reason the irequeit was 
nut granted, it is understood, is that 
to excuse pupils WeJ'iesday aiievnmm 
wtmltt tend to break into their regular 
ruuvne of school work, ;tml lust fur- 
thermore it wcul*; eausrt considerable 
'.irvenience > fhe faculty to make 
the change. 

The bid of $7.10 per cord for 200 
cp.'-Is of tamarack^ preseiiitiJ by the 
O'Hara Dray & Fuel company was ac- 
cepted. 

A decrease of $20,000 in the amount 
of insurance carried on the school 
buildings was voted, making the total 
to be carried about §202.000. The 
amount will be distributed as equit- 
ably as possible amonsj the insurers 
doing business in ihe city. 



Officers of the local Coommercial 
Club received word this mo rning 
from Mayor Ralph Webb of Winni- 
peg that between 75 and 100 men and 
women of Manitoba would spend the 
n ; ght of Saturday, January 23, in 
Thief River Falls as the first stop on 
their great "Pine to Palm" automo- 
bile tour. The question of handling 
this vast caravan from the north will 
be given the right of way over all 
other business at the Commercial 
Club meeting tomorrow noon. The 
"Pine to Palm" tour is a demonstra- 
tion staged by the people of Winni- 
peg, sponsored by the Winnipeg 
Tribune, to convince the world that 
the north has all-season, all-weather 
roads. The tour extends from Win- 
nipegto New Orleans over Qie Jeffer- 
son Highway, the return trip to be 
made by a different route. . Jule Pro^ 
vencher and Mayor W. W;.PricKard L 
Jr. of this cfty, are plaiuiing, on ; join- 
ing the party at. this point, 

To Speak at P-T. Meet. 
Miss Telulah Robinson, head of tne 
traininig department of the Bemidji 
State Teachers* College, will speak at 
a meeting of the Parents- Tenchers 
Association to be held at the high 
school Monday evening, February 1. 



No Warren Game Friday Night. 

The basketball game scheduled for 
Friday night this week between the 
local and Warren high schools at 
Warren has been postponed, accord- 
ing to Coach Lars Thune, until Wed- 
nesday evening, January 20. 



Installed Crookston Auxilars. 
Mrs. J. M. Bishop was installing of- 
ficer at Crookston Monday night for 
the American Legion Auxiliary. A 
gavel representing successful compe- 
tion in the district in the race for Aux- 
iliary members will be presented to 
the Ada unit. 



CAN YOU BEAT IT7 



Julius Hanson of Kratka town- 
ship sold four yearling steers and* 
two yearling heifers last; week 
for which. --he received a -total of 
$370.00 or at an average price of 
about $60.00 each. This re- 
presented his return for ■ a few 
weeks of whole -milk feed, lots of 
ofskimmed milk and alfalfa, and 
a little ground feed. Mr. Han- 
son was well satisfied with his 
investment 



V 



^ r v f :.;^«-;- v.,:, ^ -.^;4fcigy;feai^^ ; -_■.;; 



PAGE TWO 



- j ;t 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 




G. A. Rutter of this city left last 
"Wednesday afternoon for Watertown 
S. Dak., where he Will be employed. 

Mr. and Mrs. \V.|c. Hartje of St. 
Hilaire spent Wednesday in this city 
shopping and visiting with friends. 

Miss Dena Eifcenes returned to 
this city Wednesday evening, after 
spending the vacation at the home of 
her parents, at Overly, N. D. 

Miss Ruth Watson, who spent the 
vacation /lays at the homfe of her 
parents at International Falls, re- 
turned to this city! Wednesday. 

Miss Alice McLean returned to 
this city last Wednesday from her 
home in Grafton, [N. D., where she 
has spent i the past two weeks visit- 
ing. 



Miss Margaret Williams returned 
to her home in this city Wednesday 
after spending a iew days at Roseau 
as the guest of Miss Aneta Dahl- 
tjuist. 



Mrs. M. Blidej postmistress at 
Mavie, arrived in | this city last Wed- 
nesday, and spent the day heie 
shopping and attending to matters ot 
business. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926. 



Price reduction) for dry cleaning 

: several articles of wearing apparel; 

Monday Jan. 18. See our ad elsewhere 

in this issue fori particulars. Thief 

River Dress Club. 

Miss Benora Engebretson arrived 

in this city Wednesday evening from 

: Mayville, N. D. I She spent a two 

weeks vacation there as a guest at 

tiie home of her parents. 



Miss Bernice Boyer, returned to 
this city Wednesday afternoon from 
her home in Crookston. She spent a 
two week j vacation as a guest at the 
home of her parents of that city. 

Miss Martha Mayhew arrived in 
' this city last Wednesday afternoon 
from her home at Greenbush, and 
will resume her studies in the normal 
training department of the local high 
school. 



Miss Phvllis 
Mr.' and Mrs. J 
been the guest 
city for the pas. 
urday evening 
is teaching. 



Curtis, daughter of 

P. Curtis,, who has 

of her parents in this 

two weeks, left Sat- 

r Detroit where sue 



srehert returned to 

day to resume her 

rcipal of the Knox 

spe it the past two weeks 

guest at the home of 



Miss Linna B 
this city Wedne 
duties as prii 
.school. She 
in Mentor as a 
her parents. 

Miss Esther Gronvold, who has 
spent the Christmas vacation at the 
home of her parents at Rugby, N. D., 
returned to this city Wednesday. She 
will continue her work as teacher at 
.the Knox school. 

Miss Camille Warner, who spent 
the vacation in this city as a guest 
at the home of! her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Warner, left 'Saturday for 
Middle River. She teaches a rural 
school near that place. 

J. J. Linde of this city left Thurs- 
day -evening for Minneapolis where 
he will spend a week visiting with 
friends. From (there he will go to 
Cloverdale, Ore., to be a guest of 
his daughter. Mrs. C. C. Lovell. He 
expects to be gone for about two 
months. 



be goi 



Miss Mercedes Moore of Newfolderi 
spent Saturday in this city shopping 
and visiting friends. She returned to 
her home the same evening. 

Mrs. A. Arnevik arrived in this 
city Wednesday from her home in 
Holt, and will spend a few days as 
the; guest of Mrs. S. K. Dahle. 

Sigrud Grothe spent Saturday in 
this city shopping and attending to 
matters of business. He returned to 
his [ home in Oklee by car the aarae 
evening. 

Price reduction for dry cleaning 
several articles of wearing apparel* 
Monday Jan. 18. See our ad elsewhere 
in this issue for particulars. *J>hief 
River Dress Club. 

Miss Clara Halvor&on return* 
this city last Wednesday evening 
from Warren, where she has spent a 
two weeks vacation as a guest at 
the' home of her parents. 

Miss Faythe Warner, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs..W. E. Warner of this 
city, left Wednesday afternoon for 
St. Hilaire where she spent a few 
days visiting at the Frank Dann 
home. 

Miss Aneta Dahlquist, who spent 
the vacation at the home of her 
parents at Roseau, returned to this - 
city Wednesday to resume her work 
as instructress at the Washington 
school. 

Miss Betsy Legvold, who has spent 
the past two weeks in this city as a 
guest at the home of her mother, 
Mrs. Ole Legvold, Sr. left Saturday 
afternoon for Georgeville, where she 
is teaching. ■ 

Miss Margaret Quammen who has 
spent the past two weeks as a guest 
at the home of her parents at Cyrus, 
arrived in this city Wednesday, and 
resumed her duties as primary teach- 
er at the Knox school. 

Johanna Nabben who spent the 
past two weeks in this city as a guest 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. P. Nabben left Wednesday 
afternoon for Grand Forks, N. Dak., 
where she attends. school. 

Miss Eleanor Blide arrived in this"! 
city Wednesday afternoon. She has i 
spent the past two weeks as the guesi 
of her father, M. Blidej at Roseau, 
and after visiting for a brief time 
here/ left for her home at Mavie. 

Miss Hazel Wdnghum who spent 
a two weeks vacation as a guest at 
the home of her parents, at Green- 
bush, arrived in this city Wednesday 
afternoon and will resume her studies 
at the teachers training department. 

Miss Mildred Thompson returned 
to this city Thursday morning to re- 
sume her duties as history instruct- 
ress at the high school. She spent 
a two weeks vacation as a guest at 
the home of her mother at Mahno- 



Miss Marion McMillian, who has 
spent the past two weeks as a guest 
at the. home of her parents in Grand 
Forks, N. D., returned to this city 
Wednesday to 'resume her duties in 
the domestic science department of 
the Lincoln high sehool. 

Miss Loretta Dietz, who spent the 
past few days in this city as the 
guest of Miss Harriet Anderson, left 
Wednesday afternoon for her home 
at Wahpeton, N. Dak., where she will 
visit briefly prior to . returning to 
Mantador, N. Dak., where she 
teaches 



Mrs. G. Vaughan of Plummcr.! 
spent Saturday in this city shopping 
and visiting with friends. 

_ Russell Elefson left ■ Sunday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis", where he will 
attend the Minneapolis School of 
Business . 

Miss Gladys Elofson, who has been 
attending school in Minneapolis ar- 
rived in this city last Friday, and 
spent the week-end here as the guest 
of her mother, Mrs. Bessie Elefson. 



Mrs. W. H. Bon Durant and Mrs. 
a. J. McCarthy returned ■ to their 
'Homes in this ;ity Thursday morning 
after spending two weeks in Minne- 
apolis as guests at the home of their 
parents, M. and Mrs: J. J. Reddin. 

>. and Mrs. Harold Moi-schinger, 
:o have spent the past two weeks 
in this city as guests at the home of 
the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
B. Roemhildt, expect to leave the 
latter part of the week for their 
home at Waterville, Minn. 

Alvin Erickson, who has spnt the 
past week in this city as a guest at 
the home of his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Ben Erickson left Sunday eve- 
ning for Enderlin, N. Dak, where 
he is employed. He was ac- 
companied by V. D. Siebert. who has 
been his guest here for the past 
week. 

Miss Edith Shosteri, who has been 
visiting with her parents at Erie for 
the past two weeks, spent a few days 
in this city as the guest of friends. 
She recently graduated from the 
Ancker hospital at Minneapolis, and 
left Saturday evening for that city, 
where she^will practise nursing. 

Mrs. B. J. Dickey arrived in this 
city Thursday morning from her 
home in Grand Forks, and has been 
visiting at the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam McMahon who re- 
side east of this city. She has also 
been the guest of friends here. Mr. 
Dickey was formerly employed at 
the J. C. Penney Store here. ! 



Basket Social. 

The St. Bernard's Guild will have 
a basket social in the church parlors 
Tuesday evening Jan. 19. A short ; 
program is being arranged, follow- \ 
ing which the remainder of the eve- ■ 
ning will be spent playing cards. 
Ladies are requested to bring has- j 
kets containing lunch for two. j 



SENSIBLE SAVING j 

The rather staggering sum of $702, 
191.34 is on deposit in Los Angeles ■ 
banks, carried by 47,461 accounts by ■ 
■school children. . This is » the state- 
ment of A. H. Thomas Junior Vice- 
President, the Pacific Southwest 
Trust and Savings Bank, who is 
President of the Los Angeles Banks' 
School Savings Association. The 
purpose of this association is to pro- 
mote thrift and thrift education in 
the. public schools of the city. 

School banks in the United States 
now have §25,913,532 on deposit, in 
10,163 institutions, with 3,000,000 
children as depositors. They drew 
5458,072 interest on their deposits 
during the past year. Such banks 
are now in operation in 39 states. 

It is not neeessar? to make misers 
of children but it is in their own best 
Interest to discourage senseless ex- 
travangance, and encourage syste- 
matic saving. 

Principals and teachers have co- 
operated in this movement. From 
June 22, 1923, to Oct 1, 1925, Los 
Angeles school savings grew from 
5232,541.55 to $702,191.34. 



X 



+ +♦«?! ?!» , MIIMtM'MUMUHIIIHHHHMMMMM t XIIMMIHMHtM 

♦♦ >>MlimMIMMHHMMMtlM>lll> I MHM>HHMMMMIM>MMMMM 



•# 



■*-■ 



Specials 

For One Day Only 

Monday, January 18th 

$1=22 
$1^2 



Ladies 
pr 



plain wool dresses (in colors) diy cleaned and 
sd regular price $1.50, one day only. 



Ladies pjain cloth coats dry cleaned and pressed 
regu ar 1 price $1.50, one day only _ _...__ 



A discounts 20'* off regluar price will be allowed on all silk dresses. 

Men's shits dry cleaned and pressed regular price $1.50, (|» 1 .00 
or.e flay only _ _ ___ Jfc J_I_ 

Men's cloth overcoats dry cleaned and pressed 
reiruhr price $1.50 to $1.75, one day only $1.00 to 

;vTen : s nkkties dry cleaned and pressed 
regular price 10c and lactone day only :..„ 



Ar. exir 
ti'i::iiviecl 



_ 5c 



charge will be made for garments that are pleated or fur 
■ ..,-•], ine above prices are for one day, Monday, January 18th., do 
no i include mail orders and are for cash only. 

GET YOUR ORDER IN EARLY, FIRST HERE, FIRST SERVED. 

Thief River Dress Club 



Phone 42 



it tllll H I 



" CLEANERS THAT CLEAN" 



M. L. Holbrook 



mm 

M ill I MM 



zz&zx&z uuiuuiiii^^ 



Anniversary 
Sale 



25 Per Cent Reduction from Original 
Prices on SUITS and OVERCOATS. 



0<dercoat< 



$42.50 Overcoats .... 
$40.00 Overcoats _. 
$35.00 Overcoats .... 
$30.00 Overcoats _ 
$25.00 Overcoats :.- 
$20.00 Overcoats .... 
$18.50 Overcoats .... 



_ $31.88 

$30.00 

........$26.25 

— $22.50 



-.$19.25 
.$15.00 
...$13.50 



Suit* 



$50.00 Suits 



$37.50 



$40.00 Suits ... „., $30.00 



$35.00 Suits 
$30.00 Suits 
$25.00 Suits 
S20.00 Suits 
$18.50 Suits 



...$26.25 
.$22.50 

$19.25 

_ _ _$15.00 

.-..- $13.50 








Extra Special 



30 MEN'S FANCY SUITS— Strictly all wool, 

all hand tailored 

and made by the best 

firm in America. We 

sold them for $50, 

?40 and $35. They 

must go at 



$14.75 



Extra Special 

One lot of Men's light weight, all 
wool overcoats, 
a $30.00 value. 



Out they go at the 
give-away price of 



$4.95 



Friday and Saturday Specials 




Stock Up at Reduced Prices ! 

The man with an eye to economy will appreciate the wonderful values we 
are offering in this Sale, of Furnishings — all measuring up to the highest 
standard of workmanship, fabrics and style. Shirts; neckwear, hosiery, un- 
derwear, pajamas, etc. — they're all here in generous assortments. 



Boys' AH Wool Sleeveless Slip- 
over Sweaters— $2.00 
and $2.50 values 
at 



50c 



Men's Flannel Pajamas and 
Night Robes— ?3.00, $2.75 
$2.50 values Friday and 
Saturday only 



$1.85 



Boys' Suction Soled Basket 
Shoes — $2.50 and $2.00 
values, white they 
last -. „ 



Ball 



98c 



Painters White Overalls— size 32 
only. A ' 
$1.75 value 
at - 



39c 



Men's Suede Dress Gloves — 

In dark grey, brown and 
light grey. Fleece lined $2.50 
and $2.00. values at 



$1.45 



Men's Neckwear— $1.50, $1.25 and 
$1.00, silk, silken wool and knit 
ties, in the latest patterns, Friday 
and Saturday only.... ".. 



75c 



Men's Fleece Lined 

A $1.50 value,, 

while they last 

at „ _ 



Underwear — 



98c 



Men's Cotton Worsted Dress 

Pants, $2.50, 

$2.25, $2.00 

values at 



$1.45 



Our entire stock is at your disposal at greatly reduced prices. ALL SALES 
WILL BE STRICTLY FOR CASH. 

Amann Clo. Co. 



Open Evenings 



Thief River Falls, Minn. 

We Give S. & H. Green Stamps 






^%*;4-^ 



■V---'- 




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 



iz&F 



13, 1926. 



#fe^^'-y-5^^^^^'W^"'-- 



- '- ^?f^fgS^##^ 






■■ *..- ■ ■ ■ ■ r i 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNi. 




Appear in Recital, 

According to information 
here Miss Mildred Engen 
Georgia Frissell, pupils 
Evelyn Hanson at McPhail 
Music, appeared in a recital 
the McPhail auditorium in 
apolis, > . j 

These are both local girh 
may bo of interest to know, \ 
merly pupils of lire. Thelm i 
Erickson. 



and 

9* 



received 

Miss 

Miss 

School of 

given at 

Minne- 



and it 

were for- 

Holm 



Semi-Annual Business Meeting. 

The officers of-the Daughters of 
Norway held their semi-annual busi- 
ness meeting Friddy evening. Mrs, 
C. L. Peterson was the host^; " 
lowing the business meeting 
ments were served. The officers pre 
se"nt were Me^dames C. F. Erickson, 
T. Haraldson, B. Knudsen, C. 
rud, ;E. J. Overland, P. L. V 
Jack Nelson and Knute Dahl 



W. 
the 



Mrs. 
ess to 
ning. 
the closf 
lunch 



C. Gul- 
staunet, 



Bridge Club Meets. 

H. Bon Durant wis .host- 
Bridge club yesterday eve- 
T^ierc was three tables^ and at 
of the evening a delicious 
wis .served. 



Sleigh-ride Party. 

Last Saturday a group of 

people spent the fore part 



evening sleigh-riding, and 
gathered at the home of Mrs. 
Johnson where they enjoyed i 
ous lunch. Games and dancing 
the diversion for the evening, 
were twenty-four- guests. 



young 1 

the 

later 

Kegina 

deiici- 

formed 

There 



Old Time Dance. 

The Daughters of Norway will 

sponsor an old time dance ti at will 

be held in the Sons of Norway hall 
Monday evening Jan. 18th. There will 

be old fime music and lunch, and 
everyone" is invited. j 

j -Royal Neighbors. 
Next Wednesday evening at the 
Masonic hall* the Royal neighbors wil 



hold their installation. Mrs. 
Wassgren will be Oracle; Alice 
son, vice oracle; Pansy Collin 



oracle; Ethel McClelland, charlclelor; 



Bessie Robinson, recorder; 
Barden, j receiver; Olga 
marshall; Lillian Whiting, assistant 
marshall; Orpha White, inner 



Laura 
Nelson, 



^ . _____ dentin- 
al; Christine Ohm, outside sentinel 



Isabel Schuster, manager; 
Hoppa,_musican; Mary Lane, 



Selma Fontaine, Courage; Olga Rol 



tion. 



land, Modesty; Anna Hendry 
selfishness; and Hilda Malone 
durance. 

A soci ll time with dancing and re- 
freshments will follow the 



Abbie 

Erick- 

past 



7 Eastern Star. 

A regular meeting of the Eastern 
Star willibe held at the Masonic hall 
on Wednesday evening, Jan. 13. It is 
requested! that all members be pre- 
sent. •** 

Mrs. Haug Hostess. 

Mrs. CI M. Haug entertained a 
number of her friends at her home 
last Tuesday afternoon. The hours 
.were spent playing cards, and a de- 
licious luncheon was served at the 
close of the afternoon. Twelve guests 
were present. 

*** 
i Rebekahs Install. 

The Lyon Rebekah lodge will in- 
stall olficers on Thursday evening at 
the I. 0. 0. F. hall. Mrs. Noami 
Bredeson I will be Noble grand; Mi's. 
Ruth Hoium, vice grand; Miss Olive 
Lonson, recording, secretary; Miss 
Lillian Eide, financial secretary; Mrs. 
Katherine Greene, treasurer; Miss 
Lilly Brurud, warden; Mrs. Minnie 
Ruane, conductress; Mrs. Minnie 
Rude, ch-jplain, Thora .Nelson . and 
Bertha Lonson, supporters; Mable 
Johnson, inside guardian; Ruth An- 
derson, outside guardian; Marie Iver- 
son, musican. 

A social hour will follow the instal- 
lation, at; which time the out going 
officers will act as hostesses. 

Officers Installed. 

Riverside Encampment No. 22 of 
the I .0. 0. F. held installation of 
officers Friday evening, Jan. 8. Fol- 
lowing are the members that took the 
oath of office. John L. Magnuson, 
chief patriarch; Oscar Pederson, 
senion warden; Alfred Bredeson, high 
priest; H. G. Goethe, junior warden; 
Adolf Ecklund, scribe; H. M. Gren- 
dahl, treasurer; A. G. Gabrielson, 
guide; Alfred Stenberg, inside watch; 
Carl Melby, outside sentinel; Alf 0. 
Anderson, first watch; Percy Favrow, 
second watch; Charles Fisher, third 
watch; A. M. Langseth, fourth watch; 
Bernard Knudsen, first guard of 
tent; E. M. Bennes, second guard of 
tent. The installation was conducted 
by D. D. G. P. Va! B. Chaping of 
Roseau. 



Gusta 
Faith; 



talla- 



Library Notes. 

The regular monthly meeting of 
the library board was held on Wed- 
nesday, January 6th. at 2 p. m. All 
members were present except the 
president :of the council who is ex- 
officio member. 

Besides the regular reports, bills 
and communications, the list of sub- 
scriptions to periodicals for the en- 
suing year was discussed. It was de- 
cided to discontinue several of the 
less used publications and to add 
Current History arid The Golden 
Book. These will begin with the 
March issue. 

The children's story hour will be 
held in the juvenile department of 
the library on Saturday afternoon, 
January 16th, beginning at 1:15 p. 
m. All children of the first, second 
and third -grades are cordially invit- 
ed. 



Community Club Meets. 

The Girls Community club held 
their regular meeting at the Legion 
club rooms last Monday evening. 
Plans were made to hold a card party 
in the hall next Monday evening. 

A musical' comedy, "Hellol There", 
will be -sponsored by the club, and 
committees were appointed to have 
charge of thut work. The. chairmen 
are as follows; Miss Agnes Sands, 
advertising; Miss Clara Halvorson, 
program; Mrs. Mi. Brink, costume; 
and Mrs. Harold Eide, ticket. 

Dancing formed the chief amuse- 
ment for the evening, the features of 
this .were a Virginia Reel and Broom 
Dance supervised by Miss " Maude 
Johnson. 

The hostess for the evening were 

Misses Marian McMillian, Bessie Sed- 

lacek, Olive and Lena Lonson, Bertha 

Ordal and Lola Ridgeway. 

*** 

Auxiliary to Meet. 

The Women's Auxiliary of the 
American Legion will hold their 
next meeting at the Legion club 
rooms on Tuesday evening, Jan. 19. 
The hostesses for the day will be 
Mesdames George Nelson, L. A. Her- 
manson, Arthur Auringer, and Kern 
Olson. At the last meeting it was 
decided to have a membership drive 
Three Tenders were choosen, namely 
Mrs. Roy Erickson, Mrs. Verner Nel- 
son and Mrs. Martin E. Carlson. At 
the close of the drive the two losing 
sides will entertain for the winners. 
•** 
Ukelele Club. 

The mmebers of the Ukelele club 
held a regular meeting in the Le- 
gion club rooms last evening. Under 
the able supervision of Miss Myrtle 
Williams they are all beginning to 
handle the "ukes" like veterans. 
*»* 

Olson-Provfincher 

Lfist Tuesday afternoon occurred 
the marriage of Miss Ada Olsom .of 
Greenbush and Doris Provepsber, 
■son of J. Provencher of this cifcjrhe 
cererriony took place at Red l5ake 
Falls. Saturday evening they left 
for Minneapolis where they will make 
their home in the future. 
*** 
Entertains Informally. 

An informal party was given at the 
0. N. Olson home last Friday evening 
in honor of a number of out of town 
people who have been spending the 
holidays in this vicinity. The hours 
were passed in a social manner, and 
at midnight a delicious lunch was 
served. Those present were Misses 
Lillian Steenerson of Erskine , Ethel 
Conklin of Moorhead, Inga Dahlen of 
Grand Forks, Vivian Olson of Crook.s- 
ston, Agnes Kvall, Clara Olson, Ida 
and Gertrude Steenerson, Hazel. 
Frances and Pearl Conklin and Mr. 
and Mrs. Clayton Steenerson and 
Messers Ogden Rose of Ayr, N. Dak. 
Orton Olson of St Paul, Leroy Rude, 
""■■'lie and Eber Conklin, Lawrence 
Ecklund, Earl Rude, Alfred Steener- 
son and Emil Johnson. 



Regular Meeting, 

A regular meeting of the Macabee 
lodge, will" be held Tuesday evening 
atlthe Masonic hall. Each member is 
urged to be present for this meeting 
as plans for the coming installation 
will be discussed. 

•»• 

' Sons and Daughters Install. 

At a joint meeting of the Sons and 
Daughters of Norway held in their 
haU last Thursday evening the 
officers for the insuing year were in- 
stalled. Mrs. E. M. Bennes was the 
out going president, and her place 
was taken by Mrs. C. F. Erickson; 
Mrs. Jack Nelson, vice president; 
Mrs. T. C. Lindberg, secretary; 'Mrs. 
Iver Aaseby, assistant secretary; 
Mrs. Ed. Haraldson, financial secre- 
tary; Mrs. Bernhard . Knudsen, trea- 
surer; Mrs. Martin Evenson, fcere- 
moner; Mrs. A. Dybvik, marshall; Ida 
Legvold, assistant marshall; Mrs. A. 
Haugen inside guardian; Mrs. C. L. 
Peterson, outside guardian, Mrs; 
John Jordal, Mrs. T. Tharaldson, Miss 
Lillian Eide and Miss Lilly Brurud, 
sick committee. 

This was followed by the Sonfi of 
Norway installing the following 
officers: Bernhard Knudsen, presi- 
dent; Jorgen Eide, vice president; Ed. 
Ness, judge; Tilford Reierson, secre- 
tary; N. J. Anderson, financial secre- 
tary; L. H. Larson, treasurer; Dr. P. 
L. Vistaunet, regent; S. Myrom, and 
A. Grendahl, marshalls; Ole Offer- 
dahl, inside guard; Haaken Hanson, 
trustee for three years; S. Kolberg, 
historian. 

The remainder of the evening was 
spent in a social manner, and a de- 
licious luncheon was served at mid- 
night. 



.PAGE THREE 



■ A CURE THAT COSTS NOTHING. 

Grade crossing accidents can be 
! prevented, not by taxing public for 

grade changes, but by automobile 

drivers stopping and looking before 

crossing railroad tracks, 
j This is proven by experiments of 

the Standarad Oil Company, of Indi- 
j ana, which requires all its truck 

drivers to stop, look, and listen be- 

■ fore crossing, railroad tracks. 

j In the year 1924, the vehicles op- 
I erated by that company crossed rail- 
I road tracks 31,000,000 times without 
i an accident. 

j Public officials and others, having 
j to do with the regulation of traffic 
[and avoidance of accidents may well 
! consider the significance of this per- 
f ormance. 

i It is a remedy for accidents which* 
insures easy and quick cure at no 
expense to taypayers, where as to 
remedy by grade changes would take 
half a century for the 256,000 cross- 
ings in the United States and cost 
the taxpayers no less than $15,000,- ' 
000,000. 



A French movie will be shown ' in 
Northfield, Minnesota, January 15, 
under the auspices of the French Cir- 
cle of Carleton college. 



' " THE CHURCHES I 

* r— » 

Scandinavian Ev. Free Church. 

. ' J. 0. Jacobson, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a. m. 
. Morning worship at 11 a. m. 
Young Peoples meeting at 4 p. m. 
English language. 
Evening services at 7:30 p. in. 
Prayer meeting on Thursday eve- 
ning at 712 Main Ave. North. 
... 

Christian Science. 
Regular Sunday services are held 
at 11 a. m. in the church at La Bree 
Ave and First St. Subject Sunday, 
Jan. 17 "Life." Sunday school at 10 
a. m. Wednesday evening meetings 
are held at 7:46. The public is 
cordially invited to these services. 
«*. 
Angustana Church. 
Albip A. Larson, pastor. 
Services in American language 
next .Sunday at 10:80. Sunday school 
at 11:46. 

The Mission Society meets next 
Friday, Jan. 16 at'4 o'clock at the 
church. . 

... 
Sw. Ev. Mission Church 
O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 
Sunday, Jan. 17. Sunday school at 
10:00 arm. No services. 

Tuesday. Jan. 19. Prayer meeting 
and Bible study at A. V. Brodin's 
Home, St. Paul Av. S. 7:30 p. m. 

Wednesday, Jan. 20: Rev. C. S. 
Lundquist from Ogelvie, Minn., will 
preach at 8 p. m 1 . All welcome . 
**• 
Mavie Lutheran Church. 
E. O. Sabo, Pastor. 
Services Sunday, January ' 17, in 
the Highlanding church at 11 a.m.and 
in the Silverton church at 2:30 a.m. 
The confirmation class will meet 
after services Sunday. 

The Telemarken Ladies' Aid will 
be entertained Thursday afternoon, 
January 21 by Mrs. Halvor Waale. 
*** 

Zion Church. 

■ Aug. Bredeson. Pastor. 

Sunday school at 10 a.m. Services 
at 11 a.m. and 7:45 p.m. Religious 
instruction Friday afternoon from 1 
to 4. Ladies' Aid Thursday after- 
noon, January 21. All welcome. Ser- 
vices in Rindal church Sunday at 2:30 
p.m., January 17. " 

*** ' 

Goodride;e Lutheran Church. 

V. O. Aker, Pastor. 

Sunday, January 17: Sunday school 
at Giodridere at 10 a.m. and English 
services at 11 a.m. Communion ser- 
vices at Deer Park at 2 p.m Annual 
business meeting of the United Ladies 
Aid Wednesday, January 20 at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Hanson. 
Bethany Ladies' Aid meet with Mrs. 
A. Newton, Thursday, January 21 The 
confirmants meet as usual: Deer 
Park every Tuesday at 2 p.m. At 
Erie every Saturday at 11 a.m., and 
at Goodridge every Saturday at 2:30 
p.m. 



Trinity Lutheran Church. 
S< L. Tallakson, Pastor. 
Sunday school and week-day school 
for any and all as usual. Come. 

Morning worship, English language 
with sermon topic: "Jesus at the; 
Wledding," 11 a. m. 

Junior choir and Junior L. L: song- 
services at 7:45 p. m. Young and old 
urged to come and enjoy this service- 
Annual business meeting held on 
Tuesday, the 19th at 3 p. m. Banquet 
supper for all adult church members,. • 
men and women, same day 5:30 to 
hear plans and prospects for church, 
building. No plate charge. 

No Bible hour next week, pastor 
being at the pastoral conference at 
Fergus Falls, the 20th and 21st. 

"I must be in my Father's house." 
Cornel Welcome! 

.«• 

St. John's Lutheran Church. 
E. H. Kreidt, Pastor. 
Sunday school 9:30 a. m. 
English services 10:30 a. m. 



* W. C. T. U. Program. 
A law enforcement program ob- 
serving the national constitutional 
prohibition anniversary will be given 
Saturday evening, Jan. 16., at the 
M. E. Church under the auspices of 
the W. C. T. U. A good program 
consisting of speeches and musical 
numbers will be given. An invitation 
is extended to the public. 

Wool Association To 

■ Hold Annual Meeting- 

The. annual meeting of the Minne- 
sota Cooperative Wool Growers as- 
sociation will be held at the Old 
Capitol, St. Paul, on Jan.. 14 starting- 
az 10 a. m. 

R. E. Jones, general manager or 
Lhe association, has just issued a. 
pamphlet to th.2 menbers which is a. 
vatuable compendium ef information 
en the growing of sheep and wool 
and which deals with breeding, feed- 
ing, housing, ges era! care, sheaung. 
Candling of the fierce ami markc-liiijr 
of the produc\ 

The pamphlet reveals th>it 'he as- 
sociation will handle this season ap- 
proximately 600,000 pounds of wool; 
that sales made on Dec. 1 will aver- 
age net to the grower 43c to 46 M: c 
f. o. b. Wabasha, for the bright 
mediums, that members and patrons 
number about 1800; that it has the 
reputation among Eastern buyers of 
putting up its wools in better condi- 
tion and better graded than else- 
where in the Northwest: that its edu- 
cational work for the improvement 
in quality and condition of the fleece 
is producing gratifying results, and 
that it aims to put Minnesota on the 
map along with the best wool states 
in the country for desirable wools 
and well bred sheep. 



An evening high school with a 
trained faculty and fully accredited, 
has been opened in San Juan, Porto 
Rico. 





JANUARY SPECIALS 

Commencing Thursday, Jan. 14, and ending Saturday, Jan. 23, this store will give unusual values in 

women's, men's and children's wearing apparel, consisting of 




Overcoats 



MEN'S SUITS 
One C 

Men's Suits, values 
S35.00, sizes 36 
While they last 

$19.95 



These are real 



Suits 



Shoes 



Ready-to-Wear 



Dry Goods 



Remnants 



Dresses 



Hosiery 



to 
to 42. 



\auies 



OVERCOATS 

$18.00 values $13.95 

$22.50 values $17.85 

$25.00 values $19.95 

$30.00 values $24.75 

$35.00 values $28.75 



MEN'S and BOYS' 
SHOES 

$2.50 values .....$1.65 

$3.00 values ......$2.45 

$4.00 values ._$3.19 

$5.00 values $3.95 

$6.00 values $4.95 



SCOTCH CAPS 
95c 



MEN'S and BOYS' 

SWEATERS 

95c 



MEN'S HORSE- 

HIDE MITTS 

89c 



MEN'S FLEECE 

LINED UNION 

SUITS 

$1.19 



DRESS SHIRTS 



$1.50 values 

$2.00 values 

$2.50 values 

$3.00 values 



Women's and' Men's 
HOUSE SLIPPERS 

Reduced 

20 per cent 



ALL FLANNEL 
SHIRTS 

Reduced as follows: 

$2.00. values ......$1.59 

$2.50 values _...$1.85 
$3.00 values.... $2.35 

$4.00 value $2.95 



_$1.19 

.$1.65. 

$1.95 

.$2.45 



BOYS JUVENILE 
SUITS 

Just a Few Left. 

50 per cent 

REDUCTION 



LADIES' SILK 
DRESSES 

ONE EACK 

Regular prices ?19.50 to 

$42.50.. special 

$10.75 



WASH DRESSES 

Linens, voiles and 
Pongees, special 

$1.59 



LADIES' WINTER 
COATS 

One group, special 

$8.75 



TWILLTNE AND 
FAILLINE 

54-inch wide 

$3,59 



DRESSES 

Figured Crepes, 
. Flannels, Special 

$6.75 



WINDSOR 
FLANNEL 

36-inch special 

_8c Per Yard 



i 



CHILDREN'S 
SWEATERS 

$1.65 values $1.00 

$3.98 values-. $1.98 
$7.00 values— $4".98 
$8.50 values..- $6.98 




THE BIG ST0RE7QHRIFTY PEQPU 




THIEF RIVER FALLS. 



MINNESOTA 



McCill's Patterns 

We now carry a 
complete stock of 
McCall's Dress and 
Embroidery Pat- 
terns. 



Each little girl ac- 
companied by her 
mother, will receive 
a doll pattern free. 



Cotton Blankets 

High grade cotton 

blankets 64x76, 

special 

$1.69 



REMNANTS 

Short lengths of silks, 
woolens, georgettes, sat- 
eens, flannels and other 
materials at 



LESS THAN COST 




i ... l.:',-._-i.: : 



_•_____. -.^Zi___ 






u' :■ . ••-^ii^-Wi-j-^i^-gi&fe; , 



'_ i <_^f_i 



:^8^j>^>3^a3>j 






\ 



PAGE FOUR 



I 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Thief JRivefft Trjbune 



'Published Every Wednesi 
■ Established 1001 



LUDWIG I. KOE - 
WILLIAM E. DAHLQUIST 
H. S. SNYDEK 



President 

" Editor 

City Editor 



Official Paper of Pennington 
Entured us secoud-ciass mutter at the 



SUBSCRIPTION' $2.00 1'EltJ YEAR 



COMING 100 STRONG. 
Word was received from Winni- 
peg today by Commercial Club offi- 
cials that the delegation from that 
city which is staging the j "Pine to 
Palm" tour over the Jefferson High- 
way, will invade Thief. River .tails 
Saturday night, January 2.$, one hun- 
dred strong. Thief River balls is 
the first night stop of this great cara- 
van. Deeeeeelighted. 



CARRY 01?. 
The combination poultry and al- 
falfa show held in Thief River Falls 
last week was an unqualified success. 
This success was not an accident. An 
event of that kind does not just hap- 
pen of its own accord. To make that 
event a success required a lot of sacri- 
fice in the ^orm of labor and money 
on the part of those who served on 
the various committees.' As a result 
of the efforts of those.' who "put it 
over" the entire community is receiv- 
ing thousands of dollars worth of fa- 
vorable publicity. And when consid- 
ered from this angle the sacrifice was 
a miglitv profitable investment. 
} . 



eventually this project will be an 'ac- 
complished fact. The northwest has 
a balance of jpower in the affairs, of 
the nation which, if properly con- 
centrated and applied, can be con- 
verted into a ; real force. 

Arid speaking of oceans, Col. 
Ralph^Webb, 1 mayor of Winnipeg, 
gave a highly interesting and in- 
structive talk' Thursday night on the 
importance of Hudson Bay as a snip- 
ing point for western , Canada and 
northwestern- United States. On a 
flat map Hudson Bay seems to be 
far removed from 'the possible paths 
of commerce but when considered on 
a globe it is easily apparent that this 
great body of water is not only veiy 
close to northern European ports but 
is also quite accesible to. the in tenor 
of the North American continent, 
According to the Colonel the inter- 
ests of eastern Canada are blocking 
the construcion of a few miles of 
rail which is necessary to connect 
Port Nelson with the interior. Their 
situation is evidently a parallel to 
ours. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926. 



NYE SEATED 
Gerald P. Nye, who was recently 
appointed by the governor of North 
Dakota to succeed the late Senator 
Edwin i ; . Ladd as Senator from that 
state, lias been accepted by the Sen- 
ate by a vote of 41 to 39, according 
to news dispatches this morning. 
There was undoubtedly some ir- 
regularity in the appointment of 
Nye. A strict interpretation of the 
letter of the law would have dis- 
qualified him. But the spirit of the 
law entitles North Dakota to this re- 



presentation and the 
important than the ] 
per house is to be c 
taking this broader 
question. 



spirit is ' more 

etter. The up- 

mgratulated for 

view on the 



PLAY B { ALL. ■ 
Local ; baseball enthusiasts are 
sounding the call J for a baseball 
team for this summer and the pre- 
sent time is not too early to start 
action along this line. ' Small town 
baseball has suffsred a serious relapse 
in the last few years. Automobiles 
and golf, have detracted the interest 
of adults and the high schools seem 



to be concentrating 
en basket ball and 
players and deficits 
game hard body 



more and more 
football. Salaried 
have dealt J-he 
blows in many 



towns. But baseball is still the great 
national game of America and it is 
worthy of that title. There is enough 
local material here 
home talent team, 
credit to |the city 
healthy recreation 
community. 



to form a fast 
that would be a 
and a source' bf 
for- the entire 



*- the red Lake road 

Another monun ent to the aggres- 
sive spirit of the Thief River Falls 
Commercial club vill be erected this 
summer in the building of the road 
to Red Lake. The struggle to get 
this roadi built has extended over sev- 
eral years and although it will un- 
doubtedly be several more years be- 
fore it' really comes into its own as an 
important highway there seems to be 
good reason to believe that at some 
time in the not too distant future this 
road is destined to become one of the 
busiest thoroughfares leading to this 
city. | 

' One of the immediate benefits 
which this road will confer upon the 
people of the northwestern section of 
Minnesota and North Dakota is its 
making available tor recreation one of 
the largest fresh water lakes in the 
United States. With its 440 square 
miles of ; water, excellent fishing, 340 
miles of | the finest white sand beach 
in the comment and a shore line 
dressed in a primitive splendor as yet 
unmarred by civilization, this lake 
should develop into a wonderful sum- 
mer playground. 



COME 6 { N OCEAN. 
The Tidewater Congress held in 
St. Pauljlast wejjk united and chrys- 
talized the sentiment of the north- 
west states in the fight for a water- 
way from the Great Lakes to the sea. 
' This united effort will not fail and 

v ; ■' 



SMOKE SCREAMS 

The annual effort to "Save Agri- 
culture" is being performed. There 
is little excitement evident even a- 
mong those most vitally interested, 
The "plan" in the spotlight this year 
is the "Noyes Plan." It isn't 
noisy as the name might lead one to 
suppose — not as noisy as some plans 
with a more quiet title.. It has much 
merit. It embodies the same princi- 
ple of business as that used by the 
manufacturers when they sell their 
surplus products on a foreign market 
at a lower price than that which they 
demand at home. This is good busi- 
ness in manufacturing because it does 
away with unemployment and idle 
factories. The American consumer 
would npt pay less for these products 
if the manufacturer put out only so 
much as was necessary for home con- 
sumption. And what is good business 
for the manufacturer of machinery 
should be good business for the manu- 
facturer of wheat and corn and oats. 
We believe the plan would prove ben- 
eficial to the northwest if given a trial 
but it's our guess that it will not be 
given a trial. Some day, maybe, if 
we wait long enough, congress will 
recognize the Northwest. If you are 
seriously waiting for that time to 
come, our advice would be to prepare 
for a nice long wait. By the time re- 
lief does come, let us hope our grand- 
children will not need it. Under the 
circumstances the crafty thing to do 
is to try. to get along without it. The 
development of 'dairying and diversi- 
fication proves that most of the farm-- 
ers have alrea'dy come to this conclu- 
sion, and given half a chance during 
the next few years, the farmer is going 
to work out his own salvation in spite 
of the politician. Of course when the 
sun of agricultural prosperity reaches 
its meridian height again every poli- 
tical party and faction will claim the 
credit. It is to laugh. 



La Vogue 

FOR 

HOSIERY 

Ask for 

Wayne Knit 
No. 793 - 

A service stocking knitted from 
eleven threads of silk, garter 
hem and top knitted from ex- 
tra strong two thread lisle. 

FULL - FASHIONED 
SILK BOOT 

Rose Taupe 
Gun Metal 
Mauve Taupe 
Atmosphere 
Long Beach 
Almond 
F. Nude 

Price $1.50 Pair 

No. 798- -Chiffon 
Silk Hose 

ROSE TAUPE 

$1.50 Pair 

Lai VOGUE 

GARMENT SHOP 

H. O. Melby, Prop. 



OWNERSHIP EXPENSIVE ' 
Ownership ' ,qf .an automobile 
seems to be more or less <of a serious 
thing. Responsibility aa a result" of 
ownership can follow you through the 
most astonishing conditions and cir- 
cumstances. Last summer a man 
named Hess to all intents and pur- 
poses stole a car belonging to Fred 
Schtlpih of St. Cloud. Mr. Schilpin 
had given Hess the car to be deliver- 
ed to a buyer. Instead of delivering 
the car Hess went for a joyride with 
two lady friends. He ran the 'car 
off the grade near Osakis and the 
girls we're hurt. They brought suit 
against Schilpin, owner of the car, and 
a jury awarded them $8,000 damages. 
Last week a motion for a new trial 
on the "ground that Hess in no way 
represented Schilpin, but in fact had 
taken the car directly contrary, to 
Schilpin's orders and that the verdict 
was therefore a great miscarriage of 
justice~was denied.* To the ordinary 
outsider who looks on a court as a 
place of justice, and not a place of 
split haired foolishness over technical- 
ities, the case with its outcome is quite 
a surprise. — Hutchinson Press. 

— • -» ' &M 
THERE'S A REASON 

The President, the politicians, and 
the metropolitan 'press are having a 
great deal to say these days about the 
condition of agriculture and about 
remedies for that condition. 

Yet, it is .surprising how many col- 
umns and columns of speeches, state- 
ments and interviews one may read,- 
and find nothing but words, words, 
words. 

We are not pessimistic about ' the 
future of agriculture, but optimism 
alone is not the remedy. Too many 
good people are too pessimistic, and 
too many good people — overwhelmed 
by the flood of meaningless words — 



are too prone to take refuge in opti- 
imsm.-., 'j,-:;;. : ' ■,- ■■ :. " 

. During the past. five years, the ave- 
rage farm in Minnesota decreased in 
value $29.47 per acre. The aggre- 
gate decrease in value of all the farms 
of the state was $905,162,997— near- 
ly a round, billion of dollars. Some 
body blow, that. Incidentally,: the 
percentage of farm tenantry rose from 
24.7 per cent to 27.1 per. cent. We 
also need not overlook the healthy 
sign that the number of farms in the 
state increased about 10,000, and that 
the average farm is smaller — 169.3 
acres in 1920 to '159.6 acres in W25. 

Remedies? Yes, remedies galore, 
but the dominant notes in the whole 
discussion are politics and selfishness. 

The politicians are out to catch 
votes and will back any proposal that 
appeals, however unsound it may be. 
The big selfish interests intent on 
"maintaining their present control of 
farm marketing content themselves to 
exposing the unsoundness of the poli- 
ticians' remedies. And what a chorus 
of jazz and jangles there is. - 

Meanwhile the farmer can ':ardly 
be heard at all. He has been more 
hurt than the politicians, but if he is 
saying anything at all, he cannot be 
heard above the squeal of the politi- 
cians. He is more sound in his think- 
ing than apy bunch of brokers or. gam- 
blers, and yet he can hardly be blam- 
ed for not having any enthusiasm for 
joining hands with those who have 
made him the "fall guy" in the present 
marketing system. 

The farmer pretty generally knows 
where he is hurt, and by whom and 
how and why. But his voice has not 
been .clear. His political expression 
has been too often carefree, and his 
business expression of what he w:is 
trying to get at has been beset with 
many difficulties, but very quietly, the 
farmer is going ahead and doing 



things which will confound the poli- 
ticians and overwhelm the selfish. The 
farmer and the farmer's quiet, hard- 



working leaders deserve a great deal 
more attention than they arc gettingi 
—Morris Tribune. '- 



A Farmer's 



"Farm Service" stores specialize on 
the farmer's needs and problems. 
They offer you more for your money 
than you can buy in any other way 
by giving merchandise of establish- 
ed value at a fair price. In these 
stores you will discover short-cut 
ways to do things, articles that will 
save your time, your temper, your 
money, and make your life more 
comfortable. Make a practice of 
going to your "Farm Service" Hard- 
ware Store. It pays! 



Christenson Hdw. Co. 

"The Winchester Store? 
t Hardware — Fuel 

We GiTe S. & H.Green Trading Sumps 



NEXT 
WEEK 

Will, be the 
first of a 
series of 
mesf-ogea • 
.about 
seasonable 
Hardware 
you need. 




Buy Where You 
See This Tag [ 

2____2C 




Condensed Comparative Statements 

OF THE 

First and Peoples State Bank 



RESOURCES 
Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts .. 



Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures. 

Other Real Estate ; 

Bonds & Securities . 



Cash and due from Banks. 



Dec. 31st, 
1922 

-$426,793.97 

- 1,250.74 
_■ 50,000.00 
_ 53,789.39 
_ 10,890.00 
_ 41,722.76 



Dec. 31st, 
1923 

$406,728.14 

1,745.45 

50,000.00 

61,363.50 

14,195.77 

118,914.91 



Dec. 31st, 
1924 

$363,235.51 

NONE 

50,000.00 

69,337.39 

100,021.30 

128,280.10 



Dec. 3l8t, 
1925 

$336,214.10 

53.33 

50,000.00 

75,921.35 

105,165.17 

141,733.42 



LiABmnES 



Capital Stock. 
Surplus — 



Undivided Profits— 

Reserve .for Depi-eeiation. 

Deposits 



$584,446.86 

$ 75,000.00 

15,000.00 

6,299.30 

900.00 

. 487,247.56 


$652,947.77 

$ 75,000.00 

15,000.00 

8,572.46 

900.00 

553,475.31 


$710,874.30 

$ 75,000.00 

15,000.00 

6,829.26 

900.00 

613,145.04 


$709,087.37 

$ 75,000.00 

15,000.00 

2,600.00 

900.00 

615,587.37 



$584,446.86 $652,947.77 $710,874.30 $709,087.37 



We invite your attention to condensed comparative statements made up from 
reports as required by the banking department at the close of each year. 

The gradual reduction in loans during the past four years indicates a healthy 
condition of our territory in that loans have been paid during a period of severe 
depression. 

The ever increasing of cash and secondary reserves indicates the conservative 
policy of this institution, by preparing itself to meet any emergency. 

The increasing and maintained deposits prove money has been made in our 
territory and that diversified farming and the raising of alfalfa does pay. 

'' This institution stands ready to give co-operation in any form that any good 
bank can safely extend, to make Thief River Falls the most prosperous commun- 
ity in Northwestern Minnesota. L H. IRGENS, Cashier. 







MORGAN'S 9c SALE 



STILL GOIJSfG 

OJV 



II 



:.,. V. -". 



*"«e: 



'■■■ ■■!'■■ ' "->vi- ':H^> ■:'■-'-■ Y|sa__1^^p^^.^ J^^.^;-v- ..■;.' .. j 



-y^ 1 ?. :*•.>■. 



"".-^v.-JJf.;^, 'rV*' w^j; 



s*?5 



«v155SR^P?^i 



.• ^ : '--^--' 



' .V. ■ .- ■ 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926. 



TfflgP RIVER fiVLLS TRIBUNE 



SWpEPSTAKES 
ARE ANNOUNCED 



Gustafson and 

Win $50 Loving Cups 
From Local Banks. 



4. A half million dollars would no 
doubt ■ maintain- the best educational 
system the county ever experienced 
having. There are many many 
many ithings that. you could do with 
an additional half million dollars 
many } of which you need and would 
like to do. 

Thej objective to have ultimately 



Rosendahl 1B,00Oi acres of alfalfa is surely rea- 
sonable for its means approximately 
15 acres of alfalfa per farm for each 
of the 1100 to 1200 farms of the 
county which average nearly, 240 
acres per farm. 

r, n . , ' . . . . With this important development 

Dave Gustafson, local machinery I should expect to see other import- 
dealer, won the SoO loving cup offered ant changes and developments take 
by the First National bank for the ; place, just as you know they are al- 
best male bird in she recent Poultry ; ready taking place. For example; 
show with his Barred Rock cockerel; | the sweet clover acreage in Penning- 
2 1 «« Rosei ™ ahl , « Warren won ton County has grown from 447 acres 
the $50 cup offered by the First and \y>. 1920 to 6564 acres In 1925. The 
peoples bank for the best female inicorn acreage has grown from 4884 
the show with his White Rock hen. ; acres in 1920 to 5049 acres in 1925. 
fcacn will receive $3 cash prizes of- 1 The swine population of the county 



Growth of Fire Department 
t Is, Noteworthy 



fered by the Association. 

j L. A. Westphal of Thief River Falls 
had the best cock bird in the shi 
a! White Wyandotte. The prize x 
?S from the Association and a large 
box of chocolates from W. A. Bishop. 
J C. V. Dols of Rosewood showed the 
best pullet in the show, a Black 
Minorca. 

! About 500 birds were on display 
this year but not quite so many as 
the year previous. 

| The village of Hazel won a prize of 
$10. from the First and Peoples bank 
for exhibiting the most beautiful 
booth; Holt $10 from the First Na- 
tional for the largest variety of home 
products in its booth St. Hilaire 
also had a fine display. The Thief 
River creamery had a booth but was 
not entered in the competition. 

[A complete list of prize winners 
will appear in next week's issue of 
The Tribune, the list not being avail- 
able this week. 



Speech of F. E. Balmer 
State County Agent Leader 

j (-auo 33cj iuojj panui;uoQ) 
alfalfa seed and in 1924 the alfalfa 



has increased from 3244 in 1920 to 
4561 in 1925. The poultry population 
has remained approximately the 
same but its quality has greatly im- 
proved. The sheep population in- 
creased from- 6250 in 1920 to 7900 
in 1925. Sugar beet growing has be- 
come a new^ farm enterprise during 
recent years starting with four acres 
acreages varying since from 100 to 
- 1 - a demonstration in 1918 with 
2200 per year. 

Pennington County is to be con- 
gratulated upon the thorough going 
fashion in which it has gone about 
accomplishing this constructive pro- 
gram of betterment. It is evident 
that you believe that what is worth 
doing 'at all is. worth doing well. 
What has taken place here in recent 
years will continue to greater fulfill- 
ment ' It would seem that Penning- 
ton County is a living example of the 
prophetic vision which Abraham Lin- 
coln entertained for American Agri- 
culture' when in 1859, nearly 66 years 
ago,' in the only speech he ever made 
on the_ subject of fanning, he spoke 
these immortal words: 

It is certain that thorough culti- 
vation would spare half, or more 



(Continued from page one.) 
agreeing that a better man could not 
possibly be found. "Paul", a3 he is 
familiarly called by all his fire fight- 
ers, never lets his mind wander very 
far from the fire department. He 
talks fire department, thinks fire de- 
. .ui-tment, praises fire department — 
and he never misses a fire. He is 
64 years old, but as spry as any of 
his men for all that. 

The first uniforms consisted of 
.-im^ver pants were handy when the 
fire bell began to ring out the warn- 
ing, bright red flannel shirts and 
regulation caps. Many were the eve- 
nings spent by wives of the firemen, 
making those shirts the cream of 
perfection, each hoping that her 
"man" would outshine the next one 
in appearance. This first public ap- 
pearance of the department members 
was on July 4, 1894 when they were 
in charge of the celebration. 

For two years the only remunera- 
tion received by the members was 
the honor of being a fireman, and 
<ch was fined |1 for every fire vp 
missed where water was used, and 50 
cents when water was not used. A 
fine of 25 cents for each meeting 
missed also was imposed. On Febru- 
ary 25, 1896, howeter, the city council 
voted to pay the firemen each $1 for 
every fire alarm to which they re- 
sponded. In 1899 were they permitt- 
ed to elect their own chief, and not 
until 1912 was a fire team provided 
for. 



Nils Rein, Violinist 

Will Play Here Friday 

■Nils Eein, famed violiinst, who has 
appeared before local audiences sev- 
eral times; will be Dresented Friday 
night of this week at the Sons of 
Norway Hall under the auspices of 
the Sons of Norway lodge. He will 
render several classical selections and 
a few improvisations of Scandinavian 
folk songs. 

LINCOLN WINS FROM STEPHEN 

The Lincoln high school basketball 
team took the long end of a 19 to 
7 score in a game with Stephen at 
the city auditorium last Friday night. 

The contest was slowed up con- 
siderable during the first half, by the 
many fumbles on both .sides. The 
score at the end of the, half was 9 to 
3 in Thief River Falls favor. 

.The locals made a spurt during the 
last period, however, and piled lip a 
heavy lead which Stephen could not 
overcome. 



Ho Auditor's Convention. 
County Auditor T. P. Anderson will 
leave Sunday evening for 'Minne- 
apolis, where he' will attend the 
annual Auditor's convention. Be- 
fore returning to his home in 
this city, he will spend a short time 
in Mankato as the guest of his son, 
Glen, who is employed with the Stan- 
dard Oil Company there. He ex- 
pects to be gone about, a week. 



Now equipment has been 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default hUTlog been mode in the pay- 
ment of the auin of Fifteen Hundred 
Forty Dollars, which Is claimed to he due 
and 1b due at the date of this uotlce, upon a 
certain Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by John Morgan and liilma Mor- 
gan, hiB wife. Mortgagors, to Albert S. 
Lleberman, Mortgagee, bearing date the 
loth day of September 11)23, and with a 
power of sale therein cotituliu'd. duly re- 
corded In the office of the HeglBler of 
Deeds in and for the County of Penning- 
ton, and State of Minnesota, jn the 20th. 
day of September 1023, at o'clock A. M.. 
in Book 51 of Mortgages, on page 203. 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 



acreage went to 3712 acres. Then tnan half, the cost of land, simply 



ytju secured another carload of seed 
for local distribution and the acreage 
in] 1925 leaped to 6287 acres, though 
the latter census figure was obtained 
before much of the 1925 plantings 
were made so it has been conserva- 
tiyely estimated that the present 
acreage iij^rom 1000 to 1300 acres 
above that figjire or a total of ap- 
proximately 7500 acres at the present 
time. 

[Now let's drive down this import- 
ant mile post of progress. When 
this important campaign in 1920 it 
then had only one acre of alfalfa for 
every 95 acres then growing wild 
hay. Now at -the end of 1925 Pen- 



Tn'tin+n- I,-.. U f ,z ,. -" limn is prouu or wnat lie uocs iiui. 

^°9?™^%rt*?^ a J°l well. W«h the. former his heart is 



because the- same product would be 
got from half or less than half, the 
quantity of land. This proposition is 
self evident, and can be made no 
plainer by repetitions or illustrations. 
The cost of land is a great item, even 
in new countries, and it " constantly 
grows greater and greater, in com- 
parison with other items, as the coun- 
try grows older. 

"The effect of thorough cultivation 
upon the farmer's own mind, and in 
reaction through his mind back upon 
his business, is perhaps quite equal 
t any other of its effects. Every man- 
is proud of what he does well, and no 
man is proud of what he does not 



every 2.2 acres of wild hay. Let _.. 
assume that it is intended that the 
alfalfa shall; replace the wild grass, 
then how -much more wealth comes 
annually to Pennington County from 
7509 acres of alfalfa than would 
come from the 7500 acres of wild hay 
which the alfalfa replaces? All 
available records for the county show 
that as an average wild hay will yield 
less than a ton per acre. Well es- 
tablished alfalfa should yield from 
two and one-half to four tons per 
acre. Now what is the comparative 
value of these two crops? What is 
a ton of wild hay worth? What is 
a ton of alfalfa hay worth ? Alfalfa 
hay in protein is thiee and one-half 
times as valuable as prairie hay and 
it yields fully three times as much 
per acre. It almost sounds as though 
an. acre of alfalfa was nine times as 
valuable as an acre of\wiId hay and 
noi doubt the dairy cow could soon 
solve the riddle for us. But let's be 
reasonable and conservative and take 
a common sense position in the mat- 
ter. 

Let us say that alfalfa hay is twice 
as |valuable as wild hay and will yield 
three times as much per acre. Then 
7500 acres of wild hay yielding one 
ton per acre having a value of §6.00 
per ton would be worth §45,000. But 
we. have 7500 acres of wild hay now 
replaced -with alfalfa yielding three 
tons per acre worth $12.00 per ton or 
a total of 22,500 tons of alfalfa hay 
having a value of S270.000. The value 
of, the alfalfa exceeds the value of 
the wild hay by $225,000. 

But this is not the end of the Al- 
falfa story for Pennington County. 
As; you gradually change your farm- 
ing system and expand your livestock 
program, the county ultimately may 
find • it profitable to substantially 
double its present alfalfa acreage. 
We occasionally hear the slogan that 
there should be an acre of alfalfa for 
every dairy cow. Your dairy cattle 
population was estimated at 13,500 
ou January 1, 1025, and this is likely 
to increase, so I am inclined to feel 
that we may expect the alfalfa acre- 
age as a part of the permanent plan 
to be realized during the next five 
years, should be doubled, or increased 
to j 15.000 acres. Then we should 
be jable t c say that alfalfa has in- 
creased return? 



in his work, and he will do twice as 
much of it with less fatigue; the lat- 
ter he performs a little imperfectly, 
looks at it in disgust, turns from it, 
and imagines himself exceedingly 
tired — and little he has done cornea 
to nothing for want of finishing. 

"The : thought recurs, that educa- 
tion — cultivated thought — - can best 
be combined with agricultural labor, 
or any labor, on the principle of 
thorough work; that careless, hall 
performed, slovenly work makes no 
place for such combination; and 
thorough work, again, renders suffi- 
cient the smallest quantity of ground 
to each man; and this again, con- 
forms to what must occur in a world 
less inclined to wars and more de- 
voted to thearts and peace than here- 
tofore. Population must increase 
rapidly, more rapidly than in former 
times, and ere long the most valuable 
of all arts will he the art of deriving 
a comfortable subsistence from the 
smallest area of soil. No comm'unity 
whose every member possesses this 
art, can ever be the victim of oppres- 
sion in any of its forms. Such com- 
munity will he alike independent of 
crowned kings, money kings and land 
kings. ' 

"Let us hope then that by the best 
cultivation of the physical world be- 
neath and around us, and the best 
intellectual and moral world within 
us, we shall secure an individual, co- 
cial, and political prosperity and 
happiness, whose course shall be on- 
ward and upward, and which, while 
the earth endures, shall not pass 
away." 



debt secured thereby, was duly assigned 
added by HaItl Albert S. Lleberman Mortauee. 
,. - , ,. ,., ,, , ' to Poter Dorn by written assignment dat- 

from time to time until the present ; ed the 28tb day of , September 1023. and 
layout is one capable of coping with rworded iu the office or said Register of 
„ .. „:*,.„*;„*, ,.,i,;«i, M ;«i,t. ****** tteeda, ou the 2nd day of February 1024, 

any situation which might arise. at on ^ O . clodt P- M ■> ln Book '-- - 

Officers and members , of the fire Mo «S?^S.°?_J! , !Ke Sjjo. 

department at the present time are: 

Paul Midderigh, chief; William War- 
ner, first assistant; Morris LaSell, 

second assistant; Philip Smith, third 

assistant; Ed. Jaranson, secretary; 

George Curran. treasurer; Harry 

Roberts, steward; Henry Froseth, T. 

P. Hornseth, Iver Bugge, and "Charles 

Herron. All the officers were re- 
elected at the annual meeting Janu- 
ary 6. 
Faithful, as they were in the for r 

mer days, the retired members can 

not completely dismiss from their 

minds the spirit which -prompted 

them to become members, and even 

to this day there is scarcely a fire 

call that does not find at least one of 

them on hand to do his hit. 



Community Girls To Stage 
Musical Comedy Feb. 9 



M. E. Chuch. 

Rev. J. Thomas Dixon. 
Sunday activities: 
Sunday and Adult Bible class 10 a. 

Epworth League, 6:00' p. m. 

Public worship: 11:00 a. m. Sub- 
ject: "The Overcomer."* 

7:30 p. m. Preacher, Mr. E. T. Mc- 
Knight, special musical number, 
violin obligato by Mrs. Frank Chris- 
tenson and H. G. Webber. 
Wednesday: l 

Class meeting 7:30 p. m. 
Friday: ; 

Scout cubs meet in church base 



,The Girls* Community club of this 
city is planning to stage a musical 
comedy February 9, according to Miss 
Lulu Cook, secretary, who stated to- 
day that the services of Miss Rosella 
Zura of Gary, Ihdiena, already have 
been secured. Miss Zura comes from 
the Rosella Zura Producing company 
and is said to be thoroughly convers- 
ant with her line of work. 

The comedy to be staged is "Hello 
There, 1 ' reputed to be one of the very 
best 'entertainments of the day. Miss 
Zura will personally take charge of 
the coaching and presentation and re- 
hearsals will begin in the near future. 



Farmer Hears Good News 
of Pennington Over Radio 



Not only Mr. Atwood, farmer re- 
siding north of Thief River Falls on 
the Pembina trail, but perhaps 
thousands o f people all over the "Uni- 
ted States, heard good news of Pen- 
nington county, through the. radio 
medium Saturday afteronon^ when 
Mayor Ralph Webb, of Winnipeg told 
about his trip to Thief River Falls 
and mentioned a number of flattering 
things about Pennington county. 

C. E. McCracken, farmer, yester- 
day told Mr. Stebbins, Thief River 
druggist, that his friend Atwood had 
remarked that during his many years 
residence here he had never heard as 
many good things about Pennington 
county as came over the radio Satur- 
day afternoon. 

And the best part of it is, as every- 
one in Pennington county will testify, 
everything good the mayor said 
about the county is true, and nobody 
here hates him in the least for saving 
it. 



ANl» WHEREAS, The sold Peter Doni 
the Assignee, and Holder of 
Baid Mortgage has duly elected 
and does hereby elect to declaro 
the whole principal sum of Bald 
Mortgage due and payable at the date 
of this notice, under the terms and con- 
ditions of said Mortgage and the power 
of sale therein contained ; and whereas 
there is actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this notice 
the sum of Ninteen Hundred Ninety-three 
and OS-100 (S1U93.0S) Hollars, with inter- 
ost therco n at the rate of seven per cent 
per annum from the 9th day of January 
11)2(1, and also S2SJ..37 taxes for the year 
11)24 paid by assignee, and ivherena the 
said power of sale has become operative, 
and no action or proceedings having been 
instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover- 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or 
any part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of the 
power of sale contained in said Mortgage, 
and purs unite x- the statute "in su<--h case 
niad^and provided, the said Mortgage 
wilj be foreclosed by a. mil" ••*" the premis- 
es described in and conveyed by said 
Mortgage, viz: 

Lot numbered Nino (I)) -»f Block 
Thirty-six (3G) Original TownBite of 
Thief -River Falls according . ro the " 
plat thereof now on file and of re- 
cord in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for said County 
in Pennington Connty and Stalo of- 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances: whlca tale will lie made 
by the Sheriff of said Pennignton County, 
at the front door of the Court House, in 
the City of Thief River Palls in said 
C&unty and State, on the 27th dav of 
February 1026, at ten o'clock A. M., of 
that day, at public vendue to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to ijov said debt of 
Nineteen Hundred Ninoty-tbpjo and 1)8-100 
Dollars, and interest, and (be taxes, it 
any, on said premises, and seventy-five 
Dollars, Attorney's fees, aB stipulated In 
and by said Mortgage in case of fore- 
closure, and the disiiursi'iucnts allowed 
by law: subject to retteutption at uny 
time within one year from the date of 
sale, as provided by law. 
Dated January *Jth A. D. 1020. 

PETER DORN 
The assignee and present owner 
of the xaid mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP and 
H. O. BERVE. 

Attorneys. Thief River ?"allB. Minn. 
(Jan: 13-20-27- Feb. :j-10-17) 



Red Lake Falls, to Have 

Legion Auxiliary Unit 

Red Lake Falls is organizing an 
Auxiliary to the American Legion to- 
night, Mrs. J. M. Bishop of this city 
having been called to undertake the 
task of getting things under way. 

At one time there was a unit there, 
but it ceased , ail activity some time 
ago . The activities of the Legion 
post the last year or so, however, de- 
manded that the women get together; 
and it is this they are attempting to 
accomplish tonight. 




PAGE FTVE 



Provencher Provides. 

J. Provencher, landlord of ye goode 
inne Evelyn, will entertain nembers 
of the local U. C. T. at a dinnerpar- 
ty Saturday evening commencing at 
7:00 o'clock. "All travelling ;nen are 
cordially invited to attend," si.ys 
Jule. 



Error in Tax List. 

In publishing the personal proper- 
ty tax list an error was made in the 
items of Mrs. Olaf Ramstad and 
Rambeck & Stone Co. An item of 
$3620.00 which was charged to Mrs. 
Ramstad should have appeared 
against Rambsck & Stone. The 
final figures were in error also in the 
proportion that they would be effect- 
ed by this change. 



Annual Church Meet , 

Held ftext Tuesday 

The annual meeting of the Trinity 
Lutheran Church will be field m the 
Church next Tuesday -afternuon at 3- 
o'clock, at which time the various 
committees will make their annual 
reports. One of the important things 
which will be considered: is the, . Mew 
building recommendation nf the dea- 
cons and trustees. At 6:30 tha 
adult members of the congregation 
will have supper in the church par = 
lor at which time the future plans 
and prospects of the congregation 
will be infomrally discussed. 



Jury Disagrees. 

The jury in the municipal court 
case of State of Minnesota vs. Emil 
O. Green, farmer living a few miles' 
west of Thief River Falls, failed to 
reach a agreement Monday evening- 
after remaining out for three hours 
and taking nine ballots. The jury 
was dismissed at 9:00 p. m. 

It was alleged, in the complaint 
signed by V. C. Noper that Emil O. 
Green had accepted«$20 from him for 
sugar beet tops after he already had 
sold them to one Lloyd Crown. Mr. 
Crown had not paid cash for the 
beets, but stated that he had made a 
verbal agreemnet and made provi- 
sions to pay Green through McCann's 
office where he had instrucetd Mr. 
McCann to pay Green 512 from 
money he had coming there shortly. 

The case simmered down to wheth- 
er Green or Crown told the truth and 
on this point the jury failed to agree- 



Subscribe to The Tribune. 
Tribune want ads bring results. 



DISTURBED SLEEP 

Caused From Bladder Weakness. Na- 
ture's Way of Telling You of 
"Danger Ahead." 
No. 160. 

J. H. Hanford, 7155 Yale Ave.. 
Chicago, 111., says. "For two years I 
have been troubled with gravel. 
Many times it would cause me to get 
up eight to twelve times at night, 
and it was very painful. Lithiated 
Buchu cleaned nie up in one week. I 
wilil be glad t tell or write my ex- 
perience." Lithiated Buchu is not a 
patent medicine as the formula is on 
the label. It cleanses rhe bladder as 
epsom salts do the bowels, driving 
out abnormal deposits, neutralizing 
excess acid, thereby J-elieving irrita- 
tirn which causes ; disturbed sleep." It 
is not a cheap medicine. The tablets 
cost 2 cents each at all drug stores. 
Keller Laboratory, Mee'nanicsburg, 
Ohio. Locally at Curtis Drug Store, 



This 

Monarch 

Range 

Should Be 



in 



Your 
Home 




It has beauty 
It has quality 
And best of all it is a range of super-service 

The splendid baking and heating qualities — the 
pride and satisfaction of MONARCH users are in 
a large measure due to the permanent, tight, 
riveted construction, made possible by the use of 
unbreakable Malleable Iron. 



LARSON FURNITURE CO. 



to the county „, ti . 

the value of wild hay to the extent of ■ m( L nt at , cOO p. m. 
a half million dollars per year. Is ; Saturday, 16th: 
this worth while? Is it desirable to! Under the auspices of the Women's 
attempt to increase the annual in- Christian Temperance Union the 6th. 
come of the farms of the county to 'Anniversary of Prohibition will be 
the; extent of a half million dollars a '. observed on Saturday at 8:00 p. >n. 
year. What would you do with an ■) ^erybody is invited to enjoy a 
additional half:" million dollars a £°°P program interspersed by spirit- 
year? Well, here are a few possibili- edroratory. 
ties: j — *-■ 




L- ^ DR.SP0FF0RD 

Optometrist 
WILL BE AT 

otel Evelyn, Thief River Falls, 
Inesday, January 27. 

will pay practically all the cost of j J%fl™ ^A* 8 '? *>* *p. .; He 
the; operation of all the automobiles fnd Ses and ^ (Jl^ ^ ltie l 
in the county and you know. that in ^price^ou can affnrrft St^ }S &t 
itself is quite a sizeable item. P T on Can afford to P a * 



1^ A half million dollars a year 
will pay all the taxes levied * " 
Pennington County at preesnt ant! 
leave $140,000 each year. 

2j A half million dollars more 
turn peryear will. pay the bonded in 
debtedn^ss of Pennington County 
a period of a year and a half. 

3j A half million dollars, a year 
will, pay nractically all the cost of 



Start the Laying I i 







Now's the time to start your pallets 

and moulted hens to laying — and cash 

^ in on eggs. Moulting puts the egg 

organs out of gear. Go after these 

dormant organs with the old reliable 

Dr. Hess Poultry 
PAN-A-CE-A 

It puts the egg organs to work. 
. It starts the feed the egg way. 
It gives red combs and red wattles. 
It brings hack the song and scratch and cackle. 
Pan-a-ce-a gives hens pep and makes music in the poultry 
yard. ( ■ > *~ * 

- Thtxrm when the *88* com* 

Lambert's Drug Store 

Wt lum * ° rlght^hm pachas* for tcery Bock 



Dr.Hess Instant Louse Killer Kills Lice: 



Poultry Industry 
Shows Progress 

The ninth annual poultry show demon- 
strates conclusively that the'industry has ad- 
vanced in leaps and bounds the past year. 

The greatest importance lies in the fact that; 
this was a show of local progress, inasmuch as 
with one exception, all exhibitors live in our 
trade territory. 

If you did not secure a copy of the Minne- 
. sota Farmers Institute Annual No. 38, Farm 
Poultry Edition, write the College of Agricul- 
ture, St. Paul. 

Get in line to cash in on this growing indus- 
try by preparing now for more extensive poul- 
try raising in 1926. One essential fcr profit- 
able poultry raising is a warm, roomy poultry 
house. 



THE PRICHARD COMPANY 



Call for JUNG'S VICTORY" BREAD I 

± s h ^, d Nonstandard, not DOW to a price. "h0^^^r^>> mv/ve fuurrrv Ta^v ^ ,, *T ^ I 



" * 1m i m W t.<~n-, 



JUNG'S QUALITY BAKERY. For sale by all grocers 

-* *'? " * ' " * ■ " ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i i f 1 1 i n 1 1 r j 1 1 j H 1 1 n f 



.■v., fe<..^ v 



: b.d.iii.l' ^i'Ayr.y^Av^^M-Sav. 



Juii«£S2ifiaiS&_ 



Ui 



» 



IGESK 






fej 



^i^\f'^k^mvsWd-}}^U'B^^^ --i-- 1 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926- 



One Minute Interviews 



YOUR NAME IN FULL? ' 

Paul Ivan Midderigh. ' 

WHEEE WERE YOU BORN? 

Paris, France. (Paree, Fronce). In 1862. j 

WHEN Dp YOU LEAVE? I 

I went io England in 1879 and joined the marines; Then I went 
to Egypt and back to Paris again and came to Canada in 1887. 

WHEN DID YOU COME TO THIEF RIVER FALLS? 
Came here from Canada in 1893. 

MY GOSH, PAUL, ARE YOU 64 YEARS OLD? HOW IN THE 
DICKENS DOES IT HAPPEN THAT YOU LOOK SO ■ MUCH 
YOUNGER THAN THAT? 

Well, you see I always had been used to lots of good wine to drink 
and that kept me young, but now I'm out of luck and am getting 
older fast. ', 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF BOBBED HAIR? 

Oh, it's |all right on some. But most older women look a lot better 
with long hair. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF SHORT SKIRTS? 
They're | all right if the limbs are good looking, but it's hcll-on- 
earth for the women with bow legs. I saw one the other day that — 

WHOA THERE OLD TOP! THAT'S GOOD ENOUGH FOR THAT 
QUESTION I 

John Slfongan says they take less cloth and cost less, but I think 

they cost just as much anyway. 

ARE THE- YOUNGSTERS OF TODAY WORSE THAN THEIR 

PARENTS WERE? 
Well, I don't know as they are. They have many more liberties 
now than we used to and don't stay home nearly so much. The 
majority of them dbn't seem to respect their parents like we used 
to when j I was a boy. 

DO YOU THINK HARD TIMES ARE OVER? 
Well, I don't think so. I don't see how they- could be harder. Still 
I think it's due more nowadays to the cost of high living than to 
the high! cost of living. 

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO A BOY OR GIRL GRADUATING 

FROM HIGH SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY? 
They shouldn't loaf around and wait for somebody ta find a job 
for them but get busy themselves. There are many right hero in 
town that could find something to do if they wanted: to work. 

WHAT IS THE EARLIEST THING YOU CAN REMEMBER? 
In 1879 I went from Paris to London on. a ship and ate too many 
cherries and got sick. I nearly fell through a port hole and was 
caught by two women. They were petting and petting me and I 
remember I was awful embarrased. 

WHAT IS THIEF RIVER FALLS' GREATEST NEED ? 
Some factories and more Co-operation. 

WHAT WOULD YOU RATHER DO THAN WHAT YOU ARE NOW 
DOING? 
I don't know. If I was a millionaire I would like to go to California. 

DOYOU THINK PROHIBITION HAS BEEN A SUCCESS? 
No! There aren't so many drunks on the streets but by gosh, when 
saloons were here you never saw a young boy go in and drink. 
There is a Jot of drinking on the sly now, and the boys and girls 
are drinking too. 

.WHAT DO_YOU THINK OF THE PRESENT ADMINISTRATION? 
It's all right for a Republican administration. Don't put that 
down though because a lot of Republicans might get sore at me. 
I'm strong for men like Teddy Roosevelt. 

SHOULD THE WORD "OBEY" BE OMITTED FROM THE MAR- 
RIAGE CEREMONY? 

No. I don't think it ought to be. Of course it's never enforced 

though. ; ' 

SHOULD A MAN MARRY BEFORE HE REACHES 26? 

No, I don't thnik so. At that age he doesn't know his own mind, 
■ and hasn't finished sowing his wild oats yet. 

WHAT IS THE MOST EMBARRASING SITUATION YOU WERE 
EVER IN?! 

Oh. gosh! Well, I don't think it would do }or the paper anyway 

besides — i 

NEVER MIND PAUL— We'll let that go. You've gone through a lot 
Hhis morning anyway.. So long, and don't kill us if we haven't 
^quoted you [exactly right. 



tittdt rn unmrM P, do our Realistic pacifists prefer civil United States rather than the separ- 

PUBLIC C UKUM . > wars and revolutions to wars be- ate states. 



—ft tween unorganized factions of a world 
: not Especially those whose folks , 



Very sincerely yours for the 
INDEPENDENCE of the U. S. 
ANDREW TROVATON, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 



THE WORLD COURT. 

By far the most important matter felt the terrors of the civil war, when| 

to be considered by the present ses- people did not even know whether . 

sion of the United States Senate is ™y «°uld. tr " s t their nearest neigh- 

the Permanent Court of International '"' ts - No . if we are . °™ ntl *° have FINANCIAL YEAR AT "U" 

Justice, commonly called the World wara ™ «« ™ an y tome? •>««« off to REVIEWED IN REPORT 

I Court have °> em between nations than be- __ . "■"•"""■w i« n.crun.1 

To some idealistic, shallow-think- *»<*" unorganized factions .of aworld ^S'^Fund sK &f n™' 

ing people this proposition does not government, so far removed from the „"'™' ™" d . S ™7* Sl, ? ht Dr0 ?- 

annear radical and it aonears to co «"non people that any chance of Despite the Legislatures' special 

E as the Greatest mealSrl vet their bein S abla *° <*">«e to get re- appropriation of ?80,000 for a main 

oron^unded to nrevent war dres3 fr ™' su< * w ° rl( > government building at the Grand Rapids Agri- 

P Tw, n fir d S t lef^naryte the thing ™W* *#>» .««* by bloody """J^ataH™. the percentage of 

., ►„ IkpthU it i«>n radical chanM revolution. the University of Minnesota's income 

in America^'st'atesm^n^'or^oT ,. ™s world government, if estab- $££*fi^ ffi,*^*^ 

Our American statesmanship, has ^wjll finally tacome ^orrupt, %8$1$&,V*& ^J* » 



been altogether of two schools, l 0T Bxsiovy snows mat is what has """I "'„"£'„', " i' UJ, „ "i„f'° *S 

States-right! and Federal sovereigni- happened t„ every organized power- Jf& ""S,™ Albert T !2Sb 

tv until inme twentvveam aim when ful clique so far whether they were 01 tne comptroller, Albert J. Lobb, 

l&TteSfonalSoValfste Trough" f ""^ « "W°» organizations, %£%££*£*»& »?"«£ 

«E *?..«-_ « ^"?i h nosed E&£J3±? V^Jtj't £?L£ f 5^T&MS 



which took root amoW some of the V osei international organization is ? 03 "*" ^ uc< ?, e .<S'? ? l the aa » T arsity 

wnicn toon root among some oi tne . . . , " f -. by W. T. Middlebrook, formerly 

university professors and finally was Sn anymore £ the eariv comptroller at Purdue, and has /be- 

deloped by one of them. into a con- JS£:"i? un ? ? re '; , ,-.- , •" come associated with «ip ii™r 

crete form known as the League of ^' s „ tlan ohurch and political organl- «°!™ ?f°Sf es te * 

Nations, but because the Socialists ^ tlona es W d it. History proves T;^"?.. than t ... Ber . 
soon hall their eves onened as to oe yond a shadow of doubt that the ^ increase oi more tnan two per- 

soonnaa tneir ejes opened as io « nossible wav tn rutjii-d smd cent, or from 6.6 to 8.7 was recorded 

what element would control such a ""j. ?i i- • * retard and . > . . , , . ,. 

feazue at that time thev soon with- Partially eliminate corruption in m receipts trom sales and misceliane- 

league at mat ume, tney soon wiui . church irnvernment in tn °us sources, which rose from $818,170 

L?a^TNaSsVr f th*mos P t re p S art CSSft te'theTeopfe aT rtud,' 8 as to ?608,131 of ^hich sum $63686.07 

Sani ' StoZ &> chafed ?hdr Possible and to keep them as much ^s tnrned back to the institution as 
ideas about the wisodm of inter- , decentralized as practical. , if,?b« ,1 „to „ nm 
nationalism at all. The election of Therefore it is a puzzle to me why' l^J™ voted 5 ?? th? 192-1 S 

1920 showed beyond a shadow of ' some of our highly educated men F. w »^H rtp ^nton^. «™™S3 

doubt what the American people : can think the way to better govern- StS A^rffS' 

thought of internationalism for' the . ments it to again remove them far m ?5 nnn b f„ tCs^nZ vear of the 

Republican Party finally forced its off from the people, even farther than Itl „V' „ '.w i d I?" 

campaign committee to come out hard I they were during the dark iniddle tJ$Z, f'rSn 2-f inn 'ifm Sv™ «'l " 

and strong against the League ofagesl If the Vinciples involved "we d th^ ^verfit hv ™n,mnHn^" 

Nations, during the early part of the ! were new, I coulcl easily see why T^ ' h J " mv S"' y J ° y c t °'i stltu i lon : 

campaign the committee had been | they should be anxious to try a worl^ |L P 000 or frol S^Ts^ ?o «™ 

trying to hang back on this issue be- 1 government scheme of some kind, !o„ ,0 SS; " fr ° m f 426 . 82 5. to $470,- 

cause they wire friendly, to the in- Eut to people at all educated there Tnt^nraT' 8 ? ?" m f crease . °i 

ternationalistic banking crowd (Wall is not. ? bout ?35,000 in interest received 

Street) and ..did not want to make If th d ^ wouId turn their ^» university ^vestments, tat^ 

minds to the real causes of war and government decreased so as to total 
teach the remedy therefor they would but 4.2 per cent of the whole in the 
be doing much more for peace, than yea r as against 4.6 of all in 1923-'24 
by getting up and supporting such The disbursements ■ summary shows 
disloyal, unamencan schemes as this that the department of agriculture, 
League of Nations and its world costing- $1,076,409.24, was the most 
C0 Ti * j.l ■ • • expensive of the university's branch- 
It is the injustice practiced by the e s and required in all 21.5 per cent of 
wars and persecutions, either through the disbursemnets in 1924-'25. Next 



an issue of it knowing full well the 
result, but wanted to leave the issue 
out so they would have a better 
chance to sneak it* through which 
they had tried to and are still tyring 
to. 

Now, just why the statesright peo- 
ple (The Democrats) should be the 
ones of our two schools to propose 
this international super-government 
scheme I do not pretend to know, 
but I think it was simply an . acci- 
dent that an individual who brought 
it out had been elected President by 
that party, and I still believe that if 
Ex-President Wilson had been a Re- 
publican practically all Democrats 
would have condemned this disloyal, 
un-American scheme, . because it is in 
even still more contrast to their gen- 
eral ideas of government than it is 
to that of the Republicans. 

Any one can easily see that no in- 
telligent person can be a loyal Ameri- 
can and support the idea of a super 
government such as the League of 
Nations and its world court, because 
it is the first duty of Americans to 
uphold and defend the sovereignty of 
their country as set forth in the Con- 
stitution and Declaration of Indepen- 
dence, all propaganda and hyprocracy 
to the contrary notwithstanding. One 
must either be loyal to National 
Supremacy or to International Su- 
pvemancy. One cannot be loyal to 
both. "No man can serve two mast- 
ers." 

Again,, as. to the second Doint, 
while, theoretically, any fully estab- 
lished world government would of 
necessity .stop international wars, 
that is wars between nations, because 
all nations would be wiped out so far 
as sovereignty is concerned so that 
all wars would then be called insur- 
rections, civil wars, or revolutions, 
just as the war here in 1861 is called 
the civil war instead of the "inter- 
state'' war which it really was. But 



their selfishness or false religious 
teaching. Reduce these causes to a 
minimum, and wars and persecutions 
will also be reduced to the minimum. 
Fnally, I want to remind all loyal 
Americans that it is their plain duty 
to write our Senators and also other 
Senators stating what they think of 
this sneaking, underhanded way of 
stealing the independence away from 
us and delivering us to the League of 
Nations with one judge out of fifteen! 
Any American who is too lazy to 
write a few letters when his country 
is in great danger of losing its -sov- 
ereignity, is not very loyal. With all 
the propaganda and money backing 
this traitorous scheme do not think 
the senate- is safe without you make 
it plain what you think of it. Neith- 
er is it any excuse that our Senators 
happen to be right on this world 
court, because they represent the 



VIVO 



WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR 
GRAHAM FLOUR 



The same high quality that distinguishes 
Vivo Patent. . 

USE IT REGULARLY 

Not only a health food,. but a healthy food all 
the time for all the family. 

Order a Sack From Your Grocer 

packed in 10 lb., 24 1-2 lb., and 49 lb. sacks. 

Hanson & Barzen Milling Co. 



^rai 



most expensively/as the aits college, 
which incldues among others all stu- 
dents preparing to enter professional 
courses. This college cost $659,179, 
accounting for 13.1 per cent of the 
total . expenditure. Administration 
called for but 3.2 per cent of the big 
institution's total outlay, or in dol- 
lars, $161,661.65. Physical plant ex- 
pense which includes all cost of heat- 
ing, reached. $349,652, at the main 
campus and took up 7.3 per cent of 
the expense. 

The report shows that gifts from 
William Herny Eustis already. turned 
over to the university are valued - at 
$1,060,224. and that W. J. Murphy 
endowment is made up of bonds 
worth at par $354,000. Daring the 
year income on the latter fund was 
$17,550, of which $17,218, was used 
in buying additional bonds with a 
par value of $16,000. 




The 
Better BUICK 

Starts easily 

Buick motor can are de- 
signed to run efficiently in ~ 
every temperature, and un- 
der every climatic condition. 
Only a small percentage of 
the million and more Buicks 
haVe the opportunity to go 
to California or Florida for 
the winter. 

Buicks start quickly, even at 
zero. The new, high-speed 
starting motor accomplishes 
this most desirable result.. 

Runs smoothly 

Buick Automatic Heat Con- 
trol reduces another cold- 
weather starting annoyance. 
— that of bucking, spitting,, 
misfiring engines. This exclu- 
sive Buick feature heats the 
fuel supply, and saves gaso- 
line, automatically and im- 
nvdiately. 

Stops safely 

In rain, snow or sleet Buick 
mechanical 4- wheel brakes 
stop the car firmly, in a , 
straight line. Neither heat 
nor cold affects the direct 
mechanical action of these 
brakes. There is no liquid in 
them to expand,- contract or 
leak away. 

Buick is a better Motor 

Car — In Every Kind of 

Weather 

Peoples Auto Co. 
Red Lake Falls 



Thief River Motor Co. 



Consolidation of 
Gilbertson& Rogers and Rambeck & Stone Co. 

SUCCESSOR TO BURSTAD & WESTAD GARAGE 

The Thief River Motor Co., being a merger of Gillbertson & Rogers 
and Rambeek & Stone Co., with garage and sales rooms at Rambeck & 
Stone Co. - place, 208 Horace avenue, has purchased the garage business 
of Burstad & Westad and will continue to operate it as a first class auto 
service station. This addition will make it possible for us to give our 
customers the best of service in all departments of automobile repairing. 

While pur place of business is now undergoing a" complete re-arrange- 
ment and overhauling, in a few days it will be in a settled condition and we 
invite your inspection. Your business will be appreciated. 

Dodge Brothers Motor Cars Graham Trucks 
Overland and Willys Knight Cars 

Farm Machinery 
Wood and Coat 



General Repairs 



Replacement Parts 



Accessories 



The Rambeck & Stone Co. will. continue in the Farm Machinery business. 

Phone 77 



-I" 



aJja^SS^^ 



^ 




T wt^-i^^^v^^&w?®?^ 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13; 1926. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



loui 




ountni (bitespondence 



ST. HILAIRE 



! Annual. Meeting Held. 

The annual meeting of the Bray 
Mutual Fire Insurance company 
was held on Tuesday afternoon in 
the village hall. The secretary's 
report was read and showed a large 
increase in business over last year. 
The election of officers. was also held 
and all former officers were re-elect- 
ed' .with the exception of A. G. Hall- 
strom who wished to resign. The of- 
ficers elected were: president, E. Au- 
bol; vice president, O. L. Larson; sec- 
retary, John O. Swanson; treasurer, 
Peter Engelstad. 



H. Bue Speaks. 
On Friday afternoon, January 8, a 
poultry meeting was held in the Im- 
perial hall at 1:30. Mr. H. Bue t pres- 
ident of the Minnesota Co-op Egg and 
Poultry association, gave an interest- 
ing speech concerning poultry and 
co-operative marketing problems 
which was well attended by many of 
ihe local farmers and townsmen. 



Son of Mr. and Mrs. Kvennes Dies. 

On Thursday the sad news was re- 
ceived by Mr. and MrA E. Hotfthat 
the little four year old son of Mr. and 
Mrs.. A .C. Kvennes of Middle River 
had passed away while being rushed 
to the Warren hospital. The cause of 
his death was pneumonia and bron- 
chitis. The funeral was held Saturday 
at the Norwegian Lutheran churcn 
of Middle River. Miss SeUaa Hoff of 
this village attended the funeral. Mrs. 
Kvennes was ioromerly Clara Hoff of 
this village. 



I Many Attend Poultry Sho w . 

The poultry show which was held 
at | Thief River Falls from January 5 
to 1 8 was welt attended, many of the 
visitors being from St. Hilaire. The 
local creamery had erected an attrac- 
tive booth in response to the request 
of the committee. The local booth 
was filled with exhibits by local mer- 
chants and farmers. Among those who 
were awarded prizes from this village 
were: J. Boelen for Wisconsin corn 
No. 7. A. Satterberg for sweet corn. 
H. Wilson for Bliss Triumph potatoes. 



.For Virgil Denhart. 

^n compliment to Virgil Denhart 
who leaves for California Jan- 
uary :16, Andrew Nyquist entertained 
a number of Virgil s friends at the 
Hazel hall Friday evening. The hours 
were spent in dancing and playing 
-whist, and at 12 o'clock luncheon was 
served. At the close of the evening 
Mr. Dinhart was presented with a to- 
ken of affection. Those present were 
from St. Hilaire, Hazel and Thief 
River Falls. 



St. Hilaire Loses Second Game. 
On Friday evening, January 8, 
Riersgord's quint autoed to Green- 
bsuh where they played the fighting 
Greenbush team. Up to the last min- 
utes St. Hilaire was in the lead, the 
score being 11 to 10. .During the re- 
mainder of the time Greenbush man- 
aged to cage three baskets, making 
the final score of 16 to 11. The local 
team was somewhat handicapped by 
the size of the Greenbush players, but 
nevertheless, this game proved to be 
the best and cleanest played this sea- 
son, only six fouls being called during 
the entire battle. 



r| Mr. and Mife. James Kenney and 
I [ daughters, Maelt and Ellen, Thorstein 
' Walseth, Marion, Ivanette, and George 
I Wilson, were entertained at the A. 
Swenson home Sunday evening. A de- 
licious lunch was served at 12 o'clock. 

Miss 1 Alma Engh returned Thursday 
from Hillsboro after spending a few 
day at the home of her sister, Mrs. 
H. Winters. 

Among the Thief River Falls busi- 
ness callers. Wednesday were:" R. J. 
McKercher, Mr. Poutz, and Rev. C. M. 
Grimsriid. 

Miss. Edith Nelson left Friday even- 
ing for Minneapolis where she will be 
employed as a nurse in a private home 
there. ; 

Miss Faythe Warner came Wednes- 
day evening to visit a iew days at the 
Frank Dann home. She returned Sat- 
urday. 

J. A. Kenney left Tuesday evening 
for Winnipeg where he will take part 
in the ice events there, racing Jim 
Walker's two horses and one of his 
own. 

Elmer and Roy Bjerk returned to 
Fargo Wednesday where they are em- 
ployed after spending the holidays at 
their parental home. 

Mrs.! A. S. Wilson and sons Earl 
and Wallace returned Tuesday from 
Minneapolis after spending two weeks 
as guests at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. J. Sieff, and son, George 
Wilson. % ■ 

Wendell Corbett of New Folden 
spent Sunday at the H. R. Allan home. 
He was accompanied back by Miss 
Leona Allan who teaches hear New 
Fo.ucn. 

Miss Tominia Hanson returned 
Tuesday from Virginia where she has 
spent three weeks visiting, with 
friends. 

On Friday evening. January 15, 
there will be a basket ball game be- 
: tween Clearbrook and St. Hilaire on 
the local floor. After the game a 
dance will be given at the Imperial 
, hail. : 

i Mr. and Mrs. J. Boelen and daugh- 
ter Johanna and A. Satterberg were 

■ Thief River Falls callers Saturday. 
Mrs/ Boatman of Crookston came 

' Friday, from Crookston to visit at the 
' home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
j T. Swanson. 
! Miss' Gladys Gullickson of Middle 

■ River came Thursday to visit at the 
| home of her brother, Ludvig Gullick- 
j son. 

Mrs. H. A. Olsen was a Thief River 
| Falls caller Wednesday.. 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Schantzen re- 
' turned Tuesday from Radium where 
they have been visiting with relatives 
and friends. They will visit for srfme 
. time at the M. Fricker home before re- 
' turning to Minneapolis. 

Harvey Olsen returned Sunday to 
, his school near Goodridge after spend- 
I ing the holidays at the home of his 
' parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Olsen. 
i Dr. 0. S. Werner and Mr. Dakken 
j autoed to Clearbrook Monday where 
i they attended to business matters. 
I Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Hall and daugh- 
i ter, Shirley, Mr. and Mrs. T. Duchar- 
me and daughter. La Valliere, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. P. Wilson, Mrs. J. Ken- 
ney, and Mrs. Hooper, attended the 
poultry show at Thief River Falls 
Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Peterson and 
daughters, Alice, Lillian and Edla, ac- 
companied by "Grandma" Peterson, 
who has spent the holidays at the 
Peterson home at Warren, spent Sun- 
day at the J. Kenney home. They 
were accompanied home by Miss Irene 
Peterson who will visit for some time 
at Warren. 



i GOODRIDGE NEWS ' 

* — : » 

The annual business meeting of the 
Erie Lutheran Ladies' Aid was held 
Wednesday, January 6 at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Olaf Omlid. The 
roomy house was filled with women 
and men. The Aid has met once 'a 
month during the past year and has 
had three special doings: Annual sale 
on the 4th of July, and a school fes- 
tival. The reports showed a very 
successful year. It was decided to 
join the Woniens' Missionary Feder- 
ation and have 6 months' parochial 
for the coming year: Mrs. Burstad, 
president; Mrs. G. Olsen, vice presi- 
dent; Mrs. Prestegard. secretary; 
Mrs. Andrew Hansen, treasurer. 

Henry Fjeld, a graduate of Good- 
ridge high school, 1924, is attending 
the teachers' college at Bemidji. He 
was home for Christmas. 

The St. Paul Lutheran church held 
its annual business meeting last Sun- 
day afternoon. Even the members 
have had an unusual hard pull on ac- 
count of the heavy loss they had with 
two failing banks. They came toge- 
ther with all debts paid. The follow- 
ing officers were elected: Secretary, 
Theo. Newhouse; treasuier, Sivert 
Anvinson; trustee for three years. Ed- 
ward Jelle. 

As usual the people of Goodridge 
and vicinity responded faithfully in 
coming to the annual lutefisk supper 
of the Goodridge Lutheran church. 

Although the weather was very 
stormy, yet 113 persons found their 
way to the Stephenson's cafe and did 
justice to the fine six o'clock dinner. 
Even a few from Thief River Falls 
were seen. Come again. The waiters 
as well as the women in the kitchen 
are to be complimented for their 
splendid service. 



as the oldest Minnesota fiddler, to 
play the music for naod-L 
play the music for an old-fashioned 
square dance in connection -with the 
Gopher Legian Radio Program to be 
broadcast from the Gold Medal Sta- j 
tion "W C C 0." from 8:00 p. m. to 
midnight of Friday, January 22, 1926. 

NOTICE FOR BIDS. 

Sealed bids will be received until 
six p. m. January 23, 1926 by the 
Oakland Park Sanatorium Commis- 
sion at Thief River Falls, Minn, for 
the sale to the Oakland Park Sana- 
torium of three hundred cords tama- 
rac wood F. 0. B. Thief River Falls, 
Minn. 

The wood to be sound, dry, four 
foot tamarac wood of uniform di- 
ameter subject to purchaser's inspec- 
tion and measurements and must be 
delivered before March 1, 1926. Bids 
may be submitted in lots of 100 
cords or for the entire 300 cords. 
, Payments of this wood will be 
made in five equal monthly install- 
ments. 

The Commission reserves the 
right to reject any or all bids. 

Oakland Park Sanatorium 
Commission, Thief River Falls. 
(January 13-20) 



Carieton College, Nqrthfleld Minne- 
sota* will offer a course of study in 
rural life and problems under Rev. X 
F. Balzer, a member of the faculty, 
next semester. - ; 



PAGE SEVER 



Legal Publications 



Square DanCe in Minneapolis. 

The Minneapolis Gold Medal studio 
in the Hotel Nicollet will be used for 
the old- fashioned square dance, the 
tunes of Minnesota's oldest fiddler, 
the Minneapolis Drum Corps, Henne- 
Pin Legion Auxiliary Glee Club, the 
Bearcat Legion Band, the Minnesota 
Agricultural College Quartette, "Art 
Smith, Minnesota Legion's One-Man. 
Band,'' Dr. E. H. Llekenapp of Fari- 
bault in whistling numbers, short 
talks by Joe O'Hara. Minnesota Le- 
gion state commander and Mrs. Rose 
Spencer of Winona, state head of the 
Minnesota Legion Auxiliary. There 
will be other numbers also on the Le- 
gion-Gold Medal Radio Program the 
evening of Friday, January 22. 1926. 



Egg Association Does 

$3,000,000 Business 



The Minnesota Cooperative Egg & 
Poultry Exchange, which was organ- 
ized as the first experiment of the 
kind just a year and a half ago, has 
closed its first full year with a busi- 
j ness of approximately §3,000,000. 
| The exchange began operations in 
(July 1924 with five district associa- 
j tions and a membership of 5,000. It 
! has grown to 17 associations with 
.22,000 members — the largest egg as- 
jsociation in America and second 
; largest in the world. Several dis- 
tricts in Wisconsin are organizing 
I along the same lines and may affiliate 
[with the Minnesota exchange as their 
i marketing agency. * 
j Accomplishments of this coopera- 
ttive include raising the basic price 
1 level in all territory covered by dis- 
■ trict associations, and the building up 
of a reputation for Minnesota quality 
eggs and poultry. 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 
RALE 
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN, ThHt de- 
fault has occurred In tbe conditions of that 
pertain mortgage, .dated the third day of 
; -March 1010 executed by Bessie Scheld 
l (formerly Bessie Hancock) and JoBeph 
: Scheld, ber husband, as mortgagors, to 
Citizens State Bank of Thief River Falls, 
j as mortgagee, filed for record in the office 
'of tbe Register of Deeds in and for Pen- 
nington County, State of Minnesota, on the 
1 31st day of July 1010, at eight o'clock and 
j no minutes A. M.. and recorded in Book 12 
j of Mortgage RecordB, on page 490 thereof 
I and on the 20th day of September, 1010 said 
i mortgage was duly assigned by saia 
! mortgagee to Helen L. Purdy, Lake City, 
i Minn., that, pursuant to a provision of said 
' mortgage, said mortgagee has elected to 
1 declare the whole debt secured thereby to 
; be now due and payable: that there Is due 
land payable, at the date of this notice, 
upon the debt secured by said mortgage. 
! the sum of Eight Hundred and no-100 
j ($800.00) Dollars, and that no action or 
: proceeding at law or otherwise has oeen 
i instituted to recover said debt or any part 
, thereof; that, by virtue of a power of sale 
• therein contained, said mortgage will be 
; foreclosed and tbe -land and premises there- 
in described, lying and being in the Coun- 
ty of Pennington, State of Minnesota, de- 
scribed as follows, to wit: The Northwest 
| Quarter (NW%) of Section Twenty-nve 
(25) in Township One Hundred Fifty-three 
i (15S> North, of Range Thirty-nine (SO) 
, West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, con- 
taining 1(50 acres, more or less, according 
to the Government survey thereof, will be 
sold at public auction to the highest bidder 
for cash by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
County, at the Front door of the Court 
House, in the city of Thief River- FallB in 
the County of Pennington. State of Minne- 
sota, on* the 11th day of March 1026, at ten 
o'clock in the forenoon, to pay and satisfy 
the debt Becured by said mortgage. 
Twenty-five. Dollars attorney's fees therein 
1 provided for, and the costs and disburse- 
ments allowed by law upon such fore- 
closure and sale. 
Dated December Hth. 1925. 

HELEN L. PURDY. 

JOHN C. DECOURCY. *•«■■** 

Attorney for Mortgagee. 

( Dec. 23-30. Jan. 6-13-20-27)) 



OLDEST FIDDLER REPORTS 
Is H. C. Petty of Kimball 

In his behalf, the Frederic A. Met- 
calf Legion Post No. 261 of Kimball. 
Minn., has entered the names of H. C. 
Petty "going on eighty," having pass- 
ed his 79th birthday last September, 




Know More About 
Electricity 

When Ben Franklin 

Partially Controlled The Electric Current 

From The Heavens 

Little Did He Realize The Uses 

To Which Electric Current Would Be Put Today 

Now More Than 

Seven Billion Dollars 

Is Invested In The Properties 

Of Utility Companies 

Electric Utility Bonds And Stocks 

Are A Good Investment 

MINNESOTA ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTING CO. 

Operated By 





NOTICE OF RKAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagors in the conditions and cov- 
enants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Gustaf Edwin Wab- 
i Hii and Anna Wahlm. hlB wife, mortgagors 
j to the State of Minnesota, mortgage*}, bear- 
ing date the 21st day of September, 1823, 
and, with a power of sale therein con- 
j tahicd, duly filed for record in the office of 
. tbe Regiirer of Deeds in and for the Coun- 
ty of Pennington and State of Minnesota, 
on the 25th duy of September, 1023, at 
eight o'clock thirty minutes A. SL, and 
duly recorded therein in Book "77" of 
Mortgages, on page 18 thereof; 

AND WHEREAS. Said default conslstB 
in the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual installments of amortised 
jirhicinal and interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-flre Dollars (025.00), 
which became due and payable on the 21st 
day of March, 1925, and the 21st day of 
September, 1025. in accordance with the 
terniB and conditions ■ of said mortgage, 
which default has continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS. By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorized 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and bolder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and does hereby 
exercise its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of tbe loan secured 
by said mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS. There 1b actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and tbe loan secured there- 
by, at the date of thia notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred Sixteen Dollars and eighty 
cents ($3,91(1.80). unamortized principal, 
together with lnter»Bt thereon from the 
21st day of September, 1025, at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (5%) per centum per 
annnm, and Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($250.00» amortized principal and interest, 
with interest on J125.00 thereof from 
March 21st, 1025. at seven (7) per centum 
per annum, and Interest on $125.00 thereof 
from September 21st, 1025, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, in all the sum of Foot 
Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-seven 
Dollars and aixty-seren cents ($4,227.67) ; 
AND WHEREAS. By reason of Baid de- 
fault, tbe said power of sale contained In 
said mortgage has become and la operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the .debt seenred by said mortgage or an; 
part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE. Notice is hereby 
given, that by virtue of tbe power of sale 
contained in said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute in Bnch case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a Bale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said mortgage, situate, lying 
and being in the County of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Northwest Quarter (NW%) ot 
Section Seventeen- (17), In Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range Thirty-nine (30) West, con- 
taining 1W acres, more or less, accord- 
ing to. the Government Snrvey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
said Pennington Connty. at the front door 
of tbe Court House In the City of Thief 
River Falls, in snld County and State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day of February, 1920, 
at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, at public 
vendue to the hlgheBt bidder for cash, 
to pay nnd satisfy the debt then dne on 
said mortgage, and the taxes, if any, on 
snld premises, and tbe costs and expenses 
allowed by inw; subject to redemption at 
any time within one year from the date 
of sale, as provided by law. 
Dated December 22nd. 1025. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. t 
Mortgagee. 
By Department of Rural Credit 
OLE O. SAOENG; Chairman. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 
Secretary. 
(SEAL! 
CLIFFORD L. HILTON. 
Attorney General. 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON, 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
610 Haram Building, 
St Paul, Minnesota. 

(Dec 28-30 Jan. 6-18-20-27) 



A course in personal arid public 
health will be offered by Prof. Neil S. 
Dungay, N. D., director of the college 
health service at Carieton college, 
Northfield, Minnesota] next semester. 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default has been .made by 
the mortgagors in the conditions and cov- 
enants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by George Monroe Tan- 
ner and Lhule Tanner, his wife, mortgag- 
ors, to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, 
bearing date the 22nd day of August, 1924, 
and, with a power of salejtbereln contained, 
duly filed for record In the office of the 
Register of Deeds In and for the County 
of 1'eunlngton and State of Minnesota on 
tbe 25th day of August; 1924, at eight 
o'clock A. M., and duly recorded therein in 
Boqk "77" of Mortgages, on page 260 
thereof; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
In tbe failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the Bemi-annual installments of amortized 
principal and Interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-five Dollars ($125.00), 
which became due and payable on the 22nd 
day of February, 1925,!and the 22nd day 
of August, 1925, In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of, said mortgage, 
which default has continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorized 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage. haB exercised' and docs hereby 
exercise its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan secured 
by said mortgage to be i due and payable 
forthwith : 

AND WHEREAS, There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan seenred there- 
by, at tbe date of this notice, by reason of 
paid election, the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred Fifty-nine Dollars and for- 
ty-eight cents ($3,959.48), unamortized 
principal, together with: interest thereon 
from the 22nd day of August. 1925. at the 
rate of five and one-fourth l5Y t ) per cent- 
um per annum, and Two Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($250.00) amortized principal and 
Interest, with Interest on $125.00 thereof 
from February 22nd, 1025, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, and {Interest on $125.0" 
thereof from August 22nd. 1025. at seven 
(7) per centum per annnm. In all the sum 
of Four Thousand Two Hundred Eighty- 
eight Dollars and Inlnety-slx cents 
($4,288.96): ! 

AND WHEREAS. By reason of said de- 
fault, the said power of sale contained In 
said mortgage has become and is operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
Instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
■the debt secured by said mortgage or any 
part thereof: \ 

NOW. THEREFORE, JNotlce Is hereby 
glvpn. that by virtue of; the power of Bale 
contained in Bald mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute In each case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage wilt be foreclosed 
by a sale of tbe premises described In and 
conveyed by Bald mortgage, situate, lying 
and being In the Countyjof Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Southeast Quarter (SE%) of Sec- 
tion Tweptv-8aven (271. Township One 
Hundred Fifty-four (1IH1 North, of 
. Range Thirty-nine (39) Weat. contain- 
ing 100 acres, more or Iesa. according 
to the Government Survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale will be made by tjie Sheriff of 
aald Pennington Cnuntyi at the front door 
of the Conrt House In the City of Thief 
River Falls. In Bald County -and State, on 
Thursday, the -*th day of Fehmnry. 1926, 
at eleven o'clock A. M. of that day. at pub- 
lic vendue to the "highest bidder for cash, 
to nay and sntlsfy the debt then due on 
said mnrtenge, and tne] taxes, if any. on 
snld premises, and the rnstR and pxpenses 
allowed by law: suhject to redemption at 
any time within nnp yeai from the date 
of sale, na provided by law. 
Dated December 32nd,! 1925. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

j Mortgagee. 

Bv TVrmrtmpnt of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAfiENG. Chairman. 
ATTEST ::H. H. FLOWERS. 
Secretary. 
(SEAL! I 

rr.TFF'OTtn L. HILTON. 
Attorney General. j 

T.TinVTfi GTTT.LTPK80N. 
Assistant Attnmey General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee. 
RIO Hfnm Building. 1 
St, Paul. Minnesota. | 

fDec 2S-S0 Jan. 6-13-20-271 



LOCAL MARKETS 

GRAIN 

Wheat, dark northern ... $1.54 

Wheat, No. 1 .._ 1.50 

Wheat No. 2 „ 1.48 

Durum, No. 1 , 155 

Flax, per bu 2.24 

Barley, per bu .46 

Oats per bu ^. ..._ 31 

Rye, per du -.87 

Buckwheat per 1Q0 lbs ...w 1.25 

Floor and Feed 

Flour, per cwt. ._: ; 5.29 

Oil Meal 2.75 

Bran 1.40 

^horts' ..'. 1.40 

Poultry 

Hens, heavy . .20 

Hens, light 12 

Heavj*. Springs _ 20 

Leghorn Springs '..... .13 

Old Roosters 09 

Geese 09 

PRODUCE 

Eggs, No. 1 _.. 26 

CREAMERY 

Cream, per qt .". 40 

Butter, per lb .48 

WOOL AND HIDES 

Wool ^ ~_ .32 

Wool .... - .36. and .37 

Cow Hides .07 

GRASS SEEDS 

Timothy, steady $4.50 to ?4.80 

Timothy and Alsike, mixed, 

weak $4.00 to $4.75 

Sweet clover, W. B., steady, S3 to $5 
Sweet Clover, yel steady 3.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady.... $20 to $24. 
Mammoth Clover steady ....$20. to 24. 

Alsike clover, steady. $16 to $19 

Common Alfalfa, weak 16.00 

Grimm, alfalfa, steady „...$20 to $25 
Cert. Grimm, firm 35.00 



M M M ♦ M t M MM * M M M M » 

t . 'We Want :: 

| HIDES AND FURS :: 

I Northern Trading Co. : : 

MM M M *4 M MMMMM MM 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

NOTTCE IS HEREBt GIVEN. That de- 
fault has been made in !the conditions of a 
mortgnee executed by Elmer E. Kolp and 
Mary Kolp, hla wife. Mortgagors, to C. L. 
Hansen, Mortgagee, dated the let day of 
November. 1022, nnd recorded In the office 
nf the Register of Deeds of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, on the lflth day of 
November, 1022. at 1 :30 b'eolrk P. M.. In 
Book in of Mortpapea bn Pape 205 there- 
of: that on the 18th dayjof November. 1022. 
said mortpape waa asslpned by tbe said C. 
L. Hansen. Mortpnpee. i to The United 
Danish Societies of America, a corporation 
organized and existing under and by vir- 
tue of the Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 
and the Deed of Assipnmpnt recorded on 
the 15th day of December, 1022. nt o'clock 
A. M., In the office of the Register of Deeds 
of Pennington County, Minnesota, In Book 
65 of Mortpages on Page 200 thereof: that 
such default consists in 'the failure to pay 
the Bum of One Hundred Eighty ($180.00) 
Dollars Interest, which fell due on the note 
which said mortgage wns glvrri to secure 
on the 1st day of November, 1024, and a 
further payment of interest which fell dne 
on said note on the 1st day of November. 
1025, and that the holder of said mortgage 
haa elected to declare nnd hereby does de- 
clare all of tbe priucipal and accrued in- 
terest on said note and said mortgage to 
be due and payable according to the terms 
and stipulations thereof: that the amount 
claimed to be due and which Is due on said 
mortgage at this date. Is the sum of Three 
Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-five and 
34-100 (¥3305.34) Dollars. 

That the premises described in and 
covered by said mortgage are situated in 
Pennington County, Minnesota,- and are 
described as follows: Tbe Northeast Quar- 
ter <NE*i) of Section i Thirty (30).- in 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North of Range Forty-two (42) West of 
the Fifth Principal" Meridian in Minnesota, 
containing One Hundred Sixty (ICO) acres, 
more or less, according to the United States 
Government Survey thereof. 

That by virtue of the ipower of sale, con- 
tained in said mortgage and pursuant to 
the statute in Buch c&Be made and pro- 
vided, said mortpagewill be foreclosed by 
the sale of said premises, at public vendue, 
to the hlphest bidder rfor cash, by the 
Sheriff of Pennington Connty. Minnesota, 
at the East front door of the Pennington 
Connty Court Honse ini the City of Thief 
River Falls, Pennington County, Minne- 
sota, on Saturday, the 6th day of February, 
1020, at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, to 
satlBfy the amount .then due on said mort- 
gage, "together with the; costs of such sale, 
and Seventy-five Dollars Attorney's fees 
stipulated In said mortgage. 
Dated December 17. ls»23. 

THE UNITED DANISH SOCIETIES 
OF A*rERICA, ! 

By THEO. QUALE. 
It's Attorney 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
THEO. QUALE. 

Attorney for Assignee of Mortgagee, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 

(Dee. 28-30 Tani «-l3-20-27.) 



iXl. 



fc^i^^^ 



The Trlhnne lias a first class job 
department. Bring ns your wort . 



rvL^i^'^&irt^^ 



Young Pine Lodere No. 221 
T.O.O.F . 

Meat* wrerj Tuesday night at 8:00 



THEO- QUALE 

lawyer 

Practice in All Courts and Be- 
fore U. S. Land Office 
McGinn Building 



SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 406 Knight Ave. N. 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Phones: 

Hospital & Office, 350. Res., 488-J 

A. W. "Swedenburg, Ph. G, M. D. 

Physician and Surgeon 
Special attention Ear, Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses. 

MINA R. SWEDENBURG. R. N. 

Supt. Hospital. and Anaesthetics. 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Surgeny aad 

the Diseases of Women ud 

Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bid*. 

Phones: 
Office 128: Residence 95 




Northern Lodge No. 236 
A. F. & A. M. 

Stated Communications 
First and Third Thursdays 



AUTO REPAIR AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMITHING 
Expert Work Guaranteed 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 



CARL B, LARSON 



LICBNSED ! 

AND UNDKBTAIKB 



Lanoa Furmlimre Oaafeasj 
Talaf Brrer Fall. 

Mlghi OaB U> 



I MltMHMHI I M I IHMUt 

DR.C.M.HAUG. 

Dentist / 

■ . 

Office Over First & Peoples 

State Bank '.'. 

Telephone No. 14 ; 

i > 1 1 1 » i n I I I I I I I I 1 1 1 1 n i ' ' ' 



Iff IB GUNK 

DB. 0. r. MELLBT 

■yt. Ear, Nose and Throe* 
DR. H. W. FBOEHUCH 
Sorcery sad Obetetiiea 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 







W- 



PAGE EIGHT 



iMlisi 



wm^^^ 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



I CLASSIFIED i^WANT ADS 



FOR SALE — Iowa Cream separator, 
at a bargain, Call 187. 44 



FOR SALE— Firdson Tractor and 

Plow and cedar posts and-poles. W. 

E. Baker. 27-tf 



WANTED — positions, two girls want 
employment in private homes. Call 
at this office 1-44-p. 



FOR SALE— as I have sold my ice 
business, I still have some lumber 
and oak timber for sale cheap if tak- 
en at once. Also have considerable 
saw dust. 44-p. 



FOUND— Check made put to Joseph 

Hesby. May: have same by paying 

for this ad. Call here. 1-44 



FOR SALE— White Holland Turkey 

Gobbler.. Good size for breeding 

purposes. Reasonable pricew-^O. K. 

Sevie, St. Hilaire, Minn. ^Sl-p 



FOR SALE— Buick Touring Car. six. 

cylinder, in good order. Joseph Vor- 

lickv, 107 Kneale Ave S. Thief River 

Falls. 3t. 

FOR SALE — 3-burner gas stove ?B. 
Fine new violin and case $20. Good 
17-23 Ford radiator ?5. One 1892 
Winchester 25-20 rifle. One 43 cal. 
rifle. One 22 calibre Stevens, rifle. 
James Havel, 407 Arnold Ave. So., 
City. tf 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Modem furnished room. 
801 Main Ave. No. Tele. 899. tf 



FOR RENT — furnished room, mod- 
ern, centrallv located, 801 Main 
Ave., phone 339. 44-tf. 



WANTED TO RENT— Improved 

farm, 160 acres. Apply G. Halvor- 

son. 2-t 43-44. 



MISCELLANEOUS 
GIRL WANTED —at the City 
Bakery. 1. 



WANTED— Girl with experience for 
dining room. Hotel Evelyn. 44 



GIRL WANTED— for general house- 
work in modern home, small fami- 
ly. Inquire Froseth "Shoe Store. 1 

FOUND^-two long sleeved wool 

gloves, of different sizes and mate. 

Call at Tribune. 88-tt. 



FOUND— Lincoln high school class 
ring. Owner may have same by pay- 
ing for this ad and identifying. See 
Mrs. 1 Wm. Parbst at Oen's store. 



WANTED — married couple on farm 
. in Roseau county, will rent equip- 
ed farm, must be good hand with 
cows. Write C. B. G. care of Tribune. 
'43-2-p. 



LOST — Heavy quilt used for auto 
robe — on Eight and Dewey, Satur- 
day afternoon .Finder please for- 
ward collect to A. O. Walsen, Box 
265, Grand Forks, N. Dak. lp. 



WANTED — Young man who wishes 
to learn trade — small salary to 
start, good future; High school gradu- 
ate or knowledge of typewriting pre- 
ferred. Apply at Western Union 
Telegraph office Hotel Evelyn. 43-2 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1926. 



LEGION CHANGES 
MEETING^DATES 

May Stage Home Talent 
Play; Social Event Plan- 
ned for Jan. 28. 



EXPERT ELECTRIC WORK— Re- 
member the telephone number is 
100 when you want real service on 
electric work. Always get the man 
that knows his business. He'll save 
you money. If you desire to have 
your houBe wired on monthly payment 
n 1an we can do it. We give prompt 
service on all calls. Alex Welch. 28th. 



Club Discusses Post Office 
at Meeting Monday P. M. 

(Continued from page one.) 
for the lease man when he arrives. 
The Citizen's bank building was sug- 
gested as a possible location. 

Dr. Swedenburg stated that the 
Rotary club some time ago had pass- 
ed a resolution stressing the urgent 
need' of better post office facilities 
here; and had forwarded a copy of 
same to the postmaster general. He 
added that if it were impossible to 
get a new building, "the least we can 
expect is better quarters than what 
the local post office staff has to put 
up with at present." 

Resolutions were passed expressing 
the urgent need of a new post office 
building in Thief River Falls, and the 
secretary was instructed to advise 
the congressmen from this district in 
the hope that they would use their 
influence in that direction. 

A motion was made and duly pass- 
ed that the club express to the city 
light department through its superin- 
tendent, Ole Legvold, the commenda- 
tion of the Commercial club for the 
ex?"!'«vt service rendered not only 
during the past year, but through the 
many ysars of its existence. Mayor 
Prichard said that the only time the 
city has been without sen-ice for the 
last 15 years was about five years 
ago when it was necessary to" shut 
off the current for. about 20 minutes. 
Very few times since then, and only 
for periods of a very few minutes at 
a time has the current failed. Con- 
trasting'this record with that of'the 
cities which have hijrh line service, 
it was considered that this city has 
the best electric light and power ser- 
vice in the world* Mr. Legvold. has 
been superintendent of the deDart- 
mnt for many years, and it has been 
through his expert management, 
members of the club believe, that the 
citv has enjoyed such excellent ser- 
vice. 

SosciV" menf'nn was mr-de of the 
goreeous lighting of the alfalfa 
palace at Main avenue and Third 
street and the sn?dal li^htins: of the 
streets during the noultry and alfalfa 
show last week. This was made nos- 
sinle. it was claimed, by the fact that 
the city owned its own plant. The 
lighting was furnished free of 
chnnre. 

Math Rarzen after stating, that the 
sen-ice here wa« of the very best, 
g.ive warning that to keep it so "we 
must put a great deal of serious 
thought tn the condition of the dam. 1 
Experts, he said, had declared that 



with more modern equipment the ■ 
present water supply was capable of 
generating about twice as much cur- 
rent as with the present layout. Then 
too, the condition of the flume has 
been declared such that it is only a . 
gamble as to how long it will with- 
stand the pressure. "Tomorrow 
morning," said Mr. Barzen, "the 
whole works may be. seen going down 
the river; and we must get busy be- 
fore it is too late." It was pointed-, 
out that the city light department 
last year produced nearly $14,000 
worth of current on an investment of 
$37,500 which was paid for ths dam. 
This is at great record, Mr. Barzen 
explained, and tended t show further 
why the city should seriously consider 
making the dam safe at the very 
first opportunity. t 

Mayor Prichard, Theo M. Thronson 
and F. F. Haynes were appointed as 
a committee to provide for some ad- 
vertising matter for representatives 
from this city to take on the schedul- 
ed auto tour to New Orleans, January 
24 when they join the cars leaving 
Winnipeg the day previous. ' The 
matter will be in the form of a cir- 
cular including pictures of farm 

i scenes, business places " and boosts 

■ for this northwest territory. 

; But by far the most ardent desire 
of. those at the meeting was in the 
direction of further prospects for a 
new post office building for Thief 

'■■ River Falls, or at least providing for 

| respectable quarters. 



Regular meetings of Elmer J. Ek- 
lund Post of the American Legion 
hereafter will be held on the second 
and fourth Thursdays of each month 
instead of Fridays, the decision hav- 
ing been made at the regular meet- 
ing January 8. Lack of attendance 
has been attributed in a large part 
to the fact that too many other activ- 
ities were held on Fridays. 

Ludvig Roe, former' state com- 
mander of the Legion and now one 
of the publishers of The Tribune, 
spoke at length at the meeting rFi- 
day night and told man yinteresting 
things concerning his experience in 
the Legion. He gave a brief out line 
of how the national headquarters at 
Indianapolis was functioning. Mr. 
Roe is a member, of the national pub- 
lications committee which has to do 
with the publication of the national 
Legion weekly. 

Oscar C. Paulson and Hans O. 
Chommie were voted as members of 
the executive committee of which the 
other officers of the post form a 
part, 

Kern Olson was appointed chair- 
man of a committee to investigate 
the advisability of staging a home 
talent play under the auspices of the 
Legion. He will be assisted by Chas. 
Eicher, Fred Scanlan and Herb Han- 
son. 

Chas. Eicher was named as chair- 
man of the post activities committee. 
He is confining his efforts at present 
to coaching kiddie kar athletes in or- 
der that they may make a good show- 
ing against Red Lake Falls at /that- 
city some time'in the near future. 

The feed for the winners in " the 
membership contest will be given at 
the next regular meeting," January 
28. If present plans materialize .the 
winners of the Auxiliary drive will 
be fed along with the men in a joint 
social affair. (This will automatically 
take care of all such minor details 
as preparing, the feed and washing 
the dishes after the event is over 
with). The executive committee at" 
a meeting Sunday morning discussed 
the possibility of arranging for joint 
meeting with the Auxiliary once a 
njonth, some sort of social affair to 
follow the business meetings. 

Ernest Rude was elected chairman 
of the house committee to succeed 
L. A. Hermanson, and Sam Brands- 
void who has been substituting for 
Mr. Hermanson for several months. 

Oscar Paulson, Sam Bransvold and 
William Crown were named on the 
service committee, the purpose '"of 
which is to take care of service men 
who happen to drift into the city arid 
need attention in one form or anoth- 
er. 

The next meeting of the post will 
be held on Thursday. January 28, and 
all post members are asked to note 
the. change in days on which meet- 
ings are held from Friday to Thurs- 
day nights. 



"The Dark Angel" Slated j 

for Lyceum Sunday-Monday ' 

t 

The Lyceum theatre Is offering its ! 
patrons next Sunday and Monday, 
January 17 and 18, George Fitzpat- 
rick's latest picture, "The Dark An- 
gel." It is a modern love story re- 
plete, with thrills and lavishness in the 
opinion of many who have seen it, and 
Mr. Brumund, manager of the Lyceum 
believes it is a picture his patrons will 
be extremely pleased with. 

Vilma Banky, Budapest actress, is 
comparatively new in American films, 
but she won a place in the hearts of 
American audiences with her grace 
and beauty and high order of dramatic 
talent. 



If you have anything you wiaX't 
sell. Tribune want ads will sell.it: 



City Council 

Makes Appointments 

(Continued 'from page One) - 
were -the; ones named: and' their, 
monthly 'salaries: 

City attorney, F. T. Scanlan..? 60.00 
Deputy clerk, Emily Fossum.... 110.00 
Street ■ commissioner,-- M. O. 

Hoff ...... .....;...:... ?115.00 

Poor Matron, Mrs. Voldnes .... ■ 35.00 
Janitor of jail, Paul Midderigh 15.00 

Fire teamster, Thea Lee . 176.00 

Supt. Water & Light, Ole Leg- 
void ..._ 175.00 

1st Engineer, Chas Krause .... 143,76 
2nd Engineer, Gust Anderson 126.50 

2nd Engineer, G. Adolph 126.50 

4th Engineer, Ed. Gannon ....:. 116.00 
1st electrican, W. S. Ferris .... 115.00 
2nd electrican, Hobt. Nelson 116.00 
Supt. Incinerator, J. Holmgrin 75.00 
Janitor auditorium, R. G. Cook 80.00 
Garbage collecter, Palmer Efte- 

land 75.00 

Dairy Inspector, Dr. L. R. 

Twete 26.00 

Filteration Eng. Lars Erickson 85.00 

Other salaries fixed at the council 
meeting Tuesday included: , 

Chief of police $ 125.00 

Night patrolman .-. 100.00 

Municipal judge _ 100.00 

Librarian ' _ _ 75.00 

Asst. librarian 45:00 

Janitor library 45.00 

Cemetery- sexton ■ 115.00 

Band director ..._ 26.00 

City Clerk ., 150.00 

The salaries of the mayor and the 
aldermen were set at ?100 per year 
while the city physician and health 
officer will receive $300 yearly. The 
compensation of the assessor was 
not decided upon last night. 

Supt. I. T. Simtey appeared before 
the council asking the use of the 
auditorium for the remainder of the 
basketball season for the high school 
team and also for the junior class 
piay on Jan. 29, both requests being 
unanimously granted. He also asked 
for funds with which to purchase a 
bass drum for the band and the 
overhauling of the large horn; both 
of these . requests were granted. 

F .L. Christensen appeared for the 
old ball team, asking for the free use 
of the auditorium for two dances, the 
.proceeds of .which are to be used for 
purchasing- uniforms for the team. 
The matter was passed for the time 
being. Jas. Cosgrove was granted a 
refreshment license for 1926, and two 
dance permits were granted to the 
Legion auxiliary for a dance Jan. 27 
and to the B. of R. E. for Jan. 26. 

Mayor W. W. Prichard, Jr., sent in 
appointments of A. W. Crown as 
chief of police, John Bratrud as a 
member of the park board and of 
George M. Wilson as a member of the 
cemetery commission, these being 
duly approved by the entire city 
council. 

An additional bond'of the First & 
Peoples State bank in the sum of 
$10,000 to cover additional deposits 
in that bank, was ordered approved 
on approval of the city attorney. 

The council set aside $500 for 
a contingent fund for use of the may- 
or. 

President Alfred Bredeson an- 
nounced the following standing com- 
mittee: 

Finance: T. A. Fossum. Carl Christ- 
offerson and H. A. Brumund. ' 

Board of Health: City physician, 
E: O. Iverson and O. C. Paulson. 

Poor; Carl Christofferson, A. 
Bredeson, H. A. Brumund and T. A. 
Fossum. 

Roads, streets and sidewalks: E. O. 
Iverson aiid T. A. Fossum. 

"Licenses, printing and municipal 



buildings: O. C. Paulson, A. Brede- 
son and E. 0. Iverson.! 

Electric light and waterworks: H. 
A. Brumund, A. Bredeson and Carl 
Christofferson. • j 

H. S. Debaters To Meet 
Warren Team Friday Eve. 

The Thief River Falls High school 
.debating team will clasih with' the 
| Warren team here Friday evening, 
I at the Lincoln High school. In the 
previous debates Warren won over 
• Crookston with a two to one score, 
! 2,".. ^ e decision of the judges gave 
I Thief River Falls the ! same score 
] over their opponents, 1 the Roseau 
; team. The speakers of both . sides 
i have spent a great deal,' of time com- 
; piling the data, and preparing their 
: addresses and every indication points 
j to an interesting contest. 
I The members of the local team are 
Ward Mathewson.' Howard Davidson, 
land Miss Eva Ayers. I Their oppon- 
i ents will be 'Rueben Holniquist, Miss 
|Katherine Bordewich | and Harold 
jToIlefson. Julius Opheim. instructor 
: of public speaking, has <had charge of 
I coaching the team. j 
I The question to be debated is: Re- 
solved that congress should have 
I the_ power to limit, regulate and pro- 
hibit the labor of persons below the 
|age of 38 years, and the local team 
will present fhe affirmative side of 
the question. 



Simley To Address Woman's 
Club Monday, January 18th 

Supt I. T. Simley will address the 
Thief River Falls Women's clubs at its 
regular meeting Monday afternoon, 
January 18, at 3:30 o'clock", on "Phys- 
ics dnd Our School." It is a subject 
vitally important to the community in 
the opinion of Mrs. R. Arnold, presi- 
dent of the club, and every member is 
urged to be there. 

General discussion will be led by 
Mrs. Win. Korstad. 

The welfare committee consisting of 
Mrs. Lucille Johnson. Mrs. C. G. Stor- 
holm, and Mrs. I. T. Simley will serve 
lunch at 5 o'clock. 

A special program of music has 
been arranged for including a soprano 
solo by Mrs. W. W. Prichard, Jr. 



Floyd Olson Has Largest 
Family at Poultry Show 



livir.^ near 
the prize of- 



Floyd Olson, farmer 
.Thief River Falls, won u .c pi^o ui 
fered by the Evelyn hotel for bring- 
|ing the largest family to the Poultry 
(show. Here is who he brought: John, 
| Dave, George, Elmer, Dreng, Roy, 
I Fred, Herman, Walter! Earl and 
| Theodore, 12 boys. Mrj Provencher 
I the hotel proprietor didn't get off so 
! easy as he had expected the prize he 
offered being a dinner to all members 
of the family registering at the audi- 
torium during the show. 

Mr. Olson says he brought all the 
boys in because he believes that the 
Pennington county show is the best 
in Northern Minnesota and he thinks 
such affairs are valuahle institutions 
f^r the development of! this part of 
the community. 

Frank DeBettinger of Orleans won 
the dinner at the Brumund for hav- 
ing come the longest distance. 



To Minneapolis. 
Lome Johnston of this city will 
leave Sunday evening for Minne- 
apolis, where he mil spend a few 
days attending to maters of business. 



Ericksons Move to 

Thief River Falls 



(Holt Weekly News.) 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Erickson 
left for Thief River Falls on Wednes- 
day where Mr. Erickson will be em- 
ployed by the state banking depart- 
ment as examiner of I the defunct 
Citizens State Bank of that city. 
Their furniture and household goods 
were hauled to Thief ; River Falls 
Tuesday evening and Wednesday 
morning. 

On Tuesday evening the people of 
Holt gave a farewell party in honor 
of Mr. and Mrs. Erickson, at which a 
host of friends were present. Rev. M. 
B. Ordahl gave a fine farewell 
speech and the villagers' showed their 
appreciation of the three, years' stay 
of Mr. and Mrs. Erickson in Holt by 
giving them a sum of (money as a 
remembrance. i 

The evening was spent in playing 
games and in conversation. 



Attractions 

At The 

[ yceutn 



WEDNESDAY AND 

THURSDAY 

"Kiss Me Again" 

with 

Monte Blue 
.Marie Prevost 
Clara Bow 

and John Roche 

It's a Gem of High Comedy and 
splendid entertainment, 
—also — . 

Kinogram News 

< " I HM IH I li l MW 

FRIDAY And SATURDAY 
"Madam Behave" 

with 

Julien Eltings 

Greatest Woman Imperson- 
ator on the American stage, 
and 
Ann Pennington 
Celebrated Follies beauty 
and famous dancer 

Added Attraction 

"Honeymoon Hardships" 

A Mack Sennett Comedy 

Matinee Saturday at 2:30 

Admission 10c and 20c 

HM I IMII I IMI II I II H I I II 



Golf Club Dance Friday. 
The Thief River Falls Golf Club 
dancing' department will give the 
first of a series of five dances at the 
Elks Club Friday evening. The first 
i dance is announced as a Snowball 
(Party and special decorations will' 
: add color to the event. 



- MsmmmMmwm 




EDS 



WANTED 

We are in the market for 

Timothy Seed, Sweet Clover, Medium Red and 
Mairimoth Clover and Alfalfa Seed 

for quick delivery 

Let us have a sample of your| seed and state 
quantity. Sample envelopes furnished on re- 
quest. Let us hear from you before you sell. 

Tessum & Go. 



OUR AIM: 
TO SERVE 
YOU WELL 
AND 

FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 



/7 (VATIOJV-WI0E f% 

. INSTITUTION- I 

enneyvo 

r DEPARTMENT STORES 
Thief River Falls' Busiest Store 




WHERE 

SAVINGS 

i ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUOUT 

THE ! YEAR 



Important 

!S 



Watch this column for 
timely nation wide of- 
ferings of values that 
are in popular demand. 



Women's 
House Frocks 

Women's Gingham and 
Percale* Aprons Neatly 
Trimmed 



m 



Safeguarding 
Your Buying 



The privilege of knowing before you leave 
home just what or how, much* your money 
always will buy at a certain store is a Gol- 
den Rule advantage. j 

It takes all speculation, all guessing, all 
uncertainties out of your buying and gives 
you the assurance of fair treatment and full 
satisfaction. I 

Such selling methods standardizes value 
and price. The customer always knows that 
she is getting the same consideration 4s her 
neighbor— no more, no less. I 

We are operating that kind of store, ac- 
cording you in your every purchase here the 
same kind of treatment we' would like you 
to accord us were you the merchant and we 
your customer. 



Special Added Attractions 
FRDDAY NIGHT 

The Lyceum management is 
offering two prizes for the 
b'est local Charleston danc- 
ers. The contest is open to 
all. 

" < 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY 
i "The Dark Angel" 

with 

Ronald Colman and 

Vilma Banky 
Famous European ' screen 
star. 

" The Dark Angel" • 
Is an unusually fine picture. 
The New York World 
writGs 
" The Dark Angel" 
and Vilma Banky are 
i among the two finest exhib- 
its which the pictures have 
provided in years. 
The New York Telegram 
writes 
"The Dark Angel" 

has a story which never has been 
surpassed on the screen for beauty. 
It is superbly acted by an excellent 
cast. 

— also — 

Johny Arthur 

"The Tourist" 
A Tuxedo Comedy 

Sunday Matinee 2:30 

«> MM » H 4 M tltltt 



TUESDAY 
"Frivolous Sal" 

with 

Eugene O'Br, 
Mae Bu 

Also 



.'I 



i 



, : 

1 

1 

i 

• 




i 


- 




■:SHBGESSr 



5*ZW, 



l^^^^^^^^H^WM§r^M^W^Wf?^W^ 




Vol. 25 No. 43. _ - 

jncreotbeet 
acreagelikely 

FORFEWflNGTON 

Sugar Factory at E. Grand 

Forks Will Be Ready 

For New C rop. 

Beets Gonsidered Excellent 

Part in Rotation of 

Crops Scheme. 



f»D| 



Wo* 



•ar; 



That raising of sugar beets lui 
Penning*-"" county is not oniy.P™*'; 
ablefrom a financial standpoint but 
fhat the industry is valuable because 
of its jbeneficial effect on tne land, 
already has been estabbshed. and al- 
Shit was possible for the Ameri- 
can Beet Sugar company to allot 
only 200 acres to this county la»t 
year, indications are that 1,000 acres 
will be contracted for this* season 

F. O. Janzen, representative of tne 
company who worked out of .he 
Chaska factory last year, is now sta- 
tioned in Thief River Falls, and will 
make the rounds among the farmer*, 
at once to ascertain the number of 
acres each will contract for. He said 
today that he expects to get at least 
1,000 acres. 

Structural steel is now being plac- 
ed in the main factory of the plant 
in East Grand Forks. Weather con- 
ditions have been such that the con- 
struction work has been going on all 
winter and now the expectations are 
that the factory will be ready for a 
30-day tryout about August lo. 
Plans for the factory call for opening 
it for the slicing of the beets about 
September 15. 

Work has now been started in the 
12,000 



""ftr 



7 



1EF RIVER FALLS. MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 20. 1926 



Lincoln High School j 
Basketball Captain i 




LEADING TEAMS 
IN DISTRICT TO 
MEETTHDRSDAY 

Roseau and Thief River Slat- 
ed for Game Here To- 
morrow Night. 



Argyle Independents to Play 

Legion Bunch Here 

January 27th. 



campaign to secure between 
and 15,000 acres of beets to supply 
the factory during its first year's 
run. , , 

The housing of the 350 people who, 
it is expected will be employed in the 
new factory, is now being considered. 
It is expected that 50 new houses 
■will be built. 

The shorter haul resulting from the 
nearness of the East Grand Forks t,. : . ..._^ • . .; ...-•, , - 
factory and the large amount of fe^J"* fP™' :?' h,ch _ he , a,wa ,y, s 



One of the i fastest basket ball 
\ games of the , season is anticipated 
:ior tomorrow |(Thursday) night at 
' the city auditorium, when the yeter- 
' an Roseau quint is scheduled to meet 
the local high school aggregation. 

The outcome of this game, in the 
opinion of Lars Thune, coach, should 
supply fans with reliable dope for 
speculation omthe district champion- 
ship, as. the locals have defeated 
every team in the district except Ar- 
gyle. And Argyle, having lost every 
'conference game- this season, should 
not cause the locals much trouble. 
The fact that Roseau is one of the 
two leading teams in the district 
would seem to indicate that the bat- 
tle tomorrow night < will be a lively 
one from start to finish. 
] 8The high school team is playing 
Warren at that city tonight and 
'should win as Warren lost to Stephen 
12 to 9 at Warren last Tuesday 
night 

I Several car loads of fans are ac- 
companying the locals to Warren to- 
night. 

The Argyle Independents are 
scheduled to try conclusions with the 
Thief River Falls American Legion 
CLIFFORD BJORKMAN quint in this city Wednesday night, 

(Captain and Guard) January 27, according to Dr. C. M. 

Clifford Bjorkman, captain and Haug, manager. The Legionaires de- 
guard plays a stellar position on the feated Argyle a couple weeks ago 19 
Lincoln High School basket ball team. t° 15 in a hotly contested game, and 
He is a veteran of two years and has f ans here t - are promised a demonstra- 
developed into an out standing play- i tion next Wednesday night which 
er. He not only covers his man- in ■ Wl ^ be well worth seeing. 

defense but is an important cog in — r— 

the team offense. "Cliff" is a hard ; Ig Satisfied With 
player, with plenty of fight. It is : 



beets 'required to keep it in operation \ ^£*J^ 1 ™**** ^ m ^°? u l a l with 
make it possible for farmers in this | hls team mates ™* basketball fans, 
sign up for 



many 



.Pennington County 



A. T. Olson, a farmer living six 

miles south of Goodridge, is satisfied 

that he has done better in Pennington 

County than he would have done had 

t i it* x-v i ne stayed in southern, A{nir..esota. He 

Local Mystery Deaths has lived here ten years, and ' figures 

the country is well along on its way 

Two brothers,: both living in this back to prosperity, he told a Tribune 

■'■•■- • ■ ' ■ ■' He considers that 



territory io p ign up ior as hwiij i . , „ 

acres as they want and at a price ; Autopsy PlOVeS Murder 

guarantee larger than that of last TheOlV Unfounded in 2 

year. The pnce this season as here- 
tofore runs on a graduated scale de- 
termined by the price of sugar on 
February io, 1927. Regardless of 

how low the price of sugar is farm- j city, and both dying on the"same day reporter last week. 
ers are guaranteed $6 per ton for . only a few hours apari: and in much he did fairly well last year. Seventeen 
their beets. If sugar is §6.50 per j the Jsame mysterious manner, prompt- acres of sweet clover yielded 200 bush- 
hundred, 56.75 per ton will be paid ■ ed members of the families in which els of seed which netted him $400.00. 
for beets; sugar $7, $7.50 per ton for these deaths occured to have 




100 CANADIANS 
HERESATURDAY 

"Pine to Palm" Tourists To 
Be Welcomed By Local 
"< Clubs. 



Local Men Plan To 
Booster Trip To 
New Orleans. 



J6in 



A caravan of Canadian "Pine *,o 
Palm" ] tourists one hundred strong, 
will make 'Thief River Falls their 
first night control of a booster trip 
extending from Winnipeg to New Or- 
leans over the Jefferson Highway. 
The visitors are expected to .arrive 
early' in the evening and an elaborate 
program is being arranged by the 
Commercial Club and Woman's Club 
to entertain them. A dinner will be 
served in the Auditorium commencing 
at seven o'-clock and this will be .fol- 
lowed by a program of speaking, 
singing and dancing. < 

The. "Pine to Palm' 1 tour is spon- 
sored by the Winnipeg Tribune and 
is being directed by W. McCurdy, 
business manager of that paper,, 
personally. The purpose of the tour 
is to impress upon the people to the 
south of us the fact that the north 
has all weather and all season roads 
and is not the frozen, isolated region 
many people believe it to -be. The 
completion of the graveling between 
the border and Winnipeg this fall 
complex a hard surfaced road thru- 
out the breadth of the United States 
and intjo the heart of Canada. Winni- 
peg expects the completion of this 
road to materially increase her tour- 
ist business next summer, which will 
mean an increase in tourist traffic 
thru here. . Several local men and 
men from neighboring towns , are 
planning on joining the party here 
and complete the trip to. the Gulf 
with them. 

An advance ticket sale will be made 
for the dinner and program. Any 
persons wishing to be present who 
are not solicited may make reserva- 
tions by calling the Tribune office. 



Local Factory Offers 
Bigger and Better 10c. 
LaLunda Cigar to Public 



beets; sugar ?7.50, beets S8.25; sugar 
$8, beets $9; sugar $9. beets $10. 
. No investment is necessary in or- 
der to mclude sugar beets in the ro- 
tation of crops. The American Beet 
Sugar company finances the whole 
(Continued on page 8) 



Swift & Co. Gives 

Away Pri^rPoultry 

\ The Thief River Falls branch of 
\ Swift &' Co. made presents of prize 
Winning cricks purchased at the Juni- 
or Live Stock and Poultry Show to 
local farmers last week. Ten birds 
were given away, the value estimated 
at between §100 and $150. The names 
of local patrons were entered in a 
lottery and the lucky names drawn 
by Joe LaBoe, the local manager. 
The names of those farmers who re- 
ceived birds are, John Johnson, Mrs 
O. Ottum, E. O. Rude, Mrs. A. C. 
Peterson, Joe Joringdal. Joe Horejsh, 
B. A. Bredeson, Mrs. C. D. Knox, E. 
Dan and J. LaBree. 



institution and one which should be 



given a boost by 
.every opportunity. 



local people at 



Fred Niclai, manufacturer of the 
well known' LaLunda cigar,- recently 
placed on the market what he terms 
a bigger and better ten cent LaLunda_ 
... . , „ ■ . cigar. The tobacco crop in Cuga. 

post He has fourteen acres of alfalfa and where** gets his supply of filler each 
mortem examinations made by local is feeding it. He-tried sheep^this year year.' was -better this season than 
officials. The symptoms in both cafe- with good success and. intends to go in- f r nine years previous, and he asks 
es pointed an accusing finger toward to this line heavier this coming year, the public to give this particular 
poisoning. Examination revealed the He started with 300 head and sold brand atrial. -The ten- cent cigars 
fact however' that in one case the , them last fall. They paid for them- have been made larger, he says, 
death was caused by the swallowing ! selves and for their board and left him : The Niclai cigar factory is a home 

of a large overcoat button which had thirteen ewe lambs for profit: -..-..... 

obstructed the intestines and in the 
other case death was due to the pene- 
tration of the intestines by a sharp 
bone which had been swallowed. The 
examination in both cases was per- 
formed by Dr. L. E. Twete of this 
city. 

The victims in this dual tragedy 
v,ere "Cody", the three months old 
English. Setter pup owned by Dr. J. 
T. Bowers, and. "Laddie," his broth- 
er, owned by Stanton Dahlen. The 
young dogs were fine specimens of 
their breed, being raised by Dick 
Schoberg of Middle River. During 
their brief stay here they had become 
very much attached to the households 
of their adoption and' had many warm 
friends among the boys and girls of 
their neighborhoods, all of whom 
mourn their untimely death. 



Local Houseman Wins 

/rln Winnipeg Races _. ~ ■ 

— . • Bennes Urges Boosting 

P. W. Roark, local horse fancier. . a t Hotel U. C. T. Party 

Winnipeg! 



Rasmus Oen Tells Reporter His 
Idea of This Country's Future 



Rasmus Oen, pioneer Thief River 
Falls merchant, who from both the 
financial and sentimental standpoint is 
more vitally concerned in the future 
of this community than any other in- 
dividual, is perhaps more optimistic 
over that future than any other indi- 
vidual. In 1889 Rasmus Oen started 
a small tinshop in this city. Today he 
owns the largest general merchandise 
store. He is interested in banks. As 
small town fortunes go he is rich,' al- 
though a stranger wouldn't suspect it 
meeting him on the street — or in his 
store either, for that matter. What 
he has, has been made here. All that 
he has- is invested here. Whether, in 
reality, his investments are worth 
much or nothing .depends almost en- 
tirely on whether this community goes 
forward or backward. And he is op- 
timistic. 

His optimism is not put on for effect 
like the smile of a politician: It isn't 
so much what he said but the way he 
said it that convinced The Tribune re- 
porter that his optimism was. deep 
rooted. When he spoke it stuck out 
all over him like a "keep off the 
grass" sign. He is satisfied that con- 
ditions locally, at present, are good, 
healthier in fact than they have been 
for many years. His confidence in 



-rr 



the future is not; based on the present 



won recognition at the 
horse races last week when his sor- 
rel mare, Ellen Silver, won three suc- 
cessive heats in the B' class events. 
Mr. Roark has 



"The future prospects of this coun- 
ty are good", declared E. M. Bennes, 
«,»«« -u™.„ ;„ L l ,v.' local insurance man, at a party given 
three horses m his u Q % members by Juel Provehcher 
at the Hotel Evelyn Saturday night. 
"We have our natural resources and 



Winnipeg stables, Mae Kenny, Ellen 

Silver and Seal Patch, either one of 

which may earn recognition if fear raw materiaI md ^ observa . 

of running on ice is overcome. The «„„„ ;„ f „,„ini„„ „„„ ,.-£„ „„,+,,. 



Winnipeg Tribune makes the follow- 
ing comment on Ellen Silver: 



tions in travelling over the north 
western part of the state, I believe 
■this section is going to enjoy a future 



Can Hogs Be Raised and 
Fattened Without Corn? 
Read This Little Story. 



R. V. Curtiss, .farmer .residing 



near Middle River, entered 



!^?i*^'^tepf^i5f^-" •^vsr^ 



$2.00 a Year in Advance, 



the 



First National Bank ot Thief 
River Falls Tuesday morning and 
-deposited to' : his credit a check - 
for $1,746.00 which he had receiv- 
ed for a shipment of 88 spring 
pigs sent to the -aouth St. Paul 
market. Most of them were far- 
rowed as late as July 1, he gaid, 
but the shipment averaged !l90 
pounds each) Be raised 114 pigs 
from 14 brood sows and after 
this shipment still has 26 left. 

'But here is the point: Those 
pigs never saw a kernel of corn I 
Think of HI' Mr. Curtis says; the 
first 100 pounds on each pig did- 
n't cost him a cent. He turned 
them on an alfalfa and sweet clo- 
ver field and made thera earn 
their own living. Then, hej let 
them into a barley field which 
the extremely wet weather had . 
rendered valueless as a crop and 
there they added more avoirde- 
ppis. Then after each one had 
put on about 100 pounds he fed 
them ground oats, barley .and 
gave them an occasional drink of 
buttermilk from the do-operative 
creamery. 

Little piggies. Alfalfa, sweet 
clover, barley and butter milk. 
Presto! Hogs! Big check. : 

Morale: Hogs can be raised 
and fattened in Pennington -coun- 
ty without corn if the crop fails 
and farmers of this county 
should, raise more hogs. j 

Automobile Club to Hold 
Annual Meeting Friday 

The annual meeting of the Penn- 
ington County Auto club will be held 
at the Commercial club rooms Friday 
evehing, January 22 at 7:30 for the 
purpose of electing- officers and a 
delegate to the state convention which 
convenes in Minneapolis February 9. 
The present officers of the Associa- 
tion are F. J. Stebbins, president; Dr. 
H. W. Froehlich, vice president; and 
E. M. Bennes, secretary-treasurer.- 

The Club has been active the last 
year in its association with the icom- 
mercial club and aims at all times to 
co-operate with that civic organiza- 
tion in farthering the best interests 
of the community. 

- The Club financed an alfalfa exhib- 
it sent from Pennington county', to 
the Norse Centennial, last Junej and 
recently the expenses of a delegation 
to Winnipeg to attend a celebration 
in connection with the completidh of 
graveling the Jefferson highway. 

There are about 75 members in the 
county at the^present time, but 
effort will be made to increase the 
[liimber this year. The dues are $2 
a year. ' ' j 



$30,000 CHURCH 
WILL BE BUILT 
HERETHISYEAR 



Trinity Lutherans Decide 

to Start Operations 

This/Spring. 



Building Will Be One of 
Finest Of Its K&id In 

This Section, 



Pennington County Wins 
at Madison Square Garden 



C. V. Dols who lives seven and one- 
half miles northwest of Thief River 
Falls, was notified this week that he 
had won first place at the Madison 
Square Garden poultry show of New 
York with a dozen Black Minorca 
eggs. With the possible exception of 
the Pennington show, the New York 
event is considered to be one of | the 
best in the country. Mr.. Dols won 
one of the Tribune prizes at the local 
show. 



At its annual meeting held in the ' 
church yesterday afternoon, the con- 
gregation of the Trinity Lutheran ■ 
Uhurch unanimously supported the 
recommendations of the trustees and 
deacons which urged immediate action 
toward the completion of a building " 
program started .gome years ago. A 
building committee with Rev. S. L. 
Tallakson as chairman, and consist- 
ing of the entire board of trustees, 
three members of the Ladies Aid, 
one member from the Dorcas Society 
and one member from the Young 
Peoples's Society, was established, 
and authorized to make arrangements 
to start construction at once. It is 
thought that actual construction will 
be under way by spring. 

The decision to build was prompted 
chiefly by the necessity for larger 
quarters, the congreagtion having 
out-grown its present housing' facili- 
ties to such an extend that further 
development was seriously retarded. 
The fact that the financial condition 
of the community and the congrega- 
tion was greatly improvel was a big 
factor however in launching this pro- 
gram at the present time. 

The 1 new structure will' be erected 
on the northeast cornor of Horace 
Ave. and Fourth St., where the con- 
gregation owns three lots and where 
the foundation has already been com- 
pleted. The building will be of brick 
construction, and according to esti- 
mates will cost $30,000. About $5,- 
000 nf this is represented in the work 
already done. The nlans for the new 
■rhnre-Vi have already been drawn and 
accented. It will be so designed as 
to enable the use of much of the pre- 
sent equipment such as the fine pipe 
cr^an. altar and puloit. It is con- 
sidered that the new buildiner will be 
one of the /finest of its kind in this 
part of the state. 

9n0" members of the conerre°ation 
were present at the afteiTioon wssion 
and a larger number attended the 
an, evning meeting, a fine spirit of har- 
mony Drevailinir thruout. The pastor 
was presented with a very substanti- 
al ourse of trold. All the old officers 
were re-elected: 

In the discussion precedinor the de- 
c^inn to build. H. S. Dahlen made 
a talk on "Coin Facts" ; n which he 
reviewed the fman'-ial development 
of thp rom t rni«ttv during the past 
few years. Those of his remarks 
whirti are nf interest to fh** communi- 
ty as a whole are printed elsewhere 
in this issue. 



♦i. £ 5m \° U } a *y ict !P r .,ff ea i h - ? f that will compare well with any see- 
the three heats after thrilling finish- tion of ^ -^ a ^ : It is up t o the in- 
es, Ellen Silver .sorrel mare owned dividual, however, to' do his part— the 
by Pat Roark of Thief River .Falls, travelling salesman, the. business 
annexed the B class pace or trot , man, the farmer, the professional 
from a field of 12." . . Iman, the railroad man. and the labor- 

— ~ — — |ei< — we should all put our shoulders 

Base Ball Club Organizes. lt o the wheel and protect and boost 

Fifty baseball players and fans those things we have. Be fair to the 

met last Friday evening and.organiz- business enterprizes we have -and the 

ed a base ball association for the facilities that are here, all of which 

coming season. Officers elected were, are absolutely necessary for the wel- 

c - Wm. Sheedy, manager; Gust Crown, fare of everyone of us." A dozen 

ajone, however. It is founded on his Sec; George Howe, Treas; Charles other guests of the local tavern keep- 
observations of over half a century. I Herron, John Brumund Jr. and James er responded to toasts and contribut- 
He has seen other countries rise, and Parenteau, directors; A. C. Yost, field ed by their remarks- to the success of 
fall, and rise again. ' director; Gordon LaBree,' assistant the evening. 

"I once lived near Albert Lea,'ini field director. On Tuesday evening,. _: 

Southern Minnesota", he said, "when i February 2, a hard timek dance will 



Review of Conditions Here as 
Delivered by Dahlen at Meeting 



land went begging at $10.00 an acre. 
People left the farms because they 
couldn't grow wheat. Year after year 
the chinch bug ; harvested the crops 
?? d . °! e People couldn't get the idea 
that they could make money by any 
other method. The chinch bug hurt 
the wheat farmers but i', was a bless- 
ing for the country because it finally 
forced methods or brought in farmers 
whowordd d.o things differently; What 
the chinch bug did for,. that country 
the boll weavil has done for the 
sonUiern Tl atates -where .the farmers 
used to raise nothing but cotton. And 
the sow thistle. ls_the samething. for! 
this country; It haa helped .us al- 
ready. ' ■ :•- -:' 
"My bpsiness in this, store increas- 
ed 15 per cent lafet year over 1924, and 
in volume was the second best I have 
had._ My biggest year was 1919 but 
considering the reduced prices on-rher- 
chandise we actually sold more goads 
this last year than we did in 5919. 
( Continued on page 8) 



i-euruttry s, tx ilttru ume3 ounce will -- . , r . ,. . . « , j 

be staged by the Night Hawks at the Rein, Violinist, trreeted 
Auditorium to raise money for the, by Appreciative Audience 

purchase of uniforms. If enough ! * rr , ... 

money is not raised in this way the Nils Rem. violinist of reputed abil- 
Night Hawks will make a donation of ity, played to a capacity house at. the 
"10.00 according to Mr. Yost, Sons of Norway hall last Friday eve- 

— : . : ' ning, the concert being sponsored by 

Melby Goes East. the local Sons of Norway lodge. Mr. 

H. O. Melby, proprietor of the La- Rein has played in this city on vari- 

Vogue Garment Shop, plans on leav- ous occasions and is always greeted 

ing here Saturday night on his spring by a large and appreciative audience. 



and summer buying trip. He witt at- 
tend the convention of the "Associate 
ed Buyers'VS cooperative buying or- 
eonlzation with '000 members thruout 
the country; 'at; the Parm,er>- • Housq, 
Chicago! v | r .-„, ■,■,;,': ;,..,■,. .— . 
. : ' ,, ■•'■'■'' -"" x ' ' ..{ — i ;^-.' -'.;;' .' 
,' v ' . KdoteraYto, barren,.; ^ ;, ', 
"A 'numbe? "of car loads ' of ' rooters 

ir^'loov"!?-' fririffht for -WnrrPn to 

hem the. -local basketball croint'hrinV 
back the -bacon." Among*' those" ' .gdni^ 
are Mr.- and Mrs. Holc.on'.0'«orij W. 
nnd'Mrs. Cj.'O." JMcksbn,' ..MS: and 
Mrs. H. S. Snvder, : Mr. and Mrs. Mor- 
ris Bye and Mr. and Mrs. Thune. 



He is considered to be rapidly ap- 
proaching to V place ' among Arnei> 
ga'e foremost violinists. ' . 

- . """■■. "■' - -J^if,.:..; -:;• C0C 

a - Freshmen- Beat H6lti' : ■ ~ i! 
.The Lincoln high school Freshmen 
basket ball, team won frorrrHpltby 
a'score of:lSj,to 6..# Holt^ast Fri'' 
day night, v.: , -;~c 



;. Premium Listln.T'Us Issue. | "... 
"The comjletei prjmiurn T list for" the 
recent Pennington County Poultry and 
Alfalfa show appears on another page 
in this issue of The: Tribune. 



Club to Discuss Home 
Coming at Noon Luncheon 

The Commercial club at its regular 
noon day luncheon Thursday will dis- 
cuss the feasibility of arranging) for 
a home-coming day during the Pen- 
nington county fair next August. 
Such an event has been the subject 
of considerable discussion for some 
time, and it is the intention of the 
club to give the proposition a com- 
plete airing at tomorrow's meeting. 



^teen^T-Bon "'•"thprs 

Open Garage Business 

Clayton and Alfred Steenerson, 
sons of G. L. Steenerson, farmer liv- 
ing one mile east of town, have start- 
ed a garage at 101 So. Main Ave. in 
the location formerly occupied by the- 
Gilbertson & Rogers garage. These 
young men are products of the local 
schools and have both had several 
years of experience in local garage?, 
Clayton having operated the repair 
department for Kohn & Fiterman 
during the last year and Alfred hav- 
ing v^rked for Gilbertson & Rogers. 
Alfred has completed a course . in 
general garage work at Dunwoodv 
Institute, where he specialized in 
electrical work. 



The following statement is a con- 
densed report of the remarks made 
by H. S. Dahlen of the First & Peo- 
ples State Bank at the annual meet- 
ing of the Trinity Lutheran church 
yesterday, in discussing the ' advisa- 
bility of building a new church atithe 
present time. Only such portions of 
his talk as may be of interest' to peo- 
ple of the community at large iare 
presented. 

'(The year 1919, I presume will 
stand out as the greatest "Post TVar" 
high -priced, period in the history of 
this country. It did not only become 
a big task for the farmers to ire- 
adjust their farming operations ■ to 
cope with that tremendous deflation, 
which yon rrdgM say came over' nifeht, 
but <a tremenaous bnsmess depressfort 
had.to. be.' overcome, as well-as Itbe 
mental^atSraaelhad' to finaergo'-a' 
marked revision. 1 ■••■-': 3 'i ;; '- 

"As we.l.oofcbpcKoverthe'year 1925 
you cannot' but agree tHot it has been 
H ; .-year of high, lights and shadows. 
Certainly it .will stand-r' out ' as ithe 
turning point far this' locality. There 
are numerous indications that ,the 
year 1926 iB to be a year of aggres- 
siveness, and continuad progress.: 

"Sound* business methods, clear 
thinking and careful analysis, coupl- 
el with characteristic American ener- 



gy will bring good results in 1926. fc 
fact, it is my firm belief that we are 
now launched on a prolonged period 
of moderate prosperity in which all 
who have carried on with calm de- 
termination and will continue to do 
so will share. 

"In making this statement I base 
my conclusion on the actual facts as 
I find them here in our midst. Per- 
mit me to submit a few figures. 
irniril "^""h 1 "*- in our city did in 
1919 the largest business in their 
career, as far as big figures are con- 
cerned, but the year 1925 is the ban- 
ner year when we consider the volume 
of merchandise sold and actually paid 
for. For instance, one of our largest 
*™,*$v',U- lon ^ a , »•??•» 1919 were 
WM 000.00 and In 1326,1616,000:00, 



able were only ! 40' per. cent of what 
they were in 1919. What does that 
mean ? Simply this,' 'the 'merchant 
have gotten away from asking the 
Wholesale houses for long time cred-' 
it and have established themselves , on 
a sound business basis and are taking 
their ten and thirty days discount. ( 
"One of our largest merchants 
■ ' ' ( ■ Continued- on page 8) I 






!.■:! 



■-^■fefr j'^-.4^ 







VP," 






;age two 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 





H. Rustad of Viking was a busi- 
ness caller in this city >Saturday. 

Sam Hanson of Hazel was a busi- 
ness visitor to this city Saturday. 

Legion Auxiliary dance Thursday 
night, January 21. Good music. 
Everybody welcome. 45 

Arne Vik and Oscar T. Hanson of 
St Hilaire spent Friday in this city 
transacting business. 

0. K. Sevre.of Wylie motored to 
this city Saturday and spent the day 
attending to matters of business. 

Lome Johnston left Sunday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis where he will 
attend to matters of business. 

Miss Helen Radneichi of Goodridge 
arrived in this city Saturday morning 
to shop, and visit with friends. She 
returned to her home the same eve- 
ning. 

Jack and Harold Baken, who have 
spent the past three weeks in this 
city visiting with friends and rela- 
tives, left Saturday evening for 
Chicago. They arejioth employed in 
the Ford plant at that place. 

Mrs. C. C. Carlson arrived in this 
city Thursday evening and spent Fri- 
day here shopping and visiting with 
friends. She returned to her home 
in Plummer the same evening. 

Miss Sighe Sorenson of Viking 
spent Saturday in this city having 
dental work done, and as a guest at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Lester 
Hendry. 

New Spring Dresses arriving daily 
at La Vogue Garment Shop. 

Mrs. H. L. Schuster arrived in this 
city Friday and visited over night 
with friends and relatives here, re 
turning to her home in Middle River 
Saturday morning. 

Mrs. Clara Paulson of Newfolden 
was a guest at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lester eHndry Saturday. She 
also shopped in this city and had 
some dental work done. 

H. W. Semisgh of this city, left 
Wednesday morning for Duluth, 
where he spent the remainder of the 
week attending a sales convention. He 
returned to his home here Sunday 
morning. 

Miss Anna Nelson, who for the 
past three weeks has been in this city 
as a guest at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A. Parbst, returned to her 
home in Lignite, N. Dak., Friday 
morning. 

Lynn Halvorson, who until recent- 
ly has been employed at the North- 
western Monumental Works of this 
city, left Tuesday evening for Mason 
City, la. He will be in the employ of 
the Real Silk Inc. 

Miss Bernice Boyer left Friday eve- 
ning for Newfolden, where she was 
the week-end guest of hr sister, Miss 
Martha Boyer. She returned to this 
city Sunday evening. 

Miss Pearl Sheiler arrived in this 
city Friday evening to be a week-end 
guest at the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Shetler. She, re- 
turned Monday morning to Trail, 
where she teaches school. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Nelson of this 
city left Saturday morning for Two 
Harbors where they will be the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. C. Mills, parents of 
Mrs. Nelson. They expect to be gone 
about a week. 

John Ward of this city expects to 
leave Saturday for Fargo where he 
will attend a sales convention that is 
to be held at the Waldorf hotel of 
that place . He will return to his 
home here the first part of the week. 

Miss Neva Sumpter arrived at her 
home in Hazel Wednesday where she 
' was called by the illness of her broth- 
er, Hubert. She will spend a week 
there before returning to Grand 
Forks, where she is employed. 

Hjalmer Bundy of this city left 
Friday evening for Minneapolis, 
where he was married Saturday 
morning. He returned with his wife 
to this city Sunday morning, and 
they will make their home here in the 
future. 

Mr. arid Mrs. S. Benson and Mr. 
and Mrs. Rudolph Sagmoen and Miss 
I.^abelle Sagmoen motored to oRse- 
wood Sunday, and spent the day as 
quests at the B. P. Sagmoen home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Sogmoen of 
this city motored to Hazel Sunday 
where they attended the funeral of 
Hubert Sumpter, the sixteen year old 
.son of Mr. and, Mrs. T. J. Sumpter^ 

Mis? Amy Danielson arrived in this 
city Friday evening and was the 
g;ie"t of Mrs. Thelma Holm Erickson 
for the week-end. returning to her 
hon-.2 at Bronson Sunday. She is a 
music pupil of* Mrs. Erickson's. 

V-.cti Lorentson, register of deeds, 
left Sunday evening for Minneapolis 
where he will attend an abstractor's 
coir.antion that will be held the first 
pjiri or the week. He will return to 
hi« : ome here on Saturday morning. 

Ml>? Luella Caton arrived in this 
city Sunday morning. She was called 
here by the illness of her mother, 
Mr.--. John Padersnn, and will remain 
. .ma fcr a;; indefinite period of 
time. 

Miss Agne-* Oftedahl, who has I 
>j.>er* the past' five weeks in this city, 
as ;. guest of her parents, Mr. and I 
Mrf. Jo'.m Oftedahl, returned Tues- \ 
■t|;:<Jy afternoon to Fargo, N. D. She \ 
\* employed with the Nash-Finch 
•ivimyany there. 

M.s. Gilbort S. Walker arrived in 
this city Monday evening- from her 
horn i. at Hurd, N. Dak., and will 
fjpend a few days as the guest of Mrs. 
Leonard Haason prior to going to 
Twin Valley where she will visit in- 
definite at i:he home of her mother, 
Mrs. Sethney. - 

Cunty Auditor T. P. Anderson left 
.Sunday evening for Minneapolis 
-where he \vill attend the annual Audi- 
tor's convention. Prior to returning 
:to his home in this c ity he will make 
:a trip to Minkato, where he will 
spend a few days as a guest of his 
son, Glen, who is employed by the 
Standard Oil Co. there. He expects 
.to be gone about a week. 



William Alexander left Monday 
morning for Devils Lake, N. D., 
where he will be employed at the 
Soo Line station. 

Miss Josie Lendobeja of Kratka 
spent Saturday and Sunday in this 
city as a guest of Miss Helen Keat- 
ing. : 

New Spring Dresses arriving daily 
at La Vogue Garment Shop. 

T. J. Sumpter of Hazel was in this 
city Saturday attending to matters of 
business. ' 

P. W. Rourk, who spent the past 
ten days in Winnipeg attending the 
horse races, returned to his home in 
this city Sunday evening. 

Roy Brown of Grygla spent Friday 
and Saturday of this week in this 
city as the guest at the home of his 
brother, F. A. Brown. 

Mrs. Rueben. Sandberg of Grygla 
arrived in this city Friday and spent 
a brief time as a guest at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Brown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hjalmer Bundy ar 
rived in this city Sunday morning 
from Minneapolis, and will make 
their home here. Mrs. Bundy was 
formerly Miss Dot Pederson, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Peder- 
son of this city. 

Miss Alvina Jonas left Friday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis where she spent 
the week-end as the guest of friends, 
returning to her home in this city 
Monday morning. 

W. J. LaBree motored to Warren 
the first part of the week to attend 
to matters of business. He w r as ac- 
companied by his daughter, Miss 
Adlynn, who went over to consult Dr. 
Bratrud. Mr. LaBree also attended 
to business at Grand Forks the same 
day. 

Legion Auxiliary dance Thursday 
night, January 21. Good music 
Everybody welcome. 45 

Miss Kate Jonas has resumed her 
duties in the ready-to-wear depart- 
ment at the J. C. Penney store. She 
has enjoyed a two weeks' vacation 
visiting with friends and relatives in 
Minneapolis. 

Hans.Heckne of Emerald, Idaho, is 
visiting at the home of his sister, 
Mrs. Carl Erickson, Mr. Heckne is 
well known in this vicinity having 
formerly been a resident of this city. 

Morris Mabey returned to his home 
in this city Thursday morning and 
will remain here for an indefinite 
time. He has spent the past two 
weeks in Minneapolis visiting friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Evenson and 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Evenson of 
Scobey, Mont., motored to Crookston 
Saturday and spent the day as guests 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. O. 
Sampson. 

Mrs. Gun3tyn Bergland was taken 
suddenly ill Friday evening at her 
home at St. Hilaire. She was taken 
to a hospital in this city and 
operated on for appendicitis Satur- 
day morning. At the present' time her 
condition is much improved, and she 
is recovering nicely. 

Miss Mary Moesen arrived .here 
Tuesday and is a guest at the home 
of her uncle, W. H. Mulry. She ex- 
pects to return, to her home at 
Crookston Friday afternoon. 
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Brown, Miss 
Margaret Brown, Rolf Rasmusson 
and Charles Engelbert of St. Paul 
motored to Grygla Sunday and spent 
the day as guests at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brown. 

Mrs. Alex Campbell, who has been 
employed as substitute teacher at 
Warren, arrived in this city Friday 
evening to spend the week-end at her 
home. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Thune and 
Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Erickson of 703 
Knight Ave. N. motored to Warren 
Friday evening to witness the War- 
ren-Stephen basketball game. They 
also visited; at the Judge Holm 
home. Mrs. Erickson is a niece of 
Judge Holm. 

Rev. E. H. Kriedt, Mrs. George Wil- 
son, Bert Umland, Mrs. Harland, 
Mrs. Leonard Hanson and Mrs. Otto 
Geske and son, were among the local 
peofle who attended the German 
Lutheran Ladies Aid that was held 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Albert 
Geske near St. Hilaire Thursday. 

Mfes Elizabeth Keating arrived in 
this city Sunday evening from Grand 
Forks, N. D., where she attends the 
Union Commercial college, and will 
spend a week here at the home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Keating. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Keating of this 
city motored t Grand Forks Sunday 
to spend the day with their daughter, 
Miss Elizabeth, who attends the Un- 
ion Commercial college. They return- 
ed the same evening accompanied by 
their daughter who will remain at 
home for a week. 

New Spring Dresses arriving daily 
at La Vogue Garment Shop. , 

Everett Roemhildt, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Roemhildt of this city 
will leave next Tuesday evening for 
Seattle, Wash., where he will be em- 
ployed for the remainder of the 
winter . 

Miss Myrtle Helgeland, who is 
teaching a rural school near Newfol- 
den visited at her home in this city, 
over the week-end. She returned to 
her school on Monday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Morsching 
returned to their home at Waterville, 
Minnesota last evening, after visiting 
with friends and relatives in this 
city for the past three weeks. Mrs. 
Morsching is a daughter of Mr. and 
Mrp. Henry Roemhildt here. 

H. W. Semisch, traveling salesman 
for the Stone Ordean Well company,' 
left the latter part, of last week for 
Duluth to attend the annual meeting 
of salesmenj for his company. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Evenson and 
children arrived in the city Thursdav 
to be guests at the home of the for- 
mer's parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. V. 
Evenson, for an indefinite time. Be- 
fore coming; here they spent a short 
time at Gibbons, Minn., visiting with 
friends and >rel?ti"«5. Their home is 
at Scobey, Montana. 

Legion Auxiliary dance Thursday 
night, January 2L. Good- music. 
Everybody welcome, 45 



._/• ■ 



OUR 

676-STORE 
-BUYING 
POWER 
SAVES YOU 
MONEY. 




flftATION-WIDE 
INSTITUTION- 



enney 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1928. 




ma 



DEPARTMENT STORES 
Thief River Falls' Busiest Store 



WHERE 

SAVINGS 

ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUOUT 

THE YEAR 



This Is 
Winter 




You Have 
% Waited For 



Snowy White Mounds of Thrift Opportunity! 



* ■ 

Don't fail to visit our Store. You'll enjoy the fresh, new displays of numerous 
household needs. It will be a buying occasion you'll long remember because of the 
pleasure derived from selecting and the savings you will enjoy^ 



Crash Toweling 

All Linen 

Recommended for dish 
towels or roller towels. 
Yard, 

29c 

Glass Toweling 

All Linen 

Imported all-linen glass 
check toweling. The yard, 

25c 



Irish Art Linen 

Good Quality 

A fine, white linen suit- 
able for all fancy work. 
Yard, 
18 in. 36 in. '45 in 

69 c 98 c $1.49 



Ramona Cloth 

Sold Only By Us 

Ramona ', Cloth! The 
unequalled linen finish 
fabric For children's ap- 
parel, fancy work, uni- 
forms, etc. Our own ex- 
clusive fabric. Yd., 
36 in. 45 in 54 in. 

29c 39c 49c 



36-in. Ramona 
Cloth 

36 inch Ramona cloth 
in colors, lavender, 
orange and yellow, Yd. ' 



45c 



All-Linen 
Toweling 

18 inch All Linen pattern 
toweling, Yd., 



69c 



All Linen Huck 

18-inch All Linen Huck 
toweling pattern. Yd., 



79c 



Toweling - 

Red or Blue Checks 
Eed or blue check. 16 in. 
wide. Fine weave, Yd., 
only, 



15c 



White Flannel 

Soft and Firm 
For many uses, buy 
White Outing Flannel' 
now- and here. Our qual- 
ity is worthy and our 
price most advantageous. 
The Yard, 

29 in. 36 in. 

23c 29c 

*~' ' ' T " , ' - ■ * 

Longcloth 

An Excellent Jfalue 
Buy longclouc here! 

Good quality, tire yard, 

only, 

15c to 29c 



New Bedspreads 

' Crocheted Pattern 
These look well, laun- 
der well, and wear well. 
Woven of strong cotton 
thread . 

With the popular -scal- 
loped edges and cut cor- 
ners. Priced, 

$2.98° $5.50 



Krinkle Bed 

Spreads 

White krinkle spreads, 
72x90, 

$1.98 «p 
Nurses Cloth 

-' 36 in. .Linen finish 
■Nursery cloth, 

25c to 39c 



Mercerized 
Voiles 

Voiles in assorted 
widths and patterns, 

29c t0 69c 



Good Toweling 

Part linen and all linen 

15c to 19c 

Colored Damask 

58 in. Damask in' red, 
blue and tan check, Yd., 



89c 



Mercerized 
Damask 

72 in. Cotton Damask, 
neat pattern, 

69c t0 98c 

All Linen Damask 

72 inch linen Damask, 
neat pattern, 

$1.69 to $2.19 
All Linen Damask 

72 in. Linen Damask, 
plain color, yd, 



$1.98 



Mercerized 
Napkins 

All cotton napkins, 20 
by 20 in. rose pattern, 

$1.49 doz, 

All Linen Napkins 

Heavy linen napkins 
22x22, pattern, 

$4.50 1« $5.69 



Penco Sheeting 

Superb Quality 

If you want the best 
sheeting, you want Pen- 
co! It is sold exclusively 
by us. Finely woven, it 
wears and looks well. 
The yard, 



63 in. 



72 in. 



55c 59c 



Penco Sheeting 

81 in. best sheeting. Yd, 

63c 



Nation -Wide 
Sheejting 

Nation-wide sheeting is 
serviceable and inexpen- 
sive. Many housewives all 
over the land prefer it 
and welcome its low 
price. The Yard 

63 in. : 72 in 

43c 47c 



Nation -Wide 

■ Sheeting 
81 in. fine sheeting, Yd, 



53c 



NEW LINGERIE FABRICS 

Pretty Checks and Stripes 




The girl or woman who likes j to make 
her own attractive underwear, wlecomes 
our present showing of all that's new and 
dainty in fabrics for lingerie, j Checks, 
stripes, etc. in batistes, voiles, Jersey fab- 
rics, etc priced, the yard from 1 

19c to 39c 



Penco Sheets 

Serviceable 

Discriminating house- 
wives choose Penco sheets 
everytime— for wear, for 
appearance, and for econ- 
omy. Sold only in cm- 
stores. Each, 

72x90 72x99 

$1.49 $1.59 



Pillow Tubing 

^Penco" Brand 
Linen finish pillow tub- 
ing, circular weave. The 
yard; 



42 in. 



46 in. 



42c 45c 

Pillow Cases 

"Penco" Brand 
Linen finish, each 
• 42x36 .45x36 

39c 42c 



NationjWide 
Sheets 

Our Nationt wide sheets 
are worthy inequality and 
popular priced. Try them. 

72x90 j 72x99 

$1.19 $1.39 



Pillow Tubing 

Nation-wide I Brand, fine 

finish, circular weave, yd, 

42 in. j 45 in. 

33c 37c 



Pillow Cases 

Nation-wide; Brand, 
42x36 j 46x36 



33c 37c 

Wizard • Brand, 
quality, each j 

25c 



fine 



1 I I 



Plisse Crepe 

For Undergarments 

Plisse rrene launders 
beautifully and requires 
no ironing. For all lin- 
gerie and children's ap 
parel. The yard. 



23c 



Plisse - Crepe 

32 in. mercerized and 
silk finish crepes, 

29c t0 49c 



Japanese Crepe 

30 in. cotton crepes, 
fast and plain colors, 



19c . 



,^> 



White Poplin 

Mercerized 

Finely mercerized pop- 
lin, a thrifty purchase. 
The yard, 

23c 49c 



White Broad- 
cloth 

A Fine Value 

Mercerized Broadcloth, 
priced, 36 inches wide, yd, 

59c $1.19 



Honor Muslin 

Our Famous Brand 
Honor Muslin stands 
first in quality! We're 
proud of it! Sold only by 
us. 

Priced, the yard, 

Bleached 



18c 

Unbleached 

16c 



Dimity Checks 

For Underwear 

Make your new wide*- ; 
garments now — from this 
popular dimity in pretty 
checks. 

In adorable colors, too! 
36-in. width, the yard, 



19c 



Wizard Sheeting 

Bleached sheeting, 81 
inch width, good quality, 
the yard, 

43c 



Wizard Sheets 

Medium weight sheets, 
size 72x90, each, 



98c 




•1 
1 






| 
> 






1 
.1 

) 


' 




i! 

1' 
ft 


- 




1 

1 







n-- 



fl 



■'JBffiKi.TT 



fc, 



^te*^;^gnBs^s*nwBHnM 



i,yna»Ki *»* 1 1 j t btt QR* B fW ffi i 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1926. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRTOUJO 



] -?f 



PAGE THE. 




Auringer HostesB. 



Auxiiars to Give Dance. 
The American Auxiliary uni'. is giv- 
ing a dance tomorrow (Thursday) 
night in the Legion club rooms to 
raiase funds with which to ciirry on 
their activities. Not only all Legion 
and Auxiliary members, but the pub- 
lic is invited to attend. The price is 
only 75c per couple and 26 cents for 



" her iriends at 
ihe 



h„ home last ?*™ ladie5 ' and « ood music is prcm ' 



ised. 

Bfoyal Neighbors. 

The Royal Neighbors will hold their 

installation of officers this evening. 

P_ thp . Mrs. Clara Anderson will act asin- 

"WiViTj stalling officer, and Mrs. Emma Da- 

Gjeruon, Agnes OftedahL_Mrs. W. J. .. ... , .,-- 

Brown, 



THE CHURCHES 



S^eVenlr,;: ihe hours were 
St at needlework and in a social 
v*a£ ami at 11 o'clock a delicious 
luncheon was served. The guests were 
Misses Lulu Cook, Alvina Jonas, Net- 
tie Ove, Jear.ette Ofted aM, ^ ^ 

_ n^.j.i. . !v ... - . dB011 r ^jj ], 6 - >j,e ceremonial mar- 
shall. Following the installation, 
" '., ™ , lunch will be served, and a social time 

■ Community uud. enjoyed 

The Girls' Community club will "old g(> ^n,,^.. Guild. 

their regular meeting at the Legion gr Bernar( p s q^ij w ;u meet in the 
club rooms next Monday evening, Jan. church par i ors Thursday afternoon. 
25. It is requested -.hat as man> hmQh win j^ serve( [ as USU al from 3 
members as possible are P reo ' ent . a f Until 6:30 o'clock. The hostesses will 
those that have been chosen for "jei^ Mesdamea j. j McCann, Frank 
.._. „,- f >,o ™„ c iVb1 comedy neiio F ^ nerj Artnur L ouze and A. J. Cas- 



and Mrs. Harold Eide. 



cast of the musical comedy 
There" will be announced. 



Regular .Meeting. 
The Lyon Rebekah lodge will hold 



per. 



Trinity Ladies' Aid. 
The Trinity Ladies' Aid will meet 



AUG IJJU" a«.~ :{.. T n n TT 1J1G l """J u««—- ' 

a regular meeting at tne l. u. u. r . Thursday afternoon, January 
hall Thursday evening. A class ol „ O . colck at t h e parlors of the 



_■ 28th at 
hall "Thursday evening. A class oi 3 Tj olck " at tne parlors of the church, 
new members will be initiated wnicn I( . ^ be entertained by Mesdames 

■ —' " ,Nels A. Nelson, J. O. Sether. Severt 

Benson and Joseph Peterson. 



viiii bVioTlowed by lunch and a social 

time. 

*** 

Degree of Honor Dance. 

The members of the Degree of Hon- 
or will entertain their friends at ; a 
dancing party that is to be held at the 
Masonic hall Friday evening. 
*** 
Bridge Club 
Mrs G. \V. Booren was hostess last 
evening when she entertained the 



Food Sale. 

The Junior department of the Pres- 
byterian Sunday school will hold a 
food sale Saturday afternoon, January 
23rd, at Rhodegaard's grocery store. 
*** 

Whist Party. ' 

The Girls' Community club held a 
party at the Legion club rooms Mon- 



CtCIUllg »".» -.— ^.u.kj UV ...... *.w b .w.l ....... .......... ... — 

members of the Bridge club at ner j (j ay eve ning. Progressive whist was 
home at Kendall Ave., N. A delicious pi ayea t seventeen tables, and iMss 



luncheon was served to the guests at 

11 o'clock. 

*** 

Sleigh Ride Party. 
In honor of her cousin. Miss Mary 
Noesen of Crookston, who has • been 



Margaret Quammen and iMss Chris 
tine Clausen won first and second 
prize. Short musical program which 
consisted of a piano solo by Miss 
Gladys Weeks, and Miss Lucile Her- 
manson and a vocal solo by Mrs. M. 



her guest for the past week, Miss j Brink was given. A dainty luncheon 
Alice Mulry entertained a^ group of w as served at 10:30. 



Christian Science. , 

Regular Sunday services are held 
at 11 a. m. in the church at LaBreo 
avenue and First street. Subject 
Sunday, January 24, "Truth". Sun 
day school at 10 a.m. Wednesday 
evening meetings are held at 7:45. 
Reading room open Wednesday from 
3 to B. The public is cordially invited 
to these services. 

*«♦ 
Trinity Lutheran Church. 
Selrner L. Tallakson, Pastor. 
Norwegian worship at 11 a.m. 
English service at 7:45 p. m. 
Special choir meeting Thursday at 
7:30. 

Willing Workers meet with Elaine 
Evenson, 611 Duluth avenue, Satur- 
dad. "It does not matter whether 
a man's religion .has had a puncture 
or a blow-out — the result • is the 
same". 

♦»* 

Augustana Church. 
Albin A. Larson, Pastor. 
Swedish services next Sunday at 
10:30. 

Sunday school at 11:45. 

The Junior Mission band meets 

next Saturday, January 23rd at 2 

o'clock at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 

C. E. Hellquist. 811 Duluth Ave. N. 

**» 

Sw. Ev. Mission Church. 
O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 

Sunday school 10:00 a. m. 

Morning services 11 a. m. 

Evening worship 7:30 p. m. 

Tuesday: Prayer and Bible study 
7:30. 

The Ministerial association of the 
R. R. Valley Mission churcih will hold 
their quarterly conference commenc- 
ing Wednesday, January 27, 7:30 p. 
m. with two sessions Thursday and 
Friday at 2 p. m. and 7:30 p. m. also 
Saturday 2 p. m.. 

Saturday evening and Sunday win 
be the Young Peoples Rally, with 
three services Sunday. Jan. 31. 

Come and bring your friends. 



M. E. Church. 
J. T. Dixon, pastor. 
Sunday activities: 
10:30 Sunday school and adult Bible 

class. 

6:30 P. M. Epworth League. 

11: a. m. Public Worship— subject 

The choir is to render special 
music. 

7:80 p. m. subject "Hold the Fort." 

Monday— Men's club and ladies to 
meet in church basement at 6:30. Din- 
ner served by Ladies aid. 

Wednesday— Class meeting Bible 
study, beginning Ep to romans. 
Satisfaction of Purity." 

Friday — Boy Scout cubs to meet in 
church basement. ' « 



Attending Short Course. 

Harvey Aubol of St. Hilaire, Minne- 
sota is at University Farm, St. Paul, 
attending a six week's short course of 
the University's Dairy School for be- 
ginners in creamery operation. Sixty- 
two of 90 men ap'plyingjfor the course 
were accepted as students, experience 
having Bhown that the test results are 
obtained with groups orj from 50 to 60. 

Instruction is given daily in all pha- 
ses of creaniery operation, including 
bookkeeping, creamery arithmetic, op- 
eration of engines and! motors, belt 
lacing, soldering and general repair* 



work. ' t 

This is the third and last course . 
the Dairy school for the fall and win- 
ter of 1925-26. W. B. Combs of the ' 
dairy division at University Farm is 
in personal charge of the work. 

Births. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Otis Dokken, Sat- 
urday, January 9th, a son.. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jack Doss, Tues- 
day," January 18th, a son. 

If you' have anything you wfsh to 
sell. Tribune want ads will sell it 



*8- I. 



her friends at a sleighride party 
Thursday evening. After riding for 
two hours, the guests gathered at the 
Mulry home where the remainder of | 

the evening was spent in a social way. | day party last Friday afternoon 
Adelicious lunch was served at 11:30. ; celebrate the fifth anniversary 



Birthday Party. 
Miss Joyce Olson,- daughter of_Mr. 
and Mrs. Haakon Olson, had a birth- 

- - - - • - to 

of 



The guests were: Miss Mary Noesen, her birth. The hours were spent 
guest of honor; Misses Bertha Ordal, playing games, and at 5 o'clock a de- 
Valeria Parenteau, Marie and Made- licious lunch was served. At this 
line Thill, Faythe Warner, Margaret time a birthday cake topped with 
Barzen Pearl'Tessum, Judith Christ-: five candles was brought in, much to 
enson and Loretta Mulry. i the delight of the little hostess and 

*•*' . . jher guest. 

Auxiliary to Meet. 



The Women's Auxiliary to the ' Temple Guild Entertains 

American Legion held their regular! The Temple Guild of the St. John s 
meeting at the Legion club rooms last ; Lutheran Church held a social Rath- 
evening. The hostesses were: Mes->ring in the church parlors last Wed- 
dames Harold Eide, A. L. Auringer, 
Kem Olson and L. A. Hermanson. 



nesday evening in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. "Harold Morsching and Everett 
Roemhildt. Fiftv guests were present 
Junior Luther League. and the evening was spent playing 

Last Wednesday evening the mem- games and in a social manner Re- 
berfof the Junior Luther League held freshments were served at 11 o'clock, 
a meeting in the parlors of the Trinity . shower 



this was followed by a violin duet by 
Gordon Overland and Justus Larson. 
A reading by Linnea Backlund com- 
pleted a very enjoyable program. The 
remainder of the evening was spent 
playing games and in a social way, 
and refreshments were served at 

10.30. 

*** 

Auxiliary Dance. 

The Legion Auxiliary will sponsor 
a dance that is to be held in the Le- 
gion club rooms Thursday evening of 
this week. Mrs. L. A. Hermanson and 
Mrs. Roy Erickson are the committee 
that have charge of making the nec- 
essary arrangements, and present in- 
dications are that it will be a huge 
success from every point of view. v 
**« 

E-istern Star. 
A regular meeting of the Winslow 
chapter of the Eastern Star will be 
held at the Masonic hall Wednesday 
evening. January 27th. It is request- 
ed that as many members as possible 
will be present. 

For Miss Oftedahl. 
In compliment to her sister Miss 
Agnes Oftedahl, of Fargo, Mrs. Har- 
old Eide entertained a number of her 
friends at her home last Saturday 
evening. The evening was spent play- 
ing cards, and at 11 o'clock a delicious 
lunch was served. The guest list in- 
culded: Miss Agnes Oftedahl, honor 
guest; Misses Adlynn LaBree, Myr- 
i.hle Oen, Myrtle Helgeland, Lulu 
Cook, Mrs. Norbert Holzknecht, Olaf 
Winger, A. L. Auringer, Oscar Nel- 
son and Harold Aineson. 
*** 

Maccebbes to Install. 
The Maccabbes will hold their in- 
stallation of officers next Tuesday 
t-vening, Mrs. Lulu Volkmann, state 
commander, of Minneapolis, will be 
the installing officer. Refreshments 
and a social hour will succeed the in- 
stallation ceremonies. 

Pedcrson-Bundy. 
Saturday morning at ten o'clock, in 
"^ the study of the First Baptist church 
of Minneapolis, Miss Dot Bertha 
Pcderson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John P. PeSderson of this city became 
the bride of Hjalmer Bundy, son of 
Theodore Bundy of this city. Rev. 
Phillpots read the ceremony in the 
presence of Miss Rose Young and Mis 
Luella Caton. The young couple will 
make their home here. 
#** 

Johnson-Evenstad. 
Miss Myrtle Johnson, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Amund Johnson and 
Owen B. Evenstad, «on of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. M. Evenstad, were quietly 
married at the Trinity Lutheran 
church Sunday. ' The impressive ring 
service was used. Rev. S. L. Taflakson 
officiating. ■ They were attended by 
Miss Lida Anderson and Halbert 
Evenstad, brother of the groom. They 
will make their future home in this 

oil; 



at the home of the former. The affair 
was in compliment to Mrs. James 
Burrell. The hours were passed so- 
cially and at needlework, and at 5 
o'clock , a delicious . luncheon was 
served. Fourteen guests were pres- 
ent 



Mrs. R. E. Backe. of Fosston. who 
has' been a guest of her son in Th'ef 
River Falls for several days, left 
Friday for Crookston where she will 
visit her daughter, Mrs. J. A. Hen- 
drick, before returning to her home. 
Her son accompanied her to Crook- 
ston, going on to Superior. Wis., to 
attend the annual meeting of sales-, 
men for the lemon Mercantile com- 
pany by which he is emnloyed. Mrs. 
"-.We visited friends and relati*- of - 
in the Twin Cities for several weeks 
before coming to this city. 

S. N. Nelson of Fargo visited 
over the week-end in this city with 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. N. Nel- 
son. 



Mavie Lutheran Church. 
E. O. Sabo. Pastor. 
Services with English sermon in 
:he Zion church. Germantown Sunday 
January, 24 at 11 a. m. The confirma- 
tion class meets immediately after 
the services Sunday. '. 
Services in Mavie at 3 p. m. 

**» 
Scandinavian Ev. Free Church. 

J. O. Jacohsen, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a. m. 
Morning worship at 11 a. m. 
Young Peoples meeting at 4 p. m. 
Evening service at 7:30 p. m. 
Prayer, meeting on Thursday eve- 
ning at Ole Moen's residence 1003 
Arnold Ave. North. 
*** 

Zion Church. 
Aug. Bredeson, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a. m.. Services 
at 11:00 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. Prayer 
meeting Wednesday evening at Rev. 
Aug. Bredeson's residence. 
Ladies aid Thursday afternoon at 
"•so Young Peoples Society Thurs- 
day eve. at 7:45. Religious instruc- 
Mon Friday afternoon from 1:00 to 
4-00. The continuants will meet at 
Rev Bredeson's residence Saturday 
morning at 10:00 o'clock. 
**• 
Opodridge Lutheran Churches. 
V. O. Aaker, Pastor. 
Sunday. Jan. 24: Sunday school 
and Bible class at 10 a.m. and Eng- 
lish services at Goodridge at 11 a.m. 
Norse services at Erie at 2:30 p.m. 
Business meeting immediately after 
the services both in Goodridge and 
at Erie. All voting members are 
urged to be present. Confirmants at 
Deer Park meet Tuesday, Jan. 27. 
Dorcas Ladies' Aid meets with Mrs. 
Roysland Wednesday, Jan. 27. Ser- 
vices at Jelle with dedication of the 
cemetery, Thursday, Jan. 28. The 
services will begin at 11 a.m. with 
Revs. E. O. Sabo and V. O. Aaker. 
Both languages will be used. Every- 
body invited. Confirmants at Erie 
and Goodridge meet every Saturday 
11 ,a.m. and at 2:30 p.m. 



Presbyterian Church. 
E. H. Lorenz, Pastor. 
The men's Bible class will meet 
with the Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. 
Preaching service at 11. Topic: God's 
good promise. C. E. at 7 p.m. Doro- 
thy Haney is leader. Evening ser- 
vice at 8 p.m. Topic: "The -Dimen- 
sions of God's Love." 

The School of Missions will meet 
Wednesday evening at 7:S0 p.m. The 
first hour will be taken up with the 
second chapter of Kenneth Miller's 
"Peasant Pioneers." , The second. per- 
iod will be taken up with a stereopti- 
con lecture. All are most cordially in- 
vited. 

. +♦* 
St. John's Lutheran Church. 
E. H. Kdeidt, Pastor. 
German services 10:30 a. m. Sun- 
day -school at 9:30 a. m. English 
Bible Lecture at 7:46 p. m. 
Election of Officers. 
Congregation. 
The following officers' were elected 
at the annual meeting Tuesday af- 
ternoon, January 12. Albert Geske, 
president; H. Roemheldt, elder; H 
koop Sr., trustee; A. Zellmer, trea- 
surer; Hans Anton, secretary. 
Concordia Ladies' Aid. 
At the annual meeting held Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the home of Mr?. 
P. Myhrum the following officers 
were re-elected; Mrs. A. P. Fox, 
president; Mrs. Herb. Fuller, secre- 
tary; Mrs. H. Roemhildt, treasurer; 
Mrs. P, Myhrum was elected vice 
president. 

Country Ladies' Aid. 
At the annual meeting held Thurs- 
day afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
Geske all the officers were re-elected. 
Mrs. Hans Anton, president; Mrs. A. 
Gseke, vice president; Mrs. H. Koop, 
secretary and Mrs. Gust Wilken, 
treasurer. 

*** 




No Mystery in 'Pyramid* 



Library Notes. 

The following new books have been 
added to our rental collection: 

Tarkingtbn— Women 
■ Boyd — Drums 

Boyer — The Emigrants 

■Norris— Little Ships 

Walpole— Portrait of a Man With 
Red, Hair 

Wilson— The Kenworthys 

Cather— The Professor's House 

Gray— The Vanishing American 

Harpers Best Short Stories for 
1925. 

Fifty boys and girls of the first, 
second and thrid grades attended our 

Story Hour" last Saturday afternoon 
and listened with keen interest to 
"Chick D. D." and Kipling's "Cat 
that walked by hmiself" as told by 
Miss Goldsmith of the Washington 
school. iMss Bloomsness of the Knox 
school will assist with the stories 
next Saturday. We begin at 1:16 p. 
m. and ask that the children be 
time. 



They do tell of a restaurant customer 
who failed to 'receive a check for his meal 
and-asked the cashier the amount of his 
bill. ^j 

"What did you eat?" inquired the bobbed 
haired lass. 

T6 which she received the pertinent re- 
. ply: "I don't know: I had hash!" 

Really, we imagine many a car owner 
would be in the same quandray if he were 
asked what is in the oil he uses in his car. 
For, verily, there are many compounded 
oils on the market— and the ingredients of 
which they are compounded makes a 
mighty difference. 

In Pyramid Oils there is no ingredient 
that will become segregated under high 
heat of a rapidly working motor. Pyramid 
Motor Oil is a 100 per cent Pennsylvania 
oil that will not break down under severest 
conditions of motor operation. 

You KNOW what you're using when you 
use Pyramid. _ 

Our, Trucks make daily deliveries into 
the country. 




VIVO FLOUR 



For the Whole Family ! 

THE RADIOLft SUPER-HETEBODYHE 

MUSIC for mother; lectures for Dad 
and bedtime stories for the little one — 
RADIOLA gets them all You'll be surpris- 
ed at the wonderful reception— and equally 
surprised at the reasonable price. 

THIEF RIVER MUSIC COMPANY 

RADIO HEADQUARTERS 




Ask your grocer for and insist upon 
getting it. 

No Better Flour Made 

Dollars earned in our home state, in- 
vested 1 in home products, produce 
more home grown dollars and keep 
the wheels of home industry turning. 
Home grown dollars are a valuable 
crop. 

Keep your dollars rotating at home. 



'Buy vivo 

Hanson & Barzen Milling Co. 




t Mr^agN.-V'.-. 



':4feafe&sft' Vi;l'»: :S'-i£i^^ 





I 



Thief River Falls Tribune 



Published Every Wednesday 
Established 3001 



LUDW1G I. UOE .... p tt . s ideut 
WILLIAM, E. .BAIILCjUIST - Editor 
H. S. SNXUEE - ... city Editor 



Official Paper or 'Pennington County 
Entered us second-clam* mutter at the 
poslou'lce at Thief ltiver Kalis, Mlnu., 
under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



SUBSCltU"rlON S2.00 PEH YEAR 



HARD TIMES 
There is so much reference to hard 
times, so many casual remarks made 
and accepted as a matter of course 
along this general line, that it re- 
quires some effort to force ourselves 
to refer to present conditions in anj ( 
other way. And yet, if we examine' 
the evidence impartially we must ad- 
mit that conditions right here in this 
community, at tile present time, arc 
good. We have developed a bad 
habit of thinking the times are hard ' 
and it is high time that we start real- ' 
izing that times are not hard. They 
were hard and the improvement has 
been so gradual that it has been dif- 
ficult to appreciate the change but 
the change has taken place. 

Of course there are many individ- 
uals in the community who are still 
fighting an up-hill battle. There are 
individuals for whom the times are 
mighty hard, but these are individual 
cases. The community today as a ( 
whole is making money. The people ' 
as a whole have money. This is evi- 1 
dent, because they are spending! 
money. Business in Thief River j 
Falls is the best it has been for mam- 
years and there is more cash business 
than there has ever been. | 

A few years ago the school dis- ! 
trict, the city and the county were in j 
the red. Today they have cash bal- | 
ances. Local taxes are being reduc-i 
ed— slowly but surely. When we- 
consider the amount of money the 
people in this community owed in 

19 . 19 and A™ realize how much of pose; so by diligence shall we • do 
this huge debt has been paid off we I more with less perplexity. He that 
must admit that our present condi- 1 riseth late must trot all day and shall 
tion is vastly improved. I scarce overtake his business at night ; 

I ts U(imIt 't; Let's tell the | while laziness travels so slowly that 
world that Pennington County is on I poverty soon overtakes him. 
her feet. Let's tell the world that "So what signifies wishing and 
way up here in Pennington County j hoping for better times? We may 
where land is cheap, we're making ; make these better if we bestir our 



One Minute Int^Yie^ 



YOUR 'NAME IN FULL? - ■ - : J- > '■- ■ i '' .: ■■>,:. ' 

: Carl Froseth. j-.r . ■ .-.:■..". (■? ■ •-,:..,:' 

WHEBE WERE YOU BORN?/. •; ' • " ''" ^-1- 

.;■ In Trondhjem, Norway. 

■fo%l^En L t^J amEAXD WHEN DID ™ «»« 

I left there in 1888 and came to Thief River Falls in 1900. 
WHAT DO YOU THINK OF BOBBED HAIR? 
Well, it's a fine thnig for the barbers all right. 

WH^T DO YOU THINK OF SHORT SKIRTS? 
; That g a very delicate question to deal with. It helps the sale of 
silk hosiery. I ve got nothing more to say on' that, absolutely 



jipeg Boosters Who | 



OF TODAY WORSE THAN THEIR 



ARE THE YOUNGSTERS 
PARENTS WERE? 

No, I don't believe they are. It may appear that they are but we 
must consider conditions existing then. and now. > 

DO YOU THINK HARD TIMES ARE OVERT 
Come and ask me this when we get hard times. 

^S*,T J? T J IE E ARL IEST THING YOU CAN REMEMBER? 
Well, the first thing I can remember— Let me see now. When I 
came here m 1900 there was an Indian pow-wow on Main street 
which took place after old nigger Henry Bosse's wedding to an bid 
Indian squaw from out east. Nick Hanson, the only policeman 
then, tried to interfere but w<as overpowered by some of the drunk- 
en Indians and taken away. That's one of the earlist things I re- 
member after comin'g to Thief River. 



GIRL GRADUATING 



WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO A BOY OR 
FROM HIGH SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY? 
Same as the rest have said — " Get to work." 

WHAT IS THIEF RIVER FALLS' GREATEST NEED? 
.Many things are needed but I think the most important is a Dost 
office building. *^ 

WHAT WOULD YOU RATHER DO THAN RUN A SHOE STORE' 
I don't know anything else I could do satisfactorily. 

DO YOU THINK PROHIBITION HAS BEEN A SUCCESS' 
No, not the way it has been handled. It is claimed that liquor is 
not needed m medicine £0 I would suggest that they stfop making 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE PRESENT ADMINISTRATION' 
*ine. We must all give it a boost whenever we can. 

tSSom "° BEY " BE omTTED PE0M THE 1UE - 

Well, I'll answer that like Nick (meaning Judge Tarrant) did. It 
doesn't mean anything. 

SHOULD A MAN MARRY BEFORE HE REACHES 26' 
No— and then he should be very careful and do a lot of thinking. 

WHAT IS YOUR HOBBY? ' 

Oh read, I guess and listen in on the world by means of radio. 




money. The past is dead. Bury it 
eighteen feet under the sod and for- 
get it. Nobody knows anything 
about the future. But at present— 
let's smile— and learn how to say, 
"Times ain't so rotten." 



Ben 

,hun 



; BEN FRANKLIN 
This oeing tue monm of 

Framuins oirtnuay ices ask 

wuat he tilings aoout conumons in 
'general. Here's some' sturr he said 
nearly two flunared years ago. The 
quotation is from ' rour ruchard's 
'Aluiaiiac." Ti.e words were spoken' 
by r-atner ADraham, a cnaracter 
created by franklin. 

"Friends and neighbors, the taxes 
are indeed heavy, and it those laid on 
by the government were the only 
ones we had to p 5 y, we might trie 
more easily discharge them; oue we 
have many others, and much more 
grcvious to some of us. We are tax- 
ed twice as much by our IDLE- 
NESS, three times as much by our 
PRIDE and four times as much by 
our FOLLY; and trom these taxes 
the commissioners cannot lease or de- 
liver us by allowing an [abatement. 
However, let us harken t!o good ad- 
vice and something may oe done for 



selves. Industry need not wish and 
he that lives pn hope vvill die fast- 
ing- There are no gains without 
pains " 



peg. But if they made that trip for 
us alone the results would not be 
greater. The greater the number of 
tourists to Winnipeg the greater will 
he the number who will pass through 
Thief River Falls. Here's hoping 
that Winnipeg maybe flooded: with 
tourists from the States this -next 
year. . , "- 1 ' 



I. T. Simley Addressed 

Woman's. Club Monday 

The Woman's Club met Monday. 
January 18, in the Commercial club 
r°oms. ",.L T. Simley, supt. of schools, 
?,%■ ■ * • veiy "Cresting address on 

civics m our schools." ' 
-'Mrs. Willi Korstad led the "round 
table discussion in a most." capable 
way. Miss Maude Johhson explained 
thoroughly the "politeness, system" 
Which she was having in -all her music 
classes in the' grades and in' her glee 
clubs. (William Mercier, a pupil from 
Canada, had been designated by the 
Pupils in Knox school as being the 
most polite boy they had known.) .. 
Mrs. Frank Christenson sang two 

?S n !?' with violin obligate by Mr. 
Webber and. Mrs. N. Harris at the 
piano. These numbers were very 
pleasing. (The piano haivng been pre- 
viously used as a clothes closet by 
the basket . ball boys, it was first 
cleaned out-much to the amusement 
iv ? nes who were Present.) 
The hostesses for the afternoon 
were Mesdames Olaf Storholm, Lu- 
cille Johnson and Mrs. Simley. (How- 
ever Mrs. Simley was not present, be- 
cause she had the mumps!) 

Lunch will be served Saturday, Jan. 
13. by the swimming pool committee 
m the Legion club rooms from 3 to 5 
clo--k. ir cen t s cost of Iunch ■ Every . 
one is invited to come and help boost 
Contributed 5 f ° r the c °"™™*- 

Prominent Speakers to 
Address Meeting at Red 
River Valaley Shows 

Former- Governor Frank O. Low- 

£'n,D U u° ls ', wiU s P« ak ™ "The 
traPiofa" at the Northwest 
benool s farm week meetings on Wed- 
nesday evening, Feb. 10, according 
to announcement received today. On 
Tuesday evening, Feb. 0, former- 
Governor W. L. Harding, of Iowa, 
mil speak on the Great Lakes-St 
Lawrence Deep-water project. 
Governor Christianson is to be the 
— <_ Principal speaker on Thurdsay eve- 
Above: Col. Ralph H. Webb, mayor mn ?i February 11, and Dr. Dudley 
of Winnipeg who is a consistent i 92" T S Watson, director of Milwaukee 
booster and is doing much to put that Sv 1 ™ tl tul*. on Monday evening, 
city on the map. '*«>. 10. On Friday evening, Feb. 
Below: W. McCurdv. Wir„.« 1 *?■ the Northwestern Minnesota 



In the Island of Cristoval off the 
coast of Australia there. is a sect of 
"shark-men" who bejie* that their 
souls exchange with ■" those of the 
sharks. 



manager of the Winnipeg Tribune, 
which newspaper is sponsoring the 
Pine to Palm" automobile tour. Both 
gentlemen spoke in Thief River Falls 
at a recent poultry show and alfalfa 
celebration. 



OUR REPRESENTATIVES 

Nearly a hundred Canadians will 
spend the next few weeks on a jour- 
ney across the United States to tell 
our countrymen to the south of us 
about the city of Thief River: Fajls 
and urging them to pay us a visit 
next summer. Millions of people 
will read about this trip. Hundreds 
of thousands will hear the message 
of our representatives. Thousands 
will accept their invitations and will 
stop in to see us. Each summer will 

see an increase in the numbers -of—- « us „■■■= , U ie win no- nave 

people from the south," the east and | curT . ent turned on until after the ar- 
the west who will drive to Thief ! £„ wjj ,^ ek of necessary appara'. 



.'. LAND VALUEk\'£i 
There is only one thing'that/ isn't 
as easy to get from Rasmus Oen as 
abatement for publication,"?: That is 
his photograph. We got Jthe '.'state- 
ment. And like most men who' don't 
speak unless they have sorSething. to 
say, he said a whole lot in a few 
words. What he said about land 
values is worth emphasizing. ..Read' 
that 'part of it a couple of times! 

To Turn On the Juice. 
The high line between Gftleferand 
this city will be "energized" next Sun- 
day, according to present plans of D. 
Short in charge of the local construc- 
tion work. The line is practically 
completed through to Holt; but the 
remainder of the line will not have 



Cold Weather Good For Ice Man. 

The Red Lake Ice company has fill- 
ed all four of their ice' houses and 
shipped several thousand tons to vari- 
ous points in Minnesota and North 
Dakota, using all the available ice on 
the river, and now they are praying 
for continued cold weather' in order 
that they may again hegin operations 
to fill their many outstanding orders. 

Moderate weather in North Dakota, 
reports are, has caused a shortage in 
ice supply, with the result that manay 
companies are placing orders with 
outside concerns 



Singers' association, with 150 "male 
voices, will sing. 

The railroads have authorized a 
fare and one-half for the round trip, 
good from Feb. 6 to 12, with final re- 
turn limit, Feh. 15. On Wednesday, 
*eb. 10, the Great Northern will run 
a special, train from Noyes and St. 
Vincent and return, and on Thursday, 
Feb. 11, from Warroad and return 
with a single fare for the round trip, 
good on these two trains onlv. A 
special over the.N. P. from Staples 
to Crookston and return has been 
authorized for February 12. 

The detailed program for the 
week's meetings and shows can be 
secured from C. G. Selvig, Crookston 
upon request. 



Demonstration 
tan reveal 
all of BUICK 
Excellence i 

Any *"?* TOU drive a Buick 
You wiU wonder how such a 
remarkable car can be .old at 
such a moderate price. 
In just a few minute, you will 
realue that you are .tartlng. 
.topping, parking, driving with 
much greater cane and Kcurity. 
And that you are surrounded 
by quality and luxury which, 
rank with the very finest. 

Butdcmonstration will tell only 
part of theBuickstory,andyou 
■hould know all of it. 

A demonstration cannot show 
you the enduring stamina of- 
body and chassis that belongs 
to Buick. Years are necessary 
for that. It can only suggest the 
.powerful ability of Bulck's 75 
horse-power Vaive-in-Head 
engine, built for hills. It can- 
not tell you how thoroughly the 
Buick "Sealed Chassis" and the 
Buick "Triple Sealed" engine 
will protect Buick performance 
on dusty, gritty roads. 

And ic cannot even hint of the 
mental ease you will enjoy, 
with Buick Authorized Ser- 
vice "just around the corner," 
everywhere in America. 

Bow Sulci, SiiCrfiiufcr VoItWn. 
Head motor can range In price 
from $1125 to SI995, f.a.b, Buick 
factories. Amone the Bwidc ol*n 
and closed models there ii dm 
that will meet your desire* exactly. 



Tribune want ads 
Try one.and see. 



bring ; results: 




cio.zo.sr 



WHEN BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE 
BUILT. BUICK WILL BUILD THEM 

Peoples Auto Co. 

Red Lake Falls, Minn. 



H^^uuuiuiuuuiuuu^ 



"It would be thought a hard gov- 
ernment that would tax its people 
one-tenth part of their TIAIE, to be 
employed in its service, but idleness 
taxes many of us much more, if we 
reckon all that is spent in absolute 
sloth or doing of nothing; with that 
which is spent in idle employriients 
or amusements that amount to noth- 
ing. Sloth, 'by, bringing on disease, 
absolutely shortens life. Sloth, like 
rust, consumes faster than labor 
wears; while the used key is always 
bright, but doest thou love life, then 
do not squander time, for that's the 
stuff life is made of. 

"How much more than is neces- 
sary do we spend in sleep, forgetting 
that the sleeping fox catches no poul- 
try, and that, there will be sleeping 
enough in the grave. If time be of 
all things most precious, wasting of 
time, must be of all things the great- 
est prodigality, since lost time is 
never found again. Let us then, up 
and do things, and doing to the pur- 
X- 



River Falls. And the delegation 
from the city of Winnipeg which is 
doing this missionary work for us is 
charging us nothing for its services. 

Of course our neighbors .of the 
north are not making the trip for our 
benefit alone. ' They have a selfish 
motive in mind to be sure. They 
wish to bring the tourists to Winni- 



- — - -■•"-,- _■■>,*•<. «* uctcsaaiy appara- 
tus, but it is expected to have the cir- 
cuit completely working by the end 
of the month. 



t DR.SP0FF0RD 

Optometrist 

will be at the Hotel Evelyn, Thief 
River Falls, January 27th. Eyes ex- 
amined and glasses fitted: 



Have You Sampled the 

New La Lunda 
10c Cigar? 

The tobacco crop in Cuba, where we buy our filler, 
this season was the best in nine years, and we are 
sure you will smile with satisfaction when you 
take a drag of our . ■ , ..' 

Bigger and Better LaLunda Cigar 
Give It a Trial 

Thief River Cigar Factory r 

F. C. Niclai, Proprietor ;_ 



■^ 



208 



.* 



::f 



MASTER KEY 
SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES 

Have been added to our vault equipment 

You Cannot Afford to Be Without One 

They provide protection against burglary or fire at such a 
reasonable cost that you cannot afford f to take chances on carry- 
ing valuable documents on your person or leaving them in " your 
home. 

Protection 365 Days of the Year 

for your insurance policies, bonds, mortgages, notes, jewelry or 
any number of other small items which are easily misplaced and 
the loss of which might seriously embaras you. 



FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 



{ ? { { Mi 1 1 ■* ■ * . ' ■ ■ ' • ' ■ ' ■ ' • ' ■ ' - ' ti'i ****** ^"'!*-* ' ■ " " ' " 'tun i 'h ; 1 1 j iT~: 

ttt . i , 1 1 urn i m 1 1 . t Mj. i 1 1 t ; t it 1 1 1 1 * m m . . n 1 1 h « . j j j i i t i j I i 1 1 1 1 * f 



I ■ ^-» II -i- .»». _- ■ . ■ V T T^. T jif^l • aOl <';vjC«4 TT T ~W. ■ ^~*m j»TT» ^~V TB-k "W *■ . <&<» -mrtmL^ m m ■». . _. . ■■ ■. •♦•' 



all f.ap-JlTN-G'S^ 



w %Q n aKr3^lln«fc'' JUNG'S QUAUW BAKERY. For sale by all grocers 

:.y,V£ £.\ t f ,i * t % " ' """ ■ ■ ' ' ' ■ • t " " ■ f 1 1 1 n ; 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m n 1 1 u n , i j tr £ 




i— 



ii 



ft<&-z.. : ■■■&'-. -• : ->i 






tM0M&d 



S»wki 



•■SHE3JSJE:; 



"WB 




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1926. 



TBBEF RIVER IFALIS TRIBUNE 



PAGE FIVE- 



I 



Mi 



JUNIORS WILL 
STAGE COMEDY 
FR10AUAN.29 

Comedy-Drama, "The Path 

Across the HHL?' Full of 

Thrills. 



Volume of Milk and Creapi 
> Sales Show Big jump 



It Eide* and' A. Auringer, 

Local Young Men, Leease 

Business. 



Cast Under Direction 
Miss Eiknes Making 
Rapid Progress. 



of 



The Junior Class play, "The Path 
Across the Hill-," cuached by Miss 
Dena Eikenes, will be present- 
ed on < Friday evening, Jan- 
uary 29. It is a comedy-drama in 
thiee act=, containing many '.hrilling 
events and just enough romance to 
"touch it up." 

Ruth Conrad, played by Dorohty 
Shirley, is engaged to Dr. Reed (Ken- 
neth Shetler) but delays mairiage be- 
cause she feels it will leave Grandpa 
Crawford (Edward Kiland) without a 
home. But Grandpa and Mrs. Davis 
(Marian Reynolds) find romance even 
in the autumn nf life, and Ruth is 
about to -marry Reed when two 
strangers arrive in town. One is 
Ru:hs' cousin, Fol, (Irene Hanson) 
who immediately sets her cap for the 
doctor, and the other is Robert Post, 
(Byron -Tharaldson) whose meeting 
with Grandpa ends his years of 
search for the man who plundered his 
fathers' bank and sent his father and 
mother broken-hearted te the grave. 
Grandpa does not deny the crime, but 
begs Post to wait until Ruth's future 
happiness is assured. Then Flo — 
but that is the surprise. The big 
question is: ''Is love stronger than 
hate?" Maybe you know, and are 
satisfied with your own answer 1 — but 
" remember '•' rx -- T> ~* 1 - 



It is two year^ since the office; of. 
city.cjairy inspector was..put ihto'fcl- 
feci. anil since that time therexluw. 
been ja, remarkable increase in 'the 
volume of milk sold by grocers" and 
dairyinen, perhaps because the resi- 
dentsjhiave come to feel that they are 
receiving milk and cream that is 
passing stanadrda set by. the state 
as safeguards for health. Only five 

dairies were at first required to sub- m , ,,. ..,■..,. -.- * A 

init their samples of milk and cream, u The soft dnnV establishment and 
there being a few small one or two W' n S»P located in the basement 
customer dealers who owned only ! ^ the .Citizens State bank building 
one cow, but todav there are 11 dai- : » n< J which has -been operated for the 
ries that each month have '.heir sam-jlf t year by the local Elks lodge 

SreSf'' and aH ^ ** ^-HuTotd^rS SuS? as 

that the inspector has plenty of work transactio * t is 6pe ^: t6 the public . 
ahead of him each month, < ovenng * *g patronized the 

from 50 to J 5 f . mile ^^ w K th al ^ , place so Kttle, it is understood, that 
the duties of the office which also ^ dinfct0IS .. at - a w .; ent meetin * g de . 
reqrnre tests of a cows at ■ various dM , ^ d 

periods for indications of tuberculin - - mnnt h= ■ 
trouble. From time to time there * "J ^"y that the Elks again wiU 
hawbeen one or more cows con- 1 / exclusive 

demned, the -last one in December, j E ^ , b house b . 

In each case the owner is paid for «« . 



•The Path 



if you arent 1 
Across the Hill.' 

Salamander Alexander John Henry 
Jones, the chauffeur and new hus- 
band of Zuzu, is a real shining light. 
He's a regular walking dictionary; 
he doesn't carry Webster's in his 
pocket either.. This part is played by 
Leonard Knadle, while Goldie Gun- 
derson takes the part of Zuzu. And 
the lively person in the play is Wal- 
ter. Who's Walter? Ruth's brother 
in the person of Philip Sundahl. 
Dances a hole in his new pumps in 
one night He evidently falls in love 
with Lutie, (Bernice Hoppa) Ruth's 
tomboy neighbor. Grandpa is too 
dear for words — Ruth calls him her 
old tenderhearted Grandaddykins. 
The vamp is Flo — one of those blond 
women, who just naturally want 
everything they can't have, but she 
""picked a lemon that wouldn't thrive 
in her climate" — who? Well, we'll 
tell you again that the Junior Class 
of Lincoln High presents "The Path 
Across the Hill" on Friday, January 
29, at 8:00 p. m. Get your tickets re- 
■served at Lamberts Drug Store be- 
ginning Monday, January 26. — Con- 
tributed. 



Holds Annual Meeting, 
Annual meeting and election of of- 
ficers of the Bray Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company was held at the 
village hall Tuesday afternoon. Re- 
port of the secretary showed the 
Company to be in good condition. An 
increase of business to the extent of 
$110,000 over last year was noted. At 
election of officers, all present office 
holders were re-elected excepting O. 
L. Larson was named to succeed A. 
G. Hallstrom as vice president, the 
latter having signified his desire to 
be relieved. Report of the secretary, 
as read at the meeting, will be pub- 
lished in an early issue. — St. Hilaire 
Spectator. 



Foasum Boys Leave. 
Earnest and Morris Fossum left 
last week for Minneapolis, Earnest 
t his old job with a heating and 
plumbing company, and Morris to the 
Kellog-Ma-Kay company for which 
he will become a traveling salesman. 
The boys have been associated with 
their brother Lyman in the Union 
Plumbing and Heating company of 
this city for several years. Lyman 
will remain in Thief River Falls and 
take care of the business. 



Dr. A. A. Michelson in measuring 
the velocity of light used a set of 
mirrors 22 miles apart. 



ELKS' STORE IIS 
sfflWfflMBUC 



the loss of the cow from federal and 
state funds. Last month 54 cows 
were tested, while 118 cows were in- 
spected in the 11 herds furnishing 
milk. 

All. samples of milk and cream 
were above the required standard of : 



from Elk members warrants it. 



ST. HILAIRE 



Hubert Sumpter Dies. 

Hubert Sumpter, 16 year old son 
3.25 per cent butterfat except one 'of f Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Sumpter, pass- 
milk, , Forty-five samples of milk ed away at the Physicians hospital at 
were tested and 15 of cream. Thief River Falls after a weeks' "ill- 

Cash receipts" at City Clerk P. G. ; r ,ess of pneumonia and pleurisy. 
Pederson's office totalled $36,698.68, Besides his parents, deceased is 
leaving a balance January 1 of $50,i survived by nine brothers and sisters, 
312.74 compared to $28,824.08 De-.Mrs. Harry Schaves, and Mrs. Her- 
cember 1. Earnings for the electric , man Smith, both of Grand Forks, 
light department for December were ■ Charlie of Virginia, Neva, Jiay, Floyd 
S5.465.57. | Dorothy, Myron, Lavora of this vill- 

Judge N. W. Tarrant reported fees \ age. 
and fines collected in municipal coui-t Funeral services were held Sunday 
totalling $40.35 in December while j at the Sumpter home east of this 



Chief of Police A. W. Crown report- 
ed five arrests. 

The Carnegie library, in the report 
of its librarian. Mrs. Hazel Halm- 
qrrin. had an estimated attendance of 
5.950' wh'lp 2.2*1 books were loaned 
patrons of the institution. 



Only Waste and Delay 
Automobile owners are paving less , . _ . 

for their licenses this vear than they tne consolation prize by Mrs. E. O. 



village, Sister Gaukee of Grand Forks 
officiating. Interment was made in 
the Swedish Lutheran cemetery. 
»** 

Mrs. G. Fellman Entertains. 
Mrs. Gust Fellman entertained a 
number of her friends at her home 
Thursday evening. The hours were 
spent in playing whist. High honors 
were wort by Miss Edith Dahl, and 



did last, and there -will be a corres- 
pondingly less to the state highway 
fund, which 'the owners will eventual- 
ly have to pay.. There is nothing sav- 
ed by the reduction. — Mahnomen 
Pioneer. 



For 1925 there were seventeen suc- 
cessful candidates for the position of 
Foreign Sen-ice Officer, among therri 
a young woman of 29, the first of 
her sex to fill- a consular position. 
She is Miss Pattie Field, Vice-Consul 
at Amsterdam. 

Horrified by the prevalence ' of Me- 
bauchery in Mecca, the holy. city of 
Arabia, it has been decided to invoke 
an old penalty . imposed by the Mo- 
hammedan law which calls for the 
public stoning t death of criminals 
convicted of certain crimes. 



Between 20 and 30 saddle ponies 
will be broken for ski-joring, that 
most popular of winter sports which 
is to be featured at the Banff, Al- 
berta, Winter Carnival; starting Feb- 
ruary 2 and continuing through Feb- 
ruary 17. . 

Minlc raising as a side line to farm- 
ing is proving a successful venture 
to a) farmer near Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island. This season 
he had 39 offspring frcm nine litters. 

"All roads lead to Rome": con- 
versely, no roads lead to Venice. 
However, an automobile road is now 
being planned which will lead..from 
Padua to Venice, and will form part 
of the Padua-Milan highway. Lovers 
of things historic groan at this mod- 
ernizing of romantic old Venice. 



Experienced generals in the Indian 
army of 1690 reckoned one good ele- 
phant equal to a ■ regiment of 500 
cavalry, or if properly supported by 
matchlockmen, at "double that num- 
ber, f 



' Though carbon dioxide is a waste 
product, animals breathing air from 
which all of this gas has been re- 
moved will die. 



A Frenchman by the name of Cap- 
tain Delingette has completed the 
first ; crossing of Africa from north 
to south by motor. 



friends -at her parental home. The; 
hOMf^^eie spenl fn a social manner; 
r and av ten thirty a delicious luncheon 
was served. The. invited guests were; 
Misses Anna Nystrom, Mary Riley, 
Rebecca Thomas and Supt. W. Peter : 
son, and , Coach M. GustavBon, in- 
structors in the schools of Clear- 
brook, Lillian Ecklof, Bendikka Hag- 
Cecelia Bartholet, Ruby Susag, 
Leta Bennett, and Prin. E. Reiers- 
gord, instructors in the, local school. 

Officers Installed. 
The local I. O. O. F. lodge held 
installation of officers Thursday eve- 
ning. Following are the members 
that took the oath of office: Oscar 
Gigstad, Noble grand; Theodore 
Skatrud, vice grand; M. Fricker, 
secretary, and Paul Roy, treasurer. 

W. C. T. U.-MeetB. 

In observance of the national con- 
stitutional prohibition anniversary, 
the local W. C. T. U. held a meeting 
at the Hed home Saturday afternoon. 
After' a short business meeting the 
following program was rendered: 

Reading-^Leta Bennett 

Reading — Mrs. Anna Martz. 

Piano Solo — Louise Hed. 

Reading— Mrs. T. Skatrud. 

Vocal Solc-^-Mrs. O. S. Werner. . 

At 5 o'clock a delicious luncheon 
was served by the hostess. 
»»* 

Luther League. 

The Young Peoples' Luther League 
of the Norwegian Lutheran church, 
held a meeting in the church auditori- 
um Sunday evening. The meeting 
was called to order by Pres. Selma 
Hoff. New members were appointed 
to serve on the program and social 
committees. The program which fol- 
lowed, consisted of the following 
numbers: 

A Lesson on Baptism told in Bibi- 
cal verse — by members of . Luther 
League. . 
Song— Luther League Chorus. 

Reading— Clifford Bilden. 

Reading — Marie Grimsrud. 

Song — Luther League Chorus. 

. Remarks— Rev. C. M. Grimsrud. 



DRUNKS USE UP 

COURT DOCKET 



TMrty-Eight Out of 83 Cas- 
es for 1925 Fay, Fines 

i ::;: ;; ; wcity. ■:■■ 

Arrests fqr drunkenness in 1925 
won by a large margin over all other 
breakers of the law for space in the 
Thief River Falls municipal court 
docket, according to the reports of 
Judge N. W. Tarrant. 

Out of a total of 83 who were 
brought up in court, 38 were arrest- 
ed forrdruiikenness, fines from $10 to 
$25, ■' being imposed, according to 
the degree of inebriation, evidently. 

Eleven paid fines of ?12.50 each for 
speeding; four were arrested for pet- 
ty larceny; one for breaking jail; one 
for violation of the dairy and food 
law; two, for issuing bad checks; 
three, for killing deer out of season; 
two for disorderly conduct; one for 
driving a motor vehicle while intoxi- 
cated; four for. gambling; four for 
assault and battery; one for nui- 
sance; and 11- were bound over to 
district court most of these being vi- 
olations of the liquor law. 

A total of $755 was collected in 
municipal court, $413 of which went 
into the city treasury and $342 to 
the county. 



Check Up. Yourself. ^ 

Boneheadetinesii is the" cause of 
most of the auto accidents. Are yoit 
in that class.?— Fairmont SentineL ■* 

The youngesY author 5 on record is- 
Winifred Sackville Stoner. At the- 
age of three -*ahe wrote a "poem which-" 
hasiately been set to music. At nve^ 
she wrote a book which was published/ 
in Europe, China and Japan. • =— 



-<«>2^ 




Burkee. At midnight a delicious" 
luncheon was served. . The invited 
guests were Mepdames E. O. Burkee, 
T. Skatrud, 0\ G. Gunstad. and Miss- 
Lillian Ecklof, Bendikka Hagen, 
Leta Bennett, Ruby Susag, Cecelia 
Bartholet and Edith Dahl. 
*** 

RIERSGORD'S QUINT 

ANNEX ANOTHER VICTORY 

The St. Hilaire Basketball five, an- 
nexed another victory to their list 
when they defeated - the Clearbrook 
quint on the local floor, Friday eve- 
ning. The .locals* defense permitted 
the visitors only four field baskets, H 
while Riergord'a .quint in turncaged 
six- from the field, making the .fitfal 
score 12-8. "Bill" Hallemack ' and, 
Wendell Beebe were unable to play 
in this game. The next game schedule 
ed is at Fisher, on Friday^ evening}: 
January 22nd. , V 

Camp Fire Girls' Patty. v 
The campaign for selling 1 : Christ- 
mas seals was carried on by the local 
Camp Fire girls in the fonh of a con- 
test. The "Red" and "Green" sides 
were organized and it was agreedi 
that the losing side should entertain, 
the winners at a party. The "Green" 
side was victorious selling twenty- 
four more stamps than the "Reds!', 
the total number being sold was 1,750- 
stamps. . The "Greens" were enter- 
tained at a Costume party. . Friday 
evening at the Rev. C .M. Grimsrud 
home. 'The hours were spent ..in 
games and contests, and at 10 o'clock 
a delicious lunch was served by the 
hostess, Alice Skottem, ' Valberg 
Grimsrud. Edna and Vera" Almqoist, 
and Valarie Olsen. The guests . in- 
cluded Leta Bennett, guardian,- Ben- 
fUkka Hagen, Gladys Severson, Alice 
Hoff, Ruth Espeland. Mary Biskey, 
Iona Olson, and Evelyn Darni: 
*•* 

Dinner Guests^ . 
Mrs. Gust Fellman was. hostess at 
a dinner party. Tuesday, when she 
entertained a few of her friends., at 
her home on Water Street. l The 
miests included, Mr. and Mrs. 'Adolph 
Satterbere. Mr. and Mrs. Enrl .Top- 
son and ,little son. Mr. T. Skatrud, 
Mi"=s Cecelia Bartholet, and Miss 
Lillian Ecklof. 

*** 

Miss Gigstad Entertains, j 
On Friday evening M*ss "Glares 
Gigstad entertained, a number ;of her 



B. A. of R. E. Meet. 

A regular meeting of the Benefit 
association of Railway Emploj'ees 
will be held at the I. O. O. F. hall 
Saturday. ■ January 23rd instead of 
January 22nd as was previously ad- 
vertised. Dancing will follow the 
meeting. 



(ADVERTISMENT) 

SLEEPLESS NIGHTS 

Often Caused by Bladder Weakness. 
It's Nature's Signal of "Danger 
Ahead." 

A. C. Eckhart, 3917 St. Clair St., 
Cleveland, O. says, "After .taking 
Lithiated Buchu tablets one week, 
the burning and smarting left me, 
and with no desire to get up nights. 
You should get the credit as I had 
tried many things. I will be glad to 
write my experience t any one. Li- 
thiated Buchu cleanses the bladder as 
epsom salts do the bowels, driving 
out deposits, neutralizes excess acids, 
thereby relieving irritation that caus- 
es getting up nights. The tablets 
cost 2 cents each at all drug stores. 
Keller Laboratory. Mechamcsburg, O. 
Locally at Curtis Drug Store. 



San-Tox American 
Mineral Oil 

A scientific corrective 
for constipation. This 
oil is tasteless and of 
highest quality. It does 
notpurge^ — it lubricates. 
Price $1.00. 

LAMBERT'S 
Drug Store 




( Advertisement) 

Gait Stones 

New booklet, written by Gall Stone 
Specialist, explains scientific home 
treatment prescribed for over 30 
years. Before risking operation — read 
about success of this method for 
catarrhal infiamation and infections 
of Liver, Gall Bladder and Gall Ducts- 
as associated with Gall Stones. Sent 
free to anyone who writes. 

DR. E. E. PADDOCK, 
Desk 106, Kansas City, Missouri. 
(Dec. 21- Jan 6-20) 



Announcing the Opening of 

STEENERSON BROTHERS GARAGE 

, 101 Main Avenue South, Thief River Falls. 

In the quarters formerly occupied by the People's Garage oper- 
ated by Gilbertson & Eogers. 

CLAYTON STEENERSON -- AL. STEENERSolj. 

..'.'. . -".'' .1. ^ -^^^arid Manage' ' 'I"^!" , . - 

■••' We are equipped'ttfharidle repairwork of aft kinds.' "Chevrolet 

, serviee a .ffljecialtw." ! <~ : : : .ns. *"'*.. '"£"* - v iv -«■ "<*'>: 

Your patronage is solicited and will be appreciated.''- W^ •&■• ^ 



PHONE 50 




When in Need of 

COAL AND WOOD 

; ; Call 

THIEF RIVER MOTOR CO. 

' ' 'Successors to Rambeck, Stone & Co. 

PHONE 77 

Prompt Delivery. 



Used By All 

Telephones Telegraphs Radio 

And All Means of Communication 

Require Electric Light and Power 

More Current Is Being Used Every Day 

Once Used It Is Indispensable 

And Bills Must Be Paid Each Month 

The Earnings of Electric Utility Companies ', 

. Furnish Money To Pay Dividends 

To Stockholders Regularly 

Our 7% Preferred Stock 

Pays Dividends Monthly 

MINNESOTA ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTING CO. — 




'.jtevii:: 












PAGE SIX 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Premium List 



Following is a complete list of pre- 
miums awarded at the rece%t Poultry 
and Alfalfa. show: 



POULTRY PREMIUMS. 

Best imlk't iu show, S. C. B. Minorca, 
C. V. Dolt;, Roaewood; bust hen In show. 
White Rock, Ed. Roaeudahl, Warren ; 
l-tfbt fciuule. Best cockerel, Barred Rocfc, 
C. i>. Uiiatufaou; beat male; best cock 
bird, \V. Wyandotte, L. A. Westphal, St. 
Hilaire. 



J 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1926. 



White Leghorns, 
ioung pen: 1st B. A. Yonke, St. Hllalre; 

???,•. \£ m * lonke * 8L ' Allaire; 3rd, ilra 
Will Wayne. . » 

Old Pen: Dr. Fruehlicb. Thief River 
Falls, • 

; S. C. Brown Leghorns. 
iir *oun« jk-ii: Oscar -N. Anderson, Thief 
Rtvor Polls. 

Whit* Orpingtons. 

\ounir pen: Int., Wm. Yonke. St. HUalre. 
Grain h, Etc. 

Swedish Select oats, C. M. Hoverstad: 
spoltz, buckwheat and nary beans,, Win 
yonke; Kola wheat and barley, Joo Oakl, 
Slavic; Marquis wheat. Ole H. Grlnde, 
Germantown; Ruby wheat, Ole Hatsa- aoy 
beaiiH, Smith Bros.; winter wheat and 
Green Mountain potaloea, P. M. Peterson: 
Alsike clover seed. L. A. Westphal; medi- 
um mi. clover, alfalfa, timothy and flax 
■"i?'™ '^- Bre| laud. Baiel; Victory oat 
aiiu 7>.orlhwefltfirn Dent corn, Fred Dola 
RohowooU, Minn.; No. 23 corn, Hugh' 
Best-; pop corn. Chaa Schwartz. 



Barred. Itock Premiums, 
Beat reus. 

Pulleta, 1st, W. J. Jnndti; 2nd., W. J. 
Jauda; 3rd, O. K. Lerol; 4th, O. K. Lerol; 

Oih ; Uth. 0. K. Lerol. Uen: 

1st. C. D. Gustafsou; 2nd, W. J. Junda. 
Cockerel: 1st. \\\ J. Jauda; Light, lat, 
Dark. C. I). Guntafson; 2nd, dark, O. K. 
Lerol. Cockerel, lijjht: 1st, W. J. Janda; 
2nd, 0. K. Lerol: Urd, 0. K. Lerol. Dark: 
1st C. D. Gustsfson; 2nd, W. J. Janda; 
3rd. W. J. Jauda; 4tii, W. J. Janda. 
Barred Hock cock birds; 2nd, C. D. Guatn- 
aon. 

S. C. B, I. Bed) 

Pullets: 1st, II. J. .Mtiyiund, .md, F. H. 
BJerke; 3rd, F. 11. BJerke; 1th, 11. J. r» r» >*•<*, 

Muyiuud; oth, p. h. Bjerek. lieu: lat. Un Une Minule interviews — and Other 









1 


PUBLIC FORUM 


1 




A FARMER'S COMMENT 





Mrs. T. J. Sumpter; 2ud, U: J. Wyland; Views. 

3rd, Mrs. T. J. Sunipter; -1th, Mrs. T. J. 

Sumpier; 3tb. 11 J. May laud. Cock: lat, 

Mrs. T. J. Sampler. Cockerel: lat. F. H. 

BJerke; 2nd, Olaf XuKet; 3rd, F. II. 

KJerke: 4th, F. II. BJerke; 3th, E. A. 

Yonk'i. 

B. C. B. I. Beds. 

Pullets: lat *Jdra. Mary Aubol; 2nd, Mrs. 
Mary Aubol; 3rd, Mra. Mary AuboL 
S. C. B. Minorca*. 

Pullets: ldt, C. V. Dola; y 2nd, C. V. 
Dols; 3rd, C. V. Dola; 4th, C. V. Dola, 
Hen: 1st, C. V. Dols; 2nd C. V. Dols: 3rd, 
C. V. Dole, 4th, C. V. Dola. Cock: lBt C. 
V. Dols. Cockerel; 1st. C. V. Dola; 2nd, 
C. V. Dola: 3rd, F. B. Coukllu; 4th, C. V. 
Dols; 3th, F. B. Coukllu. 

S. C. IV. Leghorns. 

Pullets: 1st, E. A. l'onke; 2nd. E. A. 
Yonke; 3rd, Wm. Youke; 4th E, A. Yon- 
ke; Oih, Wm. Yonke. Hens: 1st, Wm. 
Yonke; 2nd, Wm. Yonke; 3rd, Win. Yon- 
ke; 4th. Wm. Youke; Oth J. H. Roaen- 
dall. Cock: 1st, Mrs. Oacar Droits; 2nd, 
J. II. Koaendall; 3rd, J. II. Ruseudull; 
4th, Wm. Yonke. Cockerel: 1st, K. T. 
Dailager: 2nd. E. A. Yonke; 3rd, Wm. 
Yonks; 4th, Wm. Yonke; 5th. Wm. l'onke. 
S. C. B. Leehoms. 

Pullets: lat, Oscar N. Auderaou; 2nd, 
Oscar N. Anderson; 3rd, Oscar K. Auder- 
aou; 4th, Oacar N. Anderson. 

XV. Wyndottes. 
Pullets: 1st, L. A. Westphal; 2nd, L. A. 
Westphal; ;ird, L. A. Weatphal; 4th, Bert 
Thorstad: 5th. L. A. Westphal. Dens: 1st, 
L. A. Westphal; 2nd. L. A. Westphal: 3rd. 
L. A. Westphal; 4th. L. A. Westphal. 
Cock: 1st L. A. Westphal; 2nd, Bert 
Thorstaii; 3rd, L. A. Westphal. Cockerel: 
1st. L. A. Westphal: 2nd. Bert Thorstad. 
S. L. Wyndottes. 
Pullets: lat, L. A. Westphal: 2nd, Ed. 
Aubol; 3rd, Ed. Aubol; 4th, Ed. Aubol; 
5th. L. A. Westphal. 

W. Rock. 
Pullets: lat. Ed. Rosendahl; 2nd, Ed. 
Rost-ndahl: 3rd. Ed. Rosendahl: 4th. Ed. 
Roaeudahl: 5th, Dr. Mellby. Hens: 1st, 
Ed. Rosendahl : 2nd, Ed. RoBendahl. 
Cocks: 1st, Dr. Mellbv. Cockerel: 1st, Dr. 
Mellby: 2nd. Ed. Rosendahl; 3rd, Ed. 
Roseudabl. 

Jersey Giant. 
Pullets: 1st, J. II. Koaendahl. Hens: 
1st.' Dr. Froehlich; 2nd, Dr. Froehlleb; 
3rd, Dr. Froehlich; 4th, Dr. Froehlich. 
Cock: let. Dr. Froehlich, Cockerel: 1st, 
J. H. KoseudahL 

Black' Langslnui. 
Ileus: 1st, Alfred Bugge; 2nd, Alfred 
Bugge; 3rd, Alfred Bugge. 
B. Orphlngtons. 
.Pullets: lat, B. Ranum: 2nd, A. E. 
Hirst; 3rd, A. E. Hirst: 4tb, A. E. Hirst; 
5tb. A. E. Hirst. HeiiB: 1st, B. Ranum; 
2nd. B. Ranum: 3rd. B. Ranum; 4th, B. 
Ranum; 5th, fcaunm. Cock: 1st B. Ran- 
um. Cockerel: 1st, B. Ranum: 2nd, A. E. 
.Hirst: 3rd, B. Ranum; 4th. B. Ranum: 
5th, B. Ranum. 

XV. Orpnlngtous. 
Pullets: 1st, Wm. Yonke: 2nd, Wm. 
Yonke: 3rd, Wm. Yonke. 4th, Wm. Yon- 
.ke; 5lh, Wm. Yonke. Cockerel: 1st, Wm, 
Yonke; 2ud, Wm. Yonke; 3rd, Wm. You- 
.ke; 4th Wni. Yonke; 5th. Wm. Yonke. 

Bronze. ■ w min uii%j 

Pullets: 1st, W. J. Jauda; 2nd, W. J. ii™ni-"->^V'T«'^* V~" C " l ± ai1 "? ""f 
Jauda: 3rd. C. H. Fuller; 4tb. W. J. Jan- £" ™" and G }^\ Amen. I would not 
da; Oth. C. 11. Fuller. Hens: 1st. W. J. r^ 1 '"' <"• "H.„..t„ rn.-:~4.s — ^«~ tj. ■_ 
Janda ; _2nd, C. H. Fuller: 3rd. Chas 
Schnauel; 4th, C. H. Fuller: 5th. Chas 
Schnabel. Cock: 1st. 0. K. Ose; 2nd, O. 
K. Ose: 3rd. 0. K. Ose: 4tb. O. K. Oae: 
5th. C. II. Fuller. Aged Toms: 1st. M. A. 
Mulinansky: 2nd. C. H. Fuller. Cockerel: 
1st: .IDirry Woolson ; 2nd, W. J. Janda; 
3rd. W. .1. Janda: 4th. W. J. Janda; 5tb, 
Will Smith. 

W. H. Turkey. 
Pullets/ 1st. C. V. Dols: 2nd, C. V. 
Dols; 3rd. F. B. ConklUi: 4th. W. P. Wil- 
son. Hens: -1st, C. V. DoIb: 2nd. C. V. 
Dols:. 3rd, W. P. Wilson: 4th (*. V. Dola; 
5th. F. B. Conklin; Cock: 1st, Dr. Mellby 
<aged);3st. -C. V. Dols: 2nd, K. T. Dalla- 
ger: 3rd. F. B. Conklin: 4th, L. A. West- 
phal: 3th, F. ill. BJerke. Cockerel: 1st. C. 
V. Dols: 2nd. E. A. Yonke: 3rd. F. B. 
Conklin: 4th. L. A. Westphal; 5th, C. V. 
Dols. 

Bourbon Bed. 
Cock: 1st, -0. K. 'Lerol. 



I have been very much interested, 
soothedj comforted, and inspired read- 
ing what the pillars of society have 
said about bobbed hair and short 
skirts in your "One Minute Inter- 
views;" It is evident that they are 
.Med .to some apron string. 

It is evident that they are telling 
the truth when they say the -children 
are no worse than their parents were. 
Shades^ of Diogenes! Let the curtain 
drop; 

Well, I haven't much use for long 
haired men and short haired women, 
but it proves Darwin's theory. It 
Jiroves ibeyond a shadow of a doubt 
that they are the missing link. 
t As for short skirts— I don't think 
"it matters much with us old fossils, 
but they ought to put smoked glasses 
or blinds op the boys. I think there 
is something of the eternal boy in 
most of us. We like something mys- 
terious. Take the magic and mystery 
out of the bible and it would not last 
long. 

And then ,they tell what Thief River 
Palls needs. Jumping cats! Can't 
anyone see what she needs ? It needs 
to get arid of some of the pin heads. 
It is hardly believeable that- there 
were a Jot of people in Thief River 
Falls who were so lacking in civic 
pride that they, tried to put a crimp 
in the American Legion state conven- 
tion, the biggest thing that Thief 
River Palls ever put over. What did 
they expect the boys came here for — 
a Sunday school picnic? 

I wish I could remember what Doc 
Gamble . wrote about one of 
those towns in Siberia. But any- 
way it was something about the ignor- 
ance and superstition of the "people. 
Oh, awful! Well, religion and ignor- 
ance are twin sisters. Take note of 
any town that has an overabundance 
of churches and th'e people are a nar- 
row, bigoted lot wlio "believe in ghosts 
and slight-of-hand performances. Of 
course we all believe in a God but He 
is not a- little boy and He don't do 
anything fooli&h. And if He could 
make a iman I don't think He would 
bother to make a' woman out of the 
left overs. Such "bunk! 

But, Oh, God, we do beseech Thee 
to let a little flicker of reason come 
down to; Thy little children stumbling 
in the dark and Thine shall be the 



selves. But I would not care to say 
that religioin is not a necessary evil. 
There are some people . who must 
lave the fear of hell in their hearts 
or they would not be safe members 
of society. - .- \ 

t And then they tell about prohibi- 
tion. One good man-was of the opin- 
ion that there was'not as much drink- 
ing as there used to' be. .Everyone 
has his own opinion and we should 
respect them. But I think there is 
ten times as much drinking as there 
used to be. Why pretty near every 
church member is making some kind 
of .wine or hooch and I don't think 
it hurts them a bit. But it. fosters 
deceit, dishonesty, -and that 
with frightful rapidity. 



ST. HJLAIRE 



Mrs. E. Enright returned to her 
home at Thief Kiver falls Wednes- 
uay after spending a lew days at the 
Fred Leach home. 

Mr. Ole Anderson left Wednesday 
for Holt, where he will visit a few 
days. 

Among the Thief 



Bight in their pasture. After a short 
chase they managed to bag -'.hat. one 
also.— St. Hilaire Spectator. 

Guernsey Breeders Will 
Exhibit At Winter Shows 



shoppers. Wednesday were, Mr. and 
Mrs. Bakke, Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Bur- 
kee, Mrs. Earl Jenson ,and Mrs. H. A. 
Olsen. ' 

Mrs. P. Burstad returned Wednes- 

erows d a y from Grand Forks, where she has 
deceived optical ^attention. 



That members of the Red River 

Valley Guernsey Breeders' association 

River Falls "*" make 'a good showing at the 



Why we never" used to have bank|,, rM J- T - Skatrud and children La 
failures. A farmer would never think | Vaughn and Rachal, returned Wed- 
of trying to wiggle out of a contract . "esday from Duluth, where they have 
for a few' cents. He was loyal to his !?P ent ™e past two weeks visiting. at 
friends, tts creamery, anjl his God. M "; Skatrud's parental home.- 
What is he now? Deceit prompts him . "• Denhart and H. A. Olsen at- 
to strew No. 1 wheat on top of No. 3. £"*)? to b "smess matters at Oklee 
It prompts the elevator man to try I i ^v, a ^ - „ .„, . , , , . 
t skin him on weight, dockage and I, "J- Ellery Westphal left last week 
grade. It prompts him to try to sell '"VS*?? P ? n |- wl !«-<=> will visit 
frosted potatoes to his merchant and f, 8n °™ Um « before leaving for Flor- 
the merchant to retaliate by selling i "V wher ? ^ m " * e employ^- 
him 20c coffee for 45c grade. It ! -JS ,^J,ft ^ Hans ™ were 
prompts the laboring mar, to do as j 11 ^ H;ver_ Falls shoppers.Thursday. 



little as. he can for his money. It 
prompts the preacher to look with dim 



Mr.^A. F. Hall left Friday for 
Florida where he will attend to busi- 

eyes on auctions, bazars, lottery and j ne Mi^ a ?fr!', m.-jv.,.. „ f ™,,. 

^t^wSr 55 * % a \ 1 ^ to B^ftTiSStSWto ™end 

S :L^Jltl^ e babl6S Cry l the week end ^ting with friends. 

rL ^Krf, % US i ed ' t0, ♦ f , ♦ T^e who attended the Thief Riv- 

The high schools are too awful to er Falls-Bagley basketball game on 

tell about. Ask your child welfare Thursday evening were: T. Ducharm, 



Pullets: 1st, J. H. Rosendahl, Hens: 1st. 
Harry Wools«ni : 2nd, L. A. Westphal; 
'3rd. L. A. Pcstphal: 4th, Thco Steigen. 
■Cock : 1st Harry Woolson ; 2nd. Theo. 
Steicen: 3rd. J. H. Rosendahl. Cockerel: 
1st. L. A. Westphal. 

R. Bucks. 
Pullets: 1st L. A. Weslphnl; 2nd, L. A. 
Westphal. 

Ancona. 
Pullets; 1st Mrs. Hans Jurstad 
Jirs. H.-tns Jorstad. 

(iiune Birds. 
1st on pair, Fred Bterbower. 

Biuft Orpliloeton, 
1st, Preeman Lausaka. 

Wild Gnu. 
1st, J.nlien Provenclior. 



2nd, 



1st, 



1st. 



Capons. 
Oakland Park Sanatorium. 



Boys' _£ tilt-ls 1 flub Work. 
Brared Kocks: 1st, Kendall Gustafeson 
2nd. Ellen Janda; 3rd. Bernice Woobfon; 
4th, Natalie Woolson. 

Single Comb White Leghorns: lat, John 
Foster; 2nd, Gurituf Homme; 3rd, Eldoji 
Foster. 

Rose Comb Rhode Island Reda: 1st, 
George Wilson. 

White Wyndottes; 1st. Marilla Thorstad. 

Single Comb Rhode Island Reds: 1st, 
Jean Neset; 2nd, Theo Homme. 

Brown Leghorns: list, Ervln Lieu. 
Pen Prewium.1. 

Best pen in the show: C. V. Dols, 
Rosewood, Minnesota. 

Silver Lucfd Wyundottes. 
lat, Ed. Aubol, St. Hilaire. 

Minorcus. 
Old pen: 1st, C. V. Dola; 2nd, MUton 
Gillete. Young pen: lat, C. V. Dols. 

Buff Orpingtons. 

Young pen: 1st, B. Ranum, Rosewood; 

2nd,T3T*E. Hirst, Warren; 3rd, A. E. 

Hirst, Warren. Old pen: lat. B. Ranum, 

Sosewood. 

White Wyandottes. 
Young pen: 1st, L. A. Weatphal, St 
Hilaire; 2nd, Bert Tnoratad, St Hilaire. 
Old Pea: lBt, L. A. Weatphal, St HUalre, 
Black Lansshans, 
Old Pen: Alfred Bugge, Thief River 
FaUB. 

Barred Rocks. 
Youuj: pen: 0. K. Lerol, Thlei River 
> FaUs. 1st. 

White Rocks. 
Young pen; 1st, Edd. Rosendahl, War- 
ren-. 

S. C. B. T. Beds. 
Younp pen: 1st. T. H. BJerke; 2nd. T. 
H. BJerke. Thief River Falla; 3rd. Mrs. 
Mary Aubol. St. HUalre. 



belittle Qr ridicule Christianity. It is 
grand and noble. It teaches Us how 
to live unselfish, loving lives, and any- 
one who follows the teachings of the 
lowly Nazarine need fear nothing in 
this world, and the next world will 
take care of itself. Very satisfactory 
if we manage the affairs of this 
world as we should. 

.Christians, I regret to say, are as 
scarce as the buffalo. We ought to 
put them in parks and try to preserve 
the species. But religious people we 
have aplenty. Th ev are like lice on 
a hen— you can't ge rid of them with 
arsenic or snuff and so the wnriH is 
full of warring, hating creeds who 
.ake dehrht in destroving a man's 
or woman's remitntion and have a fit 
if they see people enjoying them- 



board about it. Mrs. Bishop knows, 
And what will be the result if this 
goes on? That is .easy. Gpd in 
righteous anger will destroy By fire 
(this time) the whole world, root and 
branch. 

It costs the country ten times what 
.the fines bring in. Bootleggers get- 
ting rich peddling poison; insane 
asylums full; self-respect gone. Bal- 
ance up and see where you stand and 
then ask the missing link to help bring 
back those good.old golden days when 
an honest man could walk up to the 
mahogany, dig down in his jeans, 
bring up a very small coin and get 
a glass of beer. Hooray! 

And then they tell about hard times, 
Eldorado! Where did they get that 
idea with butterfat around' 50 cents 
per pound, wheat $1.60 per bushel, 
potatoes $2 per bushel, mutton high, 
cattle and hogs good prices, labor in 
good demand and good wages — Ford 
cars half price and farm lands cheap,- 
Why there never was a time since the 
Israelites came to Egypt that a young 
man had such a chance as today. Of 
course there are people who want 
things they can't afford and there 
are banks -that are foolish enough to 
loan to such people, but that don't 
constitute hard times. The times are 
too darned good. 

The state is foreclosing on ouite a 
number of farms but I have failed to 
find a farmer who was being fore- 
closed on who did not think he had 
fold his farm for all that it was worth 
and laughed about it. 

A -short time ago a church had a 
debt of $300 it wanted "to pay. A 
committee went around and the mem- 
bers dug up so laivshly that they did 
not get all the way around and those 
who did not have a chance to pay 
were mad. That don't look like hard 
times to me. 

Well, I hone I have covered all the 
territory. Oh. yes. I have forgotten 
the KKK. W*n. this is getting Dret- 
tv long so will have to let them go 
for this time. 

I wonder who wrote that!, Well, if 
you Pre anv good at cross rubles vou 
ean-fio-ure it nut aV rfofct. If not y0 n 
darned "wright" I will tell you. 



Crookston Winter Shows February 8 
to 12 is an established fact, members 
of that organization having met at 
the Brumund hotel in Thief River 
Falls last Thursday and made such a 
decision. , 

Last year the association exhibited 
70 animals and made a wonderful 
showing. It is Hardly possible that 
such a large number will again be en- 
tered but it seeihs likely, in the opin- 
ion of Paul Engelsttt'l, president, that 
the association will make a very cred- 
itable showing. • 

.The Guernsey breeder will hold 
their annual meeting at Crookston 
during the shows when new officers 
for the ensuing year will be elected. 



ORDER LISIITINO TIME TO FILR 
CLAIMS, AND FOR HEARING 
THEREON. 

State of Minnesota 

County of Pennington— as. 

IN PROBATE COURT. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Line J. 
OanesB. Decedent. 

Letters of Administration this day bar- 
ing been granted to '-Gasper Osneaa. 

IT IS ORDERED, That the tune within 
which all creditors oflthe above nainedX 
decedent may preeent alntms againBt her \ 
estate In this Court, be; and . the aaiue ' 
hereby 1b, limited to six montbB from and 
after the date hereof; and that Tueaduy 
the 27th day of July, 1926, at ten o'clock 
A. M., In th'e 'Probate Court Rooms at 
the Court House at Thief River Falls In 
Bald County, be, and the same hereby is, 
fixed and appointed as the time and place 
for hearing upon and the examination, ad-' 
Justment' and allowance of such claims as 
ahall be presented within the time afore- 
Bald. 

Let notice hereof be "-irea by the publU 
cation of this order in "Thief River Fall* 
Tribune", a weekly newspaper as provided 

^SJ 4 ^ January 10th, 1920. 
(CODRT SEAL) 

LARS BACKE, 

THEQ. QUALE, ^^ °' ^^ ^^ 
Attorney for Administrator. - 



The Tribune has a first class J06 
department Bring us your work. 



E. Eiersgord, E. Burkee and J. Por- 
ter. 

Floyd Sumpter, who has been em- 
ployed in Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. Char- 
lie Sumpter and children of Virginia 
Mr. and Mrs. Harrv Schaves and 
daughter of Grand Forks, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Herman Smith of Grand 
Forks, came Saturday to attend -the 
funeral of the late Huber Sumnter. 

Miss Irene Peterson returned Sat- I 
urday evening from barren where 
she has spent a week as guest at the 
Henry Peterson home. 

Miss Lillian Allan and wrCTidaii 
Corbet, of Newfolden, spent the week 
end at the H. R. Allan home. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Burkee and 
daughter Beryl were Crookston visit- 
ors Sunday. 

John Hnfstad and Mr. and Mrs. 
Oscar Bore-ie and daughter Pearl 
Elaine of Grand Forks fmt"ed to 
this villas Sundav to SDend the day 
as quests at the E. Peterson home. 

Mr. Andrew Gi<*stad of Nnrth-. Da- 
kota snent Wednesday and Thursdav 
in this villace, visiting at the K, 
Gigstad home. 



Bag Two Wolves. 

A party of hunters consisting of 
Aug. Berglund, Theo. Ducharme, Hil- 
mer Nelson and A. F. Hall, assisted 
by. Ducharme's two big hounds, cap- 
tured another wolf New Years Day. 

Sunday morning when the same 
party of hunters were about to leave 
town, a telephone message from 
Brink's informed them a wolf was in 




We recommend for furnace, range, or heater 

Pocahontas 

Smokeless, stove size 

or Straight Creek 
Kentucky Lump 
Soft Coals 

Both of these are hot coals and have very low ash 
content.. " 

We also carry 

Briquets 
Lignite 

Tamarac Wood 



THE PRICHARD CO. 



:! _ 



I 



for Economical Transportation 



The United States Treasury esti- 
mates that more than 5400,000,000 is 
hoarded in stockings, old sugar 
bowls, teapots, and old-fashioned 
cupboards, or otherwise kept out of 
circulation in the United States. 



Four nations lost 376 men on sub- 
marines since. the World War. Of 
this number Great Britain lost 154, 
Japan 134, Italy 50, and the United 
States 38. 




Monarch 
Desip 




trav^? n a Jfl he M ° NARCH R ?"«<= i= built "complete in one factory, 
traveling through a consecutive series of systematic producing and 
Sn„^ S ^rtments, all working on the Malleable Iron Range 
Company policy to build a better cooking device. 

A sincere purpose and organization is back of every MONARCH 
range produced. - ' 

Points of Superiority 

bJ^S 11 the . nse i f Mjpeable ^on, MONARCH Ranges are 
Duiit with greater strength without excessive weight It permits 

|L_The cooking surface to- be made thin enough to 
heat through quickly. Greater strength without ex- 

, cessivo weight. 
2 — The doors and pther parts that are subject to 

' '""f' 8 "! handling to be made light for convenience 

; with added strength. 

hn,wi°?" 8 b t tw 'f the s '«el body and castings to 
be " v t te d to make them permanently tight. This pre- 
vents air leaks" and insures- the same satisfactory 
service, year after year. 

Larson Furniture Co. 








r*. 

:i 





1 





sr* 



A Revelation in Low 
Priced Transportation 

A type of performance never before approached in any low 
priced car — a new smoothness of- operation— new flexibility 
— new swiftness of acceleration — new beauty— new comfort— 
these have been added to its already world-famous power and 
economy to make the Improved Chevrolet a revelation in 
low-priced transportation. 



Just take one ride in this remarkable car— and you will be 
amazed to find that qualities, heretofore the chief advantages of 
owning costlier cars, are nowobtainable in a car of very Iowprice. 



* 



f B Mi ¥ prtcaf.o.b.FHnt, Michigan • 

A f ^^ Touring. . *5 10 Sedan, . . $ 735 

^ Roadster - 510 Landau - ' 765 

Coupe . . 645 MToa Truck 395 

Coach - - 645 ITonJruck 550 

KOHN & FITERMAN 

QUALITY ATiowcoST 







y 






v ^'' E ^f£'?T*«**V ^^^J&**~&& cfp^T* 






WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1926. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



PAGE SEVEj* 



| Commissioners' | 

| Proceedings ! 
a . — a 

Thief River Fnllit, Minnesota 

A regular iuljmirned rmrcnns of the 
city council was culled to order by M. A - 
Ellison. '.V-.sl.Knt, at olglit o'clock I*. . M. 
Tuesdav. Jammry Sth, 1U2H. with Alder- 
men ■Fo.-'suiii. Brunuiml, Riimbcck, fcven- 
son. and I'«uIm»i» l>res«m and Alderman 
Porter absent. 

UlnuU-s of tlu- meeting of December 
22nd were n?:ul und approved as read. 

Applications for license to ijeil milk and 
cream, bwiring the approval of the Dairy 
Inspector. wer« presented by the follow- 
ing: Gust Erickson, John Hedlund, P. B. 
Conklin, I 1 . Jacobson. A. Myrom und Ole 
R. Revdiilil. Alderman Fossum, seconded 
by Al.Ierman Biunuind. moved that thi 
applications be apjiroved for license and 
tlieiv being no objections thereto the mo- 
tion whs declared curried. 

Mr. R, den. Christian O. Granum and 
Anton M. I-aneseth, three of the bonds- 
men appearing on the bond of the Citi- 
zen's State Bank of Thief River Falltf, 
Minn., appeared before the council, and, 
following announcement of the payment 
of the claim of the city against the bank 
by. them, requested the passage of a reso- 
lution by tht; council assigning all the 
city's rights, title and interest to the 
claim filed with tlje Commissioner of 
s Banks, to them. Alderman Brumund in- 
troduced a resolution authorizing this as- 
signment, which was duly seconded by 
Alderman Rambeck and declared passed 
by the unanimous vote ot the council. 

A communication signed by Mr. L. P. 
Wolff, engineer of nitration plant con- 
struction In the city, requesting payment 
of the amount claimed due him for en- 
gineering services was presented and 
read. Alderman Brumund moved that 
the bill be rejected, which motion was 
seconded by Alderman Paulson and de- 
clared carried: 

There being no further business the 
council 'adjourned sine die. 

M. V. EYENSOK, 

President of Council. 
Attest : 

P. 0. . PEDERSONV 



RESOLUTION 

At a regular adjourned meeting of the 
city council held January Sth. lulitl. Al- 
derman Paulson, seconded by Alderman 
Rambeck, introduced the following resolu- 
tion and moved it's adoption: 

Be It Resolved, by the City Council of 
the City of Thief River Falls, Minnesota, 
that thu following bills bu allowed, to- 
■*it: 

Current Fund 

Street Commissioner's payroll ? 42.40 

H. O. Chomniie, office expense _ HUH) 

L. R. Twete, salary .____ 2.1.00 

Ed L«ee, repairs 

Bredeson & Co., supplies 



Oen Mercantile Co., supplies ^ 

Oen Mercantile Co., supplies 

.Minneapolis Bridge Co., coal 

"Water and Light DepL. ■ "War 

Crys" 

Rhodeguard & Co., broom 

Christensen Hdwe. Co., misc sup- 
plies 

Emil Horojsh. labor 

O. J. ( Ranibtck, wood ~ 

Auditorium Fund 

Ed Lee. repairs $ 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., coal ._ 

Oen Mercantile Co., supplies 

Christensen Hdwe. Co., supplies- 

Sam Brandvold. firing boiler 

Poor" Fund 

Bredeson & Co.. groceries $ 

O'Hara Dray & Fuel Co.. wood „ 

Ed Lee, repairs :._._ 

RiYi-rsidt; Gi-ocerv, groceries 

liamon & Barzen Milling Co.. 



4.S9 
8.67 
,'J0 
2.7.1 
49.81 

r».so 



feed 



ahciness. wood 



was sccouued by Aldormkri Chriatooeraon 
carried unanimously. 

Alderman Brumund, moved ■ the elec- 
tion of Oscar C. Paulson as Vice Presi- 
dent of the Council for. the ensuing term 
which motion was seconded by Alderman 
Iverson and carried unanimously. 

Alderman Brumund moved the appoint- 
ment of P. G. Pederson as City Clerk for 
the ensuing term,! which motion was sec- 
onded by Aldertpan ChristofCerson ahd 
curried unanimously. 

Mayor elect W| W. Prtchard, Jr., ap- 
peared before the council with a com- 
munication addressed to them setting 
forth certain recommendations as mayor 
of the city which was read and filed. 

A motion was Introduced by Alderman 
Fossum, seconded by Alderman Iverson 
and carried that the various applications 
filed with the city clerk be opened and 
read after which 'Alderman Paulson 
moved that all further appointments be 
laid over until January* 1-th, which mo- 
tion was seconded" by Alderman Christof- 
ferson and carried. 

Applications for public dance permit, 
follows, were presented and read: 

Woodmen of the World, Jan. 6, 13. 

Night Hawks' Club, Jan. 7. U, 21, 28. 

Odd Fellows Lodge, Jan. 26. 

Daughters of Norway, Jan. 18. 

Snyder's Orchestra, Jan. 8, 22, Feb. 5, 
19. 

John Malafa, Jan. 12, 10,26. 

Yeoman'B Lodge, Jan, 11. 

On motion of Alderman Paulson, sec- 
onded by Alderman Iverson, and carried, 
issuance of permits as per applications 
was declared approved. 

There being no further business the 
council on motion adjourned until 8:00 
o'clock P. M. Tuesday. January 12th. 

102a. 

ALFRED BREDESON, 
President of the Council. 
Attest: P. G. PEDERSON. 
City Clerk. 



Oen Mercantile Co., clothing 

"Water and Light Dept., cash paid 



' ha 



lllninapolis Bridge Co., coal 

J. C. Penney Co.. indue. i_ 

Burzen's Dairy, milk _„.. 

Thief River Co-op. Creamery. 

milk 

Louis DeCremer. meats ~: __.IT 

E. F. Zeh, groceries 

Holland's Meat Mai-ket, meats _ 
Pexer Engelstad, milk . 



20.111 
11.38 
21.01! 



Rhodeguard & Co.-r ■-■groceries 

Park Fund 
John Horejsh. Water & Light 

Dept labor ->n r\nk __ 

John Pederson. labor on rink 

Consumers Deposit Acct. 
water & Light Dept.. deposit 

refunds _ _,.■ _. 

Electric Unfit Fund 
Eiectrict Supply Co., supplies .._ 
St. P;iul Electric Co., supplies „_ 
Power Equipment Co., supplies __ 
J. I. Holcomb Mfg. Co., supplies 
N. W. Electric Equipment Co. 

supplies _ „ „ 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., coal 

Christensen Hdwe. Co., supplies _ 

Lars Erickson. labor _., 

ROLL CALL 
• Aldermen voting Aye: Fossum, 
niund. Rambeck. Evenson, Paulson. 
Aldermen voting Naye: Xone. 
Rt-solution declared passed. 

M. V. EVENSON, 
President of the Council. 
Attest: P. G. PEDERSON, 
City Clerk. 
Presented to the Mayor Jan. 5, 192fl. 
Approved Jan. 11, I92(>: 
"W. W. PRICHARD, JR. 
Mayor. 



30.05 
30.00 



B ru- 



RES OLUTION 

At a regular adjourned .meeting of the 
City Council held January ."», 1920 Alder- 
man Brumund seconded by Alderman 
Rambeck. introduced the following resolu- 
tion and moved Its adoption: 

BE IT RESOLVED, J3y the City Coun- 
cil of the City of Thief River Falls. Min- 
nesota, that 

Whereas, the sureties upon the deposi- 
tory bond of the Citizens State Bank of 
Thief River Falls, have paid Into the city 
treasury the amount of the deposit In said 
bank at the time of its closing belonging 
to the city, and. Whereas, such payment 
was made by said sureties in the follow- 
ing proportion, to-wit: Rasmus Oen paid 
five tenths thereof: Christian CL Granum 
mid three tenths thereof; and Anton M. 
Langseth paid two tenths thereof; and, 
«"«■«*« .the city, at the request of said 
sureties has heretofore filed with the 
Commissioner of Banks of the State of 
Minnesota a claim for the total amount 
of such deposit, and said sureties S 

rights of the city in and to said claim 

5S^ 1 ; H ^ REFORE - BE wresolv: 

ED that the mayor and clerk are hereby 
authorized and directed to execute and 
deliver in behalf of the citv an assign- 
ment to said sureties so paving said de- 
posit, all the right, title and Interest of 
the city in and to said claim so filed with 
the Commissioner of Banks, together with 
all accrued or accruing dividends paid or 
to be paid by said Commissioner of Banks 
by virtue of said deposit and said claim 
so filed therefor. 

ROLL CALL 
Aldermen voting Yes: Fossum, Bru- 
mund, Rambeck, Evenson. Paulson. 
Aldermen voting No: None. 
Resolution declared passed. 

M. V. EVENSON, 
■President of the Council. 
Attest : P. G. PEDERSON. 
CItV Cleric 
Presented to the Mayor Jan. 5. 1528. 
Approved Jan. 11, 1020. 
W. TV. PRICHARD, Jr. 
Mayor. 

The organization meeting of the new 
council elect was held In the city council 
chambers upon adjournment of the old 
council and all members were reported 
present as follows: Fossum, Bredeson, 
Brumund. Chrlstofferson, Iverson Paul- 
Son. ! 

™«? e 7 n ?i n i possu S mov "* the appoint- 
rKr£.«' IT 1 ^ B " ,mun <l "s temporary 
Chairman which motion was seconded by 
Alderman Bredeson and carried 
Airi^f 1 ? 1 ^ Fossum moved the election of 
H i^S. B Af de80n ? 8 ^^en* <* the Coun- 
cil for the ensuing term, which motion 



CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION OF 
THK THIEF K1VEB MOTOR COMPANY 

We. the undersigned, for the purpose of 
forming a corporation under and pursuant 
to the provisions of Chapter Fifty-eight 
(58) of the General Statutes of MiuacBOta 
for 1023. and any. '.intendments thereof, do 
hereby associate ourselves as a body corpo- 
rate, anil do heniby adopt the following 
Certitlcntt* «f Incorporation. 
ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. The name of this corporation 
clinll be Thief River Motur Company. 

Section 2. The tfeueml nature m Its bUni- 
ness shall be to buy oud sell and exchange 
u u titmo biles, trucks, tract i' n* nnd farm ma- 
chinery anil utlier Implements generally 
used on farmB: to buy and sell coal and 
wood: to buy and sell oils, greases-, .auto 
necessaries and conduct a general garage 
and repair business in connection there- 
with; to buy, sell. lease, mortgage and deal 
in such real estate as may be necessary 
In the conducting t.if the ahove business In 
automobiles, farm machinery, wood, coal, 
oils, greases and : peneral parage and re- 
pair business, and to do such other and 
further business va may be necessary for 
the carrying out of the; business of this 
corporation. : 

Section 3. The principal place of trans- 
acting the business of this corporation 
shall be in the City of Thief Itlver Falls. 
County of Pennington. Minnesota, and 
elsewhere, as may be decided by the 
Board of Directors. 

ARTICLE II. 

The time for the commencement of this 
corporation shall he January 1, 1020, and 
the period of its duration shall be thirty 
(301 years. 

ARTICLE III. 

That the names and places of residence 
of the persons forming this rorporntton 
are: O. "A. Rambeck, Arthur Uamheck. fi. 
A. GilhertRon, V. C. Rogers, John J". Kast. 
nil of Thief River Falls. Minnesota, and 
Walter P. Stone ahd William Stone of 
Cronkfttnn, Minnesota. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Section 1. The raanagjment of this cor- 
poration shall be vested in In a Board of 
Directors, composed of not less than three 
and not more thnn seven im>nihi>rs. The 
mimps and adlrcsses «r the First Board, 
of Directors aro:0. A. Rum heck, Arthur 
Rambcrk. G. A. Gilbortson, V. C. Rogers, 
nnd John J. Kast, all of Thief River Falls. 
.Minn. 

Section 2. The first officers of this cor- 
poration shall be: President. O. A. Uam- 
heck: Vice President. V. C. Rogers: Sec- 
retary. G. A. Gllhertson : and Treasurer, 
John" J. Kast. All the ahove named of- 
ficers and directors shall hold their re- 
spL'f-tive offices until the next annual meet- 
ing of the corporation to be held Febru- 
ary 10. tft2G. at which time and annually 
thereafter, a Board of Directors shall he 
elected fnmi and , by the stock holders of 
this corporation. The annual meeting of 
this corporation shall he held at its prin- 
cipal place of business on the third Tues- 
day in Jn unary oT each year. Immedi- 
ately after the election of directors, or 
as soon tbereattvt as practicable, the di- 
rectors shall meet nnd elect from their 
ni.mher a President and a Vice President, 
and from their number or from the stock- 
holders a Secretarv and a Treasurer. Any 
two officers except that of President and 
Vice President amy he held by one per- 
son. The directors and officers of this 
corporation shall hold tlicir respective of- 
fices until their successors have been el- 
ected and entered npon the discharge of 
their duties. The first meetings of the 
stockholders nnd 'of the Board of Direct- 
ors shall he held at Thief River FallB, 
Minnesota, on The 19th day of February. 
102(1. m 2 and 3 o'clock, respectively. 
" ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the Capital Stock of this 
Corporation shall hp Thirty-five Thousand 
Dollars, which shall he paid In, In money 
or property, or both. In such manner. . at 
Fiich times, and in such amounts as the 
Board of Directors shall order; The Capl 
ml Stock shall be divided into Three Hun 
dred Fifty shares of the par value of $100 
each. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The highest amount of indebtedness or 
liability to which this corporation shall 
at any time he liable or subject shall be 
the snm of Fifty Thousand Dollars, 

T n Testimony whereof we have 
hereunto set our hands this Sth. day of 
January, 1928. 

Tn the presence of: 
H. S. DAHLEN. 

L.-H. IRGENS., 

O. A. RAMBECK 
ARTHUR RAMBECK 
: G. A. GILBERTSON 
V. C. ROGERS 
JOHN J. KAST 
WALTER P. STONE 
- WILLIAM STONE 
STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
County of Pennington— bb. 
On this 9th day of Jannary. 1026. per- 
sonally appeared before me O. A. Ram- 
beck. Arthur Rambeck, G. A. Gllbertson. 
V. C. Rosters. John J. Kast. Walter P. 
fdone, and William Stone, to me known to 
be the persons named in and who executed 
the foregoing Certificate of Incorporation, 
and each acknowledged thnt he executed 
the same as hlB free net. and deed., for the 
tisp« and, pnrnosefl therein expressed; 
C--EAL) '■ 

IT. S. DAHLEN. 
■ H. S. DAHLEN. 
Notary Public. Pennington 
County, Minn.. My commis- 
sion expires August IS,' 1020. 
STATE OF MINNESOTA, . 
Department of State. 

I herpby certify that the within Instr^ 
raent was filed for record In thlB office on 
this 13th day of January, A D„ 1028. at 
4 o clock : P . M., and was duly recorded In 
Book S,4 of Incorporation on page 647. 
MIKE HOLM, 

OEFICE OF REGISTER "fSoS ^ 
County of Pennington. Minn: - ' 
I hereby certify that the within InBtru- 
mentwaB filed In this office for record on 
V l ^ l n\^ a,T a { Jan ? ar T. A. D.. 1928, at 
& #\« ' nnrt WM J. nIv raided In Book 
K of Misc. on page 291. 

FRED D. LOHENTSON. 

# T ' ,JP££ !8ter ot Deeds. 

(January 20-27.) 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE UORTOAtiE 
FORECLOSURE SALE 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagor la' the conditions and cove- 
nants of -thnt certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Nela B. BwanBon, 
widower, mortgagor, to the State of Min- 
nesota, mortgagee, bearing date the 4th 
day of February, 1924, and, with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly filed for 
record In the office of the Register of 
Deeds In aud for the County of Penning- 
ton und State of Minnesota, on the lSthi 
day of, February, 1924, at eight o'clock 
thirty minutes A. ui., and duly recorded 
thereiu In Book "77" of Mortgages, on 
page US thereof; 

ANp WHEREAS, Said default consiBts 
,1b the failure of the said mortgagor to 
pay the Beml -annual installment of amor- 
tised principal and interest, amounting 
to One Hundred Eighty-seven Dollars and 
fifty cents ($187.50/. which became due 
aud puyable on the .4th day of AugUBt, 
1023, In accordance with the terms and 
conditions of said mortgage, which default 
has continued to this date; 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fuult. and pursuant to the termB and con- 
ditions of said mortgage, and as author- 
ized ' by law, the Department of Rural 
Credit, on behalf of the State of Minne- 
sota, the mortgagee and owner aud 
holder of said uiurtgage, has exercised 
and dues hereby exercise its option to 
declare, and hereby does declare, the 
whole of the loan secured by said mort- 
gage to be due and payable forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS, There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 
DALE 

NOTICB IS HEREBY" GIVEN, That de- 
fault bat occurred in the condition! of that 
pertain mortgage, dated the third day. of 
Mnrch 1910 executed by Bessie Beheld 
[formerly Bessie Babcock) and Joseph 
Beheld, her husband, as mortgagors,, to 
CltlxeDs State Bank ot Thief River Falls, 
au mortgagee, tiled for record in the office 
of the Register of Deeds In and for Pen- 
nington County, State of Minnesota, on the 
3lBt day o£ July 1919, at eight o'clock and 
no minutes A. M„ and recorded In Book Vi 
of Mortgage Records, on page 490 thereof 
and on the 29th day of September, 1019 said 
mortgage was duly assigned by said 
mortgagee to Helen L. Purdy, Lake City, 
Minn., that, pursuant to a provision bt said 
mortgage. Bald mortgagee has elected to 
declare the wholp debt secured thereby to 
be now due and' payable; that there Is due 
and payable, at the date of this notice,- 
upon the debt secured by- said mortgage, 
the snm of Eight Hundred and no-100 
(1800.00) Dollars, and that no action or 
proceeding at law or otherwise has neen 
Instituted to recover said debt or any part 
thereof; that, by virtue of a power of sale 
therein contained, said mortgage will be 
foreclosed and the land and premises there- 
In described, lying and being In the Conn* 
ty of Pennington, State of Minnesota, de- 
scribed as follows, to wit: The Northwest 
Quarter (NW%) of Section Twenty-n»e 
(25) In Township One Hundred Fifty-three 
(153) North, of Range Thirty-nine <S») 
West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, con- 
taining^lBO acres, more or less, according 



made in rive equal monthly install- 
ments. 

The Commission reserves the 
right to reject any or all bids. ° . 
Oakland Park Sanatorium 
Commission, Thief River Falls. 
(January 1&-20) 



said mortgage, und the loan secured < to the Government surrey thereof. wiU be 
thereby, at the date of this notice, by j sold at public auction to the highest bidder 
renson of said election, the sum of Five for cash by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
Thousand Nine Hundred Seven Dollars County, at the Front door of the Court 
and slxty-une cents (?5,007.01), unonior- House, in the city of Thief River Falls in 
Used principal, together with Interest (the County of Pennington. State of Mlnns- 



thereon from the 4th day of August, 1023, 
at the rate of five and one-fourth (614) 
per centum per annum, and One Hundred 
Eighty-seven Dollnrs and fifty cents 
($187.50) amortized principal and interest, 
together with Interest thereon from the 
4th day of August, 1025, at seven (7) per 
centum per a mm in, in all the snm of 
Sir Thousand Two Hundred Forty-three 
Dollnrs and twenty-eight cents ($0,243,281: 
AND WHEREAS. By reason of said 
default the said power of Bale contained 
in said uiortKatfe has become aud -is op- 
erative, aud no action or proceeding hav- 
ing been Instituted at law or otherwise 
to recover the debt secured by said mort- 
gage, or any part thereof: 

NOW, THEREFORE, Notice is hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained lu said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the stutute hi such case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
In and- conveyed by said mortgagp, situ- 
ate, lying and being Jn the Couuty of 
Pennington and State of Minnesota, to- 
wlt: 

The Southwest Quarter (SWUl of 
Section Thlrty-Bix (30), In Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range Forty-four (44) West, con- 
taining 100 acres, more or less, ac- 
cording to the Government Survey ■ 
thereof, I 

with the hereditaments' and appurten- 
ances, which Bale will be made by the 
Sheriff of said Pennington County, at the 
front door of the Court House in the 
City of Thief River FallB, In snid County 
and State, on Thursday, the 4th day of 
March, 1920. at ten o'clock A, M. of that 
day, at public vendue to the highest bid- 
der for rash, to pay and sutlBfy the debt 
then due on said mortgage, and the 
taxes, • if. any, on said premises, aud the 
costs and expenses allowed by law, aub- 
ject 'tn redemption at any time within one 
year from the date of sale, as provided by 
law. 

Dated January 10th, 1920. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA.. 

' Mortgagee, 

By Department of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAGENG, Chairman. 
Attest: H. H. FLOWERS,. 
„„ . . Secretary. 

(SEAL) 
CLIFFORD L, HILTON, 

Attorney . General. 
LIJDVIG GULLICKSON. 

Assistant Attorney General. 
-Ittoriipys for Mortgagee, 
■nil Hiiinm Building, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb. 3-10-17-24) 



sota, on the 11th day of March 1926, at ten 
o'clock in the forenoon, to pay and satisfy 
the debt secured by Bald mortgage. 
Twenty-five Dollars attorney's fees therein 
provided for, and the costs and disBurse- 
raenta allowed by law 'upon such fore- 
closure and sale. 
Dated December. 14th. 1923. 

HELEN L. PURDY. 
JOHN C. DECODRCT. Mortgage* 

Attorney for Mortgagee. 

( Dec. 23-30. Jan. 6-13-20-27)) 



NOTICE OP REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default has been niude by 
the mortgagors In the conditions and cov- 
enants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Gustnf Edwin Wah- 
Uu and Anna Wahlln, his wife, mortgagors 
to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, bear- 
ing date the 21st day of September, 1923, 
and, with a power of sale therein con- 
tained, duly filed for record in) the office of 
the Regijrcr of DeedB In and for the Coun- 



ty or Pennington and State of Minnesota, 

on the 25th day of September 1923 at - - 

elgh;t o-elock thirty minutes A. M., ' and r b Y J? e . Sn " lff ;1 of ^J* Pehnlgnton County, 



duly recorded therein in" Book "77" of 
Mortgages, on page 18 thereof; 

AND WHEREAS. Said default consists 
in the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual installments of amortised 
principal and interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-five Dollars {$125.00), 
which became due and payable on the 21 bi 
day of March, 1925, and the 21st day of 
September, 1025, in accordance with the 
terms and conditions of said mortgage 
which default has continued to this date,- 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorized 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of MInuesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and does -hereby 
exercise its option to declare, ahd hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan secured 
by said mortgnge to be due and payable 
forthwith ; 

AND WHEREAS, There is actually doe 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the Bum of Three Thousand 
Mne Hundred Sixteen Dollars nnd eighty 
cents (S3.916.80), unamortized principal! 
together with Interest thereon from the 
21st day of September. 1925, at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (CU) per centum per 
annum, and Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 
($250,001 amortized principal and interest, 
with interest on $125.00 thereof from 
March 21st, 1925, at seven (7) per centum 
per annum, and interest on $125.00 thereof 
from September 21st. 1925, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, in all the snm of Fom 
Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-Beven' 
Dollars and sixty-seven cents ($4,227.67) ; 

AND WHEREAS, By reaBon of said de- 
fault, the said power of*saIe contained In 
said mortgage has become and Is operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
Instituted' at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured by Bald mortgage or any 
part thereof: 

NOW, THEREFORE. Notice is hereby 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default having been made In -the pay- 
ment of the sum of Fifteen Hundred 
Forty. Dollars, which 1b claimed to be due 
and Is due at the date of this notice, upou a 
certain Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by John Morgan and rfilraa Mor- 
gan, his wife. Mortgagors, to Albert S. 
Lieberman, Mortgagee, bearing date the 
15th day of September 1923, and with a 
power of sale therein contained, duly re- 
corded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds in ahd for the County of Pcnuiog- 
ton, and State of Minnesota, on the 29th. 
day of September 1023, at 9 o'clock A. M„ 
in Book 51 of Mortgages, on page 203. 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 
debt secured thereby, was duly assigned 
by said Albert S. Lieberman Mortagee, 
to Peter Dorn by written assignment dat- 
ed the 29th day of September 1023, and 
recorded in the office of said Register of 
Deeds, on the 2nd day of February 1924, 
at one o'clock P. M., in Book 65 of 
Mortgages on page 200. 

AND WHEREAS, The said Peter Dora 
the Assignee, and Holder of 
said Mortgage has duly elected 
and does hereby elect to declare 
the whole principal sum of said 
Mortgage due and payable at the date 
of this notice, under the terms and con- 
ditions of said Mortgage and the power 
of sale therein contained; and whereas 
there Is actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this uotlce 
the sum of Nlnteen Hundred Ninety-three 
and 88-100 " ($1993.98) DoUars. with inter- 
est thereon at the rate of seven per cent 
per annum from the 0th day of January 
1026, and also $289.37 taxes for the year 
1924 paid by assignee, and whereas the 
Baid power of sale has become operative, 
nnd no action or proceedings having been 
instltnted, at law or otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by said . Mortgage, 
any part thereof: 

NOW, THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN; That by virtue of Ihe 
power of sale contained in said Mortgage, 
and pursuant t- t 1 "* ctntute in such case 
made and provided, the Bald Mortgage 
will he foreclosed by n sale ■■• tht> premis- 
es described In and conveyed by said 
Mortgage, viz: 

Lot numbered Nine (0) -if Block 
Thirty-six (36) Original TownBite of 
Thief River Falls .according to the 
plat thereof now on file and of re- 
cord in the office of the Register of 
DeedB in nnd for said County 
In Pennington County nnd Stale ( 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances: whicn f-nle will be made 



at the front door of the Court House, in 
the City of Thief River Falls in said 
County and State, on the 27th day of 
February 1926, at ten o'clock A. M., of 
that day, at public vendue to the high- 
est bidder for ensh. to pay Bald debt of 
Nineteen Hundred NIn-;ty-three and U8-100 
Dollars, and Interest, and the taxes. If 
any, on sold premises, and seventy-five 
DoUars, Attorney's fees, rs stipulated in 
and by said Mortgage In case of fore- 
closure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law: Bubject to redemption nt any 
time withi^ one year from the date of 
sale, as provided by law. 
Dated January 9th A. D. 1926. 

PETER DORN 
The assignee and present owner 
of the taid mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP and 
H. 0. BERVE, 

Attorneys. Thief River Falls. Minn. 
(Jan. 13-20-27- Feb. 3-10-17) 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON PETI- 
TION TO SELL. MORTGAtiE OR 
LEASE LAND. 

ESTATE OF Dellys Ruth Gibson, Mi- 
nor Ward. 
State of Minnesota, 
County uf Pennington — ss. 

IN PROBATE COURT. 

In the Matter of the ' EBtate of Dellys 
Ruth Gibson, a Minor. 

The State of Minnesota to.Edla TJ. Gib- 
Bon, Henry A. Gibson, Hulda M. Gibson. 
Ruth A. Gihson, Hlldur E. GibBon 
George F. Gibson, E. Leontin Gibson, 
Dellys Gibson and all persons in- 
terested In the sale of . certain lands 
belonging to Bald ward. The petition of 
Anna J. Ericson, formerly Anna J. Gib- 
son; as representative of the above named 
ward, being duly Sled in this court re- 
presenting that it Ib necessary and for 
the best Interest of said estate and of 
all interested therein that certain lands 
of said ward described therein, be 'sold 



given, that by virtue of the power of sale i and praying that a license be granted to 
contained In snid mortgage, and pursuant :Anna J. Ericson,- formerly Anna J. Gib- 
to the statute In such case made and pro- son, to sell the same. . 
vlded, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 1 Now. Therefore, You and each of von 
by a sale of the premises described in ana fare hereby cited and reouired to Show 
conveyed by said mortgage, situate, lying | cause, if any you have, before this court, 
and being In the County of Pennington and at the Probate Court Rooms, in the Court 



Dr.PhiUp B.|Hadley, who has been 
studying bacterial growth in the 
Lake Huron River, has found thai a 
bacteriophage in. the water rapidly 
destroys bacteria so that it may 
some day be perfectly safe to drink 
it after filtration. 



State of Minnesota, to-wit. 

The Northwest Quarter (NW«) of 
Section Seventeen (17), in Township . 
One Hundred Flfty-fonr (154) North, 
of Range Thirty-nine (39) West, con- 
taining 160 acres, more or less, accord- 
ing to the Government Snrrey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which Bale will be made by the Sheriff of 
said Pennington County, at the front door 
of the Court House In the City nf Thler 
River Falls. In said County and State, on 
Thursday.. the 4th day of February. 1026, 
at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, at public 
vendue to the highest bidder for cash, 
to pay and satisfy the debt then due on 
said mortgage,, and the taxea. If any. on 
said premises, and the costs and expenses 
allowed by law; subject to redemption at 
any time within one year from the date 
of sale, aa provided by law. 
Dated December 22nd, 1025. 

STATE OP MINNESOTA. 
«.•„;■■. Mortgagee. 

By Denartment of Rural Credit 
OLE O. KAOENG, Chairman. 
ATTEST : H. H. FLOWERS, 

.SHAM ' BMre '" r - 

CLD7FORD L. HILTON, 

Mt-roey \ General. 1 
rjmVTa OTTTiLICKKON. 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
"M Hniom Bunding, 
**r: Paul. Minnesota. 

(Dec 28-30 Jan. «-13-2fl 271 



House in Thief River Falls, County of 
Pennington. Stnte of Minnesota, on the 
11th day of February, 1026, nt 10 o'clock 
A. M., why the prayer of said petition 
Bhonld not be granted, 

WITNESS. The Judge of said, court, 
and the seal of said court, thlB 14th dny 
of January, 1926. 

LARS BACKS, 
Judge of Probate Court. 
(COURT SEAL) 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb.-3) 



NOTICB OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 

FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default baa been made by 
the mortgagors in the conditions and coy- 
cnants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by George Monroe Tan* 
ner and Llasie Tanner, his wife, mortgag- 
ors, to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, 
bearing date the 22nd day of August, 1924, 
and, with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly Sled for record In the office of the 
Register of Deeds in and for the County 
of .Pennington and State of Minnesota on 
the 25th day of August, 1924, at eight 
o'clock A. M„ and duly recorded thereto In 
Rook "77" of Mortgages, on page 260 
thereof; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
In the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual installments of amortised 

Srlnclpal and Interest, each amounting to 
ne Hundred Twenty-flve DoUara ($125.00), 
which became due and payable on the 22nd 
day of February, 1025, and the 22nd day" 
of August, 192S, . In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of said mortgage, 
which default haB continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS, By reaBon of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of aald mortgage and as authorized 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and bolder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and does hereby 
exercise its option to declare, and hereby 
doeB declare, the whole of the loan securer 
by said mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS, There Ib actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
snid election, the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred Fifty-nine DoUars and for- 
ty-eight cents (13,059.48). unamortised 
" 'iclpal, together with interest thereon 
a the 22nd day of August. 1025, at the 
rnte of five and one-fourth (5%) ner cent- 
um per annnm, .and Two Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($250.00) amortised principal and 
intereBt, with Interest on $125.00 thereof 
from February 22nd, 1925, at seven (7) per 
centum per annnm, and Interest on $125.00 
thereof from August 22nd, 1025. at seven 
(7) per centum per annum, in aU the snm 
of Four Thousand Two- Hundred Eighty- 
eight Dollars and- ninety-six cents 
1*4,288.96) ; 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, the Bald power of sale contained in 
said mortgage has become and Ib operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage or any 
part thereof; 

NOW, THEREFORE, Notice Is hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained in said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute 'In sneb case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage wiU be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described In and 
conveyed by Bald mortgage.' situate, lying 
and being In the County of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wit: 

The Southeast Quarter (SEU) of Sec- 
tion Twenty-Beven- (27). Township One 
Hundred Fifty-four (1541 North, of 
Range Thirty-nine (39) West, contain- 
ing 160 acres, more or leas, according 
to the Government Survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
Bnld Pennington Connty, nt the front door 
of the Court House in the City of Thief 
River Falls. In said Connty and State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day of February, .1926, 
at eleven o'clock A. M. of that day, at pub- 
lic vendue to the highest bidder for cash, 
to pay and satisfy the debt then due on 
said mortimge. and tne taxes. If any. on 
said premises, and the coBts and expenses 
allowed by law: subject to redemption at 
any time within one yeai from the date 
of sale. as. provided, hy law. 
Dated December 22nd. 1025. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

Mortgagee, 
By Denartment of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. RAOENG. Chnlrmnn. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 
Secretary. 
(REAL) 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 
Attorney General. 
LtmVTO C.TTLLICKSON, 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
610 Hnmm Bnlldlng, 
St. Paul. Minnesota. 

(Dec 23-80 Jan. 6-13-20-271 



LOCAL MARKETS 

GRAJN 

Wheat, dark northern ...„ $1.55 

Wheat, No. 1 .'....... 1.51 

Wheat, No. 2 .._ 1.49 

Durum, No. 1 1.27 

Flax, per bu. _ 222 

Barley, per bu AQ 

Oats, per bu. 30 

Rye, per bu. ". 81 

Buckwheat, per 100 lbs 1.25 

Flour and Feed 

Flour, per cwt 5.00 

Oil Meal * 2.75 

Bran L_.„ .. 1.40 

Shorts ". „ 1.40 

Poultry 

Hens, heavy ... Jjg 

Hens, light 12 

Heavy springs 19 

Leghorn springs .11 

Old roosters .12: 

Geese •. . „ j.3 

PRODUCE 

Eggs, No. 1 „ .25 

CREAMERY 

Cream, per^qt. .40- 

Butter, per lb AS- 

WOOL AND HIDES 

Wool „ .32 

Wool .... ; — .36. and .37 

Cow Hides .07 

GRASS SEEDS 

Timothy, steady ?4.50 to ?4£0 

Timothy and AJsike, mixed, 

weak ; $4.00 to ?4.75 

Sweet clover, W. B., steady, $3 to $5 
Sweet Clover, yel steady, 8.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady.... $20 to $24. 
Mammoth Clover steady ....$20. to 24. 

Alsike clover, steady...- $16 to $19 

Common Alfalfa, weak 16.00 

Grimm, alfalfa, steady _...$20 to $25 
Cert Grimm, firm 85.00 



♦ tt HHH t H mm »t» 



We Want 
HIDES AND FURS 

Northern Trading Co. 



* M I M MM I H MMM I HUM 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 

Sealed bids will be received unto 
six- p. m. January 23, 1926 by the 
Oakland Park Sanatorium Commis- 
sion at Thfef Elver Falls, Minn, for 
ther sale to the Oakland Park Sana- 
torium of three hundred cords tama- 
rac wood F. O. B. Thief'River Falls, 
Minn.r 

. The wood to be sound, dry, four 
foot tarn arac- wood of uniform di- 
ameter subject to purchaser's inspec- 
tion and measurements and must be 
delivered before March 1, 1926. Bids 
may be submitted in' lots of 100 
cords or for the entire 800 cords. 

Payments of this wood will be 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE RALE 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That de- 
fault has been made In. the conditions of a 
mortgnce exrmtetl hy Elmer E. Kelp and 
Mary Kolp, his wife. Mrirtgaeora to C. L. 
HanBen. Mortgagee., dated the 1st day of 
Norember. lf»22. and recordrd In the office 
of the Register of Deeds of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, on the 16th day of 
November, 1922, at 1:30 o"eoIcb P M.. in 
Book 51 "of Mortgages on Page 205 there- 
of: that on the 18th flay of November. 1022. 
aald mortgage was assigned by the said C. 
L. Hansen. Mortgagee, to The United 
Danlah Societies of America, a corporation 
organized and existing under and by vir- 
tue of the Laws of the State of Wisconsin, 
and the Deed of Assignment recorded on 
the 15th dny of December. 1022. at 9 o'clock 
A. M.. In the office of the Register of Deeds 
of Pennington County, Minnesota, In Booh 
65 of Mortgages on Page 200 thereof: that 
such default consist's In the fanore to pay 
the snm of One Hundred Eighty (flSO.OOi 
Dollars Interest, which fell due on the note 
which Bnld mortgage was given to Becure 
on the 1st day of November, 1924, and a 
further payment of Interest which fell due 
on aald note on the 1st day of November, 
1925. nnd that the holder of said mortgage 
has erected to declare and hereby does de- 
clare nil of the principal and accrued In- 
terest on said note and Bald mortgage to 
be due and payable according to the terms 
and stlpnlatlonB thereof: that the amount 
claimed to be due and which Ib due on said 
mortgage at thla date, Ib the anm of Three 
Thousand Three Hundred Ninety-five and 
34-100 (93395.34) Dollar*. 

That the premises described . In and 
covered hy aald mortgage are situated In 
Pennington County. Minnesota, and are 
described as follows: The NortheaBt Quar- 
ter (NE%) of Section Thirty (30), In 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North of Range Forty-two (42> Weat of 
the Fifth Principal Meridian In Minnesota, 
containing One Hundred Sixty (160) acres, 
more or less, according to the United States 
Government Survey thereof. 
- That by virtue of the power of aale con- 
tain Ed In Bald mortgage and pursuant to 
the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided. Bald mortgage will be foreclosed by 
the sale of Bald premises, at public vendue, 
to the highest bfdder for caBh, by the 
Sheriff of Pennington Connty, Minnesota, 
at the East front door of the Pennington 
Connty Court HonBe In the City of Thief 
River Falls, Pennington Connty, Minne- 
sota, on -Saturday, the 6th day of February, 
1928, at ten o'clock A.,M. of that day, to 
BatlBfy the amount then dne on Bald mort- 
gage, together with the costa of such sale, 
and Seventy-five Dollars Attorney's fees 
stipulated In said mortgage. 
Dated December 1?, Id25. 

THE UNITED DANISH SOCIETIES 
OF AMERICA, 

By THEO. QUALE, 
It*a Attorney 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
THEO. QUALE. 

Attbrney>for Assignee of Mortgagee, 
Thief River Pane. MJnmeota. 

(Dec 2S-», Jan. B-U-20-3T.) 



Young: Fine Lodge No. 221 
-. LO.-O.F. 

Haste tvery Tuesday night at 8tM 



THEO QUALE 

lawyer 

Practice in All •Courts and Be- 
fore U. S. Land Office' - 
McGinn Bnildinf 




SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 405 Knight Ave. N. 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Pkmea: 
Hospital & Office, 860. Res., 48W 

A. W. Swedenbnrg, Ph. G, If. D. 

Physician and Surgeon 
Special attention Ear, Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses. 

MINA R. SWEDENBURG, R. N. 

Supt Hospital and Anaesthetic* 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Snrgeqr aad 

the Diseases of Women and 

' Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bid*. 

Phones: 
Office 128. Residence M. 




Northern Lodge No. 236 
A.F. &A.M. 

Stated Comtnonieatioiu 
Flrat and Third Thursdays 



AUTO REPAHt AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMITHING 
Expert Work Guaranteed 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED mnnT.m^ 
AND UNDERTAKER 



Lanea Fandtnre Campus 
TkieXBWer Falla 



Phane 61 



Nlghi Cmfl 14* 



r 



' H I HM t MM t l l lll ltt, , 

DR. C. M. HAUG 
Dentist 

Office Over First & Peoples 
T State Bank 

telephone No. 14 

i lMI I IIIIIIII II II I M n , i 



1EF1EBMIC 

DR. a r. MELLBT 

■ye, Bar, Now and throat 

DR. B. W. FROKHUCB 

3orgery and Obrtetrlos 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 




^SaSe^^^^^aiafe^i^^^^^^s^^-.^ : - 



i '7^'' J — "r*** • * v* 



StTfr 



i-^'&^kx^^-i 



$<?i$r; 



^?^ 



^3$«M 



!»*$;•-■' 



HnisuMbc^Kiu'. 



PAGE EIGHT 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20. 1926. 



CLASSIFIED WANT ADS 



FOR SALE— Kirdarad Tipctor and 
* Plow and cedkripojrts antl-'poles. W. 

E. Baker. '- ..." ' • '■ » ' 27-tf 



FOR SALE)— Popple cord wood $5.75 
i. a cord. Please drop a card to Hal- 
y'or Olson 120 Markley Ave. So. 45-2t 



FOR SALE— Buick Touring Car. six 
.. cylinder, in good order. Joseph Vorr 
lickv. 107 KnealeAve S. Thief River 
Falls. ' 3t. 



FOR KENT— Modern 5-room house! 

with bath. ; Fine hot water heat 

Garage. 522 'Main Ave. N. Phone 

,481, 45p 



TOR SALE— 3-burner gas stove $5. 
Fine new violin and case $20. Good 
17-23 Ford radiator $6.' One 1892 
Winchester 25-20 rifle.. One 43 cal. 
rifle. One 22 calibre Stevens rifle. 
James Havel, 407 Arnold Ave. So., 
City. tf 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Modem furnished room. 
801 Mais Ave. No, Tele. 899. tf 

FOR" RENT— Four-room all modern 
flat in Dudley building. Will be va- 
cant February 1. 45-tf. 



FOR RENT— Garagy,GaU ;i83 46-4t 



Review of Conditions :o£ 

Community. Delivered by 

: ; ' By H. g: DaWeri iU Meet. 



FOR RENt—i furnished' room, modr. fi '• ^Continued from Page 1) 

ern, centrally located, 801 Main,! "Jles in 1919 were $300,00U.00 and in 
Ave., phone 339. 44-tfi|l»26 $24fi,000.00-but if -the prices on 

• merchandise had been the Batrie the 
1925 sales would have been the 
largest in the history of this concern 
The accounts receivable in 1925 were 
less than 40 per cent of what' they 
were in 1919 which means that the 
people of this city and community 
owe this particular merchant only 40 
per cent of what they did six years 
Upon inquiry I found that the 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOUND — two! long sleeved wool 

gloves, of different dies and mate, j ago. 
Call at Tribune. 88-t£.|same conditions exist with the other 

i ■ - | merchants and lumber dealers. 

FOUND— Gentlemans' scarf. Call at | '-Now that is a wonderful and 



Police office; and identify, 
25c to pay for; ad. 



leaving ■ healthy condition indeed. If the peo- 
45. .p] e owe so little to the business hous- 
es as compared with 1919 how about 
their indebtedness with the local 
banks. Let us see. , . . ' 

December 31st. 1919 Loans 

First National Bank .... $ 652,000.06 



yon money. If you desire to have 
your house wired on monthly payment 
-'an we can do it. We give prompt 
service on all calls. Alex Welch. 280l 



EXPERT ELECTRIC WORK— Re-' 

member the 'telephone number is 

100 when you 1 want real service on 

electric work. .; Always get the man 

that knows his business. He'll Mve I pirst and" Peoples St! Bank "678,000.6 



First & Peoples St. .Bank 578,000.00 



SHIPPING ASS'N. 
HAS GOOD YEAR 



Nearly $2S,000 Received for 
Total of 140 Head. Re- 
port Shows. 



dump in' Thief, River Falls. '• 

Fifteen pounds of phosphate at 15 
cents per pound must be distributed 
on each acre. - The cost of labor is 
?25 per acre. 'The phosphate charge 
can hardly be charged to the expens- 
es of the beet crop, in the opinion 



$1,230,000.00 
December 31, 1925 . 
First National Bank ..:.....$ 328,000.00 
First & Peoples St. Bank. 336,000.00 



The Thief River Falls Shipping as- 
sociation did a business last year to- 
taling $27,949.40, according to the 
annual report submitted today by 
Emil Griebstein, manager. The num- 
ber of various kinds of livestock 
shipped is as follows: 364 cattle, 541 
hogs, 505 sheep, making a total of 
1.410 head. The number of cars 
shipped is 21. 

The report of Sir. "Griebstein, shows 
in part, the following items: 

Total receiveJ $27,949.40; paid to I 
shippers $25,170.90; St. Paul expense 
including freight $2,235.83; mana- ! 
ger's commission. $467.88; hame ex- j 
pense $33.70: paid in sinking fund ! 
$41.00; paid out of sinking fund I 
$194.62; balance in sinking fund Jan- 
uary 1, 1926. $282.13. On deposit in j 
Farmers and Merchants ba n k ' 
$262.23; on deposit in First^aSid Peo- I 
ides State bank. $19.90. \ | 

The annual meeting of the Associ- ; 
atinn will lie held in the county ; 
agent's office in Thief River Falls on j 
Friday, January 22, at 1:30 p. m. at, 
which time election of officers will 
take place and reports will be read, i 

The present officers of the Associ- \ 
atinn are Hans Avion, president: j 
Ham- Woolson, secretary; and Emil; 
Griebstein, manager . 

Increased Beet Acreaee 

Likfly for Pennington 

( Continued from page -1) i 

project, furnishing the seed, phos- 
phate, labor for blocking, thinning, ! 
pulling, cutting off the tops and pil- j 
ing, the amount being charged to the ■ 
farmers and deducted when the first , 
beets are hauled to market at the 



$664,000.00 
"Just think of it $566,000.00 less in 
loans and liscounts, which in other 
words means that -the people -in this 
community .owe at the. two institu- 
tions in this city over one-half a' mil- 

__ lion dollars less now then they did on 

of County Agent J. J. McCann, who ' *? 31st ?W ° f December 1919. Be- 

says it remains in and benefits the • ?'fe s ?"> th e 31st day of December, 

soil for three or four years The 11925 ' these tw0 mstitutions had. cash 

tops are excellent feed for cattle and l e n serve and bonds .totaling $550,000.- 

sell here for $10 per acre. The Uni-i!™. 2 s c ° m P are <t ™th $363,000.00 in 

versify of Wisconsin, howevei;, has j 1919 -^ 

estimated through experiments that ' "How about our Civic affairs ? 

sugar beet tops are actually worth ! ^t us consider those facts for a 

$25 per acre as feed, and offset the moment. 

cost of labor in raising beets. I Pennington County: 

More than 1000 acres already have ! When this county was organized in 
been signed for in the Fisher terri- 1910, it assumed $76,023.00 as its 
tory. From 12,000 to 15,000 tons, as proportionate share of the Red Lake 
stated above, will be required for the County indebtedness, 
new factory, however, and this sec- Since has paid Red Lake 

tion of the state will be able to sign County _ $ 69,023.00 

for as many acres as the farmers And since 1920 has paid 

want, at least 'until the full amount State of Minnesota bonds 20,400.00 

needed is contracted for, when allot- Other Bonds -...-...: 197,900.00 

ment will be discontinued. Total Bonds paid ■ by the 

Pennington county raised 1,800 County _ $287,000.00 

acres of beets 'in 1923, 750 acres in' "Besides paying off bonds the Coun- 

1924, and 200:acres'in 1926. The ty has expended large amounts for 

factory at Chaska could handle only highways and have highways that 

a limited anioiint, so only the 200 anv County in the State might ' be 

acres were allotted here. St. Hilaire P r oud of. 

wanted to raise beets last year but Thief River Falls: 

was unable as' were many other "Consider our city affairs and you 

towns to get an allotment w >." °e more astonished. Since 1920 

Last year the yield was as good as 'W s "Sly has paved 'the business see- 
any previous year, but the extremely tlon of the city, in all 18 blocks, cost- 
wet weather caused much inconveni- ing $232,000.00. 
ence in hauling; from the fields. But, Since 1920 have paid on. 

as the county agent stated, there are pavement bonds $44,000.00 

off years for any crop. Yields for 0n Waterwork bonds 25,000.00 

this territory have averaged 9 tons Electric Light bonds 7,000.00 

f er acre for the last three vears. Other bonds 2,000:00 

Beets are an! excellent crop for ro- „ $87,000.00 

tation with other crops. They are a . Reduction in bonds, besides hav- 
snre crop, thriving in most any kind Ing bought the water power or the 
of weather. Freezing will not hurt dam at a cost ot $37500.00 and paid 
them. Thev kill out all sow thistles, for lf; and stil l have $50,000.00 cash 
and crops following them in rotation on , nand January 1st 19,26. 
invariably are free from weeds. The _' A w ™derful showing of our city 

affairs is it not? 



tops "are worth at least $10 an acre 
for feed. 

Apparently there are many rea- 
sons why sngar beets should be in- 



"Our public schools certainly are 
in excellent financial condition. Since 
1920 have paid off state and other 



eluded in the rotation of crops in this i >om ? s 550,000.00 and today they are 

nart of the state, and indications are ! n be tter standing than they ever 

that Pennington county will sign up J 13 ™ been with $50,000.00 cash , on 

for its share of acres for 1926 hand Ja nuary 1st, 1926. 



'."Does it look as if this community 
fa going broke? Certainly not. 

"A wonderful reflection ., on : this 
community is it not? v-. 

"With these figures before us -and 
-with the knowledge of considerable 
funds invested in bonds, farm loans 
and other investment,' is' it n'bti : th:eri 
reasonable to say that this communi- 
ty is on a more sound financial basis 
than for many years past? 

"What has brought about these 
changed conditions? 

"The mental attitude for one thing, 
although there is' a lot of room for' 
improvement, work, save,' pay as you 
go appears to be more general today 
than ever before. 

"Another thing, the farming meth- 
ods and conditions have improved 
considerable. 

"Permit me to call your atentibn to 
some more facts. 

"Our-creamery paid out in the last 
few years $300,000.00 annually and 
there are three other creameries 
which together have paid equally as 
much. • . . , 

"Our Shipping association has 
hanadlel 21 carloads— 364 head of 
cattle, 505 sheep, 541 hogs in 1925 
and you know there are sereval active 
shipping associations in this county. 
In all 59. carloads of live stock were 
snipped from here in 1925. 

"Were there any sheep shipped out 
in 1919? 

"Very few, if .any, and who ever 
heard of hogs being shipped out six 
years ago. 

"Do you realize how the poultry 
raising has-increased? ' 
■' "In 1924 11 carloads were shipped 
out and in 1925 25 carloads. 

"The Poultry Association paid out 
for— 

Poultry $ 25,600.00 

Eggs .: 86.600.00 

•Turkeys 67,000.00 

$179,000.00 
and the other local dealers in poultry 
have done equally as well, half a 
million dollars— poultry 'alone. How 
much did the earnings of this branch 
of farming amount to six years ago ? 
Very little, I am sure. 

"Right here let me say that this 
fall the proceeds from the sale of 
-turkeys were the direct' means of 
'mbre farmers paying off on their ob- 
ligations at the bank in which' I am 
with than from any other source I 
could- mention. •.■■... 

"I mention these items because I 
know they have been a big factor in 
bringing about the changed condi- 
tions." ' 



Funds for Roads. 
Every motorist, and that means 
practically every man in the state, 
wants better roads and now realizes 
that every dollor spent in good roads 
is a sound and paying investment 
The fairest way to pay for good 
roads is t raise the money by a tax 
or license on the car and truck it- 
self and the balance needed b ya tax 
on gasoline. — Carrington (N. D.) In- 
dependent. 

'''- The Reason. 

When you see a town wobbling 
along on low gear like an auto on a 
muddy road you will find a town 
where the citizens send out their 
money to build up the big cities. As 
a rule your home merchant can fill 
your order just as satisfactorily. Try 
tjie experiment, — Baudette Region. 

The sandalwood in the Sandal 
.Wood Island, one of the Fiji Islands, 
had'been exhausted as early as 1815. 



Rasmus Oen Tells Tribune 
'Reporter -His Idea of 
^"fhis Country's Future 

(Continued from Page One) j 
j(P«ppfe.. are spying cash, .now. . Our 
book accounts now are* about 40 pdr 
cent' of what they were 'in '1919"! Hard 
times? Hard times are a disease of 
the mind. In spite of .the fact that 
hundreds of thousands'^ dollars are 
tied- up jn closed banks people are buy- 
ing more now than they were in 1919 
and are paying cash for it. Does that 
indicate hard times? All the preach- 
ing and talking in the world cannot 
change the methods of farming but 
nature herself changes it by forcing 
out those who are not willing to 
adopt divirsified farming. 

"The wet fall this year reduced the 
amount of fall plowing. Some think 
that this is going to make hard times 
next year but it will not It. was 
a good thing because it will mean that 
there will be less grain sowed and 
more alfalfa and clover and corn and 
cows and poultry and bogs developed. 
Jt is a blessing. . 

"The only thing that hasn't come 
back to a good neaitny cunuition in 
this country is land value and that 
.will not come back as long as we cry 
hard ti m es. . People are like sheep. 
When the market is flooded with good 
values then nobody will buy. As soon 
as there is a little demand then peo- 
ple jumpover each other trying to get 
a thing just because somebody else 
wants it The fact that land is not 
selling may be a hardship to those 
who are speculating in land but the 
farmer who lives on the farm and in- 
tends to make hisjhome there can take 
out of the farm only so much anyway 
and it doesn't make any read differ- 
ence in the value of his harvest whe- 
ther he calls that land worth $10 an 
acre or a hundred. 

"I can sympathize with the people 
who have lost heavily in farm invest- 
ments or in closed banks. I have lost 
enough myself to know that it hurts. 
But it doesn't do any good if we weep 
about it. Some years ago a man 
came to me with a story about his 
granary leaking. The grain be had 
in there was getting wet and would 
spoil. He was depressed about it and 
that afternoon he jumped into the 
river and killed himself. That cer- 
tainly wasn't the right thing to do. 
It did not stop the leak in the granary 
but instead added more grief to some- 
body else. 

'"^Conditions have improved a whole 
lot the last few years and "they are 
going tq continue to improve. The 
country is good. I ha\ e several farms 
with renters on them. Some of these 
renters are making money for them- . 
selves and me too. Seme of tbem are ' 
losing money for both of us. In most , 
cases it's up to the man himself. I ) 
do not believe there will be much of ' 
an increase in the actual earning 
power of our farm land in the near : 
future, but the ability of our farmers I 
to work that earning power of the 
land to the limit will increase and 
land values will come back Fanners 
are foolish for paying up to $200.00 an 
acre for land in Southern Minnesota 
and Iowa when they can get land in 
Northern Minnesota for less than half 
the initial investment and that. will, 
produce just as abundantly of alfalfa, 
clover, cream, cows and eggs. 

"The confidence of the people has 
been shaken but it hasn't been de- 
stroyed.^ Community development so- 
cial activity and success in business 



depend on the confidecne of the peo- 
ple in themselves and -in ..their com- 
munity. Business in' Thief River 
Falls is good, our .two. banks are in 
a healthy condition and are doing a 
conservative .Ijajikiiig business. The 
. . confidence of the people will gradual- 
. ly become stronger thari ever in those 
' lianks which, have ■ weathered the 
^torm andmdney that is out of cir- 
culation now will gradually go back, 
into these banks and from there back 
into the further development of the 
country. No, no. The prospects were 
never any brighter than they are 
right now. I have seen the ups and 
downs of the community for many 
years and have pever seen a brighter 
future ahead than we have richt now. 
The times are good and the man who 
makes up his mind that thev are good 
and decides that right now is the time 
to make hay— he will make money." 

Louis Benshoof To 

Speak From WCCO 

Minneapolis, Jan. 19.— That the 
end of the next decade will witjiess 
the elimination of fish from many of 
Minnesota's 10,000 lakes unless some 
change is made in the present laws 
is the contention of Louis Benshoof 
of the eDtroit Record, Detroit, Minn 
who will speak from WCCO Satur- 
day, January 23, at 6 p. m. ' 

Mr. Benshoof, who is widly known 
fbr the campaigns he has carried on 
for fish .ana game conservation, has 
chosen as the subject for his radio 
talk "The Big Outdoors." He predicts 
that the big outdoors of the future 
will consist of public and private 
parks and unless redical changes are 
made in outlaws, these parks will be 
wholly devoid of mid life and. primi- 
,tive features which are enjoyed so 
much at the present time. 

Unless an awakened public con- 
science insists on a close co-operation 
between natural and man-made laws, 
and the citizenry of Minnesota volun- 
tarily adopts a more rigid conserva- 
tion program, at the end of the next 
20 years Minnesota's 10,000 lakes will 
be nothing more or less than .delight- 
ful swimming pools." 




Attractions 

At The 

I yceum 



Farmers Are 

Talking 
Turkey 



The- produce concerns of Thief River 
Falls paid out to farmers for Thanksgiving 
and Christmas shipment of TURKEYS the 
large sum of. $183,978.65. These figures are 
taken from statements given this bank by 
concerns who bought turkeys. i 

This community can be justly proud of. 
this growing industry. Our city has become 
ydi Lu..ei..ised for its various ', diversified 
farming methods. 

Tlie Prosperous Future is assured to us 
from reoorts of this kind and a real step to- 
wards Thrift. :. 

It Pays to Diversify 

;' . so says the 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

. Thief River Falls, Minn. ':■ 



OUR AIM: 
TO SERVE 
YOU WELL 
AND 

FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 




tf ptATION-WIBE 
.. INSTITUTION 



f 

VQ 



enney 

r DEPARTMENT STORES 
Thief Riser Falls' Busiest Store 



WHERE 

SAVTNGS 

ARE 

GREATEST - 

THRUOUT 

THE YEAR 



Important 




Watch this column for 
timely nation wide of- 
ferings of values that 
are in popular demand. 



3(Mn. 

Jap Crepe 

Fast color, yd. 

19c 



6^^liejf| : ^V,|n|^' ; --' 
nai&grap>test»sJS'r 



Keeping Faith 
With Our Trade 



We believe there's a lot of hodge-podge 
play andunnecessary veneering in the ap- 
peal often made by some stores to attract 
trade. 

We have no contraversy with others as to 
how they shall run their business. "How- 
ever, we reserve the right to keep our own 
operations steadfast in the Golden Rule 
policy which enables us to grow and while 
growing to safeguard the interests of our 
customers. 

We elect to sell for cash only and main- 
. tain uniform values and prices by omitting 
so-called "sales" from, our operations., 

In .this way the public always is "able to 
- know just what t» expect aWhis Store. ' . 




WEDNESDAY AND 

THURSDAY 

"Married Flirts" 

with 

PAULINE FREDERICK 
CONRAD NAGEL 
MAE BUSH 

A lesson in 

"HOW TO KEEP 
YOUR HUSBAND" 

— also — 

Kinogram News 

"HIMM I n 

FRIDAY And SATURDAY- 

RINTINTIN 



"Tracked in the 
Snow Country" 

This is by far the best pic- 
ture that Rin Tin Tin has 
appeared in. 

Added Attraction 

"THE FAMOUS OUR 
GANG" 

in 

'Commencement 
Day" 

Matinee Saturday at 2:30 

Admission 10c and 20c 



SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

"Shore Leave" 

, with 

Richard . Barthelmess arid 
Dorothy MacKail 



"AGOOFYGjPB"^ 

A Christie. Comedy -,; 

Sunday Matinee- 2:30 ' 





L 



'l 



"ilG 



^;;>"*S 



i ! 



•— r 



CANADIANS ARE 
FETED HERE AT 
GREATBANQOET 

"Pine-to-Palm" Tourists Get 

Rousing Welcome at First 

Night Stop. 



Speaking, Singing, Dancing 
Are Features of After- 
Dinner Program. 



■With the first lap of their mid-win- 
t.r cross-coun'.ry run to New Orleans 
completed, the' eighty-fire Canadians 
who made up the Pine-to-Palm tour- 
ist party, rolled into Thief River Falls 
Saturday evening at about six o'clock. 
In spite of the, fact that they left 
Winnipeg during one of the worsi 
itorms that city has ever experienced 
they arrived here only an hour be- 
hind the schedule which they had laid 
«ut for themselves. Only two mishaps 
■were reported on that 174 mile 
stretch, one of them being the loss of 
a wheel on the service car at Erfl- 
»erson and the other being a car 
joing into the ditch near Wylie. Both 
of these cars overtook the main body 
at this point during the night. 

Provencher Goes In Ditch. 
Jule Provencher joined the caravan 
iere, taking with him in his car J. P. 
Mattson of Warren and Mayor Theo- 
dore Christensen and E. G. Busse of 
Bed Lake Falls. According to an A. 
P. news dispatch in the Grand Forks 
Merald of this morning Mr. Proyen- 
•her's car went in the ditch at Albert 
lea yesterday. The report is as fol- 
lows: "A car driven by J. Provencher 
of Thief River Falls, skidded on an 
icy road nine miles northwest of here, 
and went into a ditch, turning over, 
•'.hers in the machine were Theodore 
Christensen, mayor of Red Lake Falls 
and E. G. Busse, city clerk of " 
Lake Falls and Editor Mattson 



Red 
of 



uuunty Engineer Starts 
Surveying Red Lake Road 



Surveying of the right of way 
for the east road to Red Lake is 
now going on at a rapid pace. 
County Engineer Bert F. Umland 
and six; helpers having begun 
operations there. last .Friday, 
January 22. About three weeks' 
time will be required to complete 
the survey, in the opinion of Mr. 
Umland. 

The road to be completed lies 
between the east road out of 
Thief Biver Falls and the ten 
mile stretch west from the Red 
Lake narrows, and is 16 and one- 
half miles in length. Arrange- 
ments were made two weeks ago 
by the state highway department 
for funds with which to complete 
the road, the wjork to be super- 
vised by the Beltrami county 
board. The Thief River Falls 
Commercial club is responsible 
in a large measure for the suc- 
cessful outcome of the project. 



$5,000 STATION 

TO BE BUILT AT 

MAIN AND 3RD 

Peoples Oil Company of 

Bemidji Buys Property 

Owned By Mrs. Aos. 



Bredeson, Present Occupant 

of Building, May Build 

in Near Future. 



TO ELECT HEAD 
OFlCREAMERY 
NEXT FRIDAY 

Rynestad and Tige Were 

Named New Directors at 

Annual Meet Monday. 



Office of Secretary to Be 

Discontinued; Duties 

Fall on Manager. 



Election 'of officers of the- Thief 
River Falls Co-operative Creamery 
association; will be the chief order of 
business at the annual meeting of di- 
rectors at the* Commercial club 
rooms next Friday afternoon. ' S. E. 
Hunt has been president and Thos. 
H. Bjerke, secretary and treasurer 



Warren. After their machines are j during . the past year. Officers are 
repaired they plan to join the party { elected by- the board" of . directors 
■which is driving from Winnipeg jtqjfrom among their own ^members. 
New Orleans." "*"""' Two directors were 1 elected ' at the 

What is said to be the largest ban- annual meeting Monday afternoon, 
( Continued on page 8) \ namely T. jK. Rynestad and J. M. 

— ; — jTige, who [take the places of S. E. 

Women to Serve at Coffee '.Hunt and Thos. Bjerke. Other mem- 
T7-i j_ i o *. _j«„ * f * n « nnA n ' Ders °^ tf * hoard of directors are: 

Klotch Saturday Afternoon Hans Asfyini Henry Pbpej and F T 

— ! Satre. Two directors are elected 

Members of --he Woman's Ch'.b will . each year for two years, and one 
serve luncheon in the Legion club ; more the third year so that part of 
rooms Saturdav afternoon this week the board for each year remains in 
from 3 to 5, at 'what they call a coffee .office continually. 
"Klotch." Anyone who has never At the annual meeting a resolution' 
attended a "cofTee klotch'' can find out was passed providing for the discon- 
ior the extremely low price of 15 tinuance of the office of secretary, 
cents just what kind of an animal his duties to fall upon the manager, 
that is. M r - Bjerke is closing the books of 

The women still have the swimming the creamery this week so that oper- : 
pool idea in mind and it is to raise ation under the revised system will 
money for that fund that they spon- begin the ;first of next week. Joe i 
sor these little affairs. "Parents who Holte is manager of the creamery, 
■want their youngsters to learn how to who with some additional help is ex- 
swim should feel obligated to be pected to keep the books of the or 



The property on the corner of Main 
avenue and Ihird street, last week 
was sold to the Peoples Oil Company: 
of Bemidji, a permit, for the erection 
of a $5,000 filling station was granted 
by the city council in regular ses- 
sion last night, and construction work 
will start early this spring. 

The .store building on the corner has 
been occupied for the last five years 
by Alfred Bredeson, grocer, and -is 
the property of Mrs. .Agnes Aos; for 
many, years a resident of Thief River 
Falls. John Aos; deceased, erected the 
building about 25 years ago and for 
several .years conducted a general 
store. He -sold his grocery business 1 to 
Martin Benson, now manager of the 
Peoples Co-operative store, and 12 
years ago sold out his entire dry 
goods department to Mr. Benson who 
remained in that business until five 
years ago when he relinguished his 
lease to Mr. Bredeson who has con- 
ducted a grocery business there since. 
The small structure adjoining the 
Bredeson grocery on the north at one 
time was occupied by the Thief River 
Dress Club but 'has. been vacant for 
{ Continued on page 8) i* 

SC0DTTR00P 4 



DISTRICT COURT 
CONVENES HERE 
|TDESMY,FEB.2 

Forty-one Civil and Six 

Criminal Cases Included 

in Calendar List 



Judge Andrew Grindeland 

of Warren to Preside; 

Term Will Be Short. 



Forty-one civil and six criminal 
cases are calendared to come up for 
consideration at the winter term of 
district «ourt which convenes in Thief 
River Falls next Tuesday morning 
February 2. Judge Andrew Grende- 
lahd of Warren will preside. . 

Of the 41 civil cases 10 are continu- 
ed 'and. 16 personal property tax cas- 
es, leaving only five new cases besides 
those for the collection of personal 
property tax. The criminal docket con- 
sists df six continued cases and no 
new ones. The term apparently will 
not be- lengthy. 

There being no criminal cases in- 
volving a penalty of more than ten 
years imprisonment, the calling of a 
grand jury according to law was not 
required. 

Following is a list of the petit jur- 
ors, who are summoned to appear on 
February 3: 

O. O. Hofdal, Kratka; C. M. Even- 
son, Thief River Falls; Henry Hall- 
strbm, Polk Centre; Knut Dahl, Thief 
River. Falls; John Sorenson, Thief Ri- 
ver Falls; Krist Larson, Smiley; Gan- 
der Erickson, Goodridge; Sivert Nel- 
( Continued on page 8) 



WILSON TO HEAD 

IS ORGANIZED CEMETERY BOARD 



Meeting Last Night Perfects 

Organization of 17 Boys > 

From Trinity. 



-here." said Mrs. H. W. FrneMich, 
president of the Woman' club, in com- 
menting yesterday upon the situation. 



ganization. 

Total sales of the association last 
year are summed up in the annual 
report presented Monday afternoon 
bv Secretary Bjerke as follows: 
Milk ; _ .? 1,506.50 



Froseth's Commence Big m]ik _ ^ lijusbu 

Shoe Clearance bale Buttermilk 765.75 

i Cream ..._: _... 2,597.24 

The doors of the Froscth Shoe P"g«d tatter milk. 883.09 

Store were closed yesterday to pre- 2"™' ■"•-•-■■ "::~ r 228 '?S?=2 

pare for the gigantic clearance sale , Creamery supplies, etc 104-60 

■which, according to their announce- i _ 

ment, began today and will continue , L ° tal sale 3 j233.866.58 

until Saturday, February 6. A. T. ' .,.,:,, 

Casey, tales adjuster of Moorhead, bpecial RadlO Program 

Minn., is handling the sale, and is 

offering unusual bargains in footwear 

in order to reduce the $15,000 stock 

which the company considers much l 

too large for this time of- the year. 



Local Male Quartet 

Invited To Broadcast 



The exquisite quality of the melody 
produced by the local Legion quartet 
at the Pine-to-Palm program Satur- 
day night earned for them an invita- 
tion to broadcast their vocal verdure 
from the Grand Forks radio station. 
The invitation was extended by Rus- 
sel Stensrud, owner of the Frederick 
Hotel, who attended the banquet here. 
The members of-the quartet who will 
perhaps he able to accept the invita- 
tion in the near future are Kem Ol- 
son, Robert Lund and Millard Myh- 
rum of this city and Henry Halvor- 
son at Goodridge, and Miss Maude L. 
Johnson as accompanist. 



No Game Tonight. 



The basket ball game which, 
had been scheduled for tonight 
at the city auditorium between 
the local Legion team and- .the- 
Argyle Independents, has been 
postponed until next Monday 
night, Dr. C. MV Haug, manager, 
announced today. The postpone- 
ment was made in co-operation 
with the Junior class when it 
was found that members of the 
cast which are to present a 
Thursday matinee performances 
of their annual class play needed 
the auditorium for rehearsal to- 
night. 



Every Wednesday Night 

The Thief River Grocery Company 
announces a special radio program to 
be presented each Wednesday night 
from 9 to 10 o'clock by a special 
"Nash-Finch Concert Orchestra" from 
station W. C. C. O., Minneapolis and 
St. Paul. The orchestra is composed 
of some of the finest musicians in the 
Twin Cities; and will play the popular 
classics. 



Seventeen boys from the Trinity 
Lutheran congregation at a meeting 
held last night in the church auditori- 
um took the scout oath and pledge, 
and perfected an organization to he 
known as Scout Troop No. 4 of Thief 
River Falls. 

They are: Arthur Angell, Robert 
Baily, Glenn Brokke, Gaynor Eide, 
Oscar Granurc, Lawrence Helgeland, 
Howard Honim, Gordon.. ' Johnson,, 
George Larson, Arnold, Mickelson,) 
( Continued on page. 8) 

C. Gustafson & Son Take 

Chrysler Car Agency 

C. Gustafson & Son, local imple- 
ment dealers, have taxen the agency 
for the famous Chrysler line of auto- 



City Clerkfs Report Shows 
$4,196.53 Balance in . 
Treasury. 



George Wilson was elected presi- 
dent,' Carl Larson treasurer, and Al- 
fred Bredeson secretary of the Ceme- 
tery commission at the annual meet- 
ing of that body in 'the council cham- 
bers last' Friday night, Mr. Wilson 
takes the place of Mayor W. W Pri- 
chard, Jr., resigned. Mr. Bredeson 
and Mr. Larson were re-elected. The 
city clerk, P. G. Pederson, acts as 
'secretary for the Commission. 

The report of Mr. Pederson shows 
that on January 5, 1925, the balance 
in the general fund was $11.07. Re- 
ceipts for lot sales were $490, one- 
fourth ofwhich goes into the perpetu- 
al care fund. ' An appropriation of 
$1,000 from the city wth other miscel- 
laneous items brought total receipts 
mobiels, Dave Gustafson amounced | for the year to $2,071.76. Disburse- 
today, and arrangements are being ments were $1,852.64, leaving in the 



Interesting Program 
Prepared For Parent- 
Teachers Meet Monday 

Featuring an address on "Some 
Qualities to be Achieved thru Educa- 
tion" by Miss Telulah Robinson, head 
of the training department of the Be- 
midji State Teachers College, a 
splendid program will be presented at 
the meeting of the local Parent- 
Teachers Association 1 to be held in the 
high school auditorium Monday eve- 
ning, February 1. Other numbers on 
the program will be a report on the 
recent State Convention by Mrs. H. 
W. Froehlich, chairman of the state 
committee on illiteracy; several songs 
by the Junior Girls' Glee Club; a vio- 
lin solo by Lawrence Eklund and a 
piona solo by Violet Rhodegard. 

A light lunch will be served follow- 
ing the program; Following the the 
members of the refreshment commit- 
tee for the evening: Mrs. A. P. Fox, 
Mrs. Herbert Fuller, Mrs. Math Bar- 
zen, Mrs. Carl Christofferson, Mrs. 
Andy Craik, Mrs. Ed. Korstad, Mrs. 
M. V. Evenson, Mrs. Charles Hell- 
ouist, Dr. O. F. Mellby and Morris 
Bye. 



PRESENTATION 
OF CLASS PLAY 
FRIDAYJVENING 

"The Path Across the Hill" 

Comedy to Be Staged 

at Auditorium. 



Juniors Have Never Failed 

to Draw Full House 

With Entertainment 



Is love. stronger than hate? 

That is only one of the perplexing 
questions of life which will be answer- 
ed next .Friday evening, January' 29, 
at the city auditorium, when the Juni- 
or class of Lincoln high school pre- 
sents their annual class play, "The 
Path Across^ the Hill." 

Miss Dena Eikn.e'ss, one - of the 
faculty, has conducted rehearsals for 
several weeks and announces that ar- 
rangements are now complete for the 
presentation Friday night.. 

^ The^ high school orchestra under the 
direction of Miss Maude L. Johnson, 
■will play between acts. 



PENNINGTONfO 
DOHERiHARE 
AT BIG'SHOWS 

\ 

Nearly 500 Hea3 of Live- 
stock to Be Exhibited 
at Crookston. 



Special Effort Being Made 

to Have Local Farmers 

Attend in Body. 



Nearly 500 head of livestock will 
be shipped to Crookston the latter 
part of next week to represent Pen- 
nington county at the Red River Val- 
ley Winter Shows, February 8 to 12. 

The shipment will contain three 
car loads of Guernseys, a car of Hol- 
steiens, Shorthorns and Ayrshires, 
hogs, besides a large exhibit of poul- 
try, grains, alfalfa, sweet clover, etc 

Guernsey breeders who will exhib- 
it are; Peter Engelstad, Harry Wool- 
son, F. B. Conklin of Thief River 
Falls, and Stuart McLeod of Good- 
ridge. Waldie Christenson and others 
will show Holsteins. Jens Letnes win 
show Ayrshires, and * Poland. China 
hogs. The Percheon association has 
made arrangements to exhibit two 
car loads of horses. Some of those 
who will ship horses to the show are: 
Jens Letnes, P. W. Roark, Halvor- 
stad, Willie Randorf, L. O. Williams 
and H, P. Rued. 

Paul Engelstad, president of the 
Guernsey Breeders association, will 
have charge of the swine department 
of the shows. He is an enthusiastic 
booster for Pennington county and in 
a statement yesterday urged Thief 
River Falls citizens, business men and 
farmerrs. to attend the Red River 
Valley event in a body. :He believes 
they owe it to the farmers who are 
doing so much to advertise the coun- 
ty through exhibiting m such an ex- 
tensive way. 

J. J. McCann, county acrent, again 
will be in charge of the livestock di- 
vision. Mr. McCann has acted in that 
■ \ ( Continued oh page 8) 

Fair Board Meets Toniiht 
to Arrange for Free Acts 



Various offers to stage the free' act 
entertainment feature of the county- 
fair next August will be considered at 

, a meeting tonight at the Commercial 

_ . .... __. The orchestra | cmo roomsof officers and directors 

is playing some excellent numbers and j °* the_ Pennington County Agricultur- 
undoubtedly will prove a most pleas- 1 ^ society. - 

ing addition to the evening's enter-! The Board makes a practice each 
tainment. ! year of taking care of these de'-ails at 

A brief synopsis of the play was | an early date to insure the services of 
run in last week's Tribune, and the ; the best attractions possible. Accord- 
cast of characters is herewith repeat- :- n g to Secretary J. J. McCann the 
ed: I directors have a large variety of pro- 

grams to chose from, larger, in fact. 



Provencher to Head Auto 
Club for Ensuing Year 

Julien Provencher, proprietor; of the 
Evelyn hotel, was elected president of 
the Pennington County Automobile 
Club at the annual, meeting off that 
body last Friday afternoon, January 
22. Dr. J. ,T. Bowers was made vice 
president and E. M. Bennes, secretary. 
F. J. Stebbins is the delegate to the 
state convention to be held in St. Paul 
February 9J Mr. Stebbins was presi- 
dent of the .organization last year. 

There were 82 members in the club 
last year, but "there should be .300 or 
more", says the new president; "and 
an effort will be made to increase die 
membership i by a large margin.';. •'..■ 
. The . cIudt is active in co-operation 
wi,ta theCpmmercialiClub, •■".. :,:,-. -_v ; 

"Giti Ver^ict'o'f4423.i2J- -'j ! 
A verdictiof $423:02 was given'Kern 
Olson in DMrict Court at Crookston 
last week in his suit against I. R. Mel- 
boe of Gully. The verdict was given 
Olson to pay the -cost of. damages to 
his car when hewas smashed intohy 

IMelboe on.September-lft.'n'?-" 
Fred Scanlan was the attorn; 
Mr. Olson. " 



made to perfect a sales and service 
organization that will adequately take 
care of the needs of the large terri- 
tory extending from Pennington 
county north to the Canadian line. 
Three models of these cars have been 
ordered for March first delivery and 
a demonstrator may be brought in 
sooner than that. 

The Chrysler line consists of five 4 
cylinder models and eight 6 cylinder 
models. The line is a development of 
the last three years although Walter 
Chrysler, president of the company, 
has. an enviable record as an automo- 
bile engineer, having many years of 
experience as a successful manager. 
Three |years ago he bought the Max- 
well plant and started building his 
line of sixes under the Chrysler name 
and a new line of fours under the 
Maxwell name in order to keep the 
old Maxwell dealer organization in- 
tact. Last, summer he put his own 
name on the four and built it with the 
body lines of the six. His cars have 
been considered the greatest develop- 
ment in American motor car construc- 
tion in recent years and today is one 
of the fastest selling lines in the coun- 
try, the "factory production being 
maintained at about 800 cars a day. 

Girls' Community Club 
To Present Home Talent 

Rehearsals "of the farcical musical 
comedy "Hello There", sponsored by 
the Girls' Community club and slat- 
ed for the city auditorium Tuesday, 
February 9, begin next Friday under 
the direction of Mr. Matineau repre- 
senting the Zura Producing convoanV 
of Gsfry, Illinois. 

The : play is divided into twb acts 
with three scenes and is saildto be a 
,"side*Hplitter!'.xrom' beginning .to .'end. 

»TiriteW;San»bFe'brBary 18. . 
The annual Tractor School conduct- 
ed hy-the toternatiohal-Harvester Co;, 
will be pWserited hvThief tRiver Falls 



( Continued on page 8) 



Base Ball Dance Will 

Be Held Tuesday Night 

The local base ball association will 
hold a dance in the auditorium Tues- 
day evening, February- 2, to raise 
money for the purchase of base ball 
uniforms for the cominig seosan. A. 
G. Yost, president of the Night 
Hawks, is working on the arrange- 
ments and announces that the affair 
will be a strictly old time affair and 
the "Hard Times" variety with kan- 
garoo court'n everything. The fines 
levied upon those who insist, on 
"throwing dog" will be very moderate 
he says and a final court of appeals 
will be established to hear all grievan- 
ces.' Those who still enjoy a good 
baseball game will be there, but un- 
der the circumstances without bells 



Engelstad Speaks at 

State Dairymen's Meet 



Speaking on "Pioneering in the Red 
River Valley," Peter "Engelstad of 
this city addiessed the annual conven- 
tion "of the Minnesota State Dairy- 
men's Association at Brainard, last 
Thursday morning. In his talk Mr. 
Engelstad reviewed his experiences as 
one of the first settlers of this section 
of the country ' and commenced on the 
changes which have taken place in 
late years. Portions of his speech 
were published in the Twin City and 
Duluth newspapers. .. 



May Leaset Gartland Store. ; . 

.Negotiations: are now under: -:*ray, 

according -to- reports, for the lease ,of 



JQHiing the-'Langseth Shoe-store' oh- 
the; west? J» the, Consumers : r Whole- [ 

- -— c » SHreGrdceiy company- of -Minneapolis, 

by the Gustafson&j Sortilmplementita. chain stora cohceriu- -THe building 
Co. on ^February 18/ -The annual has been^becupiea' until recently by L. 
„_„„-. r^rm+.or <»tv1c.p- An? will be I G&rtland; grocery and isthajmrperty 
•■:-:-: ■*.: **:. .srune nme, Mr. Uustaxson i of J. P. Curtis.. Nothing definite has 
.annpunces. - I been decided up to the present time. 



Samuel Crawford, grandpa — Edward 
Kiland. 

Robert' Post, the visitor„„Byron Tha- 
raldson. 

Walter Conrad, Ruth's brother.... Phil- 
- ip Sundahl. 

Dr. Jimmie Reed (with ambition).... 
Kenneth Shetler. 

Salamander Alexander John Henry 
Jones, Zuzu's choice....Leonard Kna- 
dle. 

Mrs. Davis, Grandma— .Marion Rey- 
nolds. 

Ruth Conrad, nicknamed "Bobbie".... 
Dorothy Shirley. 

Flo Gray, Ruth's cousin....Irene Han- 
son. 

Lutie, a neicrhbor....Bernice Hoppa. 

Zuzu, the cook, Goldie Gunderson 

Reserved seats are on sale at Lam- 
bert's drug store, and if the rush of 
last year is repeated for this event 
those who want to get a good seat 
had better take a wise tip and make 
such provisions immediately. 

W. A. Peck, State Livestock 



than at any previous year. 

The officers and directors of the 
fair board are: 

Herb. Fuller, president; EmT, Griel- 
stein, first vice president; Fred .Beer- 
bower, second vice president: Theo. M. 
Thronson, treasurer; J. J. McCann, 
secretary; Dr. G. A. Penney, Roy 
Lambert, S. E. Hunt, Fred Herrick, 
Dave Gustafson, directors. 



the store bmnd^.c^^rhird-stiBet ad- at^Bbch'estery Sfinhi,- Wriiing -against 



i Gustafson is Honored By 
Minn. Implement Dealers 

Dave Gsutafson, prominent imple- 
ment dealer of this city, was elected 
president of the Minnesota Implement 
Dealers association at the annual 
meeting of that organization recently 
in St. Paul. He was vice president at 
one time and has served as a director 
for several years. Mr. Gustafson at- 
tended the national federation conven- 
tion in Chicago last year and has in- 
tentions of making the trip again this 
year. ^v. 

Commissioner, to Speak at | District Tournament 

Club Luncheon Tomorrow Will Be Played Here 

— — — - The district basket ball tournoment 

A talk by W. A. Peck of St. Paul, wflI be held in Thief River Falls, 
state livestock commissioner, \viH'l March 4 and 5 it was learned late 
feature the regular Thursday luncheon ™f afternoon. Naming of the town 
of the Commercial club tomorrow. lyhich is to have this tournament was 
His talk will center around the ad- Ief ' with the schools of the district 
yjsability of this county's undertaking i ™ the vote was 4 in favor of Thief ■ 
area testing of all cattle. Elver Falls and 3 for Warren. 

Area testing consists of examina- ' '■ 

«on by the state of every head ofiPastors Meet This Week 
cattle in the county and the elimina- 
tion of every animal tubercular in- 
fected. The state pays the farmer 
for such animals, and a fee of 25 
cents per head is charged for the test- 
ing. 

■ There are advantages to be gained 
from area testing, in the opinion of 
County Agent J. J. McCann, who 
states, that all packing concerns offer 
a premium one tenth of a- cent per 
pound for hogs which' come from area 
tested districts. It is very desirable, 
he says* that the ; county be absolutely 
free f»m this disease' as' Jt'' is 'trans- 
ferable from cattle' to humans^ Comi- 
ty agents at'Varibns fimesjiave re- 
<^yeoVcircuIarV from theTSlayo C 



I Clinic 



permitting 'tuDercuiar . cattle^ to re- 
main"; iri their" respective counties he- 
canse bf;the :: danger to. humans. 

■ A: meeting .of fanners and others 
interested will -follow the Commercial 
club hour, but whether ahv action will 
be taken" or not is up to dairymen and 
the county coromissfonerai 



In Quarterly Conference 

The quarterly conference of past- 
ors of Swedish Mission churches from 
Northwestern Red River Valley will 
be held in Thief River Falls this 
week, beginning today and continu- 
ing throughout the week. The first 
meeting will be held in the local 
Mission church at 7:30 this evening, 
followed by two sessions daily, 2 p,m. 
and 7:80 pin: Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday, and three ,big" 'services 
SuSday.'ll ajri., 2:80 aM .7:30- p.nl. 

The young people's !ntaV#infetR5l- 
tyiHn^TK held on" Satu^^ySSing, 
representatives from i -the' y^tSuSus 
chnrcKestaHnK part 'Ci^W^bivt 
of WarreniWll be'-' ;-tlte"'- p^cipal 
speaker. Services Simony i'affcrnoo* 
and evening wfll be in the : English 
language, according to". Rev: ; 0? > J. 
Lradell, pastor of the Ideal church. - 

The public is cordially invited .to 
these conferences throughout the 



:4 



4- 



i^*a* M 




w^w^^m^W&^ 



V AGE TWO 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 




J. R. Kiewel of Fergus Falls spent 
Monday in this city attending to mat- 
ters of business. 

Gunder Asbjornson of Wanke mot- 
ored to this city Friday and spent th 
■day attending to matters of business. 

Roy Wold of this city went to War- 
ren Friday on a business trip. He 
returned to his home here the same 
evening. 

Alfred Helgeson and J. J. Spieler 
of Hazel motored to this city Satur- 
day and spent the day attending to 
matters of business. 

Miss Nora Steeh of this city spent 
Wednesday of last week in Red Lake 
Falls attending to matters of business 
and visiting with friends. 

Miss Signe Sorenson of Viking 
spent Monday in this city shopping 
and visiting with friends. She also 
had some dental work done. 

Miss Inga Homme of Trail spent the 
week-end in this city visiting with 
friends and relatives. She returned 
to her home Monday morning. 

Miss Adlynn La Bree of this city 
went to Warren Friday where she 
visited with friends, returning to her 
home here the same evening. 

Mrs. C. A. Bloomquist of this city 
left Saturday morning for Warren 
where she spent the day as a guest 
at the home of 31. and Mrs. J. A. 
Bloomquist 

Clarence Vevea, who is employed 
at the Emporium at St. Paul is in this 
city for a indefinite period of time 
city for an indefinite period at the 
home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Vevea. 

Miss Durah Kelly, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Kelly, has accepted 
a position in the dry goods and ready 
to wear departments of Oen's Mer- 
cantile Co. 

Lome Johnston returned to his home 
in this city the latter part of the 
week after spending several days in 
Minneapolis and St Paul attending to 
matters of business. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Parbst return- 
ed to their home in this city Thurs- 
day morning after spending ten days 
in Minneapolis and St. Paul visiting 
with friends and relatives. 

Everett Roemhildt, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Roemhildt of this city 
left Tuesday afternoon for Seattle. 
Wash., where he has secured employ- 
ment for the remainder of the winter 

Mr. and Mrs. Bart Wangensteir 
went to Warren last Friday to visit 
for the day with friends and relatives 
They returned to their home in this 
city the same evening. 

Fred Lorentson, registser of deeds' 
who has been in Minneapolis for the- 
paat few days attending an abstract- 
or's convention returned to his home 
in this city the latter part of the 
week. 

Miss Johanna Wedul who is em- 
ployed as teacher in one of the rural 
schools near Hazel, arrived in this 
city Friday evening to . spend the 
week-end as the guest of friends. 
She returned to Hazel Monday morn- 
ing. 



A. B. Smith of Red Lake Falls was 
a business visitor to this city Thurs- 
day, j 

Victor Schiolin of St Hi! aire spent 
Friday in this city attending to mat- 
ters of business. 

Louis Roseland motored to this 
city Friday ^nd spent the day trans- 
acting business, returning to his home 
in Newfolden the. same evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Moe, motored 
to this city Friday and spent the day 
shopping and visiting with friends. 
They returned to their home at New- 

I' f olden the same evening. 
j J - 

Miss Myrtle Helgeland who is 
teaching near Newfolden arrived in 
this city Saturday evening to visit. 
over the week-end at her home. She' 
left Monday: morning to resume her 
duties. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W, Booren and 
Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Kiewel motor- 
ed to Crookston Friday evening to 
attend a dinner party that was given 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. 
Holbrook. ; 

Mrs. J. E. Bloomquist went to 
Warren Saturday, where she visited 
for a brief time at. the J. A. Bloom- 
quist home and returned to her home 
in this city the same evening. 

Miss Bertha Ordal, who is employ- 
ed at Mulry's Bazaar visited over 
Sunday in Newfolden as a guest at 
the home of her sister, Mrs. A. M. 
Lokken. She returned to this city 
Monday morning. 

Mrs. John P. Pederson, who under- 
went an operation at the Physicians 
hospital about a week ago is reported 
to be improving nicely, and will be 
able to return to her home the first 
part of tht week. 

Mrs. Hovind J. Lindberg arrived in 
this city last Thursday evening to 
spend a few days as a guest at the 
home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
T. T. Kiland. She returned to her 
home in Mahnomen Friday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs, Harry Booren of 
Plummer motored to this city Satur- 
day to attend the banquet that was 
given at the : auditorium in honor of 
the tourists 'from Winnipeg. They 
returned to their home the next day. 

Bert F. Umland, county engineer, 
returned t his home in this city the 
latter part of the week, after spend- 
ing a few days in Minneapolis where 
he went as a representative from the 
local Masonic lodge to attend a meet- 
ing of the Grand lodge." 

Miss Nora Lindquist, who is teach- 
ing near Kratka arrived in this city 
Friday evening, and spent a brief 
time with friends enroute to her home 
at Wylie, where she was a .week-end 
guest at the home of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. A- Lindquist. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Kiewel of this 
city left with the Winnipeg tourists 
Sunday morning, and accompanied 
them on their trip as far as Little 
Falls. They spent a day at that place 
visiting with a brother of Mr. Kiewel, 
returning to their home here Tuesday 
evening. 

Mrs. Ida Urdahl, daughters Delor- 
es and Verona, and son Dennis, left 
Tuesday morning for Fordville where 
they visited for the day at the A. A. 
Helgeson home. From there they 
will go to Manvel, N. D. and will 
spend two weeks as guests of Mrs. 
TJrdahl's mother, Mrs. Nettie Hemly. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY: 27, lWfc 



K. K.. Austin returned to Mb home 
in Kratka Thursday after spending 
nealy a week in Crookston and Grand 
Forks, visiting and attending to mat- 
ters of business. In Crookston he was 
the guest of his mother, Mrs. Emma 
Austin, She is 91 years of age. 

H. O. Melby, proprietor of the La- 
Vogue Garment Shop, left Saturday 
evening for Chicago and other pointB 
in the' east where he will do the buy- 
ing for the spring and summer 
months. He will also a,ttend a con- 
vention of the American Associated 
Buyers which is to be held in Chi- 
cago. 

I Mrs. Oscar Nelson has been engag- 
ed to take charge of the office work 
at Dr. R. Arnold's office. Miss Nora 
Steen wHo was employed there for- 
merly, has accepted a traveling posi- 
tion with the Noe-Equl Textile Mills, 
who have' their district offices at Far- 
Go, N. Dak. She will leave shortly 
to assume her new duties. 

County Auditor T. P. Anderson re- 
turned to his home in this city Satur- 
day morning after attending the Au- 
ditors' convention in Minneapolis. He 
also visited with his little grandson, 
Donovan Alnes, at the Phalen Park 
sanatorium, and made a brief trip to 
Mankato, where he spent a few days 
as the guest of his son, Glenn. 



John Ward, local representative of 
the National Biscuit Company, left 
Thursday' afternoon for Fargo, N. D. 
to attend a sales convention that was 
held at the Waldorf hotel Friday and 
Saturday.- He returned to his home 
in this city Saturday evening. 

Miss Elizabeth Keating, who has 
spent the past two weeks in this city 
as a guest at the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Keating expects to 
leave the first part .of the week for 
Grand Forks, where she will resume 
her studies at the Union Commercial 
College. ' * 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Evenson and 
three daughters who have; spent the 
past two weeks in this city as guests 
at the M. V. Evenson home, left Sat- 
urday morning for Devila Lake, N. 
Dak. where they will visit* for a day 
or two enroute to their home at Sco- 
bey, Mont While here they motored 
to Crookston to spend a day as guests 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. 0. 



Hilson, Lillian Johnston, Messrs. 
Leigh Anderson, Maurice Holzknecht, 
K ^ n e%.Streeter, George Johnson, 
and Al Kohn. 



Among the local residents that mo- 
tored to Warren to witness the bas- 
ket ball game last Wednesday even- 
ing were: Mr. and Mrs. H .S. Snyder. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. 0. Erickson, Mr. and 
Mrs^.Hoken Olson, Mr. and Mrs. Mor- 
ris Bye. Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Thune, 
MisseS Elizabeth' Keating, Maverette 



915 Bushels of Gopher 

Oats Prom Nine Acres 

Writing the Minnesota Experiment 
station Fred Lindquist, a. farmer of 
Olivia, Renville county, says he har- 
vested 915 bushels 'of Gopher oats 
(Minn. No. 674) from exactly nine 
ac S P 16 grain was' grown- from 
certified seed which was advertised in 
the 1926. seed list of the, Minnesota 
Crop Improvement association. The 
association's list for 1926 will be issu- 

i^E & Fel >niary and will offer for 
sale $60,000 to 70,000 bushels of Go- 
pher seed which was grown in vari- 
ous parts of Minnesota and most of 
which has been duly certified. 

: Tuition ftes in the State secondary 
schools of Czechoslovakia are graded 
according to the incomes of the par- 
ents of pupils. 

A school for the training of colored 
librarians has been established at 
Hampton Institute, Virginia, through 
the cooperation of the Carnegie Foun- 
dation! One year of college training 
is required for entrance. 



Record Flocks Made 

Good Profits in 1925 



Records faithfully kept of 28 flocks 
enrolled in the Poultry Record Farm- 
ers Project show that 1925 was a good 
year for Minnesota poultry keepers. 

The class in poultry raising, at the 
Farmers' and, Homemakers^ Week 
Short Course at Uuiversity Farm was 
told by Cora Cooke of the agricultural 
extension service that the average net 
return from these flocks for the year 
was $2.30 a bird. In 1923 the returm 
per bird averaged $1.68, while in 1924 
it was $2.10. 

Much of this gain is to be attrib- 
uted, of course, to the higher prices 
for eggs in 1926, but increased pro- 
duction also plays an important part. 
The 28 flocks averaged 126.6 eggs per 
«%} n m 1925 as against 102 eggs in 
1923 and 120.2 in 1924. The highest 
production in 1925 in any flock was 
198.9 eggs per hen, which is consider- 
ably higher than any record made ia 
this project in former years. , 

"It is interesting to note," said Miss 
Cooke, "that of the ten flocks having 
the highest average production ia 
1925, all of them producing more than 
140 eggs per hen, seven were from 
the northern part of the -state.*' 

About fifty co-operatives have 
agreed' to keep records in 1925. 




Special Train 

Low Fares 

to 

Crookston 

( Winter Shows 
For JNorthwest School 
( Farmers Week 

February 11, 1926 

For the benefit of those desiring to attend the Winter 
Shows, the Great Northern Railway will run a special 
train and sell round trip tickets for the one-way fare on 
February 11, Warroad and intermediate points to 
Crookston and return. 



Warroad - 
Salo! . . 
Roseau - - 
Fox - - . 
Badger - - 
Greenbush 
Strathcona - 



Schedule: 
6:00 a. m. Middle River 8:20 a. m. 
Holt - - :- 8:40a.m. 
Thief River Falls 9:10 a.m. 
St. Hilaire - 9:27 a. m. 
Red Lake Falls 9:52 a. m. 
Tilden Junction 10:25 a. m. 
Crookston j- 11:05 a.m. 
M. 



6:25 a. m 
6:50 a. m. 
7:02 a. m. 
7:17 a. m. 
7:40 a. m. 
8:01 a. m 



Return train will leave Crookston at lu:00_P. 

The low fare tickets will be good on 
Special Train Only j 

CaH on local Agent 
A. J. Dickinson, Pass. Traffic Mgr.', St. Paul 

Great Northern 



A Dependable Railway 



The Development of an Idea 

■ ■ i " ■ 

In 1889 Kasmus Oen ripened a tinshdp in this city. While the investment represented only 
a few hundred dollars in money, the investment was in reality a great one. It represented a 
mans entire wordly possessions. It represented that man's faith in the community. It repre- 
sented that man's faith in his own ability to render that community a better service. It repre- 
sented an IDEA. 

i 

■ From that idea has developed one of northwestern Minnesota's greatest mercantile estab- 
lishments. From that little tinshop has grown a great department store— seven large stores in 
one— men's clothing, women's ready-to-wear, shoes, dry goods, furniture, hardware and gro- 
ceries. 

37 Years of Growth and Still Growing 

During these past thirty-seven years this store has enjoyed a steady, healthy growth. In 
1925 this store sold more merchandise than during any other year of its history. 1926 is going 
ahead of 1925. The old IDEA is still growing. . 

And with this growth, the ability of the store to render a better service to the community 
increases. Increased sales mean greater buying power and less overhead expense charged' to 
each individual sale. This store has been a good place to trade in the past. In 1926 it will be a 
better place to trade. ■ • ■ 

While this growth is the reward of service, it is also a fine, tribute to the community which 

has made that growth possible and to the people of the community who are loyally supporting 

home institutions. In summing up this past progress the management wishes to express its 

appreciation to the employees for their splendid co-operation and to the patrons for their confi- 

\ dence and support. 




tHE BIG SI0RE^j[HRiFrY PEOPLE 

THIEF RIVER PAUS.7 O MINNESOTA 




-I 



U- 




fe— -- 




wm 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1926. 




THIEF RIVER FALLS TJRTOPNE 




PAGESEVE» 



Legal Publications 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Dubiult bnvlin; been uuitle ill the pay- 
ment df thi* sum of One Thousund Two 
Huutlreil Seveuty-Svt aud 15-100 ($1275.15) 
Dollun*. which is ukiimeil to lit: due and 1b 
due nt the date of this notice upon a cor- 
»ulu ..lurtKUfv, duly, executed and delivered 
fcy P. P. Huynus and Edith J. Hay ties, his 
■wife. M«rtRaRwrs, lo Mason City Loan 
A Trust t'ouiuaiiy, Mortpajree. bearlns 
date the 24th day of November, 1010, and 
•with a puvwr of sale therein contained, 
duly m-onled in the office of the Register 
of Deeds in and for the County of Pen- 
ltiiiirti'ii and Stale of Minnesota, on the 
Itfltb day of November, 1010, ut 2:30 o'clock 
P. M. in Book 13 of Mortgages, on page 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 
debt seeiirrd Uiervliy, was duly assigned 
by said Mason City Loan & Trust Com- 
pany uilso Hjielled Mason City Loan & 
Trust Co..) 'Mortgagee, to Charles H. 
lteVoe by written assignment dated the 
30th day «f Ueceuiber, 1010, nnd recorded 
In the office of said Register of DeedB, on 
the Kith day of October, 1025. at 11 :0O 
o'clock A. M., in Book 75 of Mortgages on 
imge !lSi. and no net ion or imieeedings 
hnving been instituted, at law or other- 
wise, to recover the deiit secured by autd 
Mortgage or any part thereof, except that 
an netion has been heretofore instituted in 
the Municipal Court of the City of Thief 
Klver Falls, In the County of Pennhigim 
and State of Minnesota to recover ■ upon 
Mr $30.00 past due interest coupons, a part 
•f the debt secured by said mortgage and 
that said action has been dismissed nnd 
discontinued nnd except that an action has 
been heretofore instituted in the District 
Court of Pennington County. Minnesota to 
recover upon the principal note of ?1000.00 
■with Interest since Its maturity, a pnrt of 
the debt secured by said mortgage: that 
jadgment has been rendered therefor In 
nald Court; that an execution has been Is- 
miod upon said Judgment and ■ that said 
execution has heen returned wholly unsat- 
te/ied. 

NOW. THEREFORE. NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of the 
power of sale contained in Raid Mortgage, 
and pursuant to the statute in anch ense 
made and provided, the said Mortgage will 
be foreclosed by a sale of the premises de- 
scribed in and conveyed by said Mortgage, 
viz: 

The West Half (Wfct of the North West 
Quarter INTV,) of Section Twenty-two 
122). In Township One Hundred Fifty- 
three (1531 North, of Range Forty-five US) 
West, of the Fifth Principal Meridian, in 
Bennington County and State of Minnesota, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances: 
•which sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
raid Pennington County at the front door 
of the Court House, in the City of Thief 
River Falls In Bald County nnd State, on 
the 12th dav of March. 10211. at 10:00 
o'clock A. M.. of that day. at nubile ven- 
due, to the highest bidder for ensh. to pay 
said debt of $1275.15. and interest, and the 
tnxeft. tf any. on Bald premises, nnd Fifty 
Dollars Attorney's fees, as stipulated In 
and by said Mortgage In cape of fore- 
elosnre. nnd the disbursements allowed by 
law: subject to redemption nt any time 
within one year from the dny of sale, db 
provided hv law. 

Pnted Janunrv 2«th. A. T>. 1026. 

CHARLES H. DeVOR. 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
PERL Tv\ MABTV and 
H. O. CHOMMTE. 

Attorneys for Assignee of Mortgagee. 
Thief River Falls Minnesota. 

(Jan. 27 Feb. .1-10-17-24- Mar-3) 



NOTICE; OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That de- 
fault has occurred In the condition! of that 
eertain mortgage, dated the third day of 
March 11)10 executed by Bessie Beheld 
(formerly Bessie Babcock) and Joseph 
Scheld, her husband, aB mortgagors, to 
Citizens State Bank of Thief River Falls, 
as mortgagee, filed for record. In the office 
of the Register of Deeds In aud for Pen- 
nington County, 8tate of Minnesota, «n the 
Mst daylof July 1919, at eight o'clock and 
no minutes A. M., and recorded In Book 12 
of Mortgage Records, on page 490 thereof 
and on the 29th day of September, 1010 said 
mortcagcj waa duly assigned by said 
mortgagee to Helen L. Purdy. Lake City, 
Minn- that, pursuant to a provision of said 
mortgage. Bald mortgagee has elected to 
declare the wholB debt secured thereby to 
be now due and payable; that there la due 
and payable, at the date of this notice, 
upon the debt secured by said mortgage, 
the sum of Eight Hundred and no-100 
(¥800.00) ■ Dollars, and that no action or 
proceeding at law or otherwise has Deen 
Instituted to recover said debt or any pan 
thereof; that, by virtue of a power of Bale 
therein contained, said mortgage will be 
foreclosed and the land and premises there- 
in described, lying and being in the Coun- 
ty of Pennington, State of Minnesota, de- 
scribed as follows; to wit: The Northwest 
Quarter (NW%) of Section Twenty-tne 
125) In Township One Hundred Fifty-three 
(153) North, of Range Thirty-nine (59> 
West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, con- 
taining 1C0 acres, more or less, according 
to the Government survey thereof, will be 
sold at public auction to the highest bidder 
for cash by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
County, at the Front door of the Court 
House, In the city of Thief River Falls In 
the County of Pennington, State of Minne- 
sota, on the 11th day of March 1926, at. ten 
o'clock in the forenoon, to pay and satisfy 
the debt secured by Bald mortgage. 
Twenty-five DoUars attorney's fees therein 
provided for, and the costa and diamine* 
ments allowed by law apon such fore- 
closure and sale. 
Dated December 14th, 1029. 

i HELEN L.' PURDY. 

i Mortgage*. 

JOHN C. DECOURCT. 
Attorney ;for Mortgagee, 

l Dec. 23-30. Jan. 6-13-20-27)) 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE 8AJLE 

WHEREAS, Default has been made, by 
the mortgagor in the conditions and cove- 
nants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Nels B. Swansea, 
widower; mortgagor, to the State of Min- 
nesota, mortgagee, bearing date the 4th 
day of February, 1024, and,, with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly filed for 
record In the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Penning- 
ton and State of Minnesota, on. the ISth 
day of February, 1924, at eight o'clock 
thirty minutes A.- ul.. and duly recorded 
therein In Rook "77" of Mortgages, on 
page 143 thereof; 

AND WHEREAS. Said default consists 
In the failure of the said mortgagor to 
pay the Beinl-nnnunl Installment of amor- 
tised principal and interest, amounting 
to One Hundred Eighty-seven Dollars and 
fifty centB ($187.50), which became due 
uud payable on the 4th day of August, 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default having' been made . In the pay- 
ment of the sum of Fifteen Hundred 
Forty DoUars, which is claimed to be doe 
and la due at the date of this notice, apon a 
certain -Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by John Morgan and lillma Mor- 
£in, his wife, Mortgagors, to Albert S. 
ieberman. Mortgagee, bearing date' the 
10th day of September 1023. and with a 
power of sale therein contained, duly re- 
corded In the -office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Penuiog- 
ton, and State of Minnesota, ju;the 20th. 
day of September 1023, at o'clock A. M., 
in Book ta of Mortgages, on page 203, 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 
debt Becured thereby, was duly assigned 
by said Albert S. Lleberman Mortagee, 
to Peter Dorn by written assignment dut- 
ed the 20 tb day of September 1923, and 
recorded in the office of 'said RcglBter of 
Deeds, on the 2nd day of February 1024,- 
at pne o'clock P. M., In Book 05 of 



KOTICE OF RFAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE PALE. 

WFIEREAR. Default has, been mnde by 
the mortgagors in the conditions .and 
eovennnts of that-certain mortgage duly 
*xocuted and s delivered by John Knsmnk 
and Anna Knsmak. his wife, mortgagors, 
in t'"- State <if Minnesota, mortgagee. 
bearinc date the I7tb dny of October 1023. 
and. with a power of sale therein contain- 
er], duly filed for record In the office of 
the Register of Deeds in and for the 
County of Pennington and State of Mlnne- 
i<ota on the 10th day of October. 1023. at 
nine o'clock A. M-. and duly recorded 
therein In Rnok "77" of Mortgages, on 
pa::c !1 thorc.f : 

AND WHEREAS. Raid default i-onsista 
in the failure of said mortgagors to pa? 
the semi-annual installments of amortized 
principal and Interest, each amounting to 
(!•'•■ lTmirir«,i F..ny n-Hnrs aed six- 
ty-three -puts iSl-IO.ill): which became due 
and payable on the 17th day of October. 
1!)24. the 17th day of Anrll. 1025. and the 
nth day of October. 1025. In accordance 
with the terms and en nil it Ions of said 
mortgage, and to pay the general taxes on. 
•aid niortcasrert premises for the vcar 
li'2-t. which taxes the State of Minnesota, 
iimrtjrntree. in default of said mortgagor*, 
to pay the same, paid on the fith dav of 
T/ny. 1025. to-wft: the sum of Two Hun- 
dred Thirteen Dollars and seventy cents 
(S213.701. which default has continued to 
this date: 

AND WnEREAS By rentmn of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of nairt mortgage- and as nnfhnri»e<] 
bv law. the Dnnartment of TTnral Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner nnd holder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and does hereby 
eTercfpo its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan seenred 
bv said mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS. There is actually due 
nnd claimed to he due and nnynble upon 
*nid mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
by, at tht» date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Four Thousnnd 
F-nir Hundred Six Dollars and thirty-eight 
eenta (.■M.-MO.SSl. unnmortized nrinclrnl. 
together with Interest thereon from the 
17th day of October. 1025. at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (JiV») per centum per 
-innnm nnd Fonr Hundred Twenty-one 
Dollars and eiehty-nine cents (J421.R0) 
amortized nrinelnal and interest, with In- 
terest on *140.fi3 thereof from October 17tb. 
1R24. at seven (71 ncr centum per annum, 
and Interest on SHO.fW thereof from April 
17th. 1025. at seven (71 per centum per 
annum, and Interest on $140.63 thereof 
from October 17th. l!)?fl. In nil the sum of 
Five Thousnnd One Hundred Thirtv-nlne 
Dollars and thirty centB (S5.130.30K 
rinding the amount paid for taxeB, as 
aforesaid: 

AND WHEREAS. By reason of said &e- 
fault, the said power of sale contained In 
Mid mortgage hna become nnd Ib oper- 
ative, and no action or proceeding having 
fceen instituted at law or otherwise to re- 
cover the debt seenred by said mortgage 
or any part thereof; 

NOW THEREFORE. Notice is hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained in said mortgage, and pursu- 
ant to the statute in such case mnde and 
provided, the Raid mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
in nnd conveyed by said mortgage, sltnate, 
lying and being in the County of Pen- 
lilngton nnd State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 
The Southeast.. -Quarter (SEV,) of 
Section Twenty-fonr (24). in Town- 
ship One Hundred Fifty-four (154) 
North, of Range Forty (40) West, con- 
taining 1(10 acres, more or less, accord- 
ing to the fJovernment survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments, and appurtenanc- 
es, which sale will be made by the Sheriff 
ft said Pennington County, at the front 
door of the Court House In the City of 
Thief River FhIIs, In Bald County and 
Ftnte, on Thursday, the 11th day of March. 
1020. at ten o'clock A. M. of that doy, nt 
pnbllc vendne to the highest bidder for 
cash, to pay and Bottsfy the debt then due 
«-n said mortgage. Including the taxes 
paid on eald premises, and the costs and 
expenses allowed by law: subject to- re- 
demption at any time within one year 
from the dnte of sale, as provided by law. 
Dated January 2dth. 1026. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
„ „ Mortgagee. 

By Department of Rural Credit. 
i« * 2r LB -, a 9AG BNG. Chairman.. 
(REAL) H * PL0WBKS . Secretary. 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON 
Attorney General. 
MTDVIG GULLICKSON, 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
P0 Hamm Building, 
" Paul, Minnesota. 
(Jan. 27 Feb*. 3-10-17-24- Mar-3) 



■« 



CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION OF 
TUK THIEF RIYER MOTOR COMPANY 

We, the undersigned, for the purpoae of 
forming a corporation under nnd pursuant 
to th-j pnivisiona of Chapter Fifty-eight 
(53) of the General Statutes of Minnesota 
for 1023, isud any amendments 'thereof, do 
hereby associate ourselves as a body corpo- 
rate, and do hereby adopt the following 
Certificate of Incorporation. 
ARTICLE I. 
Section* 1. The name of this corporation 
shall be Thief River Motor Company. 

Sectlon;2. The general nature of its bn«l- 
nesa' shall be to buy and seU and exchange 
automobiles, trucks, tractrrs and farm ma- 
chinery snd other implements generally 
used .on farms: to buy and sell coal and 
wood; to' buy and sell oils, grenses, auto 
accessories and conduct a general garage 
and repair busSnesB In connection there- 
with ; to buy, sell. lenBe, mortgage and deal 
In such real estate sb may be necessary 
in the conducting of the above business In 
automobiles, farm machinery, wood, coal, 
oils, greases and general parage and re- 
pair business, and to do such other and 
further business as may be necessary for 
the carrying out of the business of thlB 
corporation- 
Section: 3. The principal place of trans- 
acting the buBlueBS of this corporation 
shall be In the City of Thief Itiver Falls, 
County of Pennington. Minnesota, and 
elsewhere, as may be decided by the 
Board of Directors. 

ARTICLE II. 

The time for the commencement of. this 

corporation shall be January 1. 1020. nnd 

the period of its duration shall be thirty 

(30) years. 

! ARTICLE III. ' 
Thnt the names and plnces of residence 
of the persons forming this corporation 
are: O. A. Rambeck-, Arthur Rambeck. G.' 
A. Gilbertson, V. C. Rogers. John J. Knst. 
all of Thief River Falls. Minnesota, and 
Wnlter ■ P. - Stone and WlUInm Stone, of 
Crookstori, Minnesota. 

) article rr. 

Soctton,'l. The manacoment of this cor- 
poration shnll he vested In In a Board of 
Directors; composed of not lesq than three 
nnd not more than seven members. The 
mimes 'and addresses of the First Board 
"f Directors are: O. A. Rambeck. Arthur 
Ramhect', O. A. Gilbertson. V. C. Rogers, 
rnd John J. Knst, all of Thief River Falls. 
'Minn. 

Section 2. The first officers of this cor- 
poration shall be: President O.-A. Ram- 
beck: Vice President.- V. C. Rogers: Sec- 
retary. O. A. Gilbertson: and Trensurer. 
John J. Kast. AH the above named, of- 
ficers and directors shall hold their re- 
snective offices until the next annual meet- 
ing of the corporation to be held Febru- 
ary 10. 1026. at which time and annually 
thereafter, n Board of Directors shall bo 
elected from and by the stock "holders of 
this corporation. The annual meeting of 
this corporation shall he held nt its nrln- 
cipnl place of business on the third Tues- 
day in January of each year. -. Immedi- 
ately after the election of directors, or 
as soon therentter as uractlcnble the di- 
rectors shall' meet nnd elect from their 
nnmher a President and a Vice President." 
nnd from their number or from the stock- 
holders a Secretary and a Treasurer. Any 
two officers except that of president and 
Vice President may be held by one per- 
Bc-n. The directors and officers of this 
corporation shall hold their respective of- 
fices until their successors have been el- 
ected and entered mton the discharge of 
tbelr duties. The first meetings of the 
stockholders and of the Board of Direct- 
ors shall be held at Thief River FaUs, 
Minnesota, on the 19th day of February, 
1020. at 2 and 3 o'clock, respectively. 
ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the Capital Stock of this 
Corporation shall be Thirty-five Thousand 
Dollars, which shall be paid In. In money 
or property, or both.- In such manner, at 
pnch times, and In such- amounts as the 
Board of Directors shall order. . The Capi- 
tal Stoek .shall be divided into Three Hun- 
dred Fifty shares of the par value of $100 
each. 

ARTICLE VT. 

The blgheBt amount of Indebtedness or 
liability to which this corporation shall 
at any time be liable or subject shall he 
the sum of Fifty Thousand Dollars. 

In Testimony whereof we have 
hereunto :set onr bands this 9tb day of 
January. 192C 

In the presence of: 
H. S. DAHLEN. 

L. H. IRGBNS. 

O. A. RAMBECK 
ARTHUR RAMBECK 
G. A. GILBERTSON 
V. C. ROGERS ' 
JOHN ,T. KAST 
WALTER P. STONE 
WILLIAM STONE 
STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
County of Pennington — ss. 
On this' Oth day of January. 1020, per- 
sonally appeared before me O. A. Ram- 
beck, Arthur Rambeck, G. A. Gilbertson. 
V. C. Rogers. John J. Kast Walter P. 
Mone, and William Stone, to me known to 
be the persons nnmed in- and who executed 
the foregoing Certificate of Incorporation, 
nnd each acknowledged, that he executed 
the same as hlB free art and deed, for the 



1023, In accordance with the terms aud j Mortgages on page 200. 
couditlous of Bald mortgage, which default AND WHEREAS, The said Peter Dorn 
ha ?iJri"y?iSS l »4?A5 llI £ ,late: - ., . tne Assignee, and Holder of 
AND WHEItEAb, By reason of said de- (aald Mortgage baa duly elected 
fuult, and pursuant to the terms and con- , and does hereby elect to declare 
ititlous of said mortgage, and us author- I the whole principal sum of said 
hwd by law. the Department of Rural Mortgage due and payable at the date 
nwiiif on h-hnif n t «,„■«.... „* " l "-- 1 -' this notice, under the terms and con 



Credit, on behalf of the State of Mlune^ 
aota. the mortgagee and owner and 
holder uf suid mortgage, mis exercised 
and dues hereby exercise Mb option ' to 
declare, and hereby does declare, the 
whole of the loan secured by said mort- 
gage to bo due and payable forthwith; 

AND WHEREAS. There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loun secured 
thereby, at the date of this notice, by 
reason of snid election, the sum ot Five 
Thousand Nine Hundred Seven Dollars 
and sixty-one cents ($5,007.01), unamor- 
tized principal, together with interest 
thereon from the -1th day of August, 1025, 
at the rate of five and one-fourth (B%i 
per centum per anuum, and One Hundred 
Eighty-seven Dollars and fifty cents 
(¥187.50) amortised principal and interest, 
together with interest thereon from the 
4th dny of August, 102fi, at seven (7) per 
centum per nnnura, in all the sum of 
Six Thousand Two Hundred Forty-three 
Dollars and twenty-eight cents (?0 243.2S); 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said 
default the said power of sale contained 
in said mortgage has become aud Is op- 
erative, and no action or proceeding hav- 
ing been Instituted at law -or otherwise 
to recover the debt Becured by said mort- 
gage, or any part thereof: 

NOW, THEREFORE, Notice is hereby 



dltionB of said Mortgage and the power 
of sale therein contained ; and wherena 
there la actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this notice 
the sum of Nlnteen Hundred Ninety-three 
nnd 08-100 (91003.08) Dollars, with Inter- 
est thereon at the rate of seven per cent 
fer annnm from the Oth day of January 
M&Vand sIbo ?280.37 taxes for the year 
1024 paid by assignee, and whereas the 
said power of sale has become operative, 
and no action or proceedings hnvlng been 
Instituted, at law o> otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or 
any part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by virtue of the 
power ot sale contained In Bald Mortgage, 
and pursuant 'to f-e statute in such case 
made and provided, the said Mortgage 
wiU be foreclosed by a sale c< 'be premis- 
es described in and conveyed by said 
Mortgage, vis: 

Lot numbered Nine (0) <>f Block 
Thirty-six (36) Original Townslte of . 
Thief River Falls necording to the 
plat thereof now on file and of-, re- 
cord In the office of the Register of 
Deeds iu and for said County 
In Pennington County nnd Stall of 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances; whlcn tale will be made 



given, that by virtue of the power of sale i by the Sheriff of *ald Pennlgnton County, 
contained in said mortgage, and pursuant^ at the front door of the Court Honse, in 



to the stutute In such case made aud pro 
vlded, the Bald mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale ot the premises described 
in and conveyed by said mortgage, situ- 
ate, lying and being In the County of 
Pennington and State of Minnesota, to- 
wlt: 

Tbe Southwest Quarter <SW%) of 
Section Thirty-six (36), in Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range Forty-four (44) West, con- 
taining 160 acres, more or less, ac- 
cording to the Government Survey 
thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurten- 
ances, which sale will he made by the 
Sheriff of Bald Pennington County, at the 
front door of the Court House iu the 
City of Thief River Falls, iu said County 
and State, on Thursday, the 4th day of 
March, 102U. ut ten o'clock A. M. of that 
day, at public vendue to the highest bid- 
der for cash., to pay and satisfy the debt 
then due on Bald mortgage, and the 
taxes, if any, on Bald premises, and the 
costs and expenses allowed by law, sub- 
ject to redemption at any time within one 
year from the date of sole, aB provided by 
law. 
■ Dated January lflth, 1026. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
_ _ . Mortgagee, 

By Department of Rural Credit 
OLE O. SAGENG, Chairman. 
Attest: H. H. FLOWERS. 
(SEAL) • Secretary. 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 

Attorney General. ' 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON. 

Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee 
«10 Hamm Building. v 

St. Paul, Minnesota. -■■'-*• 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb. 3-10-17-24) 



the City of Thief River Fulls In said 
County and State, on the 27th day of 
February 1926, at ten o'clock A. M„ of 
that day, at public vendue to the high- 
est hfdder for cash, to pay said debt of 
Nineteen Hundred NIn-jty-tbree and 08-100 
Dollars, and Interest, and the taxes, it 
any, on Bald premises, and seventy-five 
DoUars, Attorney's fees, as stipulated In 
and by said Mortgnge In rase of fore- 
closure, and the dlsbursetuVnts allowed 
by law: subject to redemption at any 
time within one year from the date of 
-sale, as provided by law. 
-Dated January 0th A. D. 1026. 

PETER DORN 
j Tbe assignee and present owner 

of the said mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP and 
H. O. BERVE, 

Attorneys, Thief River Falls. Minn. 
(Jan. 18-20-27- Feb. 3-10-17) 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON PETI- 
TION TO SELL, MORTGAGE OR 
LEASE LAND. 

ESTATE OF DellyB Ruth Gibson. Mi- 
nor Ward. 
State of Minnesota, 
County of Pennington— ss. 

IN PROBATE CODRT. 

In the Matter of the Estate of DeUys 
Ruth Gibson, a Minor. 

The State of Minnesota to Edla IT. Gib- 
son. Heury A. Gibson. Hulda M. Gibson. 
Ruth A. Gibson, Hildur E. Gibson 
George F. Gibson, E. Leontln Gibson, 
DeUys Gibson and all persons in- 
terested .in the sale of certain lands 
belonging to snid ward. ' The petition of 
Anna J. Erlcson, formerly Anna J. Gib- 
son, as-reprc'sentative of the ftbove named 
ward, being duly filed In this conrt re- 
presenting that It is necessary and for 
the best Interest of said estate and of 
all Interested therein - that certain lands 
of said ward described therein be sold 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 

FORECLOSURE SALE. .— -.. ^..^.. . u «« u -.= D „ lu 

WHEREAS, Ddfault has been made by I nnd praying that a Hcenae be granted to 
the mortgagors In the conditions and cov- ' Anna J.- Erlcson. formerly Anna J. GIb~ 
cnants of that certain mortgage duly exe- ' *P". to sell the same. . 
Un te and n AS^v. P M.n by t? Mt .^ 1MwIn Wah " Now - Therefore, You and each of you 
to "the State o \in £ H' B Wlfe ' mort «*sors, ! are hereby cited and required to show 
InJ -date ?tb* %ul l\tl *i ™"SW, bear- 'cause. If any you have, before this conrt. 
and wth«2 P r n ? »/i Se ?l ember ' 1B23 ' i at the Probate Court Rooms. In the Court 

S&6iauiD?^L*r^^^m^ n : iVonK ln Th!ef Rfvpr FalIfl - county of 

the "kobSS of nirt-^f ™^J * th ^ oft i ce oi i Tennington. State of Minnesota, on the 
ty of ^enuTncton and Rt«?f S'^ 8 Coi V n " llth Aa ^ ot ™™rs. 1020, at 10 o'clock 

eight o'clock thirty minutes i. M ' and , Bh ° Uld n0t be ^ ntei - 
duly recorded therein In Book "77" of' WITNESS, The Judge of Bald conrt. 
Mortgages, on page 18 thereof • \ and tbe seal of said court, this 14th day 

AND WHEREAS, Said default conBlBts ! of January, 1026. 

**■" *"" " LARS BACKE, 

Judge of Probate Court 
(COURT SEAL) 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb.-3) 



H. S. DAHLEN. 
H. S. DAHLEN. 
Notary, Public, Pennington 
County, Minn.. My cnmmls- 
„„ . _ 8l°n expires August IS, 1026. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. - 
Department of State. 

I hereby certify that the within Instrn- 
5? iJS" F* 1 - or record In this office on 
this 13th day of January, A. D., I92B. at 
4 o clock P. M., and was duly recorded In 
book 8-4, of Incorporation on page 647 
MIKE HOLM, 

OFFICE OF REGISTKR^&S 8Ute - 

County of Pennington, Minn. 

I hereby certify that the within Instru- 
ment wmrflled in this office for record on 
the lr.th day of January, A. D. 1026 at 

£°°* «. Mir " nfl W!, "J. oly weeded In Book 
K of Hfsc, od page 201. 

' FRED D. T.OTtF.N^^nw. 



(January 20-27.) 



in the failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual Installments of amortized 
principal and Interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-five DoUars ($125 00). 
which became due aud payable on the 2Ut 
day of March 1925, and the 21st day 7of 
September, 1025, In accordance with the 
terma and conditions of Bald mortgage, 
wi >Ich default has continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS. By reason of snid de- 
fault, and pursuant to the termB and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorised 
y J 8 ?- the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and doeB hereby 
exercise Its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan secured 
?y « flId mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith: 

MND WHEREAS, There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Three Thousand 
™. e H < u , n .&f ! !L Sfrteei1 Do »ars and eighty 
cents (13,916.80), unamortlted principal, 
together with interest thereon from the 
21at day of September. 1925, at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (5%) per centum per 
annum, and Two Hundred Fifty Dollars 
(?250.00) amortised principal and Interest, 
with Interest on $125.00 thereof from 
»rch 21st, 1023, at seven (7) per centum 
per annum, and interest on $125.00 thereof 
from September 21at. 1025, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum. In all the sum of Fou» 
Thousand Two Hundred Twenty-seven 
°;l a i? J"l5 sixty-seven cents ($4,227.67) ; 
, A i^ D .u WH ^? BAS ' B ' wason of said de- 
fault, the said power of Bale contained ln 
said mortgage has become and Is operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
Instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage or any 
part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE. Notice Is hereby 
given that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained In. said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the stntute In Buch case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described In and 
conveyed by said mortgage, situate, lying 
and being n the County of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Northwest Quarter (NW«) ot v 
Section Seventeen (17), In Township 
One Hundred FIfty-foor (164) North, 
of Range Thirty-nine (30) West, con- 
taining 160 acres, more or less, accord- 
ing to the Government Survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances. 
wRIch sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
snid Pennington County, at the front door 
of the Court Honse ln the City of Thief 
River Fans, In said County and State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day of February, 1020." 
at ten o'clock A. M. of that day. at public 
vendue to the highest bidder for caah, 
to pay and satisfy the debt then due on 
said mortgage, and the taxes./ if any, on 
said premises, and the costs and expenses 
allowed by Isw; subject to redemption at 
any time within one year from the date 
of sale, ss provided by law. 
Dated December 22nd, 1925. • 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 

- - ^ Mortgagee, 

By Department of Rnnl Credit 
OLBv O. S AOBNO. Chairman. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 

(SEAT,) 8eCMlaPy - 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON. 
Attorney General. 
T.TTDVTO GtTLLICKBON, ' . 

Assistant Attorney General, 
^""leynfor Mortgagee, . 

"*i rjnmm Bnnainr. ... 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON FINAL 
ACCOUNT AND FOR DISTRIBUTION 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
COUNTV OK PENNINGTON— ss. 
IN PROBATE COURT. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Nels 
Peter Nelson, also known as N. P. Nelson, 
Decedent. 

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA. TO Au- 
gusta K. Nelson. Jesselyn Sophia Nelson 
and all persons Interested in tbe final ac- 
count and distribution of the estate of 
flald decedent: The representative of the 
above named decedent, having filed in this 
Court her final account of the administra- 
tion of the estate of said decedent, to- 
gether with her petition praying for the 
adjustment and allowance of Bald final' 
account and fur distribution of the resi- 
due of said estate to the person thereunto 
entitled. Therefore. YOU, AND EACH 
OF YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, before 
tela Court at the Probate Court Rooms 
In the Court Himse In the City of Thief 
River Falls, In the County of Pennington. 
State of Minnesota, on the 19th dny of 
February, 1026, at 10:00 o'clock A. M., 
why said petition should not be granted. 

Witness. The Judge of said Court, and 
the Seal of said Court, this 2lBt day of 
January, 1026. 

LARS BACKE, 
(SEAL) Judge of Probate Court. 

PERL W. MABEY and 
H. O. CHOMMIE, 
Attorneys for Petitioner, 
Thief River FaUs, Minnesota. 
(Jan. 27-Feb. 8-10) 



NOTICE Or REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE BALE, . 

WHEBHA8, Default has been ma do by 
the mortgagors ln the conditions and cov- 
enants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered. by George Monroe Tan- 
ner and Llula Tanner, his wife, mortgag- 
ors, to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, 
bearing date the 22nd day of August, 1024, 
and, with a power of sale thereto contained, 
duly filed for record in the office of the 
Register of Deeds in and for tbe County 
of Pennlngtoa^and State of Minnesota pfi 
the 20th day of August, 1924, at elrfht 
"o clock A. M., and duly recorded therein" In 
Book "77" of Mortgages, on page 200 
thereof; 

AND WHEKEA8, V Said default consists 
in thB failure of said mortgagors to pay 
the semi-annual installments of amortized 

Srinclnal and interest, each amounting to 
ne Hundred Twenty-five DoUars ($125.00), 
which became due and payable on the 22nd 
day of February, 1025, and the 22nd day 
of August, 1025, In accordance with the 
terms and conditions of said mortgage, 
which default has continued to this date; 
AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to tbe terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorised 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 
mortgagee and owner and holder of said 
mortgage, has exercised and docs hereby 
exercise Its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, tbe whole of the loan secured 
by said mortgage to be 'due and payable 
forthwith; 

AND WHEREAS. There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
sold mortgage, and the loan secured there- 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Three ThouBand 
Nine Hundred Fifty-nine DoUars and for- 
ty-eight cents ($3,050.48), unamortized 
principal, together with Interest thereon 
from the 22nd day of august, 1925, at the 
rate of five and one-fourth (5%) per cent- 
um per annum, and Two Hundred Fifty 
Dollars ($250.00) amortized principal and 
interest, with Interest on $125.00 thereof 
from February 22nd, 1025, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, and Interest on $125.0u 
thereof from August 22nd, 1025. at* seven 
(7) per centum per annum, ln all the snm 
of- Four Thousand Two Hundred Eighty- 
eight Dollars and nlnety-slx cents 
($4,288.96) ; 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, tbe said power of sale contained ln 
said mortgage has become and Is operative, 
and no action or proceeding having been 
instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage or any 
part thereof; 

NOW. THEREFORE, Notice Is hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained In said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage wlU be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described In ana 
conveyed by said mortgage, situate, lying 
and being In the County of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Southeast Quarter (BE%) of Sec- 
tion Twenty-Beven (27). Township One 
Hundred Fifty-four (154) North- of 
Range Thirty-nine (SO) West, contain- 
ing 160 acres, more or less, according 
to the Government Survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale wilt be made by the Sheriff of 
said Pennington County, at tbe front door 
of the Conrt House In the City of Thief 
River Falla, In said County 'and State, on 
Thursday, the 4th day of February, 1026, 
at eleven o'clock A. M. of that day, at pub- 
lic vendue to the highest bidder for cash, 
to pny and satisfy the debt then due on 
said mortgage, and the taxes, if any, on 
snid premises, and the costs and expenses 
allowed by law: subject to redemption at 
any time within one yeai from the date 
of sale, as provided by law. 
Dated December 22nd. 1925. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

Mortgagee. 
By Department of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAGENG. Chairman. 
ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, 
& Secretary. 
(SEA LI 

CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 
Attorney General. 
T.TTTiYTG GTTLLTCKSON. 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
ftlO Hamm Building. 
St. Paul. Minnesota. 

(Dec 23-30 Tan. 8-1S-20-2T) 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made "In the pay- 
ment of the snm of Two Thousand Jnsv 
Hundred Ninety-six and 25-100 <*2,PW).g» 
DoUars, which hi claimed to be due an* 
la due' at the date of this notice upon s 
certain Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by F. F. Haynes and Edith 3, 
Hnynes, hU wife. Mortgagor?, to Masoat 
City Loan & Trust Co., Mortgagee, bear- 
ing date tbe 8th day of August, 1010, ana 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded In the office ot the Regis- 
ter of Deeds in nnd for the -O/unty of 
Pennington and. State of Minnesota, on 
tbe 10th day of August, 1010, at 1:30 
o clock P. M., in Book 58 of Mortgages, 
on page 630, and no action or proceed- 
ings having been instituted, at law or 
otherwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said Mortgage or any part thereof, 
except that an action has been heretofore 
Instituted in tbe Municipal Court of the 
Cfty of Thief River Falls, in the County ' 
of- Pennington and State of Minnesota to 
recover upon six $60.00 past due interest ■ 
coupons, a, part of the debt secured by 
said mortgage and that aald action has? 
been dismissed and discontinued and ex- 
cept that an uctioif has been heretofore 
Instituted In the District Conrt of Pen- 
nington Cobnty. ■Minnesota, to recover 
upon the principal note of $2 000.00 with 
interest since Its maturity, a part of the 
debt secured by said mortgage; that Judg- 
ment has been rendered therefor In said 
Court; that an execution has been issued 
upon said Judgment uud that snid execu- 
tion has been returned wholly unsatis- 
fied. 

Now. Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, the said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
m Ji nd conveyed by snid Mortgage, via: 

The South East quarter (SEVi) of the 
South East quarter (SEtf) of Section 
Eighteen (18) and tbe West Haif (W%> 
of the South West quarter -(SWW) and 
the South East quarter (SEfc) of the 
South West quarter (SWfc) of Section 
Seventeen <">, all in Township One Hun- 
dred Fifty-four (154) North, of Range 
Forty-four (44) West, of the Fifth ITln- 
clpal Meridian, ln Pennington County and 
State of Minnesota, with the heredlta- 
me , ntfl and appurtenances: which sals 
will be made by the Sheriff of said Pen- 
nington County at the front door of the 
Court House, In the City of Tbl«f River 
Snl 8 ^ 111 H ia Coant y and State, on the 
12th day of March, 1926. at 10:00 o'clock 
A. M.. of that day, at pubUe vendue, to 
the highest bidder for cash, to pay said 
debt of $2,506.25 and interest, and the 
taxes, u any. on said premises, and Sev- 
enty-five DoUars, Attorney's fees, as stip- 
ulated In and by said Mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, and tbe disbursements al- 
lowed by law; subject to redemption at 
any time within one year from the day 
of Baler as provided by law. 

Dated January 23rd, A. D. 1920 

MASON CITY LOAN k. 
TR08T CO., 

PERL W. MABEY and "o^***- 

H. O. CHO-MMJJD, 

Attorneys for Mortgagee. 
Thief River FaUs, Minnesota. 
(Jan. 27-Feb.-3-10-17-24-Mar.-3I 



ORDER LIMITING TIME TO FILE 
CLAIMS, AND FOR HEARING 
THEREON. 

State of Minnesota 

County of Pennington— ss. 

IN PROBATE COURT. 

In tbe Matter of the Estate of Llna J. 
Osness, Decedent, 

Letters of Administration this day hav- 
ing been granted to Casper Osness, 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time withm 
which all creditors of the above named 
decedent may present claims against her 
estate ln this Court, be, and the same 
hereby Is, Umlted to six months from and 
after the date hereof; and that Tuesday 
the 27th day of July, 1026, at ten o'clock 
A. M., in the Probate Court Rooms at 
the. Court House at . Thief River Falls ,ln 
said County, be, and the same hereby Is, 
fixed and appointed as the time and place 
for hearing upon and the, examination, ad- 
justment and aUowancer of such'' claims as 
shall be presented within the time afore- 
— Id. - . 

Let notice hereof be *Hven by the publi- 
cation of this order In fTnief River FaBa 
Tribune", a weekly newspaper as provided 
by law. 

Dated January 19th, 1026. 
(COURT SEAL) 

LABS BACKE, 
. _- Judge of Probate Court 

THBO. QUALE, 
Attorney for Administrator. 

( Jan. 27-Feb. 3) . 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That de- 
fault has hoen mnde in the conditions of a 
mortgage executed by Elmer E. Kolp and 
Mary Koln. his wife. Mortgagors to C. L. 
Hansen. Mortgagee, dnted the 1st day of 
Novemher. 1022. and recorded in the office 
of the Register of Deeds of Pennington 
County. -Minnesota, on the 16th day of 
Novemlmr. 1022. nt 1:30 n'enlcfe P. M.. In 
Book 51 of Mortgages on Page 205 there- 
of: thnt ou the 18th dnv of November. 1022. 
snid mortamgp wns assigned' by the said C. 
L. Hansen, Mortgagee, 'to The United 
Danish Societies of America, n corporation 
organized and existing under and by vir- 
tue of the Laws of the State of Wisconsin 
and the Deed nf Assignment recorded on 
the 15tb day of December. 1922. at 9 o'clock 
A. M„ in the office of the Register of Deeds 
of Pennington County. Minnesota, ln Book 
65 of Mortgages on Page 200 thereof: that 
such default consists in tbe failure to pay 
the sum of One Hnndred Eighty ($180.00) 
Dollars interest, which fell due on the note 
which said mortgage was given to secure 
on tbe lBt day of November, 1924, and a 
further payment of Interest which fell due 
on Bald note on the 1st day of November, 
3925, nnd that the holder of said mortgage 
has elected to declare and hereby does- de- 
clare all of the principal and accrued in- 
terest on Bald note and said mortgage to 
be due and payable according to the terms 
and stipulations thereof: that the amount 
claimed to he due and which Is due on said 
mortgage at this date. Is the sum of Three 
Thousand Three Hnndred Ninety-five and 
34-100 ($3305.S|) Dollars. 

That tbe premises described in and 
covered by Bald mortgage are situated In 
Pennington County, Minnesota, and are 
described as follows: The Northeast Quar- 
ter (NEK) of Section Thirty . (30), In 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North of Range Forty-two (421 West of 
the Fifth Principal Meridian in Minnesota, 
containing One Hnndred Sixty (160) acres, 
more or lets, according to the United States 
Government Survey thereof. 

That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said mortgage and pursuant to 
the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided, said mortgage will be foreclosed by 
the Bale of said premises, at public vendue; 
to the highest bidder for cash, by the 
Sheriff of Pennington County, Minnesota, 
at tbe East front door of tbe Pennington 
County Court Honse In the City of Thief 
River FaUs. Pennington County. Minne- 
sota, on Saturday, the 6th day of February, 
1926, at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, to 
satisfy the amount then due on said mort- 
gage, together with the costs of such Bale, 
and Seventy-five Dollar- Attorney's fees 
stipulated In said mortgage. 
Dated December 17. 1»»25. 

THE TTNITED DANISH S0CIETD3S 
OF AMERICA, 

By THEO. QUALE, 
It's Attorney 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
THEO. QUALE. 

Attorney for Assignee of Mortgagee, 
Thief River FaUs, Minnesota- 

(Dee, 23-80 Jan. 6-15-20-27.) 



« U t H t HMMM . M I* MM .* 

DR. L R. TWETE 
Veterinarian 

. Phone Res. 80 Office 597 
(Sopth of Ogahmah Hotel) 
THIEF RIVER FALLS 
^ »il t m i HiHHtl 



SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 405 Knight Ave. N. 
Thief River Falls. Minn. 

Phones; 

Hospital & Office, 350. Res., 488-3 

A. W. Swedenbnrg, Ph. G, M. D. 
Physician and Surgeon 

Special attention Ear. Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses. 

MLNA R. SWEDENBURG, R. N. 

Snpt. Hospital and Anaesthetics. 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Surges? anal 

the Di&eases of Women anal 

Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bid*. 

Phones; 
Office 128. Residenco 90. 



THEO- QUALE 

.Lawyer 

Practice in All Courts and Be- 
fore TJ. S. Land OSes 
McGfam BuiMJnt 



Tonne Pine Lodge No. 221 
I.O.O.P. 

Heats arsirj Toetday night a* 8:00. 



AUTO REPAIR AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMITHING 
Expert Work Gnarante cd 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 




Northern Lodge No. 236 
A. F. & A. M. 

SUted Communications 
Firat »nd Tiiid Thnrsdays 



CARL B, LARSON 



LICENSED mranirmm 
AND UNDEBTAXmt 



Lumb Fanltut Caafm 

Ikkl Binr Talk 



plum n. 



sigh oa -us 



>h t i >t 



DR.C.M.HAUG 
Dentipt 

Office Over first ft Peoples f 
State Bank \ 

Telephone No. 14 I 
hi i r ittti 1 1 ii i m m i ) , i- 



THIEF BIB W 

ra. a r. hellbit , 

Wj% Eat, Now and Throat 
DB. H. W. FsUHSttCB 
3ut«ry and ObaMrhi 

OFFICE 




*AGE*ffOtm 



*?m 



•Vi"»^*]4^^**,'f^ftiP 



JB&wr 



Ifaiit Kivsr tiltf irilione^^s^Si^t 



Published Every Wednesday 
- BaulJlish^d IdOl 



LUDWIG I. ROB ... - 
WILLIAM B. DAHIAJUJST 
H. S. SNYDER 



President 

Editor 

City Editor 



Official Paper of Pennington County • 
Entered as second-claBS -wattec, at the 
postodice at Thief River Falls,. Minn.; 
under the Act of March .3,' 187ft."" " 



SUBHCK1FTION *3,oa,PEtt YEAtt 



THE DOER . 

"It is not the critic who counts; 
not the man who points out 'how the 
strong man stumbled. or where the 
doer of deeds could have done them 
better. The credit belongs to the man 
who is actually in the^rarena; whose 
face is marred by dust and sweat and 
blood; who strives valiantly; who 
errs and comes short again and again 
because there is no effort without er- 
ror and shortcoming; who does actu- 
ally strive to do the* deeds; who 
knows die great enthusiasm, the great 
devotions, spends himself in a worthy 
cause; who at the best knows in the 
end the triumph of, high achievement; 
and who at the worst, if he fails," at 
least fails while daring greatly, 
that his place shall never be with 
those cold and timid souls who know 
neither victory nor defeat." — Theo- 
dore Roosevelt. 



same to ship goods from Thief River 
Falls. to ;Warroad'as' it does to.'sHip 
them to Middle River. .It costs, Jess 
to ship goods from : Grand 'Forks jo 
Thief Riyer Falls than it does from 
Crookstoh to Thief River Falls. * [ 
If it wasn't' for the fact that, we 




the .total number of electors. -highways gasoline is relatively chew 

.'H we couJpV' settle the/l^iUc of our- er, arid fliat they Have to 'utopf&ss 
political contests ona-Mingie 4ay bricei feequwtty fpf feeLt^jan formerly. The: 
to ^L^^HfayW^^^nw* have' Wiiffiicr&cfi^sigriifWe is to de-| 
a far'JSrj^;al^„ff™ crease sales, foTTirttaVeler bound for 

ti^pajfae^jh: fW/.^mds?' , ■ ! iropo>taht , another state ^Utak&'Tia'mbwrfeas 
fUnchpft of;. IdariScrjatie^republic^n! than ftecesaary'to carry him twastate : 



u of.. ■':<&. , t _ ,. 

flovtirnntenk : The "tirtfcesseis " l of " vot-! 
ing have bieen saniucn improved, and 
the Jtmtu^^f.Vscratchin^' ^e ticket 
and >olirig with independence has so 



.have prohibition and realize- the ab^- grown, that^hi^. concentration of'eev- 
surdity of such a thought we might &$- dectioin days' into one would in- 
u„ :-/i:-„j-.„ u-t: JL* >-™»™7™ lyplves none of the old dangers 



be inclined to believe that 'whoever 
■wrote these rates was under the in- 
fluence of liquor at the- time the- 
atrocity was committed. It happen- 
ed in a hurry and maybe the haste 
accounts for the discord. 

The Fargo Commercial Club 
started it when they asked the inter- 
state commerce commission to adjust 
their freight rates to the Twin Cities 
so as to be on the same basis as towns 
on the Minnesota side of the line, 
which was reasonable. The inter- 
state commerce commission recogniz- 
ed the grievance, and ordered the rail- 
roads to make such an adjustment as 
would be equitable. 



,. that 

brought about shorter terms and 
more frequent appeals to tne people. 

SOMETHING WRONG. 

(Northfield News.) I 

Governor "Al" Smith of New York 
almost spoiled Tammany's Christ- 
mas by announcing that he was 
through with politics, and that -He 
would not be a candidate lor a fourth 
term as governor or for the U. S. 
Senatorship in opposition to "Jim- 
my" Wadsworth. 

The governor says he will not 
"lift his finger" to obtain the demo- 
cratic nomination for . president ' in 
1928. 

Smith's excuse for quitting the 

political game in which he has play- 

„„ u . u ~v ^-..u^. The railroads jed such a spectacular part is that 

did this but instead of reducing the £ e must S et *»*> active business and 



JUSTIFIED THE EFFORT 
The results obtained in the enter- 
tainment of the "Pine-to-Palm" tour- 
ists Saturday night justified the great 
efforts put forth. It was truly a com- 
munity achievement. The labors of 
more than a hundred local people con- 
tributed toward its success. By this 
voluntary labor and experienced man- 
agement the affair was practically 
made self-supporting. 



ANOTHER MILESTONE 

The local co-operative creamery 
has completed another successful year. 
The annual statement reveals a heal- 
thy condition and all indications point 
to a gradual growth that will insure 
its success as a financial undertaking. 
It has already demonstrated its suc- 
cess as a price builder for the dairy- 
man. Any farmer who is sceptical 
about the value of a co-operative 
creamery should compare the prices 
paid for butterfat in cities that have 
creameries with those where the far- 
mers are not organized. 



FARM RELIEF 
Nearly all the measures of farm re- 
lief suggested aim to bolster the prices 
of such products of which there is ap- 
parently too. much produced to meet 
the domestic demands. And in all 
cases the almost insurmountable prob- 
lem of disposing of the exportable 
surplus without somebody taking a 
loss is encountered. It is safe to say 
that the greatest single factor in 
bringing about diversification in this 
territory has been the inability of the 
farmer to realize a profit of small 
grain growing. It is also safe to say 
that the longer this condition exists 
the more complete will be the diversi- 
fication and gradually the production 
of profitless small grains will fall off 
to such an extent that a tariff wall 
may prove effective. The tariff has 
already done much to strengthen the 
prices on dairy products and authori- 
ties are agreed that that day when this 
country has an overproduction of 
dairy products is far off. An increase 
in the protection on dairy and poultry 
products and the assurance that that 
protection would keep abreast of the 
farmers' cost of production for sever- 
al years to come, would, in a short 
time, make other relief unnecessary. 
The kind of relief that will take the 
market gamble out of dairying, poul- 
try raising and the growing of hogs 
and sheep will be a whole lot more 
effective than that form of relief 
which will encourage the growing of 
more small grain. ."■ -.<■ 



Fargo rate and the rates for other 
cities on the Dakota side of the line, 
they very quietly, raised the rates for 
the towns on this side. The Minne- 
sota Railroad & Warehouse Com- 
mission, started prosecution and on the 
23rd of this month [he United States 
District Court issued an mjuncinn 
restraininig the prosecution. This 
probably means that a long court bat- 
tle will follow which eventually can 
be settled only one way. But save 
your freight bills and wait with 
patience. , 



FEWER ELECTION DAYS 

(Minneayolis Journal.) 
Nearly half of the states of the 
Union elect their Governors for a 
term of four years — while most of 
the others probably wish they did. 
A bipartisan movement is under way 
in New York state to offer the peo- 
ple a constitutional 



earn some money for his family." 
Mayor Arthur Nelson of St. Paul 
has served final notice on his friends 
that he cannot comply with their re- 
quests that he stand as a candidate 
for re-election. He cites the same 
reason given by Al Smith for the 
stand he has taken. 

Both these men have been eminent- 
ly successful as public servants. 
Their experience has trained them 
for still greater service but they 
confess they cannot stand the strain, 
financial and otherwise, and they 
give way — usually to mediocre or 
average men,- whose service to -the 
public is of a like kind. This is^not 
in line with America's boast of ef- 
ficiency in management. If higher 
salaries to officials occupying . re-: 
sponsible executive positions will .be 
the solution then let's have higher 
salaries. 



changing the terms of both the Gov- 
ernor and the Senate to four years, 
and making the elections- • coincide 
with the national elections. 

There are advantages in the longer 
term that ought to be considered in 
Minnesota, The chief one is that it 
relieves the executive of worries 
about re-electioin and permits him to 
devote his energies to carrying out 
the polities to which he and his party 
have pledged themselves. 

Governor Christianson, for exam- 
ple, has got his plan of State reor- 
ganization under way,- thanks to the 
action of :the Legislature. But he 
will have to go before the people and 
ask for re-election long before its 
practical workings can be thoroughly 
tested out. 

The politicians who opposed the ex- 
periment ao bitterly in the Senate and 
who came so near to preventing the 
bill from passing, will be able to go 
to the people with claims of failure 
long before a fair judgment as to its 
efficacy can possibly be made. 



TYPICAL ENGLISH JUSTICE 

(Murray County Herald.) 
Some communists were recently 
. arrested in London, and the London 
amendment, I News published an article and a car 



toon approving the arrest and hold- 
ing the arrested men up to scorn. 
The paper was fined $5,000 by the 
court on the grounds that the car-: 
toon had tended to stir up bitterness 
and prejudice the trial, making,, i£ 
difficult for the accused to get^'.d 
fair trial. This incident is typical 
of English justice. It would be dif- 
ficult in most countries to get so im-i 
personal a decision. Yet the deci? 
sion was in line with the true pre- 
cepts of law. • However hated the 
cause may be, it is entitled to a"fair 
trial before the court, free frond-un- 
due prejudice and pressure. It) is 
often complained- that in this coun- 
try newspapers try a man before 'the 
courts do, and that in any ca^fe 
where public mind is open to pr^mj 
dice it is difficult to get a fair itiaF. 
The English judge upheld the idea 
that the weak and despised should 
have the same protection . as the -rich' 
and powerful. In doing this he real- 
ly strengthened the hands' of the 
government, for if the accused, jfe 
convicted it cannot be said that they 
1 ' ,:J not receive every consideration 



wherethe tax'.is-sraaUerr.Tbe.isigns 
are rediculous arid may as well be dis- 
played by raerchants'in other, lines to 
show the price tof goods, plus^taxes, 
licenses, insurance, i overhead,.,hjsses, 
and other factors that enter into ^busi- 
ness.— Neveda Highway News. -,,.: 



said a li-.c^., ij0i ; v Wua ;j be adopt- 
ed and the. fight against snow block- 
ades wi^bfe contintied; on all routes 
yielu^ng^f^ir retuji) fa service to the 
general public. 



Trinity Lutheran Church. 
S. L. Tanaksoujypfcstjiri. v -; 
No preaching service Sunday, but 
Sunday school as ""usual. . 



bilng rresuttp. 



Tribune want ads 



>'■ - Wild Heifer "Heifs". 

David Haugen, farmer living six 
miles northeast of Plummer, suffered 
a fractured rib Saturday afternoon 
when a two year old heifer which he | 
was taeing up for the first time, 
crushed him against a stake in the> 
stall. Mr. Haugen did not realize at 
the time that he had been hurt as he 
felt no pain until Saturday night. He 
is getting along nicely. 

MIDWINTER TRAFFIC 

CENSUS IS ORDERED 

First winter counts of traffic on 
state trunk highways in Pennington 
and over the state are started, says 
a current highway bulletin, to ascer- 
tain the extent of winter use of the 
routes and obtain a measure of war- 
ranted expenditures for snow-plowing 
and other winter maintenance. 

Commissioner C. M. Babcock. has 
ordered the" counts on odd days and 
under different weather and road con- 
ditions by regular employees of the 
department. The checkup will show 
the number of cars using various 
routes over the state and provide a 
basis for determining amounts that 
can justly be spent to keep them open. 

Predictions in the department went' 
contrary to the common impression 
that winter gas tax receipts would 
cover the cost of opening all roads in 
winter. However, highway officials 



<££ii*v 




On the other hand, we doubt if the 
Administration has found itself able; did „ w * ^^ VK KVKCV 
to hew quite so closely to the line as j guaranteed by the law. 

it promised and desired to do, be- j 

cause it has had always ot keep in Gasoline Price Signs. '" 

mind the imminence of another cam-, it is noted that in several sections 

Thl' -*o,w. a ■ • * j , I of the State signs are displayed at 

The recent American tendency has i service stations showing the price of 

been toward too many elections and j gasoline to be cents, stated 

CSSfJ 1 * 3 *!^"? " f ; n!nf!l,ms and P ]e - i 4 cents, total cents. The dealer 

ir*' P . tendency accounts in seems to be spreading propaganda 
part for the alarming growth of poli- against the tax but the purchasers of 
tical apathy and the steady diminua- gasoline are not impressed by such 
tion in the ratio of those voting to | signs. They know that with improved 



SAVE FREIGHT BILLS. . 
Save your freight bills. Especially 
if you do much shipping, because 
some day in the distant future you 
may get a refund on them. At any 
rate that is the hope expressed b; 
county attorney Theodore Quale, 
who believes that the fight for a re- 
adjustment of the present rates in 
this territory will be carried to the 
higher courts and finally won. There 
is ho question about the present rate* 
being woefully lacking in harmony. 
It costs less to ship goods by freight 
from Warren to Mahnomen than it 
does from Thief River Falls to Mah- 
nomen. It costs less to ship goods 
from Bemidji to Karlstad than ; : it 




Please Bring Your Bill 

TX7B SUGGEST that yoa the bill, you have to wait 
Jli_.i rmg y ou r. telephone until a duplicate is made 



o your telephone 

bill when paying at our office, 
or inclose it when paying by 
mail. That will help you 
and us. 

If your bill always accom- 
panies payment, either at 
pur business office or by mail, 
it saves time and makes sure 
that proper credit is given. 

When you do not bring 



until , 

out. This, of course, takes 
your time and delays othera 
who may be paying their 
bills. 

Our constant effort is to 
provide the best possible 
service atthelowestpossible 
cost to our patrons, and 
every little bit saved helps 
to this end. 



The interests of the public, of pur em- 
ployees and our investors are the same. 



Northwestern BellI 



IUephone Company 



j*'» "' ^rijiVMV i riT i hi i Vu 




San-Tox American 
Mineral Oil 

A scientific corrective 
for constipation. This 
oil is tasteless and of 
highest quality. It does 
not purge — it lubricates. 
Price $1.00. 

LAMBERTS 
Drug Store 




Camel's Back 

Gosh! Folks are hard headed. 

There's sjSll an element of auto owners who 
claim it doesn't make much difference what "' 
gasoline or motor oil you use. One of them 
steps forth to prove his claim by saying on 
this order: . 

"I've driven this car six months; ifs gone 
five thousand miles; it's still running like a 
sewing machine ; I've never paid any attention 
to the kind of gas or oil I bought." 

Quite so. Indeed most cars are build these 
days to take care of just such maltreatment 
as this. Well hand it to the manufacturers; 
they've developed almost a super-machine in 
the present day automobile engine. 

And yet— there's the story of the last straw 
that broke the camel's back. No manufacturer 
can build 1 a machine that will continue to 
stand up under the wrong fuel and lubricant. 
Old Man Depreciation gets in his work 
eventually, and with vengeance. 

But Pyramid Oils and Gasoline, used con- 
stantly, stop depreciation before it sets in. So 
fine a piece of mechanism as the engine in 
your car— regardless of its make— deserves 
the best fuel and lubricant you can buy. And 
that's Pyramid. 

Our trucks make daily deliveries into the 
country. 




Thief River Fafls, Minn. 



HI l !•!! ?' ? ' * " " ' " " "- * ' * * * " * *t H M ♦ ♦ ♦ H MM M M t It M » M H > I I I > M t M M M > t » M * 



' MHIHHMI tll l HII I HH Il IHIH I H II tmHHtHIIHI I t l 



Directors Who Direct 



The board of directors of the First and 
Peoples State Bank is composed ' of men 
well known in Thief River Falls for their 
business ability and sound judgment. 

They are constantly in touch with the oper- 
ation of this bank and give generously of 
their time and efforts to make sure that 
everything possible is done to safeguard our 
customers and give them complete, efficient 
service which will make their association 
with this bank of greatest benefit to them. 



FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 



Mffr i MM ii MMMM ''''***'**** 1 ***'***'''''^''''!! l ^ ^ ^ *^ ;| «;f ? f?? MH tltl ' M «♦^ 
i t i i t ) i > i i i .},{ i i i i i j, t TU > .( i .w;h mi i j * . » %*}jf im i tui 1 1 < r i 1 1 » » » m 1 1 i n n it i t i n i TTI 



♦ M liii) ll l l| l | | | | MIM 



'Call for sHJNG!S 

K* h.-UliPto a stovSari, notDOWNtoa 



price. ■ . . 

■ . winmuum T i V- i 'T ii -" ; 



Il i tl M I M IIIIIII MMM IIII M IIIIII M I M IIi r ill H III M IItll M I M t M II M I' M I M IIII M IIill ■ 

_.^__ mm*st.''^ „ JUNG'S QUALITY BAKERY. For sakb^grmfs^%:: 

f#r»1Y^^^Vri^H l JM''w%7H^T f > >i /M t VM I« MrMM « ^MMfMMM « M - _M I I l l II I fil'li' l M> '• 



'i-icrT *.!^tyi 



it 



. _a li ~- -' .t-.-v. ;s&&»%. . ■"•:■.■* f^fe- ^V^Sg^^St^i^^afeia^ •■* !: -^ 




M:^v^^^$SS^.: ^:^ r ^^&^k\ : ■ .rt , >..', 4> -^ 



m 



K 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1926. 



Darned Wright 

Writes 



Again 



Editor Tribune: 
. A Jew years ago at a social gather- 



§T. HILAIIW 



St. Hilaire Defeatf 'KaSeiv V ! 
With a versatile attack that counted; 
points fro^L every.. portion of.. ...the,' 
" " school . quint 



put him wise?" "Yes." "Well, I am; 
that kid". "Why that was over, 20 
years ago, how could you remember 
me!" "Well", he replied, "I was not 



jog a man who had recently moved in- fi oor the Si. Hilaire high 
fc-pie township came up to a group of !, took, »se^n6Sjame^e« 
men anti said "my neighbor, I" think] 20-8 score.' Passmcf'smoc 



men and said "my neighbor, I" think j 20-8 score.' 'Passmg's'mbb'thly thruout 
I know you." "Well, you have got the the fray the St. Hilaire boys managed 
best of me", replied the man, "I cant to find the hoop with considerable' re- 
place you." Do you remember .; of Lgujarity, sinking' the leather Spine 
working such men out in Idaho and I tiniea frontons field as against a : 
a green kid came there to work and [meager 'two goals from the' Fisher 
' "" "■"--*■ ""'-" T boys. | 

' Hallemack.jnidget forward, was 
the scoring light of the game, sinking 

..... _ _ the sphere, five times from the field 

quite sure until I saw you smile." So and adding a free throw to total 
I think that any country that won't I eleven points. He was closely follow- 
wipe the smile off a man's face in 20 1 ed by Hackett, who sank three field 
years engaged in the farming game | markers f>r six points. "Scoogie" Nel- 
speaks well for that country. Json played a smooth floor game and 

Afterwards my neighbor ' told me • contented himself with feeding the 
how he had worked for a sort of . ball to his' mates. He was the light 
shyster farmer who had hired a boy | of the team's offense and his defen- 
in Spokane and he was supposed to ] sive play was brilliant For Fisher 
work for his board till he commenced I high schoqlA>Nelson at floor guard, 
to cut logs, and I happened to know 'looked ihejbest, with his stellar floor 
that he had no logs to cut. The kid i work helping to advance the ball to a 
was so young and honest looking that I scoring position only to have the 
1 felt tha'. it was my duty to tell him. i Fisher attack miss the counter or lose 
Afterwards I got acquainted with this : the ball through brilliant guarding of 
man and he told me how he used to the locals. The game was rough on 
roam from Kansas to the coast run- , the extreme, Captain Hackett being 
ning steam thresh engines in Kansas ' ejected on :four personals, 
and donkey engines in the woods of; The line up was: 
Washington. There was hardly a *>t. Hilaire 
western state that he had not worked " acRett 
in. But finally a good woman put a ««■»? . 
stop to his running and he started galtanack 
farming in Colorado. He was a hard »»"«""» ■ 
worker and thrifty and it goes with- «eraon 
out saying that he did fairly well. But ™«en 
the semi arid lands of Colorado were ; 

not exactly to his likeing and having -_ „ T , ,. 4i , „ . 

a good chance to sell he did so. I "«: E Lane and little son Burton 

He had heard and read a good deal °f Thief River Falls came Friday to 
about the Red River Valley and Pen- ™t«5|*J f^jftr* 6 h ° me '° £ 
nington county so he came east to in- . her sis. er Mrs. P. Ortloff. 
instigate. He liked the land and .Mr .J. Kenney who ^has been, taking 
bought five sections. Oh, I hear some P«* >« »e ice events at Winnipeg 
of you sav he must have a dandy state ««« S» "day to spend a couple days 
loan. No, I forgot to tell you, he is J|*- Ius fanu, y- He returned Tues- 

" So'n'ow'he is a real asset to Kratka Mira H a «l Dann who teaches at 
socially, morally, and financially, f^f 1 :^" 4 ae week en <i at her P ar " 
Some times at gatherings he comes entaI "ome. 
up behind me and grabs .me. And I 



_ 


Fisher 


RP 


Linskey 


LP 


Knutson 


C 


Erickson 


RG 


Nelfion 


LG 


Moe 




Kopang 



Mr. and Mrs. Milton Shantzen of 
twist and squirm but it is n'o use. He Minneapolis «*o has spent the past 
"sure a big man physically and men- ««« weeks visiting with friends at 
Sllv And I sav I give up, who is it? Radrom, came Wednesday to spend 
Sd^e says it^^LTold hog slopper. »» time^ s iH n g t the «. ^ eT 
He can tell more about raising hogs ^?,w?™lff "^ to * helr home 
in one minute than Herb Fuller can in at $™ n ^& ,,„ Cath „,„ m „„ • , 
five and that is going some. I honest- M'ss Blanche de Cathaleaneau, who 
ly believe that he knows more about ?^ nd ^ 1 ^™™ a '. scb °° l - at Red 
growing alfalfa than any man 



Pennington county. In fact he is a 
walking encyclopedia of farm lore. 
He makes a specialty of raising, hogs, 
Hereford cattle, and alfalfa, 



Lake Falls spent the week-end at her 
parental home- 
Miss Clara Hellgerson expects to 
. „.,„.. leave Friday for Minneapolis where 

'nSrfcv she w" 1 attend school. 
- ey ' Mr. N. E. Beebe returned 



Routine Matters Occupy.! 

;(>1 tr. >,; i ■■!><.■";": .-.1 foi j-.'jIr' ■' ;>?&&•.■* 

mebiingf last* night, aUimembi&ra'tbe* 
ing^pwissent.-i granted a building , per- 
mit' to the Peoples Oil Co., for a fill' 
ing station) down itown;:«lectedi-Dr. J. 
T;. Bowers as city physician-, granted 
a batch of dance permits and soft 
drink licenses, gavet varipps organiza- 
tions free "use. pf the auditorium, and 
disposed of minor routine- matters. 

The request for a building permit 
stated that -the building will* be of 
concrete and brick and would -*ost 
approximately $5,000, conforming ta 
provisions of the fire ordinances, and 
will be located on the, northwest cor- 
ner of Main and Third. 

Dr. J. T. Bowers was elected city 
physician last night when the council 
broke the tie vote of 3 to 3 taken two 
weeks ago, Dr. H.- W. Froehlich, the 
present incumbent being the onlv oth- 
er contestant for the position. Mayor 
W. W. Prichard, Jr., immediately 
sent in his appointment of Dr. Bowers 
as city health officer, and the council 
duly approved of same. 

Dance permits were requested by 
the following; Night Hawks,, Elks. 
Sons of Norway, Snyders' orchestra, 
Woodmen of World and Jhe baseball 
club, all of which were granted, some 
being for more than one dance. Soft 
drink licenses were granted to L. J. 
Cerny, Harry Frey, Geo. Christo, Geo. 
E. Larson, Carl Christofferson and C- 
H. Porter. 

The Girls Community club asked 
for free -use of the auditorium on Feh- 
9, County Supt. of Schools Ole R 
Sande for Feb. 5. and the "baseball 
club fori Feb. 2, all requests being 
granted. 

The City clerk was authorized to 
advertise for bids for the city deposi- 



j ™ "t "„,'«« w i'in™ f fnt-rftrlurA rar - XN * a ' **eeDe returned Monday 
him forVisTrnigh* BbSta'SS *» «•?**■. Texas, where he has 



but alas, he.3 a ver^LKS %&%?*' ""' "* «* 
man and what they call paper shy, **" 



estate 



andmethinks I hear him say, Wright, da ^ ^i^l^^X^i",™; 
you put my name in the paper and J S„f v ,™vfl ♦l" u ?F y ?V the .^ 
you Low what will happe^and bv ^S^S me f G ^SmE^Tu,* 
gosh I know he could do it.- So all . , ______«" T I , , ;i K V 

liat I can say is that he lives in the ^ '"Lf??^^L " 'LT^t,™' 
Southwest part of the township, ftgt %$**£% ,»^S SSS^ """ " 
Sm, a ^f^u^SeST^itTou ,*£* Arisen and Masses Marie 
w», get Rehmso^ie^an^W ^ $$^%g&£ t & a S£ 
P. H. WRIGHT , Kratka. Mr Arehje Johnson left p^y | 0J , 
,. ,, «, t, Minneapolis where he will visit for 

Ano^ner ^e^Z I^^esidents °°™ h^^T^ e b 
of this communitv passed to the great ne f s £,£» gdS^rjajto.- 

KbS.N^:ivis^^^^^ 

comine to Amenca 63 vears ago. She por^j. 

first lived in the southern part of 0n g unday afternoon, there will he 

Minnesota near Winnebago, coming to a "Community Get To-gether" given 

this vicinity 44 years ago, and l.vrng at the Norwe ^ an Luthe ^ n , hnr S.™ 

in the town of Norden .ever since. .She program will be given and at tJw 

was predeceased by her husband 19 cIosc of tne aite ^ 00n CTDDer will be 

years ago, and left two children to served . ^s meeting will be sponsor- 

mourr, her demise, viz., Mrs Gust ^ b the E P 

Gulseth and Louis Fera^en. The de- 




■mmm, 



THIS is the month 
in which 01R COAL 
proves its superior- 
ity. If your supply 
is low, order som| 



Coal 77 l 

Thief River 
Motor Co. ; 



cea. c eH had b=°n ill for about 3 months 
and the end was nntunexnected. The; 
funeral services will be held from the 
familv hnme tomorrow. Thursday, 
Rev. Bredeson ofFiciatinp. 



Arthur Bloom, 
Arthur Bloom, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Bloom who reside near Eose- 
■wood, passed away last Wednesday, 
January 20. His death was caused by 
tuberculosis. He was born at Rose- 
wood February 4, 1899 and was near- 
ly twenty-seven years of a?e at the 
time of his death. Funeral services 
were held Monday, Rev. Drotts ■ of 
Vikinp officiating, and interment was 
made in the Rosewood cemetery. 



Elvie Noreen Svedberg. 
Sunday morning, January 24th, af- 
ter as illness of two weeks, ocenred 
the n*ath of Elvie Noreen, little 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Svedberg. She was born in this city 
November 8, 1924 and at the time of 
her death was one year two months 
and sixteen days old. Besides her 
father and mother, she is survived by 
two sister^. D^ris and Ba and two 
brothers, Marvin and ^den. Funeral 
services will be held to-morrow. Rev. 
Aug. Bredesori officiating, and inter- 
ment will be made at Greenwood. 



(ADVERTTSMENT) 

NIGHT'S REST 

DISTURBED 



2s Nature's Way of Telling you "Dan- 
ger Ahead." A Healthy Bladder 
Hoes Not Act at Night. 



Mrs. G. W. Bushong, 1012 S. East 
St, Bloomington, HI., says, "Lithiat- 
ed Buchu tablets relieved me of blad- 
der weakness. Was disturbed twenty 
' to twenty-five times a night. I feel 
I am well.; I. tried many-treatments,, 
submitted .to operation, ; ahd v .:mucb,; 
torture. In one .week after. ^ takingl 
Lithiated Buchu I could " n6Hce~inF- 
jrovement: I -will be glad -to ■<• tall 'if- 
;write. my experience." ...Lithiated 
! ; Buchd' is not a .patent medicine. The 
^formula i» on the bottle. "It cleanses 
; the bladder as epsom sal^s d" ^" ' 
i bowels. The tablets cost 2 cents each I 
■ : at all: drug stores. Keller Laborotorv, 
• Mechanicsburg, O. Locallv nf r.j^Tc- 
Drug Store. — Adv. 



for Economical Transportation 



CHEVROLET 



I ^* m A Type of Peri ormoi 



*l 



tpry , arid for Die oflffelal f. ''newspaper 
for OS •eomlnt ,yo»r/.,tiSe^ldi to be' 
lopeneff.Wb: 28." ■'"''" ' *" v 

fluftal aj|teeo" r t(j ! taie' 
in tft.the Doprlhou'se, 
fcth '.to'.^ay'feoO : ' L S)r 
— ^..„ „ y ^/only.. "?;".', :;-,' ■'',,. 
A communlcal^bn was received from 
Andrew ' Troyaten' asking .for "the 
position of city assessor, and 'the 
same was filed for future reference. 
AireCiUest foiistreet lights on Bridge 
street at the fntersections of Merriam, 
Kheale and Maple streets, was referr- 
ed to the electric light committee, 



while a communication from the resi- 
dents of the.: town ;of North residing 
justPofttside ofijOje. northern city 
,limltg regarding. poor electric light 
service.was referred to Supt' of Light 
'Ole'Legvold arid'the"water and light 
committee to report at 'the next meet- 
■ingi -.*>), ■■■>'■ : ,:i- ,;'!.■';. • 

A resolution w.as passed raising. the 
salary^f the dairy inspector from $2S 
fo $30.per.month'was passed when it 
was explained 'tBat! he waSnow in- 
specting It-xiairies instead of 5. that 
are furnisiirig erfflun and milk .,to 
citizens, ■ii'ollowina.'the allowance of 
the.usdal grist "bftills , the council 
adjourned until Febi 9. 



Christian Science. • ' •.,•; 

Regular Sunday services' are ;held 
at 11 a. m. in the church at 'La' %e» 
Ave. and First St. Subjeet^onday, 
Jan 31 "Love."' Sunday School at 10' 
A. M. 'Wednesday evening meetings 
at 7:46. Reading room-open -Wednesv 
days from 3 to 5. The^publioMsfpiarT 
dially invited tb'these services* ;.ijj-«".' 
^ — — W- -y« ij.'Vf ' , 

A Federal Bureau of Education-,-, 
similer to ihe United States.iJ?ureau* 
of Education, -for the purpose i of^eot; 
lecting'and. diffusing informatiott..rer- 
specting education generally, fs urge* 
for Australia by the Australia: 
Teachers' Federation. '■■'? '-■ 



Attention, Radio Fans ! 



Arrangements have been made with W. C. C. 0. r the Gold 
Medal Kadlo Statidn, to broadcast a NASH'S DELICIOUS 
Orchestra Program every Wednesday night from 9 to 10 
o'clock, beginning Feb. 3rd. A special orchestra of full con- 
cert strength will be formed and directed by Mr. Wesley Bar- 
low, and it will be known as the "NASH-FENCH CONCERT 
ORCHESTRA." 

Mr. Barlow stands as the foremost concert-master of the 
Northwest, and the ONE HOUR programs of special musical 
entertainment will be carefully composed of exceptionally 
pleasing selections of the so-called popular classics of today; 
therefore, the highest standard of musical entertainers. 

This orchestra is especially organized for the NASH 
COFFEE CO., and is composed of the best musicians in 
'Minneapolis now playing with the State Theatre Orchestra 
and the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. 

Don't forget, the date— every; Wednesday evening from 9 
to 10 o'clock— beginning Feb. 3rd. 



" - ; ■ . -y :ii , ., 

Thief River Grocery 

Branch Nash Finch Co. 

Distributors of Nash Delicious Coffee 



If you are one who hu not yet . 
been behind the wheel of the 
Improved Chevrolet, yon hacve 
more than a treat In itore. You 
have yet to experience a type 
of pertonnance never before 
ofiered In any low-priced car. 

A performance so effortless* so 
smooth* so powerful, so spirited, 
that you will call It nothing 
short of a revelation I 

Chevrolet's leadership has been 
based on giving quality at low 
cost. Now the unproved Chev- 



f Performance 
Never Before Obtained 
In Any Low Priced Car 

,ro!et gives another reason for :< 
an even wider margin of lead* 
ership— performance die equal - 
of which has heretofore been '; 
unattainable In the low-prlca . 
field. 

Drive where you will— and as 
long as you like, through traffic, 
through sand* through mud* 
overhills— and over mountains, - 
If you please. Expectsomething 
really new, really worthwhile, 
something really unique— and .' 
you will not be disappointed- 



jfe^rrW 

J * Touring . . . «510 *&* - • • - *7i 



Roadster 
Coope • 

"fenfe • 



•510 
510 
645 
645 



Sedan -- • . • *735 
Tanrftn * • •. 765 
K Tod Track . 395 

1 Ton Track - 
(CkutoOA) 



550 



AUttkikl. •. k W* ICdKwr '' 



, '""' - '•-• ■■'•■- V:,..- Vr, ii 

QOAL.^ r AT LSW COST: 




Economy 



Time And Labor Is Saved By Using Electricity 
The Shop Is A Better Place To Work In 
And The Home A Better Place To Live In 
When Electric Current For Power And Light 

Is Provided 

The Use Of Electricity Increases Constantly 

As The Worker Produces More When Liberally 

Supplied With Power And Light 

The Happy Home Is The Well Lighted One 

Both Constantly Require More Electric Current 

Increased Use Means Steady Earnings 

Preferred Stock Dividends Are Paid Each Month 

MINNESOTA ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTING CO. 




.-.t g . f •» ' !!. 




PACE SIX 



Farmers Advised to 

Raise More Colts 



"Go ahead and raise a few colts" 
was the advice given to members of 
a livestock husbandry class of the 
farmers' short course at University 
Farm last week by W. H. Peters, 
chief of the animal husbandry staff 
of the university. 

Mr. Pe'.ers pointed out that in the 
last five years the horse population 
of the United States had declined 
from 19,000,000 to 16,000,000, or 16 
,per cent. The rate of decrease will 
/be even more pronounced the next 
four years, he said, because many old 
J horses will die and there will be com- 
Iparatively few young ones to take 
their places. Colts born in 1926 will 
/ not be ready to go to work before 
1930. 

"Farmers who expect to be able to 
buy all the horses they need at a low 
price the next *en years, as they have 
been able to do in the past, are due 
for a surprise," said Mr. Peters. 
''There is no large surplus of horses 
anywhere nor is there a locality where 
horses are being raised in large num- 
bers except in a few places in west- 
ern range states. And the western 
range bred .horse .is not a highly satis- 
factory animal for use on a cornbelt 
or grain farm." 



I PUBLIC FORUM I 

•ft. : ft 

100 Per Cent America. 

Thief River Falls, Minn., 26-l- j 26. 
The Editor, 

Thief River Falls Tribune. 
Dear Mr. Editor: 

A recent issue of your excellent 
paper made reference to the un-Amer- 
ican spirit of several organizations. 

I do nor-.propose to reply to the in- 
nuendo at any great length but just 
to suggest that there is another side 
to the question. 

All organizations, I understand, of 
the lodge character must first be re- 
gistered at Washington, D. C. and 
this in itself gives at least the bit- 
terness of criticism ' a new object, 
which is not the thing allowed but 
the authority allowing it. The un- 
Americanism is- therefore found, if at 
all, in the authority allowing such or- 
ganization. 

Having obtained a' charter the sec- 
ond attack is made upon certain char- 
acteristics. The K. K. K. which has 
come in for most of this may be men- 
tioned. Its ideals are generally ac- 
cepted when rightly understood. The 
material difference between the or- 
ganization and good 100 per cent 
Americans as I have found it, is sim- 
ply that individuals are unostentati- 
ous while the organization is militant.. 

The greatest objection to the K. K. 
K. work is made against that of its 
secrecy. But has this great republic 
no secret servants ? Does it not ex- 
pend thousands yearly upon this very 
thing? Therefore secrecy of activity 
is not un-American. 

We can find a better view if we ask, 
who fears this secret system? It is 
not ^question of race, religion, or any 
of these superficial differences. It is 
conduct. The objections come from 
the outlaw, bootleggers, 'gamblers, 
thieve? and robbers. Who fears the 
K. K. K. ? The same gang, with the 
home-breaker whose ethical classifi- 
'Catiion is adulterer or fornicator, and 
all other community disturbers. 

The bitterest attack, however, has j 
been f:>r the . religious stand of the 
Klan. This is to be expected. Es- 
pecially as it is the one distinctively 
protestant body which in itself ga- 
thers all, the otherwise isolated mem- 
"bers, of our glorious faith into a con- 
solidated body, therebv enabling us 
to maintain the goodly heritage of re- 
ligious, freedom purchased so dearly 
by" the Pilgrim Fathers. 

No wonder therefore opposition is 
to be expected. The opponents know 
that "Union is Strength," There are 
other organizations of distinctly re- 
ligious character functioning in th ! s. 
city. The Klansman has not uttered 
a word against them. He believes in 
liberty evpn in this sense. 

He is ?00 per cent American, sup- 
porting the relic'iii vh>ch rebnught 
birr this birthrieht of independence, 
and loyal to the laws which maintain 
it. No good citizen need fear this 
"Repnblir watchdog, whether .Tew. Ro- 
man Catholic, or colored neither need 
he try to destrov him.. He is here to 
stav and you sha.l have all the. good 
he ^orps to secure. 

Thanking you the Editor for your 
valuable 'fppcp T am. Sir. 

Yours faithfully, . 

J. Thomas Dixon. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY «, 19M. 



OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE GQUHTY 

I 



ITA 



Thief River Falls, Minnesota, January 
5th, 1820.) 

Pursuant to law the county board for 
Pennington County. Minnesota met In 
the office of the County Auditor in the 
City of Thief River Falls, at 10 o'clock 
In tho forenoon,- , 

The meeting was called to order by the 
Chairman, Commissioner Roy. On roll 
call the following; members were present: 
Commissioners Hanson, Ness, Larson, 
Roy and'; Olson. Commissioners absent 
None. 

Pursuant to Chapter 433 of the revised 
laws of 1015 the. County Board did ex- 
amine Uie accounts of the Auditor and 
the Treasurer and all funds in'.the Treas- 
ury and filed their certified statement of 
the same with the County Auditor of 
which the following is a copy; 
State of Minnesota ) 

(ss 
County of Pennington ) ■ 

A statement of the exact amount of the 
moneys in the Treasury of the County of 
Pennington, State of Minnesota, on the 
5th day of January, 1021). 
Checks arid cash items $ 2,540.29 



Silver and gold . 
Currency 



Deposited 1 in Banks . 



34.50 
. 1.015.00 
. 133,054.2,1 



TOTAL - 



-$130,048.13 



We hereby certify that the foregoing 
statement Is true and correct according 
to our beat knowledge and belief. 

By the Board of County Commissioners, 
Pennington County, Minnesota. \ 
By J. S. ROY, 
Chairman. 

On motion duiy carried the County 
Board adjourned until 1 o'clock in the af- 
ternoon. 

J. S. ROY, 
Chairman 

Pursuant to adjournment the County 
Board met at 1 o'clock. All members 
being present, 

Tho mcetlngSB-as called to order by 
the County Auditor. The Board then 
proceeded to elect a Chalrmon for the en- 
suing year. The result of the election 
was as follows: 

Commissioner Larson received three 
votes, Commissioner Ness one vote. Com- 
missioner Roy, one vote. 

Commissioner Larson having received 
the majority of votes cast he was duly 
declared elected chairman for the ensuing 
year. 

The Board proceeded to ballot for Vice 
Chairman' for the ensuing year: Com- 
missioner Hanson received two votes and 
Commissioner Roy received threee votes. 
Commissioner Roy having received the 
majority votes was duly declared elected 
Vice Chairman for the ensuing year. 



The following was voted on by the 
County Board and duly carried; 

The newly elected Chairman named the 
following committees for the year lD2u: 

Committee on finance, Lareon, Hanson, 
and Roy. 

Committee on ditches, Olson, Ness, Lar- 
son, Hanson, Roy and T. P. Anderson. 

Committee on roads and bridges. Han- 
son,- Larson, Olson, Ness, Roy, and T. P. 
Anderson. 

Court House and jail, Hanson, and T. 
P. Anderson. 

County Board of Health, Dr.' A, W. 
Swedenburg, Roy, and Larson. 

A report of tiie Highway Engineer'waB 
presented to the County Board. The same 
was read* and ordered filed. 

Report of the Probate Judge giving de- 
tails In full of the monies paid out by 
him for Mother's pension was presented 
to the County Board. The same was read 
and duly approved and ordered filed. 

Commissioner Hanson offered the fol- 
lowing resolution and moved Its adoption, 
duly seconded by Commissioner Olson : 

BE IT RESOLVED, that the County 
will pay for the eradication of gophers 
and crows for the year 1D26 In accordance 
with chapter 357 laws of 1015, bounty to 
be paid as follows; For crows, lu cents 
each; pocket gophers, t> cents each; strip- 
ed and common gophers, 3 cents each.- • 

All members present voting for the res- 
olution it was duly approved. 

The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Roy, who moved Its adop- 
tion, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Ness: 

Whereas the County Board of Penning- 
ton County at Its meeting January, 1013, 
did by resolution create a sinking fund 
for the purpose of paying oft. the bonded 
Indebtedness of the County, as the same 
may become due. 

NOW, THEREFORE, Be" It Resolved 
that the sum of Six Thousand Dollars 
($0,000.00) be and the same raised by 
taxation for 1020 and the County Auditor 
hereby is authorized to levy the same 
amount In addition to all other taxes-au- 
thorized by law. 

The resolution was voted on and duly 
carried. 

The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Roy. who moved Its adop- 
tion, duly seconded by Commissioner Ol- 
son: 

BE IT RESOLVED, that the sum of 
One Hundred twenty-five dollars be and 
the same Is hereby appropriated from the 
general Revenue fund of the County to 
the Red River, Valley Development Asso- 
ciation, and that the County Auditor here- 
by is authorized and directed to Issue his 
warrant in said amount to the Red River 
Valley Development Association. 

All members present voting for the res- 
olution it was so duly approved. 



arrived and three bids were received an 
follows: 

Bid of Minneapolis Bridge Company 

For building bridge aa shown by plans, 
$2,400.00. #*•-»— 

Extra piling per lineal foot. Increase 
$1.50; decrease, .05. 

Extra lumber per mill board measure, 
increase, $60.00; decrease, 32.00. 
Extra bolt, per pound Increase, .20; de- 
crease, .05 

Extra work per hour, man, .55; horse 
.30. 

. Work to begin on or before March 
1020 and to complete work on or before 
April 1026. 

Certified check for $150.00accompanied 
bid. 

Bid of H. P. Lund and Sons 

For building bridge as shown by plan. 
$1,878.00.' ' 

Extra piling per lineal foot, increase, 
$.25, 

Extra lumber per mill board measure, 
Increase, $45.00. 

Extra bolts per pound. Increase, $.15. 

Extra work per hour, man, $.40; horse, 
$.30. 

Work to start in January 1026 and to 
complete before April 1st. 1020. 

Certified check for $100.00 accompanied 
said bid. 

Bid of Roy Belcher 

For bulldins bridge as shown on plan, 
$1, < 80.00. 

Extra piling per lineal foot, $.70, in- 
crese: $.70, decrease. 

Extra lumber per mill Board measure. 
$.00, Increase; $.00, decrease. 

Extra bolts per, $.15, Increase; $.15, de- 
crease, 

«.*n Xtra work per nour ' man ?-*°: horse, 

Work to begin February 1, 102(1, and to 
be completed by March 15, 1026. 

Certified check for $100.00 accompanied 
said bid. 

Motion made by Commissioner Olson 
and duly seconded by Commissioner 
Hanson that the bid of Roy Belcher for 
constructing the bridge across the Red 
Lake River near Neptune be accepted. 

Motion was voted on and duly carried. 

On motion duly carried the following 
bills were audited and ordered paid: 

Oen Mercantile Co., supplies. $ 40.50 

G. J. Werstlein. premium on 

bonds i . 30OiOu 

Henry Nelson, blacksmith work _ 3.00 
Minneapolis Bridge Company, 

bridge on Judicial 30 ' 258 60 



0.00 
41.14 



324.50 



- 3.00 
12.00 



TO THE COUNTY BOARD OF PENNINGTON COUNTY MINNESOTA 

Pursuant to law I present below a statement of the amount of taxes levied for 
County purposes for the current year, the amounts collected and apportioned to date 
and the balances uncollected, together with the actual cash balance remaining to 
the credit of each County fund at the close of business on the 31st day of December, 

" T. P. ANDERSON, County Auditor. 

Amt levied Amt col- 
for current lected and Bal uncol- 

year apportioned lected 

~$ 25.880.16 $ 19,925.72 $ 5,054.44 

~ 29,711.01 22.800.95 6,010.00 

72,059.41 47.127.00 24,880.72 

3,222.47 978.04 

4,715.95 1,131,18 

3,930.42 1,192.09 



County Revenue fund „ 
Road and Bridge fund . 
Ditch fund 



County Bond and Interest . 

County Sinking fund . 

Sanatorium fund . 



4,200.51 
6,147.13 

5,122.51 

Balances remaining to the credit of each fund as follows: 

Amounts 
Debit Credit 

County Revenue _.._„ $ 52,580.73 $ 59,517.34 



Road and Bridge . 
Ditch . _.. 



Bond and Interest _. 
Sinking fund 



62,180.64 
80,500.32 
1,592.03 
4,118.11 
12,090.82 



ri,8S3.50 
103,780.38 
1,045.38 
6,488.37 
15,368.30 



Credit 
0,930.61 
9,090.86 
22,280.00 
53.35 
2,370.20 
2,371;4S 



The matter of receiving and opening 
bids for the County Printing for the year 
lft20 was duly taken up by the Board. 
Only one bid was that of the Thief River 
" lis Tiinco-. 
To the Honorable Board of County Com- 
missioners, Pennington County, Minne- 
sota. 
Gentlemen: 

Pursuant to call for bids and offer 
therefore, the undersigned publishers and 
proprietors of the Thief River Falls Times, 
a weekly newspaper as defined by law and 
published In the City of Thief River Falls, 
Pennington County, Minnesota, hereby 
oiler to publish in said Thief River Falls 
Times the notice 'and list of delinquent 
taxes to be published in said county of 
Pennington as required by law during the 
year 1920, the rate and the amount to 
be paid for such publication to be the 
legal rate allowed by law therefor, name- 
ly 15 cents for each description In such 
tax list. 

The undersigned publishers further of- 
fer to publish in the Thief River Fails 
Times as required by law during the year 
1920 the financial statement uf said coun- 
ty, proceedings of the County Board and 



The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Olson who moved its adop- 
tion, duly seconded by Commissioner Roy: 

Be it resolved that the sum of $300.00 
hereby is ordered transfered from the 
General Revenue fund of the County to 
the County Attorney's contingent fund, 
and the County Auditor and the County 
Treasurer hereby are" 1 authorized to make 
the proper transfer on their books in their 
respective offices. 

■ Resolution was voted on and duly car- 
ried. 

The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Hanson who moved Its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Olson : " ■ 

BE IT RESOLVED, That the sum of 
$300.00 hereby is ordered transfered from 
the General Revenue fund to the Inciden- 
tal fund and the County Auditor and the 
County Treasurer hereby are authorized 
to make the proper transfer on the books 
in their respective offices. 

The resolution was voted on and duly 
approved. 

The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Hanson who moved 'Its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 



all official publications of Bald county, as Ness: 

required by law or customarily published, j WHEREAS, The Comity did heretofore 
The rate and amount to be paid therefor recover Judgment against the Citizens 
and for each thereof to be the rate stip- State Bonk of Thief River Falls, and the 
ulated by law, namely 90 cents per folio, sureties on the County Depository bond 
for the first insertion and 45 cents per given by said bank, and Whereas Rasmus 
folio for the second and each subsequent Oen and Christian O. Granum have paid 
insertion and 25 cents per folio as stlpu- said Judgment In the sum of $1287.43. 
luted by law for all tabular matter,* said NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED* 
compensation being additional to regular that the County Treasurer be and hereby 
rate. Is authorized and Instructed to assign to 

We further agree to furnish bonds with the said Rasmus Oen and Christian O 
sufficient [sureties for such publications Granum the claim filed by him in behalf 
or all of them as required by law. of the County with the State Banking 

If the foregoing bids are accepted and Department agaist Baid Bank, 
agreed to by said Pennington County, the All members present voting'for the res- 
undersigned propose to offer and. make olutlon it was so declared approved. ' 
each of such publications once without On motion duly carried the county board 
charge to the county in the Thief River adjourned until 9 o'clock in the forenoon 
Falls Tribune, a weekly newspaper pub- January 0. 



Defends Schools, 

Mr. Editor: 

Someone once, truly said, "It takes 
:il] kinds of people to make a world." 
-After reading an article in the Public 
IV -im of The Tribune for Wednesday 
January 20, 1026, I was pleased to 
thivk that when *he author of the 
iirt : ?le died there would be one less 
.specie of parasites in this world. 

I rsually can find words to express 
my opinions* but no language within 
,, r .,-p — .V"* f, r , >an, European or 
fi-r.^ano — contains words, capable of 
e-uri'ssinjr my contempt for a person 
vlv- "ill write an article like that and 
then be so ashamed of it, or his name 
n> '« rrfti=e to *;i-cn his article. In his 
lyirar attark upon the high school he 
("■rp^essed himself clearly as a person, 
why having never been near a place 
iniE^ines it as it would be, were he 
the-e. 

Kis familiarity with the eternal 
ooy. the several methods of skinning 
others, and the -manner of walking up 
to the mahogany — in the good old 
days? — slapping down a small coin 
«nd getting a glass of beer, convinces 
me of the type of a human anthropoid 
.such a person must ne. 

Sincerely, 
HOWARD DAVIDSON, 
.Senior-Lincoln High School. 



EM1L LARSON, 

<- Chairman. 
T. P. ANDERSON, 
County Auditor 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota, January 
6th, 1026. 

The County Board met pursuant to ad- 
journment at "9 o'clock A. M. AH mem- 
bers present. 
.Meeting called to order by the chair- 



Almost two-thirds of the 6tudent 
"body of Transylvania College, Ken- 
tor 1 - ■» — *"•• **■-*■*■ ^y^ Vhnr all or 



llshed In ; the City of Thief River Falls, 
In said county and without charge to the 
county furnish supplements of the notice 
and delinquent tax list and financial state- 
ment to the St. Hllalre Spectator a week- 
ly newspaper published at St Hllaire in 
said County of Pennington. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MATTSON BROS., 
; ■ By A. E. Mattson, 

Publishers- of the Thief River Fails . 
Times. ' j The following resolution was offered by 

The following resolution was offered by , Commissioner Olson who moved its "adop^ 
Commissioner Ness who moved its adop- tlon, duly seconded by Commissioner Han- 
tlon, duly^seconded by Commissioner Roy. 'son: 

Be it resolved that the bid of the Thief • r R tt o-peni wn mi,., .. „ _ 
River Falls Time, be accepted and that ,„{£ dLriS_*5l<,_? ' U,e "*" more 

■the County Auditor arid the Chairman . SL?nnfni?S ?£» .iS,' - ' 

of the County Board be. and hereby Is, ',„ B s e Jg JJJ "f, *},*$! Z "^ c 1 °. 1 ?" comm P" 
authorized to enter Into n contract on be- g-S' S^J^J^ 15 ,7; ^"R 41 ' 
hair or Pennington County according to JfK ™i»i!L !S%„aV Sf «, between 
law. Such publication to be at the maxl- 5| D 2ff°™~ £? th? S^ e 8 » llt i"™- 
mum legal rate according 'to law, and -a ffi SSii?™^, to .JS e SL™. 1 ?" ?_ the 

„ b c co'rd'ln C , , h o e ia S r °' S *~' mM """"^ • ^' « «"• "'»«" sSn^aud'S 
according, to law. . 8 and 17c and 10, 10 and. 15, 11 and U. 

All members present voting for the res- and 12 and 13, all of township 152 Hange 
olutlon It was so duly declared approved. 40, Deer Park, to the NE corner of the 

The following resolution was offered by last said section 13 and continuing thence 
Commissioner Hanson who moved Its east on line between, sections 7 and 18 8 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner and IT, fl and 10, and 10 and 15 of Twp -62 
°' a o n; and Range 39, Hickory, to the NE corner 

BE IT ! RESOLVED. That the Thief of the last said section 15 thence south on 
River Falls Times, a weekly newspaper line between sections 15 and 14 22 and 23' 
published! at Thief River Falls. Minne- 20 and 27, and 34 and S5, alLof said Two; 
sola, be, and the same hereby Is, deslg- 152 and Range 39. HlckoryJ'to the south- 
nated by the County Board or Pennington em boundary of Pennington County 
bounty as the newspaper In which the Be and the same hereby Is de2gnated 
■ btlce and list of real estate tales remain- as State Aid road No. 14.* And be It fur: 
J 18 ^S!? < ? u ?'f, ? n "■l.A' f ay ° f Janu " ther "solved that wo respectfully request 
ary, 1020, shall be published. the Honorable Commissioner of Highway* 

All members present voting for the res- to concur In the above resolution. 

SS° n . u :W T" "° de ?'?f ed approved. I All members present voting for the res- 

The fo lowing resolution was offered br oluUon.lt was so declared approved. 
S? n "S',1 ner ""It Jfl mov . cd "f ^ dop " A at"'*"'** of the Onandal «mdiUon 
Uon, duly seconded by Commissioner of the county of Pennington, at the close 

"bITS RESOLVED, that the salaries 1^X1^'^?^^ SgK 
v°ir U iS M f0 Ki n ?o,S?' omolBiB for *o showing in deuStte'SSsSuons of "the 
IZ, 2? £Z™,? ' ows: .,,™,J Aud "° r ' B ° fflM was submitted to S? 

£„' f .?f„ h ° ij 'J-2S2-S2 ? ount y *»« by. the County Auditor and 

?h£m At ? oraov J-SO0.00 . on moHon was dirty approved. ■ 

?Vriff ....T.irn,- ^nS 1 . Th .'l Ume '"£. ™»lvlng and opening bids 

•mm as ; Jailor , 240.00 for the construcUon of. a bridge Scross 

I ■•■■.. __ 840.00 tie Red Lake River, near Neptune, had 



New Sanitary Supply Co., sup- 
plies 

Ed Lee, repairs on Jail _; , 

The Times Company, supplies and 

legal pubUcaUons 

Dr. Blegen, medical care of Brad- 
ley _______ 

Henry Cousin, use of plow . 

Sanitary Service Company, sup- 
plies _ , B7 „ 

Town of Star, contagious disease 

expense __ _ 51.00 

warren Pharmacy, lnedicine for 

Bradley _ 3.35 

Williams Stationary Co., supplies 5.73 
Fritz Cross Company, records _ 80.52 
Miller Davis Company, supplies _ 10.10 
Japs Olson Co., spilies ________ 53.54 

There being no further business the 
County Board adjourned until Thursday, 
January 28th, at 10 o'clock In the fore- 
noon. 

E_IL LARSON. 
Chairman. 
Attest: 

T. P. ANDERSON. 
County Auditor and 
Ex-Officlo Clerk of the Board. 



CITY COUNCIL 



Tblef River Falls, Minnesota 

A regular meeting of the City Council 
was called to. order by Alfred- Bredeson, 
President, at eight o'clock P. M. Tuesday, 
January 12th, 10_0, with all members 
present. 1 

Minutes of the organization meeting of 
.January 5th were read and approved as 
read. 

Superintendent SImley of the schools 
appeared before the council with the re- 
quest that the Council donate the use of 
the city auditorium for high school basket 
ball games and tournament and the date 
of January _0th for class play, and that 
the Council pay the repair charges on the 
bass instrument used by the band and 
purchase a bass drum. Alderman : Paul- 
son moved that the requests be granted 
which was seconded by Alderman Iverson 
and carried. ^ 

F. L. Chrlstenson appeared before the 
council in behalf of the base ball team 
and requested the donation of the use of 
the city auditorium for two evening for 
the purpose of puEUng on dances; pro- 
ceeds to go towards purchasing uniforms, 
which matter was laid over for further 
consideration. 

Rev. E. H. Lorenz as spokesman for 
the Protestant Pastors of Thief' River 
Falls presented and read a petition signed 
by the Pastors requesting the council to 
take steps 'to close the moving picture 
theatres of the city during Sundays. Al- 
derman Paulson moved that the communi- 
cation be laid over for consideration' at 
some future period which motion was sec- 
onded by Alderman Brumund and carried. 

Reports of the City Clerk, City Treas- 
urer. Chief of P611ce, Municipal Judge, 
Librarian and Dairy Inspector were on 
motion accepted and ordered filed. ' 

James Cosgrove presented an applica- 
tion for refreshment license and a motion 
was introduced by Alderman Brumund 
that Issuance of license be approved. Mo- 
tion was seconded by Alderman Paulson 
and no objections being entered thereto 
the motion was declared carried. 

Two applications for public dance per- 
mits were presented. The B. of R. E. on 
January 22nd and the American Legion 
Auxiliary on January 21st. Issuance of 
permits was on motion of Alderman Iver- 
son, seconded by Alderman Fossum, de- 
clared approved. 

Mayor "W. W. Pilchard, Jr., presented 
appointments as follows : A. W. Crown as 
Chief of Police: John Bratrud as member 
of the Park Board; Geo. M. Wilson as 
member of the Cemetery Commission^, Al- 
derman Brumund moved that the appoint- 
ments be approved which was seconded by 
Alderman Paulson and declared carried. 

The Carnegie Library Board presented 
a recommendation increasing the' salaries 
of the Librarian and Assistant Alderman 
Chrlstofferson moved that the increase be 
approved which seconded by Alderman 
Brumund and, there being no objections 
thereto, the same was declared approved. 

The First & Peoples State Bank as city 
depository presented additional security 
for city moneys and, upon approval of the 
city attorney, ' Alderman Brumund moved 
that the same be accepted and filed which 
motion was seconded -fly Alderman Fos- 
sum and carried. 

The council then proceeded with the re- 
mainder, of the appointments for- the va- 
rious city positions." Alderman Brumund 
moved that appointments be made by bal- 
lot which motion was seconded -by Alder- 
man Iverson and declared carried. .' ■_ 

The result of:baUoting *Qr office of City 
Physician Indicated a vote of three bal- 
lots' for Dr. Bowers , and three for Dr 
Froebllch on four consecutive ballots af 
ter which appointment was deferred. 

Balloting for City Attorney :. Result of 
ballot indicated five votes for Fred T. 
Scanlan and 1 vote for H. O. Choromle 
Fred T. Scanlan was declared appointed 
City Attorney for the ensuing term. 

Alderman Brumund moved that Emily 
G. Fossum be retained as Deputy City 
Clerk for the ensuing: term which motion 
was seconded by Alderman Fossum -and 
carried unanimously. 

Balloting for Street Ctominlflslon : result 
of ballot indicated five votes for H. O. 
Hoff and one for James A. Burrell. H. o. 
Hoff was' declared appointed as Street 
Commissioner for the ensuing term. 

Balloting for Poor -ialron: result of 



ballot indicated a vote of five for Mr_. 
Peter yoldneus and one for Mrs, A, Erlck- 
son. lira. Peter Voldneas was declared 
appointed Poor Matron for the ensulng- 
tenn. • 

_ Balloting .'for Janitor of'the City Audi- 
torium: result of ballot Indicated a vote 
of fpur for R, G. Cook, one for E. O. 
Erickson and one for E. A/Mostue. R. 
* F°?.. _f as de clare3- appointed Janitor 
of Auditorium, for the ensuing term. 

Balloting for Incinerator Tender:- result 
of ballot Indicated, a unanimous vote for 
Jolin Holmgren .who was declared ap- 
pointed Incinerator Tender for the ensulnc 
term. 

.Alderman Brumund moved that Paul 
Mldderigh be retained as Janitor of Jail 
ror the ensuing term which motion was 
seconded by Alderman Paulson and de- 
clared carried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved that Theo. 
Lee be retained as Fire Teamster for the 
ensuing term which motion was seconded 
by Alderman Brumund and declared car- 
ried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved that Ole Leg- 
void be retained t os Superintendent of 
Water and Light Department for the en- 
suing term which motion was seconded by 
Alderman Chrlstofferson and declared car- 
ried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved that appoint- 
ments of Plant Engineer* be made as 
follows: Chas. Krause, 1st Engineer; G. 
Adolph, 2na Engineer; Gust Anderson, 3rd 
Engineer; Edison Gannon,- 4th Engineer* 
which motion wbb seconded by Alderman 
Chrlstofferson and declared carried unan- 
imously. 

Alderman Paulson moved that W. S. 
Ferris and Robert Nelson be appointed 
ci *y electricians for the ensuing term 
which motion was seconded by Alderman 
Christpfierson and declared carried unani- 
mously. 

Alderman Brumund moved that Palmer 
Efteland be retained as Garbage Collec- 
tor for the ensuing term which motion 
was seconded by Alderman Christoffei- 
son , i J nd declared carried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved the retention 
of L-j R. Twete as Dairy Inspector for the 
ensuing term which motion was seconded 
by Alderman Iverson and declared car- 
ried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved the retention 
or Lars Erickson as Engineer of Filter 
Plant for the ensuing term which motion 
wa ? a . ec onded by Alderman ChriBtofferson' 
and declared carried unanimously. 

On recommendation of Mayor Pilchard 
Alderman Paulson moved that the salar- 
ies of the Chief of Police and Patrolman 
be fixed at $125.00 and $100.00 per month 
respectively. Motion was seconded by Al- 
derman Brumund and declared carried 
unanimously. 

Alderman Brumund moved that the sal- 
ary of the Judge of Municipal Court be 
fixed at $100.00 per month which motion 
was secon_ed by Alderman CEfistofferson 
and declared carried unanimously. 

Alderman Paulson moved that the sal- 
aries of the City Physician and Health 
officer be fixed at $150.00 each per year 
which motion was seconded by Alderman 
Iverson and declared carried unanimous- 
ly. 

Alderman Brumund Introduced a resolu- 
tion appropriating to the Mayor's Con- 
tingent Fund the sum of $500.00 which 
was declared carried unanimously. 

Alderman Brumund introduced a reso- 
lution urging the Standard Oil Company 
to complete tho construcUon of their gas 
and oil distributing station on the East 
Side on their property and that a copy 
of the resolution be mailed to the Man- 
ager of their company at 'Fargo. N. D. 
Adoption of the same was seconded by 
Alderman Paulson and declared carried. 

Resolution fixing the salaries of offi- 
cials and employees for the ensuing term 
appropriating $500.00 to the Mayor's Con- 
tingent Fund and allowing regular sched- 
ule of bills were Introduced and declared 



There being no further business the 
council On motion adjourned. 

ALFRED BREDESON. 
President of the Council. 
Attest: 
P. G. PEDERSON, 
City Clerk. 



•RESOLUTION 

At a regular meeting of the City Coun- 
cil held January 12, 1026, Alderman Bru- 
mund seconded by Alderman Paulson, In- 
troduced the following resolution and 
moved its adoption: 

BE IT RESOLVED, By the City Coun- 
cil of the City of Thief River Falls,- Min- 
nesota that 

WHEREAS, the Standard Oil Company, 
a corporation, has heretofore seen fit to 
begin the construction, within the cor- 
porate limits of the City of Thief River 
Falls, of a branch station to be known as 
a Bulk Station, and to be used for the dis- 
tribution of the products of the Standard 
Oil Company throughout the territory 
within the vicinity of Thief River Falls 
and elsewhere, and- 

WHEREAS, the- Standard Oil Company 
has since seen fit) to abandon and dis- 
continue said construction work, and 

WHEREAS, we believe that the com- 
pletion and future operation of the said 
Bulk Station Is and would be fn further- 
ance of the Interests of Thief River Falls, 
and would be a desirable addition to the 
business and commercial Institutions op- 
erating within the City of Thief River 
Falls. 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOL- 
ved, that we do hereby make known to 
the Standard Oil Company our interest 
in the furtherance, of the operations as 
hereinbefore set forth, and do hereby cor- 
dially request and Invite the Standard Oil 
Company to resume 'its operations and 
construction of the said Bulk Station with 
a view to Its completion and operations 
at the earliest date possible; 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that 
the' Standard Oil Company, through Its 
proper officers at Fargo, North Dakota, 
be presented with a copy of this resolu- 
tion. 

ROLL CALL 

Aldermen voting Yes: Fossum, i Brede- 
son, Brumund, Chrlstofferson, Iverson, 
Paulson. 

Aldermen voting No: None. 

Resolution declared passed. 

ALFRED BREDESON. 
President of the Council. 

Presented to the Mayor, Jan. 12, 1920. 

Approved Jan. 18, 1926. 

W. W. PRICHARD, Jr.* 
Mayor. 
Attest: P. G. PEDERSON, 

City Clerk. 



Resolution 
At a regular meeting of the City Coun- 
cil held January 12, 1925, Alderman 
Brumund, seconded by Alderman Chrls- 
tofferson. Introduced the following resolu- 
tion and moved Its adoption: 

Be It Resolved. By the City Council of 
the City of Thief River Falls, Minnesota, 
that 

Whereas, the council deems It necessary 
and expedient in order to advance the In- 
terest of the city, that an appropriation 
be made for the Mayor's contingent fund. 
Now, Therefore, be it resolved that the 
sum of $500.00 be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriatecT out of the current funds 
of the city, for the Mayor's contingent 
fund, and the cleric and' treasurer arc 
hereby directed to transfer said sum from 
the Current Expense Fund of the City -to 
the Contingent Fund of the Mayor. 
ROLL CALL 
Aldermen voting Tes: Fossum, Brede- 
son, Brumund, Chrlstofferson.- Iverson and 
Paulson. . . 

Aldermen voting No : None. 
.'Resolution declared passed. 

. ALFRED BREDESON, 
President of the Council. 
Presented to the. Mayor Jan, 12, 1296. 
Approved Jan. 18, 1926. 

W. W. PRICHARD, JR., 
Mayor. 
Attest: 
P. G. PEDERSON, 
. City Clerk. 



Iverson, seconded by Alderman Brumund. 
Introduced the following resolution and 
moved its adoption: 

Be It Resolved, by the City Council of 
the City of Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
that the salaries of tht- following named 
officers and employees of the ' City of 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota, for the terra 
beginning January 5th, 1926, be. and tne 
same are hereby fixed as follows: 

Mayor _ __. $100.00 per year 

Aldermen . ___. $100.00 per year 

City Physician $150.00 per year 

Health Officer $150.00 per year 

City Assessor $500.00 per year first year; 

$300.00 per year second year. 

City Clerk. — — __ $150.00 per month 

Deputy City Clerk and Bookkeeper 

_™ __ $110.00 per month 

C ty Attorney ___ _. $50.00 per month 

SL 1 ?' Treasurer — ■ ?25-00 per month 

Chief of Police $125.00 per month 

Patrolman , __ $100.00 per monUi 

Municipal Judge $100.00 per montii 

btceet Commissioner — $115.00 per month 

™ ° r * Iatron $35.00 per month 

Fire Teamster, self and team . 



i a ^i7ZS~7~T~X $1(5.00 per month 

Janitor of Auditorium „ $S0]" 
Inclnerator Tender 
Garbage Collector 
Janitor of Jail 



[00 per month 
$75.00 per month 
$75.00 per month 
$15.00 per month 



B and Di rector {during school year) 

Dairy^s^tor ^li^oo^r SSfi 

— $75.00 per month 

$15.00 per month 



Librarian 



^2 L l^FFP?- 00 P^ .month Oct 
PermoS ^ ba ' ance °' >«' *<>■« 

Sexton of Cemetery xn 5 on _-_ m __ tk 

Superintendent Water and TuBnTlSIp? 

FtaTEnglneer _____ Vl«ra _ r m„»_ 

Tiiird Engineer . $120.50 per monrli 

Fourth Engineer $115.00 gr SonS 

First Electrician . $115.00 per month 

Second Electrician _ $115.00 per month 
Engineer Filtration Plant 



$&,.00 per month 

The salary of the City Clerk shall In- 
clude services as Secretary of the Ceme- 
tery Commission. The salaries shall be " 
paid on the first and 15th day of each 
month In the case of those whose salaries 
are fixed by the month ; where salaries are 
fixed by the year payment shall be made 
quarterly beginning with March 1st of 
each year. The Mayor and Clerk are au- 
thorized and directed to issue the City's 
warrants in accordance with the above 
schedule. 

ROLL CALL 
Aldermen voting Yes: Fossum. Brede- 
son, Brumund, Christofferson, Iverson 
and Paulson. Aldermen voting No: None. 
Resolution declared passed. 

ALFRED BREDESON, 
President of the Council. 
Presented to the Mayor Jan. 12, 1926 
Approved Jan. 18. 1926. 

W. W. PRICHARD. JR., 

Mayor. 



Attest : 
'. G. 



PEDERSON. 
City Clerk. 



Resolution 

At a regular meeting of the City Council . 
held January 12th, 1920, Aderman Paul- 
son seconded by Alderman Fossum Intro- 
duced the following resolution and moved 
Its adoption: 

BE IT RESOLVED, by the City Coun- 
cil of the City; of Thief River Falls, Min- 
nesota, that the .following bills be allowed, 
to-wit: 

CURRENT FUND 
Street Commissioner's payroll ,.-.., ? 51 <« 
Thief River Falls Times, publica- 
tions , 



KJewel Products Co.. 's 
ing compound 



tit, sweep- 



Water and Light DepC power 

and electrical supplies „ 

N. W. Bell Telephone Co.. pfione 

rent, tolls -1 

Daniel Shaw, premium on bond __. 

Andy Craik, repairs 

Ed Lee, repairs 

Paul Medderigh. fire warden ser- 
vices . 

Inkonomy Inkwell Co., inkwells .. 

G. G. Williams, misc. mdse. 

S. JT. Poston, gravel . 



11.8_ 
40.00 



. Beolntlon 
At a resrnlflr n-«*it1nir of the CIry Coun- 
cil held __.-.".-.•■: ?'^:. "-" ■■ 



POOR FUND 

Scott Laird, scliool supplies $ 

G. G. Williams, paint, varnish _ 
Peoples Co-op Store Co., groceries 

Carl Froseth, footwear 

Water and Light Dept., light ser- 
vices 

Fanner's Meat Market, meats " 

N. W. Bell Telephone Co., phone 

rent 

Riverside Grocery, groceries I 

AUDITORIUM FUND 
Lnion Plbg. _? Htg. Co., repairs _ 
N. W. Bell Telephone Co., phone 

rent „ 

Water and Light Dept., light and 

water 

Thief Grocery Co., misc. mdse. _ 

LIBRARY FUND 
St. Paul. Book & Sty. Co.. books „$ 
Seminary Book Bindery Co., re- 
Water and Light Dept., light and 

water __________ 

Oen Mercantile Co., misc. mdse. 

CONSUMERS DEPOSIT FUND 
Water and Light Dept, deposit 
. refunds . . • 

i ELECTRIC LIGHT FUND 

Scott Laird, office supplies $ 

Red Lake Ice Co.. cooler Ice 

Robert Nelson, labor - „ 

Water and light Dept.. freight, 
express 



76.33 

LlO 



7.51 
1.38 



1.40 

6.00 
25.28 



Westinghouse Electric Mfg. Co 

electrical supplies . 

Reliable Motor Co., repairs „ 

Jewel Electric Motor Co., 'repairs 
Electric Supply Co., electrical 

supplies 



34.74 
5.GS 
19.71 



Kelley How " Thomson 
trical supplies 



Co., elec- 



— Paul Electric Co., electrical 
supplies 

Duluth Electrical Supplies Co., 
electrical supplies -• 

Phoenix Light Company, elec- 
trical supplies . 

N. W.- Electric Equipment Co.. 
electrical supplls . 

Thief River Falls Times, publica- 
tions - 

G. G. Williams, misc, supplies __ 

water and Light Dept. elect. 
supplies' ' ^ 

N ie5Jt' BeI1 Telephone Co - Phone 
Oen Mercantile Co.. misc. supplies 
H?n°_"° my inkwell Co.. Inkwells!! 
Henry Gran, repairs 
Wlnton Nichols Lbr. Co.. boards 
Standard Oil Co., oil 

ww WATERWORKS FUND 

- r__.'. Telephone Co.. phone 



17.85 
2.43 

7.68 

7.» 

8.15 
6.08 
6.M 
.95 
12.B3 



Ed Lee, repairs 



3.00 

59.66 

. t . ROLL CALL 

Aldermen voting Aye: Fossum. Brede- 
son. Brumund, ChrlstoCferson, Iverson, 

Aldermen voting Naye: None. 
Resolution declared passed. - - 

" ALFRED BREDESON, 
President of the Council 
Presented to the Mayor Jan. 12, 1920. 
Approved Jan. 18, 1926. • 
W. W. PRICHARD, Jr., 
Mayor. 
Attest: P. G. PEDERSON 
City Cleric. . 

'•Bepeat€rs''.ia 1 the Goshen, Ind, 
high school have been reduced about 
10 per cent by an effective system of 
checking up every two weeks children 
who are threatened with failure in 
their studies. .Teachers and the 
pruicipalcooperate in the effort to 
reduce student mortality, and prob- 
lem cases are' given special diagnosis 
and receive individual attention. 

Recent legislative action win great- 
ly increase the income of the Univer- 
--*-. -"pcrto T>ico. 



_■:*.:__ __*.*__L ,... ; j^._1 ^-.^-^ 



i 




^S^PPSti. . */^.rr'i/i--- 



|Sp!>|» 




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1926. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 




c5ocip 



fiL 




riano Recital. 

Mrs. Dori^ Halvorson Pope will 
present a number of her pupils in a 
piano recital to be given next Tuesday 
evening in the Lincoln high school at 
8 o'clock. [ 

Parents, friends and all who are in- 
terested are invited to attend the re- 



PAGE 7NTcp;?D 



Banns Announced. 
Banns have been read in the St. cital. . _ 

Bernard's church announcing the ap- 1 The prograai is as follows; 



proaching marriage of Miss MaEda- 
llne Thill, daughter of Mrs. J. Thill, 
and Christian Engelstad, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter Engelstad, who re- 
side southeast of this city. 

In honor of Miss Thill and Mr. En- 
gelstad, Mrs. Ole Engelstad entertain- 
ed at a five o'clock dinner Sunday 
evening. Besides the guests of honer 
the guest list included Misses Marie 
Thill, and Alice Mulry and Maurice 
Holzknecht. 

Tonight Miss Thill is the guest of 
honor at a miscellaneous shower giv- 
en by the Lady Foresters in the club 
rooms of the St. Bernard's church. 
•«• 

Surprise Party. 
Monday evening members of the 
Swedish Mission church and their 
friends pleaasntly surprised Mr. and 
Mrs. Emil Olson at the home at 229 
Marklev Ave. N. A program was 
given, which consisted of several se- 
lections by the ladies quartet, two 
piano solos by Mrs. J. Jackson and 
short remarks by Rev. Lundell, Gust 
Anderson and B. Dan Bjorkman, after 
which the evening was spent in a so- 
cial way. Refreshments were served l 
by the ladies at 11. Mr. and Mrs. I 
Olson were presented with a purse of ( 13. 
money. I 



Duet of the Dolls ....Brett 

Celeste Crown 

2. Duet -.....-...Old English Carol 

Richard Nelson — Donald Hanson 

3. Three Little Chickens. Grant- 

Schaefer.... 1 . -...Sidney Lieberman 

4. Dancing Daisy Fields Mokrejs 

Donald Hanson 

6. Duet. .-..- German Folk Tune 

Sidney Lieberman— Celeste Crown 

; 6. Valse Grazioso.... Bentley 

Mazurka- .; .. Masters 

Dorothy Anderson 

October Woods .... Bentley 

Nimble Fingers ..... — . Orth 

Richard Nelson 

Rondo ..'. Lichner 

Althea Krueger (Plummer) 
The Mill .- Jensen 



7. 



8. 



9. 



10. 



11. 



Library Notes. ! 14. 

In spite of the storm last Saturday 
afternoon, thirty-five of our small jg 
friends grouped about the open fire , 
and enjoyed a cozy story hour. Miss 1( . 
Bloomsness and Mrs. Zeh proved , 
themselves gifted story tellers. Miss 
Bloomsness used Hawthorne's "Snow !?• 
Image," Kathryn Pvle's "Rabbit That 
Played a Trick On the Elephant," and 
"Hold Fast" Mrs. Zeh told an or- 
iginal story of a useful little tree. I Liszt 

Hiss Easter of the Knox school will l g, 
have charge of the stories on next 
Saturday. The time is 1:15 p.m. in 
■the main room of the library. 



Warrior's Song Heller 

Fern DeVelling 

Shepherd's Lullaby. -...Friml 

Richard Mabey 

Duet — Moonlight Revels Andre 

Fem DeVelling;— <3race Provencher 

12. Hovering Butterflies Gaynor 

Punch and Judy ~. Lemont 

Ruth Bessler 

The Rope Dancer. Koelling 

Elfin Dance ..Gurlitt 

Helen Hermanson 

Will o* the Wisp Jungmann 

Grace Provencher 

To the Rising Sun .Torjussen 

Joyce Nelson 

Valse Caprice — Newland 

Alice Larson 

Polish Dance Scharwenka 

Spanish Dance . Abelle 

, Catherine Hjertos 
On Wings of Song..„Mende!ssohn- 



Maccabes Install. 
Mm. Mary Volkmann of Minne- 
apolis, state commander of' the Mac- 
cabes, was installing officer at the next Sunday at 10. 
installation held by. the local Mac- at 11:45. Ladies' 



Augustana Church. ■ 

Albin A. Larson,' Pastor. 

Services in American' language 

0. Sunday school 

Aid meets next 



cabee order here last evening. Mrs. Friday, anuary 29, at the church par- 
Mary Lane was installed as command- loraj at 3 o'clock, entertained by Mrs. 
~ Mrs. Naomi Bredeson, lieutenant John Lorigran. 



commander; Mrs. May Kline, past 
commander; Mrs. Anna Rlsberg, chap- 
lain; Mrs. Ruth Halldin, finance keep- 
er; Agnes Hermanson, collector; Va- 
leria Steen, record keeper; Karen 
Johnson, sergeant; Esther Gjertson, 
lady at arms; Anna Moline, sentinel; 
Anna Amon, picket; and Ella Wal- 
dorf, captain of the guard. Miss Dora lT „_,_ „,,,,,. _,..--.., • o t 
Nadeauf district deputy, of Duluth, ^W^ bh . c w . orsh '?. " ^, m '- S »J'- 
was also here to witness the ceremo- ' J" 1 *. ™* ° f "> B *"?>>' •' " _ T , h ° 
nies. A social time followed the in- , F^. wiU ***<* m anthem Official 
stallation and refreshments were serv- bo ?£* m «' s af ? er 6 S™^' 7:S ,? p ^ : 
ed at midnight. The next meeting |"J>l«t, "Securing the Crown." The 
will be in the form of a card party, Epworth^League chorus girls will 



The, Willing Workers meet at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Carlson, 
007 Arnold Ave. N„ Tuesday evening 
February 2, at 8 o'clock. 
*** 
Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Sunday 3lst: 10 a.m., school and 
adult Bible class. 6:30 p. m. Epworth 



and will be held February 9th. 

a** 

For Mr. and Mrs. Brodin. 
Friends (ot Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Bro- 
din pleasantly surprised them last Fri- 
day evening when they gathered at 
their home at 424 St. Paul Avenue 
South. About forty guests were pres- 
ent Several selections were sung by 
the ladies' quartet, and Gust Ander- 
son read an original poem. C. Gust- 
afson and Rev. Lundell both gave 
short addresses. A purse of money 
was presented to Mr. and Mrs. Bro- 
din. The remainder of the evening ^".S,. 1 ^,?.-?' J ™ Dnca ' J aaa ^ e ' 
was spent in a social way, and at mid- ;3"* ^Pi^^J^S^i^A 11 ,^!; 
night a delicious lunch was served. 
«*• 

Elks' Dancing Party. 
Last Friday evening the Elks en- 



sing. Wednesday: 7:80 p.m., class 
meeting and Bible study, /textbook, 
Epistle to the Romans. Friday 7 
p.m. Scout Cubs meet in the church 
basement 

♦•* 
Sw. Ev. Mission Church. 
O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 
The pastora of the N. R. Valley 
Mission churches will meet for their 
quarterly conference here this week, 
commencing Wednesday at 7:30 p.m., 
continuing Thursday, Friday and Sat- 
urday, with two sessions daily at 2 
p.m. and 7:30 pjn. Biblical addresses 



day evening and Sunday with three 
I big services, 11 p.m., 2:30 p.m., and 

7:30 p.m. will be the Young People's 

I mid-winter rally. Representatives 

;«„„j „ ,]„„„;;,.- „„_i "a. ,. • jfrom the different places will take 

£. y »Lf S ,L P ™ rty T thBt -V ¥11" '■ P 81 * Mr - c - S- Pillistrom from War- 
at their club rooms. In spite of the ;«„ wi „ ^y. Saturda y eTening . Sun . 

Jie usual good day afternoon and evening the Amer^ 



Mavie Lutheran Church. 
.'-•..» 6. Sabo, Pastor. . ■ 
Services Sunday, Jan. 31, in the 
Telemarkeh church at 11 a. m. and in' 
the Highlanding church at 3 p. m. The 
confirmation class will meet after 
services Sunday. 



Births. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Aasland on 
Monday, January 26, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David Evenson, 
Monday, January 26th, a daughter. 

Subscribe to The Tribune. 



small attendance 



time was enjoyed. 



ican language will be used. Sunday 
school as usual 'at 10 a.m. A hearty 
welcome to the public is extended to 



18. 



Leonore Lieberman 



20. 



Entertains at 'Stag. 
Mrs. H. S. Snyder, 611 Main Ave. 
N., Monday evening entertained a 
number of men in honor of her hus- 
band, the occasion being his 31st 
birthday anniversary. A four course 
dinner was served at six-thirty after 
which the guests enjoyed a social 
hour at cards. 

««* 

Birthday Party. 



21. 



Dragon Flies Chaminade 

Dedication . Schumann-Liszt 

Gladys Weeks 

Maiden's Wish Chopin-Liszt 

Romance Sibelius 

Rita Fiterman 

Ballade— Op. 24 Grieg 

Lucile Hermanson 



Seventh Birthday Celebrated. 
Five little boys gathered at the H. 
W- Semisch home last Friday after- 
noon to help Merle celebrate his sev- 
enth birthday anniversary. The af- 
t „,-* o„*„-j.. '«.__-.» t, ternoon was spent playing games, and 
Krirf--n^w y - ^"t "' Mrs \ Rc ! y at five o'dock the guests were seated 
W* „f £ ? S d j' Xte J? ^^ ln « a table, prettily decorated with 



a delicious lunch. A large pink and 
white birthday cake formed the tables 



centerpiece, and bore one pink candle 



day. At the close of the afternoon 
* which was spent playing games, a de- 

rftMs'Ts 11 :?m \ fta K e foreve^one-'of SSeV Mere's y^are. 
&X'3»" w?trten m p k inr ante* ll'T^hL^r, ^Sa '&" 
Miss Dellys received a number of very £™«„n !,wrfS& 'Jft™ 
pretty presents from her friends. rentson ' John Mattson and Warren 

Dinner Party. 

Misses Iriga Stenberg and Clara An- 
derson were joint hostesses at .a 6 



Semisch. 



Woman's Club To Meet. 
The Woman's club will hold their 



audience on " .Civic Information in the 
Library," which will be followed by a 
round table discussion led by Mrs. H. 
A. Brumund. The high school orches- 
tra will render several musical selec- 



.'•i„,.L> ,:;„„o,. "„.,,* ,w ~" ~ I next meeting, in the Commercial club 

thi W»^f A / * ' T as f g ,i Ven , at rooms Mondfy afternoon, February 1. 
™n? n m A the former last Sunday Mrs . Hazel 4, ^ win' add ress the 
evening. A pink and white color audi! , nPR nn .. c .&o Tnfnrmatin,, in th» 
scheme was used. The guests were: 
Mrs. A. Stenberg, Misses Dagne Ber- 
gan and Esther Gustafson, Messrs. 
Dr. C. E. Snyder, B. E. Mellum, W. 

^LnW?' Ing ' GulIickson and Arthur «oinS. The social hour hostesses will 
fctenDerg. ^ ^ Mesdam65 , w _ w Prichard Sr.. 

w c T U Ferdie Brown^ and Gaston Ward. 

The W. C. T. U. will hold a meet- 1 „ : *!* „, . 

ing at y the Pr 5 sbyterian church Tu'es- ' . Mm ,,S m TT V i It. 
day evening, Feb. 2. at 8 o'clock p.m. n ref ^" , m = etm S of tie Girls' 
Miss Minnie Leavitt, instructress in Community club was held ln the Le- 
the high school, has arranged a splen- f 10 ? T b r0 , oms I? 34 evening. The 
did program which is under the de- „o „ h ^ rea J, :f " *¥ musical comedy 
partment of scientific temperance in- , H ? Uo There will be held in the 
struction. The speakers will be E. J club , r00I ? s . Enday evening- of this 
Gennes, George Johnson and Mrs. O. w "*' and T ln ? rder to avoid a conflict 
R. Sando. Several musical numbers v J th ™? Junior class play the hour 
will also be siven. An invitation is 0l , meetIn ff has been changed from 8 
extended to the public. * . °' cl °ck t 6:80. Following the busi- 

»*s j ness meeting a social time was enjoy- 

Whist Partv ' e °' an(1 a 'kl'cious lunch served by 

Mrs. Ed. Jaranson entertained a ^V"" ^"^ ^ 8651 ,*? 8563 ^ 1 

A delicious luncheon was served at day eTCmns ' Vebm ^ 16*.. 
6:30. I . •*• 

*** Senior Music Club. 

Card Party. I Th e Senior Music club met at the 

The Eastern Star will entertain a ! flome of Mrs. Thelma Holm Erickson, 
few of their friends at a card party ' 708 Kni ght Avenue North Mon- 
to be held at the Masonic club rooms ;day , evem 'ng-: They are . study- 
Thursday evening. There will be ' ln ^ . ii^e of Beethoven, and eight 
dancing for those that prefer it, and I of "I s compositions were played and 
refreshments will be served I studied as to his form of writing. 

**• I *** 

Daughters of Norway. | Degree' of Honor. 

The Daughters of Norway will hold ! T ^ ie members of the Degree of Hon- 
their regular meeting in the Sons of or e ntertaihed about two hundred of 
Norway hall next Monday evening. theIr fri Rids at a dancing party that 
Very important business will be ' was lle ' < ' at 'he Masonic hall last Fri- 

brought before the lodge at this time. -1 °" -""-'-- ' -■-'-•-•-- ■-- 

and it is requested that every member 
be present. ' 



Rebekahs to Initiate. 

The Lyon Rebekah lodge \nll hold 
initiation at the I. O. O. F. hall Thurs- 
day evening. Following the ceremo- 
nies lunch will be served and a social 
time will be enjoyed. 
•«• 
For Mrs. Bnndy. 

Mrs. Hjalmar Bundy, formerly Miss 
Dot Pederson, was honor guest at a 
party given at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Theodore Bundy, 320 Atlantic 
Avenue Tuesday afternoon. Cards 
formed the diversion for the af- 
ternoon, and at five o'clock a 
delicious lunch was served. Mrs. Bun- 
dy was presented with a number of 
very beautiful and useful gifts. 
**• 



I. M. P. S. 

Miss Margaret Brown was hostess 
last Saturday evening when she en- 
tertained the I. M. P. S.' at a six 
o'clock dinner. Cards formed the 
evening's diversion. The guests were: 
Misses Maverette Hilson, Dorothy 
Swedenburg, Sania Erickson, Mary 
Alexander, Lillian Krohn, Birdie Pier- „„, , 

»«; ™!^-S ?bri T , l 0, \ EImyra ^"S" ST™- A cordial 
setn and Lillian Johnston. to the public. 



day evening, j A delicious lunch was 

served at midnight. 

*** 



Bridge Club. 

Miss Myrthle Oen entertained the 
Bfidge club last Thursday evening. 
Miss Linna Bqrchert was awarded the 
high honors and the low prize was 
given to Miss Esther Gronvold. A 
delicious lunch was served at 11. 
' •*» 
Dancing Party, 
Canton No. 10 held a dancing party 
in the Elks' hall last evening.' This 
has become an annual affair with the 
Oanton, and is proving to be very 
much of a success. Refreshments 
were served at midnight 
*•• 
Dorcas Society. 
Hie Dorcas society will hold their 

at 716 LaBree avenue north Tuesday 
evening, February 2nd. Misses Olive 
Olson and Bertha Ordal will be the 
hostess. Members and friends are all 
invited to attend. 



Studio Musicale. 

sealed- SS?^& mu&dents & " '""-^ ««»Mta ^eek7 
at a studio musicale last Saturday 
afternoon. Each month some of the 
pupils will be presented in this man- 
ner. This time fifteen took part. 



THE CHURCHES 



Scandinavian Ev. Free Church 
J. O. Jacobsen, Pastor. 
Sunday morning service at 11 a. m. 
Will joint session with the Swedish 
Ev. Mission church on Sunday after- 
noon and evening. 



■ Zion Church. . _. ^ 

Sunday school at 10:00 a. m. Ser- department 

vices at 11:00 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday evening 

at G. Gunderson's residence. Religious 

instruction Friday afternoon from 1 

to 4 o'clock. Confirmants meet at 

August Bredeson's residence at 10:00 

A. M. Ladies aid February 4, will be 

served by Mrs. O. N. Olson and Mrs. 

OfferdahL Young Peoples society on 

Thursday eve. All welcome. The 

confirmants of Rendal church will 

meet at 9:00 at Carl Strbmberg's 

place and the Ladies aid will meet at 

the same place on Feb. 2, Tuesday. 

Services in Rendal church on Sunday. 

February 7 at 11 a. m. 
*** 
St. John's Lutheran Church. 
E. H. Kreidt, Pastor. 
Sunday school 9:30 a. m. English 

service 10:30 A. M. Rev. L. Keinath 

of Roseau will preach the sermon. 

Mrs. Hy. Matthees will entertain the 

Country Ladies' Aid Thursday after- 
noon the 28th. 



The Tribune has a first class job 
Bring us your work. 



QUALITY COAL 

We recommend for furnace, range, or heater 

Pocahontas 

Smokeless, stove size 

or Straight Creek 
Kentucky Lump 
Soft Coals 

Both of these are hot coals and have very low ash 
content. 

We also carry 

Briquets 
Lignite 

Tamarac Wood 



THE PRICHARD CO. 




Takelnventory 

Once a year — or oftener — you. 
take a complete inventory of 
your business. You check pro- 
fit and loss. You determine 
where you stand. 

Your INSURANCE should be 
checked with the " same care. 
Changing values should be pro- 
tected against loss by fire; pro- 
per forms should be written. 

First National 
Insurance Agency 



PHONE 4 



VIVO FLOUR 




Ask your grocer for and insist upon 
getting it. 

No Better Flour Made 

Dollars earned in our home state, in- 
vested 1 in home products, produce 
more home grown dollars and keep 
the wheels of home industry turning. 
Home grown dollars are a valuable 
crop. 

Keep your dollars rotating at home. 






Buy. vivo 

Hanson & Barzen Milling Co. 




Ladies' Aid. 
The Ladies' 'Aid of the Swedish Lu- 
theran church .win be entertained Fri- 
day. January 29th hv Hro. .-m.™ t .. 



Free Candy.. Will Be Given 

by your merchants 

for Bull Dog Orange Wrappers 

Look for the window displays 
Feb. 1st to Feb. 13th* 



□ 






?r*r; 






,»^i*.»* '■■■/,>. .:A-.'--- 



PAGE EIGHT 



THIEF RIVER FAUS TRIBUNE 



\ 



V 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1»2«. 



Listen in to theNash eo|fee^inpa|^s ^pecia^oneert programs over tne Gold 
Medal stat ion every ^edn*>sda*«ening from 9 ^o 10, beginning Febl 3rd. ' 



CLASSIFIED WANT IDS 



FOE SALE— Fordson Tractor and 

Plow and cedar posts and poles. W, 

E. Baker. 27,tf 



FOE SALE— Popple cord wood $5.76 

a cord. Please drop a card to Hal- 

-vor Olson 120 Markley Ave. So. 45-2t 



FOE SALE— While Holland Turkeys 
(quantity limited) 3 Toulouse Geese 
(first $10.00 offer buys them) and 
.several White Wyandottes cockerels'. 
L. A. Westphal, St. Hilaire, Minn. Stp 



FOR SALE— Team of work mares, 
sound and true; good set work har- 
ness; team weight 2,680 lbs., 8 and 9 
.years old, both mares in foal. Must 
be sold at once. Terms or cash. Write 
H. A. Olson, St. Hilaire, Minn. -46-2 



FOE SALE— 3-burner gas stove. 
Fine new violin and 'case $20. Good 
17-23 Ford radiator $6. One 1892 
Winchester 25-20 rifle. One 43 cal, 
rifle. One 22 calibre Stevens rifle. 
James Havel, 407 Arnold Ave. So., 
City. tf 



• MISCELLANEOUS 



FOUND— Gentlemans' scarf. Call at 

Police, office and identify, leaving 

25c to pay for ad. 45. 



WANTED TO BUY— House 

southwest portion of city, suitable 
for moving on farm — four or five 
rooms preferred. Call at Tribune for 
further information. 1-tp. 



EXPEET ELECTRIC WORK— He- 
member the telephone number is 
100 when you want real service on 
electric work. Always get the man 
that knows his business. He'll save 
you money. If you desire to have 
your house wired on monthly payment 
Han we can do it. We give prompt 
service on all calls. Alex Welch. 28th. 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Garage. Call 183 45-4t 



FOR RENT— Modern furnished room. 
801 Main Ave. No. Tele. 899. tf 



FOR EENT— Four-room all modern 
flat in Dudley building. Will be va- 
cant February 1. . 45-tf. 



FOE EENT— furnished room, mod- 
ern, centrally located, 801 Main 
Ave., phone 339. 44-tf. 



FOR EENT— an improved farm, 6 
miles from Thief River Falls. In- 
quire at Tribune. 46- 



FOUND— A ring at Pine-to-Palm 
banquet Saturday night, owner may 
have same by indentifying and paying 
for ad. Helouise Leek, Thief River 
Clinic. 1-t. 



PIANO TUNER— A. E. Mclntyre 
wilil be; in Thief River Falls soon. 
Neighboring village and country as 
well as local orders for tuning'-will be 
given prompt attention if left with 
Thief. River Music Company. 46 



FOE EENT— Modern 6-room house, 

with bath. Fine hot water. heat. 

Garage. 522 Main Ave. N. Phone 

481. 45p 



NOTICE. 
Bids accompanied by certified check 
of 5% will be received up to Febru- 
ary 16, 1926 by A. J. Veigel, Commis- 
sioner of Banks, St Paul, Minnesota 
for the sale of the following described 
real estate, to wit: 

Northeast Quarter of Section 
31, Township 158, Range 43, also 
S% of SW& W% of E% Sec- 
tions 13 154 44 Pennington coun- 
ty, Minnesota. 

For complete details see Mr. Hall, 
Farmers' & Merchants State Bank, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

2t. 



LOCAL MARKETS 



GRAIN 

Wheat, dark northern . 

Wheat, No. 1 _ 

Wheat, No. 2 



-... $1.52 

._ 1.48 

1.46 



Durum, No. 1 ..... *.. 1.25 

Flax; per bu „ :„... 2.16 

Barley, per bu 45 



Oats, per bu . 

Rye per bu „„ : 

Buckwheat, per 100 lbs ...„ 

Flour and Feed 

Flour, per cwt. 

Oil Meal 

Bran 



.29 

.84 

1.20 

5.00 
2.76 
1.40 
1.40 



Shorts ,.._ 

Poultry 

Hens, heavy 

Hens, light 

Heavy springs 19 

Leghorn springs 11 



Old roosters 

.Geese - 

PRODUCE 

Eggs, No. 1 

CREAMERY ; 

Butterfat, sweet 

Butterfat, sour _ 

Butter, per pound 

WOOL AND HIDES 

TVool „; _'. 

Wool .... .. .36. 

Cow Hides . .. 

GRASS SEEDS 



and 



Scout Troop No. 4 

Is Now Organized 

(Continued from page one.) 
Harold Larson, Grant Mickelson, 
Chester Myrorn, Morris Owen, Harlan 
Spoonheim, Irvin Spoonheim, Arnold 
Stadum and Justice Larson. 

George Wilson, chairman of Troop 
No. 3 committee spoke on the function 
and duties of the troop committee. 

Dr ; O. ' F. Mellby, chairman, and I. 
T. Sfmley and Nels Nelson, compris- 
ing the ! committee of 'troop 4, after 
subscribing to the policies and princi- 
pals of the Boy Scouts of America 
and taking upon themselves the duties 
of the troop committee as given in 
the constitution, were presented with 
the document certifying them a; 
troop committeemen, the presentation 
being made by Deputy Scout Commis- 
sioner George J. Johnson. , 

Gynther Tessum was presented 
with a registration certificate 
scoutmaster by -Dr. Mellby after 
pledging the co-operation of the com- 
mittee, the subscription to the princi- 
pals and the pledge to discharge the 
duties as ^'scoutmaster of troop No. 4. 

The troop charter was read and 
presented' by Deputy Commissioner 
Johnson to Dr, O. F. Mellby who re- 
presented the Men's Brotherhood of 
.07 j the Trinity church as chairman of the 
1 troop committee. 

Arnold Rustad, patrol leader of 



.07 
.09 

.26 

.45 

.42 

' .46 

.32 
.87 



Canadians Are Feted Here 
at Great Banquet 

( Continued from page i) 
quet ever attempted here, was given 

by the local Commercial Club and „. - . , - 

Woman's Club, Saturday evening in as . the ev emng speaker, 
honor of the distinguished travellers 
and their mission of advertising the 
north. Over two hundred and. seven- 
ty-five people were served at three 
tables extending the length of the 
Auditorium and the affair was handl- 
ed so efficiently by Harry Brumund 
and a large corps of volunteer assist- 
ants that it is doubtful if a private 
dinner for two could have been served 
with greater expedition or in better 
form. During the dinner community 
singing was lead by Miss Maude L. 
Johnson. Following the dinner Mayor 
Prichard of this city delivered a short 
address of welcome after which sever- 
al of the visitors spoke. H. O. Chom- 
tiie presided as toastmaster. The lo- 
oal Legion quartet sang several num- 
bers which were well received. A 
feature of the program was a song 
number of Miss Helen Satre repre- 
senting Miss Canada and Herb Han- 
son representing Uncle Sam. The cur- 
toin raised showing them in a .Ford 
car in an appropriate setting of 
pine and palm. 

The visiting speakers' were warm in 
their commendation of the local en- 
tertainment. It was especially ap- 
nreciated, Mr. McCurdy, sponsor of 
the tour, said, because it being the 
Irst night stop, the rousing welcnnie 
created an impression upon the visit- 
ers that would make the hardships 
if the trip more endurable. . 

The success of the evening can bo 
attributed to the fine spirit of co-op- 
eration and the willingness of a large 
number of people to help with the big 
task of entertaining so manv guests. 
Mrs. Daniel Shaw, assisted b'v othe- 
members of the Woman's Club pre- 
pared the turkeys and salads. Mrs. 
L. G. Larson was in charge of the 
table settings and decorations. Mem- 
bers of the Girls' Community Club 
and the high school basket ball team 
.did excellent work in serving. Over 
a hundred people in all took nart'in 
the arrangements and helpedl toward 
making it a success. 



the shows, and one on February 13 
to bring them home. ■■■'■- 

The' Northwest School Farmers' 
week program will be one of the big 
^atures. On Feb. 8 there will be 
judging contejta and the judging of 
exhibits, with Dr. Watson, Chicago, 
_ . aker. On Feb. 9 
a farm crops program is scheduled 
with Aamodt, Amy, Dunham and 
Clark as speakers, and with Dean 
Coffey and former Governor Harding, 
of Iowa, in the evening. 
- On Wednesday livestock problems 
will be discussed with Peters, Cairnes, 
Riser, Prof. Jager, Dean Coffey and 
N. E. Chapman as speakers. Govern- 
or Lowden speaks three times, at the 
noon-day luncheon, to the women in 
the afternoon and as the only speaker 
in the evening. 

On Thursday dairying is scheduled, 
with McGuire, Jos. Berg, L. Houske 
and Chapman as head linere. Gov. 
Christianson speaks at the women's 
meeting in the afternoon, at the de- 
velopment association dinner and as 
the only speaker in the evening. 

On Friday F. W. Murphv will give 
an address on Lincoln in the after- 
noon. -A matinee program by the 
Red Eiver Valley singers will be giv- 
en at 1 o'clock. The evening program 
is the song, festival... - 

Women's meetings each day except 
Friday. Other conferences are sched- 
uled each dav. Interested parties are 
urged to send -to th<> Northwest School 
Crookston, for a program. 



Pennington to Do Her 

Share at Big Shows 

(Continued from page one.) . 



Thief River High School ' 


Heads List in 


Conference 


Following is the standing of the 


teams in the district 


at the present 


time: 




Won 


Lost # 


Thief River 3 


.0 .. 1000 


Stephen 4 


1 800 


Roseau 3 


2 600 


Hallock 1 


2 '333 


Warren ' 1 


2 333 


Argyle 1 


4 200 


Warroad 


2 000 


Baudette ' 


000 



'.The local high school basketball 
team is scheduled to play Argyle Fri- 
day afternoon. February 29. A game 
was to' have been played at Stephen 
but postponement • was made after 
advice was received from school au- 
thorities there that -several school 
children had broken out with chicken 
pox. The contest probably will be held 
at a later date. 



Timothy, steady $4.50 to" $4.80 : *™°, ,a t „u ».£,<■ ii ™ an TTn he a 



Timothy and Alsike, mixed, 

weak _ _$4.00 to $4.75 

Sweet clover, W. B., steady, $3 to $5 
Sweet Clover, yel steady 3.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady,.- $20 to $24. 



scout. The scouts responded with the 

scout motto, "Be Prepared." the scout 

oath, and! the test of the true scout. 

William Froehlich spoke on the 

Mammoth Clover steady _W *j < g£& *£$ * ^con^raTS 

£™A?/al& 

Grimm, alfalfa, steady .....$20 to $25 " s . 0w ™ - ' «i e . ^^fL^/f J*J 

Cert. Grimm, firm ........... ..... 35.00 badge b v , Arthur Angell. and a very 



capacity for the last four years. 

Pennington county will be advertis- 
ed extensively by the huge alfalfa 
arch similar to the one which was 
erected here during the. poultry and 
alfalfa show recently. August Holm? 
berg has been hired to go to Crooks- 
ton some time next week and super- 
vise construction of the arch on which 
mil appear the inscription, "Penning- 

t °!k C .T£\ th M H t1 rac of - A£ a .' fa -" .,', founts." The topic7n~fte"ev"ening~wUi 
„-..!••* N?"™™ i s ' tbis week ;be "The Reason for Sacrifice." 
fi S?^ Speclal, -, I ? tes m i C ? ?*?- 1' Christian Endeavor at 7 p. m. 
ton for February 1L The schedule |. The SchooTof Mission meets Wert 
appears m an advertisement on ah- nesday evening at 7:30 pi m. Next 
li e L P fPr f 7 ?lr^5. bnne - • n A , 8p . e - Tuesday ™T be a review of the 
™J wJl, ,^ Northern will leave 3rd: chanter of. Miller's "Peasant 
Thief River Falls February 6 to «jn~, Kopeers" and the stereopticol lecture 
vey Pennington county livestock - to j will be on.Siam. 



The Presbyterian Church. 
Edward H. Lorenz, Pastor 
The Week day Religious Educa- 
tion class begins this Friday at the 
Presbyterian church at 1:16 p. rn. 

The Men's. Bible Class meets with 
the| Sunday school at' 9:45 a. m. 
The topic of the morning preaching 
rvice will be "The Thing That 



\Vilson to Head 

Cemetery Board 

• (Continued from Page 1) 
general fund, a total of $230.19. Items 
covered in receipts for the year are 
as follows: 

Lot sales $490, opening graves 
$391.25, annual care $122, foundations 
$42.25, pasture rent $14, sale of wood 
$1, interest of certificate of deposit 
$133.76, and as stated above the 
$1,000 appropriation from the city. 

The report show a balance in the 
perpetual fund January 6, 1925 of 
$3,844.03. During the year $122.60, 
one-fourth of the sale of lots, and 
$730 for perpetual care otherwise was 
added to the fund, making a total on 
hand at the end of the fiscal year of 
$4,196.53. 

According to the by-laws of the 
commission, lot owners may pay for 
the perpetual care of their lots at the 
following rate: One lot, 8x16 feet, 
$25; one lot 16x16, $40.' Those . who 
wish to pay for a one year care of 
their lots can d so at the following 
rate, one-half lot $2, lot 16x16. $3. 
Lots are for sale at the following 
prices: Single graves $10, 8x16 lots 
$20, and 16x16 lots ?40. 

The perpetual care fund shows a 
healthy balance, but until the by-laws 
are changed this money must remain 
in that fund and can not be perman- 
ently transferred to the general fund. 

The Greenwood cemetery at present 
occupys about 10 acres, but the city 
owns an additional 40 acre tract ad- 
jacent to it. " 

Martin Mickelson, for many years 
sexton of the cemetery, was again ap- 
pointed to that position, his work hav- 
ing been most satisfactory at all 
times. The grounds, as anyone who 
has occasion to pass by will notice, 
are kept clean and in first class con- 
dition. 



0-»-t 

To Exhibit at Crookston. 
' When the' Winter Shows at Crooks- 
ton opens its doors next week >tw» 
Pennington coimty champions will be 
competing for laurals, each of which 
has won a loving cup. J 

F. B. Conklin and Orton Olson are 
both veterans of the show ring. Mr. 
Conklin won the dairy trophy last 
year with his great Guernsey cattle, 
defeating the . Spaulding Holsteins »f 
Warren for the first time, in years. 

Mr. Olson twice has won the wheat 
trophy, in 1922 and 1924, and has 
brought home numerous prizes. One 
more sweepstake award will give him 
permanent possession of the loving 
cup he now holds. Mr. Olson compet- 
ed at Great' Falls, Mont., Chicago 111., 
Omaha, Neb., San Antonio, Texas, 
and Denver, Co., and in the spring of 
1925 he won at the National Graia 
Exposition at Kansas City, Mo. the 
award for wheat with the highest 
flour content He did not exhibit 
during the last year as he was in 
California and Oregon. In 1925 while 
in Oregon he acted as judge of grain 
a* the Pacific International Show, at 
Portland. , 



. Soldiers Stage Re-Union. 
Five members of the old -352nd In 
fantry band last week were afforded 
an opportunity to talk over their ex- 
periences in the army during the 
World War, when Delbert Henry of 
Fort Frances, Canada, happened to 
drop into Thief River Falls to visit 
his comrades Perry Froseth, L. A. 
Hermanson and H. S. Snyder. Satur- 
day afternoon Mr. Synder gathered 
up Perry Froseth, Mr. Henry, the 
visitor, motored to Warren and picked 
up Clarence Bakke then on to Argyle 
to join E. G. Robertson. The' re- 
union was staged at Argyle. Was it 
a successl 



Annual Meeting Held. 
The annual meeting of the People's 
Co-operative store was held Tuesday 
night in the offices of N. W. Tarrant, 
at which time the annual reports of- 
officers were read, showing that the 
organization had a very successful 
year in 1925:. 



Truck Goes Into Ditch. 
One of the trucks of the hi-Iine 
company, went into the ditch near 
Holt last evening and suffered a badly 
damaged cab. None of the occupants 
were injured, altho being badly shak- 
en up. A local wrecker went to the 
scene and righted the auto. 



brief history of the scout movement 

: by Glen Brokke. 

§5,000 Station to be Built | Several: contests were given, Har- 
«* AT„i„ „„,1 TI,:,.J 'on Spooiiheim winninjr.m the rope- 

at Main and iniia ^i,,^,, troop 4 . Three f troop 3 

( Continued from page 1) [were tying Inints. and Arnold Eustad 
the las* six months. :This building 'won over: Harlon Spoonheim in tym*- 
alsn is included in the property pur- . the Carrick bend. After several 
chased and will be removed as will other stunts lunch was served ' and 
the grocery building as soon as con- , the evening enjoyed socially, 
.^ruction of the new oil station be-, ; ." 

gil !?r.i «. i r «. .* >. ; District Court Convenes 

V/ith the sale of the property, how- . XX T A 1?aK 9 

evt r, Mr. Bredeson must change his .Here lUeSuay, J?eD. £, 

loc ition, and it is understood that ; 

negotiations are now under way for (Continued from Page One) 

the purchase of the lot south of the son Mayfield- Wesley J. Janda, Sil- 

Slrand grocery on Main avenue where Ter ton; Frank Svobodney, Silverton;! 

ir. all probability he will build. Anton Stene, Thief River Falls; Ed. 

The Peoples -Oil Company was or- R us tau. Deer Park; Halvor Fodstad, 

jranizetl at Bemidji four years ago by Sji ve rton; Bj. Bjomarra, Hicltory; 

H. E. Vance who is its president. It Carl Wahlin, Reiner; Peter Thorsten, 

K".r expanded since that time until Clover Leaf; C. E. Naplin, Polk Cen- 

:.o-.'.- owns bulk stations at Thief tre; Gust' Yilkens. Eocksbury; C. E. 

Pi-.-er Fal's. Climax, Halstad. Green- Oien, Eocksbury; Frank Fisher, Thief 

t.u.--h, Roseau. Warroad, Baudette, be- R.- ve ,. Falls, Verner Nelson, Thief Ei- 

.-!<!■ 5 the large station at Bemidji, ver Falls; Anton Johnson, Highland- 

;'n:' pirns are under way for the erec- ing; Paul Gilbertson, Thief Eiver 

tio- of jtation.- at International Falls Falls; Eosineus' Gausen, Thief Eiver 

En: Walker. Falls; OJB. Gunderson, Rocksbury: 

: he new station here -will be of j onn Fuhnesdahl, Norden; Elev 

gray bncli and in design similar to Aakre, Reiner; Soren Knutson, Nume- 

the station at Bemidji dal; Charles Rotzler, Black River; 

Anton Hall, who built his home in Walter Aiibol, Rocksbury. 
this citv 20 years ago, :but . who has: ' 

been connected 



with ^ a: Minneapolis 
lumber concern most of that time and 
has not resided here, ic superinten- 
dent of the oil companyV-'interest -in 
Thief River. Alex J. Schuetz froni 
Tenstn'ke. Minn., is now located in 
the city and will be connected with 
the company. 

With the completion of the new 
station, four comoanies will be re- 
•presented here, the Peoples, Standard, 
Pyramid, and White Eagle. The Stan- 
dard and White Eao-le have two sta- 
»;„-.. „.w.i ,.._•___ .i.„ »,.., „„„y^ T 

i: ' ',-u 

m- ' "' : v - r ^.~„ ; v jf n 



Rev. Parmeter Here. • 
'Rev. J. >L. Parmeter, Tdis^rict super- 
tendent of the Children's Home So- 
ciety of Minnesota,' was making calls 
in the citsf yesterday in the interest of 
the organization he rem-esents. The 
Society wjas organized, in 1889. ,-, 

'H tl ll l lll l l h i imiiiii i 



! We Want 
mEJES AND FURS 

:i Northern Trading Co. i i' 

, T-t-i- n i i:ii i ))) i i ii i i niM )) 



OUR AIM; 
TO SERVE , 
YOU WELL 
AND 

FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 




tf (ixrioN-xyiBE f% 

. INSTITUTION- I 

enneyvo 

pDEPABTMENT stokes 
Thief Riser Falls' Busiest Store 



WHERE 

SAVINGS 

ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUOUT 

THE YEAR 



Satin De Leen 
DRESSES 




just arrived 
New Styles^New Colons. 




■ — ■ — " — ■ ■»»■ 



Who Pays 
For Them? 



Day after day we give the utmost in 
value for each dollar spent at this Store. 

_ We could not do this and from time t« 
time reduce our prices, allow discounts to 
favored customers, give away premiums 
and trading stamps and in other ways de- 
part from the Golden Rule plan upon which 
this business has been so firmly huilded. 

Trading stamps, for example, may repre- 
sent an exceedingly small percentage' of a 
purchase price. However, even tho their 
value to the customer is negative, collec- • 
tively they afdd materially to a store's over- 
head expense— a costliiat must come, out of ;: 
•either profits or higher^prices. 

..^Yoj^know j&O r«ys;fQtvtJi^m,; . ;, '::z^ 



iY*. 



jm'AtwfJwn 




Attractions 

At The 

[Tceurn 

THURSDAY AND 

FRIDAY 

"The Pace That 
Thrills" 

with > 

BEN LYON 
Mary Astor 
Tully Marshall 
. - and Fritzie Brunette 

This^s a thriller with plenty gsod 
Comedy. I 'recommend it as good en- 
• tertainment. 
— also — 

MONTY BANKS 

in 

The Covered 
Schooner 



m itt nu ii nm * 

SPECIAL FRD3AY Only 

Country Store 

U ll M lllllllll II I I lltlilf 



SATURDAY 

The Spook 

Ranch 

The Fast Riding HOOT GIBSON 
anad charming HELEN FERGUSON* 
This IS AN unusually fine Western 
and-is splended entertainment. 
— also — 

A Century Comedy 
s "GOING GOOD" 

\ Matinee 2:30 

Admission 10c and 20c 



" IIHII IIHH 

SUNDAY AND MONDAY 

COLLEEN MOORE 

in 

We Moderns 

Supported by Jack Mulhail u4 
Claude Gillingwater ' 

. Added Attraction 

" "" Walter hjers 

Hot Rpggje 

Sunda/ Matinee' 2:30 !■ 




L 



JS&Lii 



i >'i^^«l^^'-?^Mfe^tt^rakT^i^.^ 




^^^^^it^rTlri-fi 



'Vga^slgBgffigHsaac a igs M 



■■■■ ^ ^^^y-^W^W^M'^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



*my$®*-M 



Thief Mm 



"■m^M [ 



1 SOCiJiTl? 




Vol. 25;No. 47.- _. 

mVIGTOTEU. 
OFPENNINGTON'S 

ALFALFARECORD 

Extension 'School President 

to Speak From WCCO 

Feb. 4th. 



THIEF; ftlVER FALLS MINNESOTA, WEDNES DAV, FEBRUARY 3, im 



$2.0G a Year in Advance, 



Stage Is Nearly Set For 

Biggest Red River Valley 

Shows. 



'"I am giving Pennington county's 
.good record in alfalfa acreage special 
mention in ray ram iiudress irora. \Y- 
CCO Thursday evening, February 4," 
writes C. G. Selvig, president of the 
Northwest Agricultural school. "I am 
more than glad to co-operate with 
Thief River Falls and Pennington 
county in all worthwhile projects for 
the advancement of this part of the 
1-state," he'' adds — and by the way 
Thif River Falls and Pennington 
■county appreciates statements like 
this, coming, as they do, from such an 
authorative source as Mr. Selvig. 

Mr. Holmberg leaves this week for 
Crookston where he will oversee the 
construction of a huge alfalfa arch to 
be displayed during the Winter 
Shows. Besides the large signs bear- 
ing the words "Pennington County, 
the Home of Alfalfa," several smaller 
ones giving data regarding alfalfa in 
all parts of the Hed River Valley will 
be placed on the arch. 

"My idea it that if all the folks in 
the Valley' work to'gether, we can 
make the outside world at least learn 
that there is such a thing as the Red 
River Valaley and its splendid coun- 
ties", wrote Mr. Selvig. . 

Pennington county will be unusual- 
( Continued on page 8) 



Young Farmer Cuts Throat 
In Spell of Despondency 



Local Turkey Breeders 
Win Places in Big All 
American Show at Forks 



O. E. Ose and W. J. Jande of 
Thief River Falls won eighth and 
10th place respectively in the Ail- 
American turkey show being held 
in Grand Forks this week, ac- 
cording to an announcement in 
the ;TaK« ftilks^Herald today. 
The Mton - Historic Society * 
yesriitiK iu U<u . 

Sufficient' interest has been 
aroused, according 'to the Herald 
to attract exhibitors from 
throughout ; the United States 
and Canada. A few Grand. Forks 
• and East Grand Forks business 
men have made this possible, the 
Herald stated, by paying the bill. 
Judging of theenttre show will be 
completed today. 

BOYSGOUTWEEK 

TOBEOBSERVED 
HERE FEB. 7-13 

More Then 2,000,000 Boys 

Become Members Since 

Organization in 1908. 



Thief River Falls Now Has 

Three Active Troops and 

Interest Is Increasing. 



The Thief River Falls Boy Scouts, 
and scouts all over the United States, 
will celebrate the. week. 01 February 
7 to 13 as the. 16th anniversary of 
scouting in this country. The move- 
ment began in England in 1908 reach- 
ed this country in 1910, and is spread 
over the world, being established at 
present in 53 countries. 

More than! 2,000,000 boys have 
promised op their honor as boy scouts 
to DO THEIR BEST to keep them- 
selves physically strong, mentally 
awake, and morally straight, and 'to 
help other people at all times. More 
than, 12,000 of these boys have become 
Eagle scouts.1 - 

The period pust closing has been of 
( Continued on page 8) 



Passengers waiting in the Soo sta- 
tion early Saturday morning were 
startled to see a young man named J. 
T. Tweten, a 30 year old farmer of 
Rollette, N. D., draw a knife across 
his throat during a spell of temporary 
mental derangement. Spectators at 
once held him so he could not injure 

himself further, the station agent W arren QUintWUl 
phoning for the sheriff and a physici-l _ i «« • - «. 

an. Invade Thief River 

The young man was taken to the 
jail where he remained until 10 o'clock 
when he was raken to a local hospital, 
the gash under his chin being sewed 
up. Relatives were notified and 
came for him the next day, his condi- 
tion, both mental and physical, being 
much improved. 



Falls Friday Evening 



LARGE CAST OF 

HOME TALENT IN 
"HELLO_THERr 

Community Girls to Present 
i Musical Comedy Febru-" 
ary 9. 



SPUD GROWERS 
tlLL ATTEMPT 
10 RE-ORGANIZE 

Meeting Is Called for Next 

Saturday Afternoon, 

Feb. 6th. 



More Than 150 Artists 
Participate in Whirl 
of Fun. 



to 



A sure cure for the blues is promis- 
ed all wno attend tne comedy "hetlo 
■Theie". at -he city auditorium next 
Tuesday evening, u'ebruary 9.' Elabor- 
ate preparation nave been under way 
the last week with S. H. Brown, : - a 
'representative of the Zura Producing 
company, conducting reheur-sais. Ac- 
cording th Mr. Brown "Hello Theie" 
has been played in many, of the larg- 
er cities and has been enthusiastically 
received wherever it has appeared. 

The qomedy is sponsored by the 
Community Girls of the cityj the 
members of which organization are 
working day and night to. insure. its 
success. More than 100 local people 
are included in the cast,. 

The synopsis of the play is as fol- 
lows: 

John and Susie Weber, brother and 
-sister, are just home from college for 
a vacation. They find the "home 
town" and the home .folks rather dull 
so decide on a house party for their 
schoolmaster. - 

To wake up father and mother We- 
ber, and - to put their rich aunt, the 
crabbed village parison and the official- 
chaperone in good\humor, they give 
a masquerade party. 

John Weber loves Grace Loveland 
and Susie finds Billy O'Donell all that 
her heart can ask for. The- parson 
and the the chaperone begin .to enjoy 
life in spite of themselves and a mu- 
tual admiration ensues. ■ -■.._, 
"; Father and the parson wear sim- 
ilar masquerades and the "plot thick- 
( Continued on page 8) 



the 



To be or not ■ to' be — that 
question! ' . . . '. 

members of the Pennington County 
Potato Growers association will-meet 
in the Commercial club rooms Satur- 
day afternoon, February 6, at 1 o'clock 
for tb& purpose of discussing and ar- 
rivbig at some decision legardlng 
theixv future activities^ - . 

Tnj| Association did not function last 
year,', the state exchange being in such 
condition as not to warrant handling 
the produce! and subordinate organi- 
zations were allowed to dispose of 
their potatoes whereever they could. 
Thousands of dollars wereinvested in 
warehouses for which, there -was no 
use, and the state Exchange went 
deeply in- debt as a, result. Last year's 
crop-was very poor, and prices "were 
good, even without an active . associa- 
tion.* 

The- Pennington county association 
should become active again in the 
opinion of County gent J. J. McCann. 
This view likewise is ■ held by J. H. 
Hajy former Thief River Falls super- 
intendent of schools and now assistant 
commissioner of agriculture for the 
state of Minnesota. Other state pota- 
to cooperatives ' are -successful and 
theie: is no reason why Minnesota can 
not fbe, many leaders believe. * 

Tjcustees of county- -associations 
arerslated to meet with the state exe- 



w. smiley ias, 
for editor: 
of local paper 



The Warren high school basket-ball 
team wilii be; entertained by the local 
high school team at the Auditorium, 
Friday evening, commencing . at 

eight o'clbsk, and the program promis- : , , t» i rm. j„ 

es to be one of great activity. While at Ot faul ltlUTSOay, 

the Warren team does not loom up 
very brightly 'on., paper, the ancient 
spirit of friendly rivalry which exists 
between the two schools is assurance 
that the spectators will witness 



Provisions for Better 
P. O. Quarters to Be Made 

Better post office quarters will be 
provided for by July 1, W. M. Hughes, thrilling battle of skill versus deter- 

-.,; ..- — i... : i.-_ !._.„■__ mination, and in such a contest the 

outcome is never a certainty until the 
final bell. 

Corporal Thune reports his squad 
all present or] accounted for and when 
they go over the top Friday night any 
failure to bring home the smoked 
side meat will not be due to "unfor- 



University Professor Died 



Jan.2& 



Minneapolis, postal inspector, having 
made a survey of the situation here 
last week. Sealed bids will be receiv- 
ed until February 20, according to 
the inspector, the space required be- 
ing 2,000 square feet, and the lease 
extending over a period of from five 
to 10 years. 

The need for larger quarters has 
long been felt by postal employees 
bere. 



Coffee Klotch Proves 

Most Enjoyable Affair 



The coffee klotch sponsored by the 
Woman's club last Saturday after- 
noon at the Legion club rooms netted ' Roseau ; 4 



Came to Thief River Fall/in 

1897, Engaging in 

Surveying 



Professor Willian C. Smiley ofthe 

University of Minnesota, who last 

week died at his home in Merriam 

tunate circumstances." Lars expects i £?F k ' was a ti°fl e tiine a resident ; of 

everv man to do his dutv. and if bis ; Thief River Falls and an active spirit 



every man to do his duty, and if his 



expectations are not futile, there will 
be-little sluggishness to mar the ac- 
tion. 

The standings of the teams in the 
conference are as follows; 

Team \ Won Lost 

Thief River Falls 4 

Stephen 4 



the organization's swimming pool 
fund $40 and proved tc be a most en- 
joyable affair The room was tastily 
decorated and the food was unusually 
well prepared. Siirilar events will 
follow from time to time, according to 
Mrs. H. W. Froehlich, chairman of 
the swimming pool committee. 

The regular meeting of the Club 
was held at the Commercial club 
rooms last Monday afternoon. Mrs. 
•Hazel Halmgrin, librarian, spoke on 
"Civic Information in the Library." 
Her talk was very interesting and 
showed that she is indeed well in- 
formed as to the contents of the li- 
brary. 

Music was furnished, by the Minio- 
wis orchestra of which H. Weber is 
manager. The name "Miniowis"' sig- 
nifis that the musicians come from the 
three states of Minnesota, Iowa, and 
Wisconsin. Members of the orchestra 
are from the faculty of .the public 
schools here. 

Discussions was held by Mrs. H. A. 
Brumund, former librarian, and short 
talks were given by Mrs. L. G. Larsen 
and Mrs. A. N. Heggen. 



Warren 2 

Hallock 1 

Argyle • ,...1 

Baudette ' 

Warroad ...0 



| Three Inches of Snojr Here. . 

..| A sparkling white ''biahlcefc 
\ of snow three inches deep coyered 
1 Thief River Falls arid surround-, 
ing territory last night, the latgr. 
est amount striking .bere for sev- 
eral weeks. Roads in all directions 
are still open, however, and' will' 
remain so as long as there is no 
drifting. ; ' 

The temperature is not far be- 
low freezing nvA oM S*l is melt- 
ting some of ( : » . M --< 
sunny side of buildir: :■-:. _ 
w ■ " " — 



% 



Auxiliary Donates $100 
to Swimming Pool Fund 



The Women's Auxiliary to the local 
American Legion set a mighty fine ex- 
ample when at their regular meeting 
in, the club rooms last night they 
voted to send'a check for $100 for the 
swimming pool fund sponsored by the 
Woman's club. The unit had the 
funds, and after some favorable dis- 
cussion, theyjdecided the project was 
deserving of their support, both mor- 
ally and financial. 

Mrs. Ernest Rude was elected vice 
president to fill the vacancy made by 
the resignation of Mrs. Oscar Paulson 
and a past president badge was pre- 
sented to Mrs. Leonard Hanson who 
held the presidency during the year 
1925. Following this, lunch was served 
by Mrs. J. S. Stene and Mrs. Harold 
Provencher who were ■ the 
for: .the evening. 



in its affairs. He cam&here in 1897 
and. engaged in surveying, was for a 
time county surveyor, arp also once 
owned the newspaper whjch is now 
■the Times. The townsifip of Smiley 
was named for him. He was a lieu- 
1000 ! tenant in the 14th Minnesota Infantry 
S00 ' Regiment during the Spanish AmeH- 
667 'can War, and during the World War 
500 ' was a major in the military intelli- 
250 gence, or secret service, department 
167 | of the American Army. 
1 At the time of his death, deceased 
was a lecturer on law at the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota and had charge of 
the extension work of the University, 
which had been build up, largely 
through his efforts, to a membership 
of over 3,000 students.' Mr. ' Smiley 
was 63 years of age, and had never 
married. ' \ 

Older residents here will recall him 
as a bright, happy, cheerful, energetic 
young man of integrity and good im- 
pulses. He was intensely loyal — so 
much so that when the call "for volun- 
teers was made in 1898 he left' his 
surveying crew in the field, walked a 
great distance to this railroad station, 
where he arrived barely in time to 
catch a train, and left for the war 
without closing, up any of his business 
deals, of which he had many, until af- 
ter his return from the war. He was 
enrolled in the first Plattsburg train- 
ing camp, in 1915 before many 
thought that we might be drawn into 
the World War, and was prepared for 
service when that call came. 



■5> : High Schtfbl Wina From Argyle. 
ji'i Lincoln;,.. high school's basketball 
team. 1 added .another to its long lletiof 
victories when it defeated Argyle 
bighschDolat Argyle last -Friday eve- 
ning) 17-to 6| 



_X_ 



n. 



L est Anybody Forget 
You automobile owners ,d6ri*t want 
to forget that your license tax will be 
'Winnnori 1 »f*w 'P'phrnnry 15. — " 
I "our tags and avoid the 
•ft'Frazee Presfti , 



Arrested for Dnmkenesa. " 

Peter Parenteau, local young man,' 

was arrested last Saturday night for 

being; intoxicated and was fined $10 

or ten days when brought up in munir 

dpal court Monday 'roormng^ He did 

not 1 pay the .fine and was returned to 

jail, but it .is understood that he ''> 

now- at liberty and: will* pay -the fine; 

The police were cabled about 10 o'clock 

Saturday night by. parties T?ho'. found 

Get | the young man ,wllfa hifl-cbat off.lying 

penalty.— I in the center of ihe. road and groan- 



F. f. Satre, County Trustee, 

To Report at St. Paul 

Meet. 



] -Stars; atjGuardjon ; 

I lihcbln^High Quint 





K«l 1 




BR - -'^^^B ^B 


w 


y . . ■ ■..*»4*.- ' ^^^H 


^R?*"i 










• . . • 



' ROBERT BRICKSON* 
"Roundy" plays a guard position 
and is one of the best defensive play- 



VAUEYFARMERS 



cutijve board in St. Paul, Wednesday, — .— ~- — ™. --*-„„.. r ^.-^ 

February .10. The number of trustees ers m this district. He is playing his 
to each county depends upon the num- 1 first year , on the team and much is 
ber of members. Pennington county ' expected of him in his next two years. 
Has. one trustee, F. T. Satre; who is- He plays hard at all times— and never 
anxious to make a favorable" report at -quits fighting. 

the ;St." Paul meeting. "Pennington! 

county members," he said, "should do 
one thing or another — either close up 
the affairs of the association or re-or- 
ganize and get it to working: .in a 
sanfiabusiriesslike, and progressive 
manner." '-', '.. 

Present officers ;of the; county ". as- 
sociation are: Hans Rued, president; 
Henry Oen, secretary; F. T. Satre,- 
truBtee. '* '..-._. 

Whether' this county association is 
going tCj be or not to be will largely 
deperid oh whether or not farmers get 

^"at T^SST* Saturday - *■ Meeting^ to Be He 1 d at 



iMAMFCASi 
iflERW01jl 
D1STR1CTCQURT 



One Case Settled Out of. 

Court, Some Continued, 

Others Dismissal. 



Indications Are That Term 

Wffl Be Short: Settleme|i|t, 

Pending in Few Cases. 



Trial of cases got under way in Dis- 
trict-court this morning at* 10 o'clock 
the case of Mary J. Clarke vs. ■ the 
Tessum Grain and Seed' company be- 
ing the first to come up. One other ' 
case, that. -of Ri AT Werner vs. Carl 
Hohner and William Hohner, is set ' 
for today: j 

Two cases have been set for tomor- 
row, that of J. S. Arneson in an effort 
to recover several items from The 
Tribune which he claims as exemp- 
tions as. a result of his bankruptcy 
proceedings, and that of Peter Appel 
vs. Henry Wilkins. 

The M. T. McFarland vs. N. A. 
Nelson, case was settled out of court, 
and settlement is pending in the fol- 
lowing: A. J. Veigel, commissioner of 
banks vs. O. A. Westlin, Hulda L. 
Melgaard vs. Citizens Security com- 
pany, Peyton Paper company vs. An- 
ton Dahl, John Efteland vs. Charles 
Fiterman, and Ole Hjelle vs. A. J. 
Esser. 

The cases of State of Minnesota vs 
Fred C. Brendecke on a b*quor charge; 
vs. Mike Welch, child abandonment; 
( Continued on page 8) 



^ome-Coming" Will Be 
- Discussed at C. C. Meet. 



HOLSTEIN ASS'N. 



The question -of whether or. not a 
"home-coming" should be held ,. in 
Thief River Falls next Fall will be 
discussed at the - regular meeting of. 
the Commercial Club at its noon lun- 
cheon* to-morrow. There is a strong 
sentiment in favor of 'such an event 
and a committee has been appointed 
to investigate the advisability of the 
undertaking. An effort will also be 
made -at the luncheon to secure a 
large delegation~-to represent Thief 
River Falls at the Winter Show to "be 
held in Crookston next week. 



Reward Offered in 
An Attempt to Find 

Poisoner- of Dogs 



Crookston Feb. 10, Daring 
Winter Shows. 



A reward of fifty' dollars is offered 
for information leading to- the; arrest 
and conviction of any person guilty of 
poisoning dogs. This action- has been 
taken by local authorities in an at- 
tempt to put a stop to a practice 
which is claimed to have caused the 
death of at least twenty-five dogs 
during the winter* many of them be- 



Holstein Consignment Sale 

Takes Place Thursday, 

February 11th. 



A Eed River Valaley Holstein 
Breeders association will be organized 
during winter shows week at Crooks- 



ing animals of considerable value. The L Wednesday February 10, ac- 

penalty for poisoning a dog. is vtery 1 . ' ,, ■ f , , 

severe, according to the City Attor- j cording to information received here 
ney, providing for a maximum sen- 1 from A. -M. Kisir, secretary of the 
tence of two years in prison and alRed River Valley Livestock associa- 

$600.00 fine. ' tion. The. principal speaker at the 

T .»:««««:-«<. Cn.. n Qft *« meeting will be former-Governor 

Legionnaires Score 30io , FranlL . Lowden of juinois, who is 

16 Victory Over Argyle jthe president of the American Hol- 
stein Breeders' association at the pre- 
sent time. R. E. Geiger, Minneapolis, 
secretary of the Minnesota Holstein 
breeders' association will be in charge 
of this matter. 
„ ,- , . , - i Eight prominent Holstein breeders, 

Sft^oV^^ii^eS Si^^Jo^^areconsi^- 
first touchdown was made by Argyle, i n ,?,«, re f .? 8 ^! e ^? oI f teln ^"i" ^ d 
the visitors lead™ in the first quar- 1]"^ 3 . 40 ^ ^"^ ■ l ?™l ea !? e ? t J Bie: 
M I held in connection with the Red River 

!»,i U ™ wcu. », the second rXS'f^^Lt^L^^™ 1 ^^' 
quarter and after being tackled a few 5^ 5? V -^ J^^P- "P r ??f nt - 
Sn^ee^dTLtch tie spirit of the ^'^.S^t^ ?; U P Sp ? l i dmg ! 

the face of extreme difficul^. ' l W ricrht. Ferims Va1I S! r. T. MrN«li w 
Sig Liefer made an excellent show- 



Ada and Thief River 

legion Teams to Battle 



The local American Legion basket- 
ball quint in a whirlwind attack last 
Monday night sank the old leather 
sphere for a 30 to 16 defeat of Ar- 
gyle's independent aggregation.' Mr. 
Riersgaard, St. Hilaire, refree, gave 



isig ueier maae an excellent biiuw -M-«T«4-«nT, . t«i« -D~..Jl'nJL\* ' » it _ 

ing, mowing down the enemies right S^Pw* t"hSS^ nS^f-' 
and left. Math Baraen, RusseU Olson, Jff T ^'nvo^nr ^A D S£*£ 
Maurice Hohknecht, and "Beans" S^J; £ %f^I',^A .J" 1 }?- 
Bennes were just basketball crazy and ! BfJ^e? faf tH. S^ M ?„ Srfi 
never lost a minutes' time in getting , KlA^tS? JS&, * f^SSSSS 
to their feet again after being knock- .Sfln NorthLZ^M,™„ P ^ £* 
eddown. ThetacMmg was equany,^ m m No^we^rn Minneso^and 

efficient on both sides . 

And the contest was one of ~.ne , . th _ ^Mifa+; 
most -enjoyable ever staged here, the;"" 16 °°™ "yeat. 



eastern North Dakota is a matter of 
xjjg! favorable :comn>ent by all who come 



hilarity of the crowd testifying to 
that. • 

The Legion Jdddierkar team, won 
from the high school 2 to 0*, no casual- 
ties resulting iy- -*.-:''■>,',. 

— - ■■■•.■■:; Keceiveg Appointment. . 
Attorney J. A.' Hen*h*s ■'.; of 
Crookston, 'Minn., has' been , appplflted 
as one of the ^ree members of the 
state of Minnesota, on the."Vriiform 
State : I*wS,.C9mn3l^.of. : thB':C<)nj4' 
merdal ; ta*' Jteaine "-;of " AinCTic*.' 
Thertf'are aii ttie'infejent lime mjiirly 
10,0M;membersi^6f-. f fiiecJiavr- leagne^ 
in fha rTTnitfel, StAteaV^.d'theit'dnty. 
is to work'oot a pr«5eednfe4f'lawB'in 



Prominent Speaker Here. 
W.'J^WorksVof Dnlnth, Grand Lec- 
turer representing the Chapter Grand 
Lodge,i A-: F,; & A. M., of the State 
of Mininesotai,' aadressed a. meeting 
of the;^orlt"etn<Ci'apter No. 82\ai 
the MasOTdcr'han laatrt night .- Thine 
was;* laige ftA ^ o^'atmembiii ind 
anainter^n*i.mWan^ ; '^PfaSt^Oli 

\n : JBair iBdard- M;«t»:iiargaay. ' j ■■>•' 
'i.The execntiye.bbard ofthe Pennmg- 
ion^Gonnty Agricultural society will 
meet at the Commercial dub roms 
tomorrow;.(Thmra<By)7 afternoon, ithe 
meeting.' announced for last weelt 
Thursday ' having been .r^^nneH; 
.Contract. for the fair ne^v . M-yj.r" 




Wild Creatures Enact 
Drama in Native Haunts 



Nevada's Plains and Peaks Setting 
for "Black Cyclone". 

Of all the states in what is roman- 
tically referred to as "The West," 
much more than a geographical term 
— Nevada comes the nea'rest to living 
up to popular impression of what the 
West of fiction should be like. "Black 
Cyclone," Hal Roache's spectacular 
adventure starring Rex. the king of 
wild horses, showing ' Sunday ' and 
Monday at the Lyceum Theatre, is a 
story of- the Nevada hills, where wild 
horses . roam ; in vast herds — where 
daily great dramas of love and con- 
flict are enacted by four-footed crea- 
tures of the wild. 

The production is one of the very 
best Mr. Brumund has been able to 
ge^, he says, and is full of thrills from 
start to finish. 



Arrangements have been made for 
a meeting of the Ada and Thief River 
Falls basket-ball teams -and on next ' 
Wednesday night local fans will have 
an opportunity of seeing the husky ' 
henchmen of Horatius Haug in a-'four 
afit attempt to hold the bridge against 
one of the fastest independent teams 
in the neighborhood. The Ada team 
comes will recommended and the lo- 
cal crew showed such a. marked im- 
provement in its game against Argyle 
that there is little question as to : the 
seriousness of the. coming contest.' The "■ 
score against Argyle was 80 tor 16. 
The line-up will be drafted from the 
following list of elegibles; Russet Ol- 
son, Sig Lefur, Lars Thune, Math 
Barzen, Maurice Holzhnecht, : Joe 
Holte and Lloyd Bennes. ' - 



Regenerative Sets Cafise - 
of Disturbance in Radio 

Folks with regenerative radii 
receiving sets who do not . kwnr 
how to tune them In properly 
could make the world better, j" ' 
they would only learn hoif.U ' 
opinion of many local fane. v 
happen to have different 
of sets. In tuning a 

latoo. fa^ jtofbrtln-trttn 

then'proertds, 'Vl ,d 

hoWlmg 1 ndi*. Is' caused wWi » 
^tt»Min5tea.;td;»U^othe*: ;3»fi(*x.. -.. ^ 

ing at; the same wave leniShsRi.. A "" 
In Bome smaller towns wkioe' ■'. . '4-^' 
there are fewer sets, cluha h»T«; ; '- r ' • -: 1 ' 
been founded, with a view" tod car ". : ';> 
operathtg in the matter and nltir . 
uiuKty lukking rauio - -'1 receptiott% :''.--'-' 
better for all who have sets.; IV ';;'' 




5' 



:i*aia 






thmi^sm 



V 



Complete new line of Valentine* ic 
each and up— At Flower Shop. 47 

For a' real Valentine have your por- 
trait taken at Borry's Studio . . 47 

Big dance at Middle River Satur- 
day night, Feb. 9. Music by Snyder's 
Orchestra. 47 

Miss Selma Maland of St Hilaire 
spent Saturday in this city shopping 
and visiting with friends. 

Mrs. Owen Evenstad of this city 
who was operated on for appendiciifs 
Saturday morning is reported to be 
recovering nicely. 

Erling Lier of Minneapolis arrived 
in this city last Saturday evening, and 
will spend a week here visiting with 
friends and relatives. 

Mrs. Martin Stendberg of this city 
left Monday morning for Goodridge 
where she will spend a week Waiting 
with friends and relatives. 

Miss Myrtle Ameson spent Satur- 
day in this city shopping and visiting 
with friends. She returned to her 
home in St. ^Hilaire in the evening.. 

Andrew Ness; County Cimmission- 
er, left Monday evening for Minne- 
apolis, where he will' spend several 
days attending to matters of business. 

Helmer Bloom arrived in this city 
Saturday evening from his home at 
Rosewood, and: was the week-end 
guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd Crown. 

Stuart McLeod motored to this city 
Monday and spent the day attending 
to matters of business, returning to 
his home in Goodridge the same eve- 
ning. 

Nick Majeres, who has been em- 
ployed at Detroit, returned to his. 
home in this city Saturday evening, ( 



For ai-eal VafeiiHne'navetyoui por- 
trait ta&n at Borry's Studio . V47 

Knut Lmdvedt of Oklee was a busi- 
ness visitor to thja' city Friday. 

Big dance at Middle River Satur- 
day night, Feb. 9. Music by Snyder's 
Orchestra. .';■: 47 

William Peterson of Lancaster 

spent Tuesday in this city attending 

to matters of business, 

\t 

Isaak. JWilson. motored to this city 
from hut home in Hazel Monday, and 
spent the day attending to matters of 
business/ 

Roy H. Brown of Grygla spent 
Tuesday' in this city attending to 
matters jpf business, and'visiting: at 
the home of his. brother, F. A. Brown. 

Miss Gladys Carlson arrived in this 
city Mityday evening from her home 
at Plummer, anl will spend a few 
days as -a guest of friends and' rela- 
tives. ] - ; - 

Mrs. John Johnson is spending a 
few days in this city visiting with 
friends. I She expects to return to her 
home in jViking,the latter part of the 
week. l ' 

! '. ■ . "- 

Lillian! Norman arrived in this city 
Saturday, and spent the day shopping 
and visiting with friends. She re- 
turned to, her home in St Hilaire the 
same evening. -.■•- 

Miss Mildred. Olson arrived in this 
city Saturday from her home at 
Crookston, and spent the week-end 
here witl) friends and at the home of 
her sister, Mrs. Kern Olson. 

A. L. Auringer of this city will 
leave tonight for Minneapolis, where 
he will s^end a day attending to mat- 
ters of business. He will return to. 
his homeihere Friday morning. 



Miss Louise Netteland,- who teaches 
at Oklee.j arrived in. this city Friday 
evening, and spent" the week-end shop- 
where he will remain for an^ndefinito PH* "i* visiting with friends. She 



period. 

Miss Garnet. Downing arrived 
this city Monday evening from her 



IMr. and Mrs. P. J. Keating, left Hon- 
. day for Grand FprksrN. Dak., where 

«he will resume hpr work at the Union 

Commerci4l College. 



returned to resume her duties Monday 
morning. 

..... „., „„„„.„, C , C ,„., B lIUU , ueI t i. Mte S s l ,v '? Wahlbeck arrived in 
home in Clearbrook. and will spend X 1 ? °*y. Saturday from her hoihe at 
an indefinite period here visiting with , t,t ™""?. an ,° was tne week-end 
friends and relatives. 1 S^ 8 * at tne home of Mr. and Mrs. 

I Rudolph Sagmoen. Miss Wahlbeck is 

Miss Edna Rye of Rosewood has >a niece of Mrs. Sagmoen. 

spent the past week in this city as a [ „. „ I, ., „ -, . ', 

guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 'Miss 'Sybil McGuinn, who has spent 
Victor Mosheck. She returned to her, 1 ? 6 S* 8 * ? onth m Minneapolis where 
home Monday morning. |? he P* 3 b ?en employed, returned to 

• [her home "in this city, pud will be the 
' Henry Halvorson, principal of the . guest of tier parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
school* at Goodridge, arrived in this ■ McGinn for a indefinite period. - 
city Saturday evening and spent the J ■ . - J -. C » « V 

week-end here as the guest of his sis- 1 . J * <ma rd Peters6n of Crookston, ,ar- 
ter, Miss Clara Halvorson. I me< l here yesterday morning and 

j spent the' day transacting business. 

Mr. and Mrs. 'Rudolph Sagmoen, IMr. Peterson was formerly a resident 
Misses Gladys and Isabelle Sagmoen >"£ "us city, being superintendent of 
v and Svlvia Wahlbeck motored toi*" 6 water! and light department 
Rosewood Sunday where they visited t ,,_ „. T m -Ti . „ 
at the B. P. and John Sagmoen • J& V> S,. J - BleaUey ° f Eo |f au 
homes. r arnv€ <l in. this city > Saturday after- 

noon, and .will be a guest at the home: 

Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Scanlan and Mr.! of Sev. and Mrs. J. T. Dixon for an 
and Mrs. Paul D. Scanlan motored to 'indefinite Iperiod. She is .the wife of 
Grand Forks, Saturday evening to at- ' Bev. Bleakley of the M. E. Church at 
tend the basket ball game. TJiey re- ^ Roseau, j 

■ sZl™!^ h ° me iD tMs dty thC - Miss Elizabeth Keating, who has 
bame e\enmg.< , spent the pagt two weefcs jn th] . g dty 

Misses Cecelia Bartholett, Ella Nel- 1 as a guestrat the home of her parents, 
son Eckloff, and Mr. Reirsgord of St. "" J **" ° T ■"--"-- '-" •'-- 

■ Hilaire wene-among those who motor- 
ed to this city Friday evening to at- 
tend the Junior calss play, "The Path 
Across the Hill." 

Miss Mable Ueland, nurse at the 
Clinic at Warren, arrived in this city 
Friday evening to spend the week- 
end as a guest at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lloyd Crown. She returned to 
her home Monday morning. 

Miss Mildien Engen who spent the 
week-end in this city as a guest at 
the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L ■ 
Albert Engen, returned to Minneapo- j 
■lis Monday evening to resume her! 
work at the McPhail School of Music j 

Miss Georgie Frissell arrived in this 
city Sunday morning to spend a day . 
as a guest at the home of her parents, : 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Frissell. She ; 
returned to St. Paul Monday evening, j 
where she will resume her work at ' 
Hamline 'University. . 

Miss Olga Dahl of Newfolden fell i 
from a horse last Thursday, putting ; 
her left arm out of joint. ' She . was ! 
taken to a hospital in this city where j 
her case was given the attention of'! 
a physical^, and is reported to he re-^ 
coverine; nicely. She returned to heir! 
home Sunday morning. j 

H. 0. Melby, proprietor of the Lai 
Vogue Shop, who has spent the past | 
tv.o weeks in Chicago and. various ! 
other points in the east on a busing I 
u-:i. -returned to -his home Saturday; 
evening. He also attended convention j 
of 'h-? Associated Buyers of America j 
ii-hile he was in Chicago. . i 

Adjutant A. W. Brewer of the Sal- [ 
va'i':n Army and three other officers 
of Farrro, N. Dak., and two officers of 
-~. "': .0:1 ",v!H . : nuv :t rev'.val ueet- ; 
inrs- Thursday and Friday evenings of I 
th'V- weok af 7:45 af the S-'.lvr/ioh Av- "■ 
-n\ hall. Adjutant Brewer i<-. a force- i 
fui speaker and an accomplished musi- 



Toasdayjmornuijt for ©Wlpjtoh'where 
^J^^^ls^iHAHwe '-ijerioa 
vislUBg..wJth fnendsiand relatives; 

^Haakon: Storhaug , returned ^from 
Minneapolis where \he. W^spent the 
ptat-w^HewiU leave- shortly for 
Miami, Fla., whereha'^U-be embioy- 
«d until .spring., ' " f.;-, ,/.; ,; ,- 

The proeeeds:'of the social: that is' 
to be given in' the'Satre school Feb- 
ruary. ,12th, 'willilje .used' in purchas- 
ing piay grpund.eguipment for the 
school. , . '*. y,s... • *■.:. .-_ '..,,■■ j--,, 

Be'v. kreidt-Bf tills citjriiiotopBd to 
the: home of Mr. and'. Mrs. Hi Al 
Matthees last Friday: to attend the 
Ladies aid of the German 'i Lutheran 
Church: which i'was Tieing. entertained 
at that place. ; ' 1 y *.,: 

' Edith Geske of the:eighth grad and 
yirginia Luhe of the sixth grade have 
been chosen to represent the' school 
for District 78 at: the county contest 
whichwill be held at the Auditorium 
of this city next Saurday. 

Mrs. Leonard Hanson was among 
the local people who .attended the 
meeting of the* Ladies Aid of the Ger T 
man Lutheran church Friday. It was 
entertained by: Mrs. H. A- Matthees at 
her home near.St. Hilaire. '. 

Sunt I. T. Simiey, chairman of the 
Regional Basket ball. Tournament as- 
sociation, left Tuesday afternoon for 
Modrhead where I he willattend a 
meeting. He will return to. his home' 
in this city Saturday morning. 

Mrs. Peter Hansel; and daughter 
Marie, are in this "city as gues,. at the 
home of Mrs. Gertrude Thill having 
come here to be guests at the' wedding 
of her daughter Miss Magdalen Thill. 
Their home is al; Red Lake Falls. 

Mr. and Mrs. .William Auringer of 
Cass Lake arrived in this city last 
Saturday evening to spend *he week- 
end as guest at , the home of their son 
and.daughter-ih,-law, Mr. and Mrs ; 
Arftuf Auringer. They returned to 
their home' Monday afternoon. ■ 



.:.:• :-',v--C>'.l|IUIQi-vMI|j'ij*^-V' :..*-i's...;4.: 

; , JfT '•.^^fBIttSJia'SE^I 

n Congress is piflizlea:' by; j'surpjift 
«rm ^products s" prOductipnifrSdiSie 
reckless, holsheviks; or'atlefflffi'sbcJal- 
Ists^ ;: suggest that vtter ; ,Government 
might" interest'ltself in helnhigif arm- 
ers market their surpJuB'abrbafl..'- i :' 
': Charles ; Williams, -." wHo'olighi to 
know' something about conservatism,'; 
says: Woj.that; problem. should vbe 
left to fanners Wthout goveranient 
help.".A two^month-old baby - might' 
be left to pution his own UtUe under- 
shirt "withbiit mommert help. - ■ The 
farmers would be as well able to deal 
with foreign. gpvernm'Snts, under our 
Constitution, or with foreign prob- 
lems, as' a baby would be'tp deal with' 
its own nourishment and clothing. 

To Iearhhowfarmers can be help- 
ed and surplus products sold at a pro- 
fit,. ,they might' find out what the 
British do with their surplus rubber 
products. -There is a rubber farm sur- 
plus. And you notice. that they man- 
age to sell it to.the United States "at 
about a dollar a pound, when it could 
be sold ^profitably at thirty cents a 
pound.- A government that wants to 
do a thing can do it - - - 



on-horse- 

„. ., _-,-___,J^»r''-Sio! 

WittSjaor itenaof thbjisaiids'of 

&£»£ .■ -:< --fr.,;; 



-'-. u Cemetery. Commission Meets. 

A meeting of the Cemetery .com- 
mission was held in the council cham- 
bers Monday evening to discuss mat- 
ter penning to cemetery! work in 
general. Carl B..Larson-was re-elected 
treasurer, and Martin Mickelsbh re- 
appointed . sexton, 



The railroad traihmeTi, hundreds .of 
thousands of faithful workers, , ask 
for better pay, and ought to get it. 

Railroads, protected by government 
enjoy prosperity. Steadily increasing, 
they should divide prosperity with the 
men- that do .the work through the 
nights in cold and rain, when those 
that collect, dividends are asleep. ' 

All Americans, especially -business 
men and money makers, should 'de- 
mand that ■ good. - workmen, get their 
fair share of t national prosperity: 

The rich man can get only his share 
of what the.average man has to spend; 

Government' figures show *hat from 
1920 to 1924, "automobiles killed 60,- 
876 men, women and children." 

And iii 1924 the "death roll., num- 
bered 16,628. 

Calculated, to give the false' :" and 
damaging impression that the automo- 
bile in itself is a dangerous, deadly 
demon, these figures are NOT true to 
fact 



£uman; 



4'The?'real,^w«?iai an^fu^-'haDpi^ 
ness.of thlscotmtry'wfll- f^n'iivm 
th^^s^le:Jproject.;!pf. science : i!and 
constructive- ,;, statesmanship more! 
.benefit than - it would- from findihg 
gold mines unlimited. .,"■ 

-\ JoKnrHulbert kilted il4Qhunian be^' 
ings, ihis total profits on the' killfngs 
being $18^200. His line is riot that 
of ; the .ordinary; holdup man for he is 



^Si^B^»'Pnl!lic" 'eiecuHonert -^aad 

chejbj! the* State pays 'SlSO.iteseems 
eas&$180 for work ■thai:lasfa'half an 
1 *mir/,But;kiIBng causes stafo oh^the 
nerves, so Mr. Hulb«rt retires. Some 
one else-can. have the:$180 job." " 



•'■''--:.' / Card of Thanks. }'.:',: 
,' We wish to thank the many friends 
a ?4 J nei ?, h, W rs i* Oie neighborhood of 
Mavie, Greenbush and elsewhere, for 
their ldndhess and sympathy shown 
us during the illness and funeral of 
our husband and father.— Mrs. Ole P. 
Nelson and children. }'■:. 



CITY OF THIEF RIVER FALLS 
Office of the 
Superintendent of Police, 

: A number of .'complaints have been 
made- to this office of the actions of 
some party or' parties ih poisoning 
dog3 in various .'parts of the city. The 
practice is a dangerous one, and car- 
ries a heavy penalty; the statute pro- 
vides for imprisoninent in the state 
penitentiary for a .period not to ex- 
ceed tw years or in a county jail not 
exceeding six! months, or for a finis 
not to exceed the sum of Five, Hun- 
dred Dollars, or for both fine and im- 
prisonment, upon conviction. . In- order 
to prevent further acts of this nature 

A REWARD OF FIFTY DOLLARS 

; hereby offered for information 
leading to the arrest and convictioii of 
any ^person or persons guilty of the 
offense. • 

(Signed) A. W. CROWNi 

Supt. of /Police... ' 
(Feb. 3) , '■'/'-•; i 



Of the sixty-odd thousand killed In 
five years some were the victims of 
stupid, reckless or drunken drivers, 
some of incompetents. 

The greater number killed were 
victims, of their own-' ' carlesshess. 
commonly described; as "jay-walking."' 

When a man on the railroad' track 
is killed, nob )dy blames the locomo- 
tive or suggests suppressing rafi^ 
roads. The signs read,^ "Stop; ' look 
and' listen," and "Keep aff'the tracks." 



The\ Colorado River, put to 'work 
and used, will add hundreds of mil- 
lions yearly to the wealth of ti\e Uni- 
ted States, . ' . 

It will' . supply ■ several' Western 



o o > o 



f CCO 

At 9:00 -P. M. every Wednesday 
evening, beginning February 
3rd, the Gold Medal Station. W 
CC 0, will.broadcast a series of 
ipopular concerts furnished . by' 
the Nash Coffee Company pf 
Minneapolis. (Packers of Nash's 
Delicious Coffee.) 

These Concerts will consist of a 
great many worth-while popular 
selections— including light oper- 
atic airs, semi-classic orchestral 
numbers, solos, and other fea- 
ture arrangements. 

The Orchestra, which is to be 
known, as "the Nash-Finch Con- 
cert Orchestra, is composed of 
members of the Minneapolis 
Symphony and State Theatre 
Orchestras and represents some 
of the best musical talent in the 
country. ' 

STAND BY!— 



NASH COFFEE CO. 

MINNEAPOLIS 




Low Fares 

to \'V 



via 



If ebrtiary ll , 1926 

Foi- the benefit of those desiring to attend the Tyinter; 
Shows, the Great Northern' Railway will run a special 
train and sell round trip tickets~for the one-way fare on 
February 11, Warxdad and intermediate points to 
Crookston and return. : .,., ■ ' ; ■' '■- 



■r- 



Mrs. Helen Montgomery arrived in 
th's city Tuesday nnon from Crooks- 
ton. where she hp." ^^nt *h- r-~* 
■week as a guest of her sister. She 
vinted here for a few days at the 
home of ],Tr. and Mrs. Ed. Lacy prior 
-to returning to Noves, Minn.- where 
she is employed. Mrs/Montgomery 
was formerly employed at the Great 
Northern station in this city. ' 

Harris Brown, representative of the 
Zura Producing Company, arrived in 
this city Friday. morning, and--- has 
commenced working with the cast of 
•"Hello There'' a musical, comedy 
sponsored bv the Girls Community 
club. The play will be given' at the 
/ur ,I *-orium Tuesday, evening, Feb. 9. 
an'*. -■ i *..i;,„»;^ ww nY(i fh^ \f f 



- 6:00 a. ntj. 

- 6:25 a.m. 

- 6,50 a. m; 

- 7:02 a. m. 
- r 7tl7a;m; 



Schedule:- : ■ ;'■) 

Middle River. ; ;8^0 a. m. 
Holt i - -- •■-. 8:40 aim. 
Thief River Falls .9:10 a. m. 
St. Hilaire - r9:27 a: m. 
Red Lake Fall* _ 9:52 a. m. 
Tilden Junction l0t2S a. in. 
'Crooktton - H.-05 a- m. 



Warroad ; 

Sa^pl .-.; 

Roseau 

Fok - - 

BaUger 

Greerfbush 

Strathcona 

Return ^airtwi^ leave Crookston at 10:00 P. M. : 

The low fire tickets i 
J A. J. mcJdmon;F^s& Traffic Mfl^., St. Paul 






.MMMMMM, I H«MMM1MtM|HM>HMMMMI Il i | M l l l MMMUM'llMM* »» » 




ur Idea of 
GroGery Store 



ervice 



Service means more than prompt attention— means 
more than courteous attention. 

- "When we speak of seiVice we mean the . ability t» 
give' prompt and courteous attention and also the ability 
to. give value 

--'-'':■ ' .-v<. , > 

> ;_ :When we solicit your patronage we ask for it in the 
belief, that we can give you just as good a service as you 
can get in any other grocery store and more than you get 
in many »f them. 

; Our prices are right They are the^ame for every- 
one andas low as they can be made, considering the quali- 
' ty ofthe merchandise i sold. We do riot make a practice of 
: nmhinga;sp.ecial on one item and getting it back on an- 
other. When we offer a special it is either because we have 
made, a "good buy" and are passing.it on to you, or be- 
cause we.are closing- out On an article. 

;.. Our; customers whoarebuymgfromus ctayin and 
day put getrtheir.groceries as cheaply as they can be got- 
ten and with promptness and courtesy too. 

j - •■•'.• 'Thafs:o^io^arof Grocery Stored 



vmw 








WWWE 

MINNESOTA 




^^fi^^^^^£ m mi Mi^m ^ m 



!'• '/: 



I 



t 



r 



t^ 



/■ 









WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1926. 



THIEF RIVER PAEES TRIBUNE 




Library Notes. 

^Ve have placed on our shelves 31 
Scandinavian books loaned us by the 
Minnesota Traveling Library. 

Seventv children attended our 
"Story Hour" on last Saturday after- 
noon. Miss Easter selected Hans An- 
derson's "Tinder Box," "Johnny 
Chuck finds *he best thing in the 
world" by Burgess and finished with 
a storv of a Real Princess. ■ , 

Arrangements are being made for 
another interesting program next 
Saturday. . - . 

Mrs. Hazel Halmgnn, Librarian. 

Women's Society 
The regular monthly meeting of 
the Women's Society of the Presby- 
terian church will be held on Friday 
afternoon at 3 o'clock at the home of 
' Mrs. E. 0. Mogenson with the follow-. 
. ing hostesses; Mrs, W. H. Kline, Mrs. 
J, Steen, Mrs. L. R. Johnstone and 
Mrs. Mogenson.' 

»*♦ 
For Mrs. Anton Stene. 
Last Thursday afternoon, twenty- 
three Iaay triends gathered at the 
home of Mrs. Anton Stene to help 
celebrate her 74th birthday anniver- 
sary. Mrs. Stene was presented wiUi 
a -purse of money by her friends. At 
the clo^e of a very pleasant afternoon 
a delicious lunch was served to the 

guests. 

#** 

Legion Auxiliary. 

A regular meeting of the Auxiliary 
to the American Legion was held in 
the Legion club rooms last evening. 
At the close of the business meeting 
lunch was served by the hostesses, 
Mrs. J. S. Stene and Mrs. Harold Pro- 
vencher. 

*** 
Ladies Aid. 

The Ladies aid of the Methodist 
Episcopal church will hold a business 
meeting at the home of Rev. and 
Mrs. J. T. Dixon, Wednesday after- 
noon, February 10. at three o'clock. 
Lunch will be served. 

.Trinity Aid. 
The Trinity ladies aid will meet in 
the Church parlors Thursday Febru- 
ary 11. Those entertaining are Mes- 
danies Edwin Erickson, Selmer Ur- 
dahl, Knute Melby, and Ernest Rude. 
The public is invited to attend. 

Bridge Club. 
■Mrs. John Bratrud was hostess last 
evening when she entertained the 
members of the Bridge club. At the 
close of the evening, which was spent 
playing cards at three tables, a deli- 
cious lunch was served by the hostess. 
*** 

Community Club. 
The Girls Community club will hold 
their next regular meeting in ^he Le- 
gion club rooms Monday evening, Feb- 
ruary 15th. Due to the fact that the 
night for the regular meeting conflicts 
with the preparations for the play, the 
date has been set ahead one week. 

Missionary -Society. 
The Foreign Missionary Society of 
the Lutheran Free Church will meet 
at the C. O. Parbst home, 810 Main 
Ave. orth, Wednesday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 10th. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to the public. 

*** 

Surprise Party. 
Man-in Meherkins was pleasantly 
surprised at his home Saturday eve- 
ning, when a group of his friends 
gathered there to help him celebrate 
his birthday anniversary. The evening 
was spent playing games, and at mid- 
nigh 1 ; a delicious lunch was served. 

Eastern Star. 
A retrular meeting of the Winslow 
Chapter of the Eastern Star will be 
held at the Masonic club rooms Wed- 
nesdav evening Feb. 10. The members, 
are all requested to be present. 
*** 

Birthday Party. 
Herman Timm was host last Friday 
evening when he entertained a group 
of friends at his home near St. Hil- 
aire. The occasion was his birthday. 
The evening was spent playing games, 
and in a social manner. At midnight 
a delicious lunch was served. „ 

*»* 

Card Party. 

The Women's Benefit Association, 
formerly known as the Maccabee 
Lodge will sponsor a card party next 
Monday evening. The officers of the 
association will be the hostesses 
and Mrs. Tharaldson has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the refreshment 
committee. 

*** 

Parcel Valentine Social. 

Come to the Parcel Sociay Friday 

evening February 12 at 8 p. m. Ladies 

bring a pared and lunch for two. 

Satre school, district 73. 47-48. 

*** 

Valentine Parties. 

Mrs. August Holmberg was hostess 
last evening when she entertained the 
oloder members of her music class at 
a valentine party. The evening was 
spent playing games, and at 9:30 a 
delicious lunch was served. She is en- 
tertaining the junior members of her 
class this afternoon. 
*** 
For Miss Robinson. 

The graduates of the Bemidji State 
Teachers College who are members 
of the t teaching force in this city, 
gave a banquet at the Evelyn hotel 
last evening in honor of Miss Telulah 
Robinson. Besides the honor guest, 
those present included Olga Blooms- 
ness, Grace Craik, Ruth Martin, Ben- 
sie Sedlacek, Linna Borchert, Buddy 
Ber?, and Ruth Easter and Mr. E. 
J. Gennes- 



; *AGfe ;! Twfei3 



At Bernards Guild. 

The St. Bernard's Guild of the 
Catholic Church will serve their usual 
l«nch Thursday 1 afternoon February 
4th, from 3 until 6:30 o'clock in the 
parlor of the Church. The public is 
invited to attend. ' 



One Minute Interviews 



HELLO NOPPER, C'MON IN AND SIT DOWN AND TELL US 
WHAT'S YOUR NAME, WHERE YOU WERE BORN AtfD WHEN, 
AND WHEN YOU CAME TO THIEF RIVER FALLS. 
I was born in Macomb, III, In 1882 and came to Thief River Falls 
in the spring of '12. -My name's V. C. Noper, but a lot of people 
say "We" C. because they can't say^'V", ..What elsetfo jjbu want to 
know] 
HOLD YOUR HORSES, OLD TOP— PEOPLE CAN WAIT FOR 
THAT MILK A FEW MINUTES. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF BOB- 
BED HAIR? 
Well,: sir, for the youngsters, school girls, it's the clear staff, but 
by dad you know I really think it's a shame for some of the older 
people' with a beautiful head of hair to cut it off. I know if it was 
me I Vould think twice before I did it. But for the younger ones it's 
the clear stuff, and a shingle bob at that. What else do you want 
to know I / ' ' 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF SHORT SKIRTS? ' 
Now ;wa-wa-wa-wait a minute. (Blushingly) You know a pendulum 
never swings so far one way but what it alwteys swings back as far 
the other way. Years ago the ladies used to go to one extreme by 
wearing dresses with Ions trailers dragging in the dust. Now they 
go the other extreme by wearing 'em so durned short. Honestly 
I've seen girls dancing when you could see their bear legs six 
inches above their knees. Hurry up now, what else do you want to 
knowf '„ ^ ' 

DO YOU THINK HARD TIMES ABE OVER? 

Yes, I do, and I'll tell you why. We farmers are getting twice as 
much for butterfat than we did three years ago. ..It was 30 cents 
then and now it is from 55 to 60 cents. Hogs was 5% cents and now 
they're 13 cents. And cattle prices have advanced in the samel pro- 
portion. Just as soon as we farmers get back on our feet the rest 
' of you needn't worry either, 'cause we're the ones that feed you. 

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO A BOY OR GIRL GRADUATING 

FROM HIGH SCHOOL OR UNIVERSITY? . 
I don't think the same as some of the others have said I believe 
they should find a job in line withwhat they want as an occupation 
and then stick to it and deliver the goods. They shouldn't work 
half the time Cor the boss and the other half looking for a raise. 
When they deliver the goods the promotion will come automoactic- 
ally. ' * . ■ 

DO YOU THINK THE YOUNGSTERS OF TODAY ARE WORSE 

THAN THEIR PAEENTS WERE? 
No, I don't think they're any better. 

YOU MISUNDERSTOOD MY QUESTION. DO YOU THINK THEY 

ARE WORSE? : . 

Now (Reporter's name)- Dofe gone it anyway! I er— 

(Mr. Noper was pretty nervous here and seemed to be anxious to 
' avoid the question. I could see he thinks they ARE worse, so I went 

on with the next question.) 

WHAT; IS THE EARLIEST THING YOU CAN REMEMBER? 
Oh, I; don't know. I guess it was the old swimming hole in the back 
pasture in Illinois; We used to jerk off the old clothes,'and by dad 
she was a great life. 

WHAT IS THIEF' RIVER FALLS' GREATEST NEED? 
Harniony among the people. 

WHAT>OULD YOU RATHER DO THAN RUN A DAIRY FARM? 
Lower the taxes about 50 per cent and go ..ahead with the same old 
Job. In 1912 my taxes were $40 on my one quarter and now they 
are S418.75. Look, here is the receipt, you can see for yourself. I 
pay nearly $1,000 in. taxes a year. - 

DO YOU THINK PROHIBITION HAS BEEN A SUCCESS? SOME- 
BODY TOLD ME THE OTHER DAY TO GET SOMEBODY THAT 

WAS DRY— THAT MOST OF THOSE I HAD INTERVIEWED 

WERE. WET. 
Well, sir, you got a DRY .one this time and I'm not a darned bit 
afraid to say so. Prohibition has been a success, absolutely. Thirteen 
years ago you couldn't walk down any of the streets without seeing 
from lone to five drunks. I. haven't seen one now for more than six 
months and I am in town every morning. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE PRESENT ADMINISTRATION? 

Absolutely all right. 
OH, I SEE YOU ARE A REPUBLICAN- ALL RIGHT. ' 

I've never Voted a straight Republican or Democratic ticket in my 

life. ! I always pick out the MAN and vote for him. 
SHOULD THE WORD "OBEY" BE OMITTED FROM THE MAR- , 
RIAGE CEREMONY? 

No. Why should it? They both promise and if they want to call off 

the deal they have a chance right at the time before the preacher 

says ."man and wife". • ' 

BUT ISN'T IT THE -WIFE ONLY WHO HAS TO PROMISE TO 
OBEY? - '_ 

Naw,, both of 'em do. It's been so long since you were married j(ou 

have 'forgotten all about it. . 

SHOULD A MAN MARRY BEFORE HE REACHES 25 T 

He otto marry the first nice little gal that comes along, if she can 

fill the bill. That's what I done but it took me 28 years before I 
■ found the right one. - 

WHAT! IS THE MOST EMBARRASING SITUATION YOU WERE 
EVER IN? 

When I asked the little brown-eyed girl to come and clean up my 

bachelor's quarters and try to make 'a home out of it. By dad! 

that was a sun-of-a-gun of a job for me. - 
Editor's Note: I hereby humbly acknowledge my inability to take 
down one tenth of what Noper said in the few minutes I talked to 
him. ' He has more pep for a man of his age than any fellow in the 
United States and he. talks so fast that I know his wife has no chance 
'whatever in an argument.. 



cordially invited to attend these meet- 
ings. 

The continuants will meet at Rev. 
Bredeson'a residence every Saturday 
at 10:00 a. m. 

A business meeting will be held on 
Tuesday, Feb. 16 in the Zion church 
basement for the. purpose of selecting 
a minister. All church members #re 
asked to be present. 

Scandinavian Ev. Free Church. 

J. O. Jacobson, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a. m. 
Sunday morning service at 11 a. m. 
Communion service at 2:30 p. m. 
Young Peoples meeting at 4 p. m. 
English language, i 
Evening service at 7:30 p. m. . 
Prayer meeting on Thursday eve- 
ning at Rasmus Ness' residence. 
*** ■ 
Trinity Lutheran Pastor. 
S. L. Tallakson, pastor. 
Graded Sunday school — any and all 
welcome to attend, 9:45. 

Morning worship in norwegian with 
sermon on "Christian stewardship" 11 
AM. 

Monthlv song-service and young 
peoples' meeting 7:45 p. m. 
Bible-hour Wednesdays 7:45 p. m. 
Aid- and Junior Y. P. L. L. .social 
meetings next Thursday, the 11th. 

What would- our community he 
without the christian churches? 
Come to church Sunday. 
... 

St. John's Lutheran C n urch... • 
E. H. Kreidt, pastor. 
Sunday school 9:30 a. m. 
German Services 10:30 a. m. 
English Bible Lecture 7:45 p. m. 
*** 

The Presbyterian Church. 
Edward H. Lorenz, Pastor 

The women's society meets at the 
home of Mrs. Mogenson Friday after- 
noon at 3 p. m. 

The Men's Bible Class will meet 
with the Sunday school at 9:45 a. ra. 

At the morning preaching service 
at 11 The Boy Scout Troop No. 3 will 
attend in a body as a part of the An- 
niversary Week exercises. The topic 
for the sermon will be "The Struggle 
of Life". 

' Special notice should be taken of 
the fact that the Christian Endeavor 
will begin promptly at 6:45 and the 
preaching services at 7:45. The sub- 



ject of the evening talk is The Mili- 
tant Action of the Church as portray-' 
ed in the Hymns" 'Stand Up',- Stand Pp 
for Jesus', 'Onward Christian Soldiers 
and 'A Mighty Fortress is Our God!" 
There will be special music. . 

At the School of Missions of Wed- 
nesday evening at 7:30 the first period 
will be taken up with a discussion of 
the 4th Chapter of "Peasant Pioneers" 
and the second period with the stere- 
opticol lecture "The Atlantic Trail." 

Father and Sons banquet Friday, 
February 12, at 6 p. m. 
•*« 

Mavie Lutheran Church. 
E. 0: Sabo, Pastor. 
Services Sunday, February 7. in the 
Silvertori church at 11 a. m. The con- 
firmation class will meet after service 
Sunday. 

The Telemarken Ladies aid will be 
entertained Thursday afternoon Feb. 
11, by Mrs. Torgus Larson. 



SLEEP A LL NIjG HT NjQW 

Says Pennsylvania Man. Not Bothered 
by Bladder -Weakness at Nigty. 
A. C. Smith, 41 W. Broad St. . 
Bethelhenv Pa., says, "I now rise in 
the morning" refreshed and feeling- 
fine. Will) gladly tell my .experience 
by words or letter. Getting up nights 
for bladder relief is nature's warning 
of danger ahead. Lithiated Buchu 
cleanses the bladder as epsom salts do- 
the bowels, driving out abnormal de- 
posits, neutralizes excessive, acids, 
thereby relieving the. irritation 
which causes getting up_ nights. The 
tablets cost 2 cents eacH at all drug 
stores. Keller Laboratory, Mechanics- 
burg, O. Locally at Lambert's Drug 
Store. 



' Tribune want ads bring result*. 



LATE POPULAR 
COLUMBIA NEW 
PROCESS RECORDS 



X(\i n i W 11116 We Danced Till Dawn 
DU4-1JI "j Just Around The Corner 

g<w n ( Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue 
DZ0-U jwhat Did I Tell You? 

(Piano Duet) 
(Piano Duet) 



C|Q n (Pretending 



Lonesome 

When Mail Ordering, add. 10c postage 



75c 
75c 
75c 



HEAR THEM AT 

THIEF RIVER MUSIC COMPANY 

• Citizens Bank Bldg. 



I HHHI M i m il HUHUHHIUH I IIHIH II MIHHIltH I HIHmHIHH t H 

HHH I HHI II UI I H l|l )HHMHMHMmnmH. I HtHtH l limMI I H II HII I I I H 



Eastern Star Party. 

The first'jparty of this year continu- 
ing; the series 'of card parties given 
by the Eastern Star was enjoyed by 
about one hundred guests and hostess- 
es on last Thursday evening. Mrs. 
Walter Smith won the ladies prize 
and Mr. Ferdie Brown the men's 
prize. Lunch was served at 10:30 and 
dancing formed the, entertainment 
for the remainder or the 'evening. 

The same plan will be used this 
year as was carried our formerly. 
Any Star member desiring to' act as 
hostess or host will notify the Worthy 
Matron that she or he is. inviting 
guests. 



THE CHURCHES 



August ant Church. 
Albin A. Larson, pastor. 
Services in American language next 
Sunday at;10:30. Sunday school at 
11:45. 

The Mission society meets Friday, 
February 5th at the church at 3:45 
The Luther League will be enter- 
tained by the Dalqulst and Longren 
families at; the church parlors Friday 
evening, February 5th at 8 o'clock. 
*** 
Goodridge Lutheran Church. 
\ V.' O. Aaker, pastor. 
Sunday, January 31. — No services 
in Goodridge as announced. Sunday 
school at 10 a. m. Norse services at 
Bethany at 2 p. m. Ladies aid of Erie 
meets with Mrs. Andrew Hanson. 
Wednesday, January 3, and the Oak 
Park Ladies aid meet the following 
day with Mrs. Gustavsen. Rev. E. O. 
Sabo will conduct services at- Oak 
Park Sunday, Febrdary 7th at 2:30 
p. m, i 

! *** 

Christian Science. 

Regular 'Sunday »et»;i^c tt ie held 

at 11 a. mi in the church at La Bree 

Ave and First St. Subject Sundav. 

Vehwr- ^ ^ lP -'r lh «*•"»»*« ~w. 

at io Ai?.:liv/:.;..,' ... ... . 

' ■■■*-■ .- ■-.'- . . - .' 



ings are held at 7:45. Reading: room 

open Wednesdays 8-5 p. m. The public 

is cordially invited to these services. 

♦*» 

Zion Church. 

Aug. Bredeson, Pastor. 

Services Sunday Feb. 7. 

Services to be. held at Rindal church 
at 11:00 a. m. by Rev. Bredeson. Ser- 
vices by Rev. T. Kleven, of Starbuck, 
Minn., in the Norwegian language in 
the Zion church at 11:00 a. m. and in 
the English language at 7:45 p. m. 
and in Goodridge at 2:30 p. m. 

Sunday Feb. 14, Rev. Eng. Hovland 
from Grand Forks will preach in the 
Zion church at 11:00 a. m. In Rindall 
church at 2:00. p. m. Everyone is 



There Is Nothing Mysterious 

about the benefits derived from eat- 
ing Whole Wheat or Graham Bread. 





Whole Wheat Bread is 

A Health Food 

Simply because it is 

A Healthy Food 

It provides the necessary roughage 
to keep you physically fit. 

As a Reducing Diet 
It Can't Be Beat. 



For Purity and Uniformity Insist on VIVO 



Order it from your Grocer. 
The two local Bakeries use Vivo. 



Hanson & Barzen Milling Co. 



« ' " tttt * " »**' ' * " » "" t * ""l" t f ttt tt t tint I I I IMM I II I I I I II I II I i ll 

M * I H H It H I t I H ft t I t It I t I I I tl I It | H I Vt l V l | j | Vm I )> M | I t III I I I lit M il I I I " » " « ' » 



^l 



[ Free Candy Will Be Given 

I , by your merchants 

I for Bull B6|| Cfc^^ | 

Look for the window displays 
Feb. 1st to Feb. 13th 





- ^£4 \4^m^^MM^iMsiSiMSSIt 



PAGE POUR 







Thief River Falls Tribune 



1BBEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Published Every Wednesday 
.Established 1001 



LUDWIG I. HOE ; - 
WILLIAM E. DAHLQUIST 
H. S.^iNVDEli - ,'..-.- . 



Presldeut 

Editor 

City Ed|tur 



Official Paper of PeuDiugtoa County 

»t-,l" 
Mln 



Entered as second-class, matter, at ^ the. 
postotrice at Thief Rive? Palls," 



yvaiuiLivc » 4UICL iiivvr ' mu 

pnder the Act of March 3, 1870. 



BUBHCUIPTION *2.00 l'EK YEAR 



"Governed, as we are, entirely by 
public opinion, the utmost care should 
be taken to preserve the purity of the 
public mind. Knowledge is power, 
and truth is knowledge; whoever, 
therefore, knowingly propogates a 
prejudice, willfully saps the founda- 
tion of his country's strength." 

Washington Irving. 

LIFE 
Edgar A. Guest. 
Life is a gift to be used every day, 
Not to be smothered and hidden 

away ; 
It isn't a thing to be stored in the 

chest 
Where you gather your keepsakes 

and treasure your best; . 
It isn't a joy to be sipped now and 

then 
And promptly put back in a dark 

place again. 

Life is a gift that the humblest may 

boast of 
And one that the humblest may well 

make the most of. 
Get out and live it each hour of the 

day, 
Wear it and use it as much as you 

may; « 

Don't keep it in niches and corners 

and grooves, 
You'l/ find that in-service its beauty 

improves. 



! 



There's a long, long trail a 'wind- 
ing 4head of theWoman's Club jn its 
search for a swimming pool. ..It will 
take j a few yeaifjof steady marching 
to reach that'destinatiori. Rojie-was 
not built in a day and the members 
of; tip, club>seem .to be satisfied that 
'the swimming pool can not -be .con- 
structed over night. ;They hare. start- 
ed" out ''to. raise the' money first and 
are not dissipating their strength on 
the first mile. Following this policy 
they'wilil perhaps run the .', entire 
course. .' '■-'. , 



HE4R THE GOVERNOR 
A jbig feature of the evening pro- 
gram at the Winter Show will be an 
address by Governor Theodore Chris- 
tensen. With his experience as a coun- 
try newspaperman; a legislator and 
governor, Ted probably knows more 
about the problems of the Northwest 
than j any other mari Having a lot 
to say and not much ijme to say it in 
has given him the ability to say much 
in a few words. To hear him will be 
well worth the price of the trip 
alonel 



necessarily boosted State iUnd local W excite' religious h6stfflae^and : K- 
outlay...:., , ; „-ur : ,.,ii».if - ,„llgious. feuds in a land where tolera- 
' '"But, ^wTth'.ffi-riecessary increaS##? n : S^ 1 religions, haiuhasn . made 
ac^untea to! : ,hy agiiic% of - olfe^fe^S igS# M r J 
*"*. ^ ; of. g pvernmen^ speni&n^^jtfe^^^ " 

lng, in-.their, annual', total; of ten bil- ! :; yusUce ; vCarr6ir.8''.eenerfeK tribute 
three billions ** ProtestaWfo? their 

. . VICeS-in l*Rljlhll<xhin(»- wli 



Srly' 



lions; probably t*o or 

needtosDend XT'" ™«i°™ning rellg 

^suoborthJW'K^^ 
tliousands of public servants whose would undertake to undo the work of 
activities could well be dispensed : the Founders cf this Republic and at- 
With. ' j tempt to unite church and state' 

'And for what do d* two or three l^S^^^SS^S^^ 
extra billions of tax dollars eo? In ; bating intolerance in religion. One is 



POISONING DOGS 
During the last week a dozen local 
dogs have died quite suddenly. The 
symptoms have been much the same 
in all cases and although there has 
been no examination to prove the 
charge, it is generally considered that 
the deaths have been caused by poison. 
Evidently there is some one in the 
community who has been bothered by 
the dogs. Perhaps for several weeks 
the garbage can has been raided every 
night and the contents scattered over 
the yard. Perhaps a pack of curs have 
been serenading the moon underneath 
their bedroom window. The moon 
has been bright lately. ' Or perhaps 
there is a neighbor!^ dog that barked 
every time anyone passed that neigh- 
bor's house. Some one of these griev- 
ances must have prompted some per- 
son to lay out poison. 

Whatever the grievance may have 
been, such action was not justified. 
There is no question but what very 
often dogs are a nuisance in a neigh- 
borhood, but there is an orderly way 
to remove a nuisance. Perhaps it is 
easier to throw out a piece of poison- 
ed meat. Sometimes the owners of 
dogs are not as considerate as the) 1 
might be. Perhaps it is not always 
pleasant to register a complaint in the 
proper way. But the man who does it 
in the proper way isn't a sneak. 

Of all the dumb animals, the dog 
comes closest to being a human. Its 
constant association and companion- 
ship with man thruout the ages- has 
developed a kinship with the human 
family that no other domestic animal 
enjoys. The boy who grows up 
without the contact of friendship with 
one or more of these animals has 
missed much of boyhood. The man 
.or woman who can not look back up- 
on such a friendship as one of the 
richest treasures of their memory has 
been ' cheated of. one of life's most 
beautiful, experiences. No person who 
has enjoyed that experience would de- 
liberately poison a dog. The severest 
punishment that could be inflicted up- 
on such a person, if they were not en- 
tirely stone hearted, would be to 
cause them to witness the death of 
one of these animals in the arms of 
its youthful master; see the look of 
love and obedience in its eyes even to 
the last struggle ; see, even after death 
had closed the eyes, the almost vain 
attempt to wag its tail as one last sub- 
missive farewell.' 



RECEIVES RECOGNITION 
The Minneapolis Journal, in its 
issue of Tuesday Evening, makes the 
following editorial comment on a let- 
ter written by Martin Evenson of 
this city. 
The. Public Trough Overcrowded 
"For every twelve taxpayers in 
the United States there is one man or 
woman on the public pay-roll, says 
M. V. Evenson of Thief River 
Falls,: A'linn., in a letter to The 
Journal, giving an unnamed periodi- 
cal as ; his authority. 

"A study of figures compiled by the 
National Industrial Conference 
Board; indicates that every ten persons 
engaged or employed in private, en- 
terprises are supporting one person de- 
pending for his. living on public funds. 
As this estimate includes pensioners 
and public charges in institutions, 
probably an estimate of one public 
servant for each twelve persons en- 
gaged in business or gainfully emploj'- 
ed would be approximately accurate. 
'Mr. Evenson sees a connection be- 
tween this crowding of the public 
trough- and burden-some taxation. 
Mr. Evenson is not deceived. Cold 
figures demonstrate the sad truth. The 

total number of public servants 

Federal, State and local — was 1 - 
785,000 in 1913. The total number 
in 1925 was approvimately 2,800,- 
000. : 

"Now what have Federal, Stile 
and local governmental expenditures 
done since 1913? They have more 
than trebled! 

Paying the after-costs of the 
world war, of course, is a not unim- 
portant part of the increase in Feder- 
al outlay. Federal aid to highways is 
another' necessary new expense. "Mo- 
torized transportation also has neces- 
siated heavy new expenditures by 
cities, counties and states, although 
the States can and should pay their 
•hare out of gasoline and motor ve- 
hicle taxes. Improvement and exten- 
sion of the public schools have also 



..„ go? *, 

what work are the superfluous hun- 
dreds of thousands of job-holders en- 
gaged ? New govermental ' activi- 
ties that could be better left to the in- 
dividual. ■ 

"The bulk of the increase in school 
expenditures is . probably necessarv. 
But, in schools the Country over, a 
great many millions. are being wasted 
on fads and other things that could 
better be done for the child in the 
home. 

Passing along to the Government 
the duties and responsibilitte that 
we should rightly assume asMndividu- 
als, may be an indolently pleasant 
manner of getting these things off our 
minds, so that we can have more time 
to kill in personally costly ways. But 
it is an expensive habit. It is' a trait 
largely responsible for the trebling oi 
public expenditures in twelve years, 
with tax money supporting more than 
eight per cent of all our employed citi 
sens." 



o w.v.u.ivv u , itiigiu,,. Villi ig 

by such straighforward statements as 
the above, , on occasions when the 
jwords will be carried far and wide 



such as is shown in' the popular play 
"Abie's Irish Rose." Unreasonable 
rears may often, be smiled away, 
when they cannot be argued away. — 
Minneapolis Journal. 




unselfish to "a degree, characterized 

pun&i?" sty " fl ' d sinc « ri ty..- •* 

• Ouseph B. Randseil of Louslana: "I 
was early impressed with his truthful- 
ness,-Ws.sturdy;,.common sense, • his 
bpnesty.m,all matters, his strong 
sense- of justice and his broadness of 
*>#&>:■: He looked faithfully after 
every /interest of this republic." .-: 

John Sharp Williams of Mississippi 
said 'The salient characteristics- of 
tne-rnan were- unfaltering- courage of 
conviction, remarkable intellectual 'in- 
tegrity, a rugged common sense> 

o J!. K c? ute i Ne l! 0n was of alien birth'S 
said Senator Wesley L. Jones, "but no 
ir uer , American ever trod our soil 
than he. Not only in war did he show 



1'"""° "*" u, = fcttineu mr una wiae;,{7- " -^""^ omy m war aia he shov 
and another is by a kindly humor, f 8 'jyalty and devotion to his couri 



THE OBSERVATION POST 



EXCHANGE ECHOES j 

Combating Intolerance 
COMBATING INTOLERANCE 
An address delivered by Justice 
Carroll of the Supreme CouiJ of Mas- 
sachusetts at a mass meeting at man or woman 



Springfield in honor of Bishop O' 
Leary has attracted considerable at- 
tention outside the boundaries of 
Massachusetts, as well as within the 
btate. Justice Carroll is spoken of as 
the " most eminent Roman Catholic 
layman in Western Massachusetts." 
Not long since he was honored by 
Pope Pius XI in being made a Knight 
of St. Gregory. Speaking in the pre- 
sence of five thousand of his -co-re- 
ligionists, he must have considered 
his words carefully. Their admirable 
spirit, and the toleration shown and 
demanded, make these words notable, 
said he: ■-.. : 

"Tula >.. n ^t. i. • i. i *'"- f""*» ""» ***• «"■ insteaa. ne went 

.J'"™, be ^ n h V_ recognizing to work, fought and conquered pover- 
us S „ m r,H^ Z°™?J h l d !fe5? h t an " w .°r »* honor, respect, confi 



Memorial addresses delivered in the 
United States Senate on the occasion 
of a s ervice to honor the memory of 
Knute Nelson have just been issued in 
permanent form. It is fitting that 
this modest little volume be received 
by Minnesotans during the week that 
marks the anniversary of his birth 
Feb. 2, 1843. We are indebted to 
Congressman O. J. Kvale for a copy 
of these tributes to Minnesota's Grand 
Old Man. 

Reading them is an education 
qualities that make character of 
kind admired by friend and foe. The 
resounding note in half a dozen tri- 
butes is one of courage, sturdiness, 
integrity, honesty. Wirth pondering, 
these estimates by men who knew the 
man to his very heart after having 
worked with, and aganst; him in peace 
and war, during times of high excite- 
ment and in days of tedious attention 
to grinding detail. He had solid stuff 
in him. nothing flashy, jazzy or fro- 
thy but he did wear welt. Any young 
man or woman who does ■ a little 
thinking about how to live a life will 
find a guide in these appraisals. ' 

Consider a few of them. Said Hen- 
ry Cabot Lodge, the artistrocrat from 
New England about the . commoner 
from Minnesota: "He was full of 
courage and possessed of real 
strength, both morally and intellectu- 
ally. There never was a more thorr 
ough American than he.','- 

This appealed to Senator Francis E. 
Warren of Wyoming, "He had no 
time for self-pity, or for whining 
about the opportunities of the" rich 
and the down-trodden conditions of 
the poor, not at all. ' Instead, he went 



*«. u 7 " 7r ucvutiuu to ms coun- 
try, Dut ra time of peace he was the 
same true, genuine, loyal American, 
on, for more of the pure, undiluted 
intense Americanism of Knute Nelson. 

2^i'J^, a st S nBt Btm '°y> mode5t . 

P* ma f- H? was scrupulously 
honest and wholly without fear. No 
task was too humble to command the 
best that was in him. His moral 
courage was equal to his physical 
courage." rim* 

Classes in civics, American history 
and government, citizenship in Min- 
nesota schools can find no better re- 
ferences for inspiriation than this lit- 
tle volume of less than 50 pages. It 
teaches what citizens, young and old, 
do not have emphasized to them often 
enough— devotion to country, honesty 
of thought, willingness to serve. 

L. I. R. 



. u ;* u "v.ncii *»jiu uuier. witn 

Sf - m religion are just as sincere in 
their beliefs as we are in ours. We 
must respect the honest opinion of 
all men. We Catholics, too, must fe- 
member that -he principles of religi- 
ous liberty which we enjoy in our Sear 
land were given to us by menV the 
great majority ,of whom were Brdtes- 
tants and sincere Protestants atltha" 
The fact remains that the overwhelm 



*..^ ^«.u iciuuuia mac tne overwhelm- 
ing majority of the legislator jT who 
enacted into our organic law religious 
toleration were Protestants, and the 
greatest enemy.of this Country is the 
man who would deprive us of' this 
very foundation of our liberties; And 
the greatest, .enemy of the Catholic 
Church is he who would undo the 
work of .the Founders of this Republic 
end attempt t unite our church. and 
state. I have been a CathoUc all my 
life, and I have never yet seen the 
one who suggested such and adsurd 
doctrine." . 

Frank statements such as this from 
prominent churchmen, of any creed 
will be welcomed elsewhere,- and 
should tend to allav the suspicions 
and fears of those who are tempted 



dence and love of his fellow men.' 

From Democratic Senators of the 
old South came high tribute. Senator 
Lee S. Overman of North Carolina 
said "He was both morally and intel- 
lectually honest; simple in his habits, 
always open-minded and sincere; de^ 
void of all hypocrisy and deceit, and 
never resorted to the tricks of dem- 
agogue to gain favor with his as- 
sociates of the people. He was s'im-' 
pie, straightforward, unassuming and 



J. Hftveifteneura E'roiTi: 
J Re-rating Setvice Pay 

James -Havel, local ex-service man 
who received a severe scalp wound 
during -the: World War, Was called to 
Minneapolis last Sunday, to undergo- 
.an examination with a view to re- 
rating his compensation.<Service men 
from .all over the state are being call- 
ed pursuant to a recent : decision of 
•he Bureau to make a more equitable 
distribution of benefits. They receive 
a rating based on their occupation 
when they entered the service, instead 
of their present occupation. 

Mr. Havel's compensation was- 
raised from $18 to $50 per month. 
Many received a raise, He says, and 
many were cut where the bureau offi- 
cials considered it proper. "I was talk- 
ing to one big fellow," said Mr. Havel, 

Seen working every day. He had been 
£*™,e ?100 per month for three 
years, and all because it was claimed 
he had a touch of tuberculosis." 



is X 



; : w * 

ANNOUNCING 

: That Miss Mary Moldum 

- - now sales lady at the Flower ♦ 
.. Shop, which position she held f 
. • prior to taking up nursing at t 
; ; the local hospital. Having been ♦ 
' ' an 5 r t " na ;e «>> getting compel- 1 

- ■ ent help lately, we assure you ? 
; this will relieve the situation. T 

£ Thief River Greenhouse. 45 f 

'"nun minn i 



Give Washday 
To the Children! 

Our Rough Dry Service will relieve you of all vour 
' burnte!"* the J 63 ,™"-- Part ° f y°»r Zoning YoSr 
neaflv MdeH°. m ^ ack *?* "l 6 flat work ir ™ e ° a "° 
S fhfwf! J mth J W00 ' cns . ba th towels and stock- 
ings fluffed dry and soft, with only the ltehter 

SS °? 8PPareI t0 !* da '*P<™<i. starched and 
ironed at your convenience. 

chUdren!" 1 hSVe " Wh °' e new day *" devote t0 your 
May we call— this week— for your bundle? 

ROUGH DRY 10c A POUND 

MODEL STEAM LAUNDRY 

Phone 118. 



f^^^ ^^^ 



'.'. 



ATTEND THE SHOW 
The Commercial Club is making 
an effort to get a large representation 
from here at the Winter Shows to be 
held at Crookston next week. Pen- 
nington County will be prominently 
, represented in the exhibits and a 
large turn-out of local boosters can 
do the County a lot of good. Person- 
«1 contact offers a wonderful adver- 
tising opportunity. ,/ .- -. : ; 




6 



All Ready For You- 

New Safe Deposit Equipment 



Safer than were the pyramids in guarding 
the ancient Egyptian's treasures are our Mas- 
ter Key Safety Deposit Boxes in protecting 
your valuables. 

An additional number of these present day 
"pyramids'' has recently been installed in this 
bank to meet the increasing demand for ample 
protection. 

Assure yourself of this double safety by 
making a reservation today, in person or by 
phorie. 



FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 



1 1 ■ ■ ■ i-l i i i r i»*tfff£»f1 ■ ' . ' . ' !!!!!.M in » i » * t V t 'i' i i » » " * » > 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ ■ . ■ ■ ■ ■ , . . . , , , 



1 Call for;. JUNG'S * V I C T G RY " B R F XW 

*■"""*" Jl2!!2L^™'-'' JUNG'S QUALITY BAKERY., For sale by all grocers 

"* ' n iii 'H iii - iii 'ni ii i i y i i t ttMiiiii'. 



It's bok°d UP to a standard 

?++++++■»-♦ t M ♦ t I I » » 



" price. 



,:M 



ifciS&iC.2£&aE; 




*&£Mi£ji^Mmiii& 







WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1926. 






>»« _ 

iS^rtjs!* 1 RTW? "FAElS TftlBTJNF 



B : •''•n »i »n : v ••'■*■ ^r-. ->.■ ■ "'■■" v " •" '■ v ' r Vinwm 



Groundhog Promises Early 
Spring to Superstitious 

It won't be long now, folks, says 
Mr. Giound riog, who crawled out of 
his hole yesterday morning to find 
that *.nere was no ruue shadow to 
frighten him back to his den for six 
more cold, dreary weeks of winter 
weather, it won't be long until peo- 
ple will be planting flowers, playing 
baseball, and dusting off their old 
Lizzies. 

The groundhog story came original- 
ly f i om Teutonic peoples . In Ger- 
many there are two proverbial ex- 
pressions on this subject: "The shep- 
herd would rather see the wolf enter 
his stable on Candelmas day than the 
sun." and "The badger peeps out of 
his hole on Candelmas day, and when 
he finds snow walks abroad; but if he 
sees the sun shining he draws 'back 
into his hole." 

"The Germans," writes Walsh, 
"have brought over with them to 
America the superstitution about' *he 
badgar. But as the badger, even in 
its distinctly American variety, is lit- 
tle known eas*; of the Mississippi riv- 
er, the fable has been transferred 
from its shouolders to those of ^he 
wood-chuck, pr ground hog. 



Interesting Program 

At W. C. T. U. Meeting 

An interesting program was' enjoy- 
ed by the members of the local W. C. 
T. U. atjtheir meeting held last night 
in the \ Presbyterion Church. The 
speakers' were Charles Ginries, of the 
Central School, who discussed "Temp- 
tations of the Boy," George J. John- 




son, deputy scout • commissioner, who 
discussed the Boy Scout movement, 
and Clarence Pope, manual training 
teacher, who discussed the "Evils of 
the Cigarette." Piano solos were ren- 
dered by Misses Katherine Bakke and 
Loraine jZelmer. The devotional ser- 
vice was; conducted by George. Wilson. 

NEW ULM POST BUILDS 

BIG SWIMMING POOL 



munity swimming pool— not in ten 
years of 'twenty — but by July 1, 1926. 
Such is the determination of New Ulm 
Legionnaires, who at their recent 
meeting tentatively adopted construc- 
tion plans calling for a §20,000 com- 
munity swimming pool, and contribut- 
ed $2,000 of this amount to start the 



' . Esther Halseth Zorteau. 
The community was saddened Mon- 
day morning when it learned 'of the 
I death, of Mrs. Harry Zorteau of Min- 



neapolis, after a brief illness. 

Esther Halseth, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. A. S. Halseth was born 
January 24*.h, 190i: ;She attended the 
schools in this city' graduating from 
the Lincoln high school with the* class 
of 1919. She then atended business 
coollege, and held: a position as public 
accountant up until August 5, 1924 
when she became the bride of Harry 
Zorteau of Minneapolis. ' " 

*z wz£**sJ? "is-",- °t: e^'K SXtt^S: 

lynne, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. 
Halseth, four sisters, Mrs. A. Mor- 
risette, Mrs. P. H. Johnson, Mrs. J. 
W. Pahlen, and Miss" Idella Halseth 
all of Plummet*, and two brothers, Roy 
of Detroit Mich., and Lawrence of 
East Chicago. 

The body was brought here for 

burialj and funeral services were held. 

this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the 

Rev. J. 



I 



SOCIAL AFFAIRS 



Thill-Enjielstad. 
A very beautiful wedding was 
solemnized this morning at ten o'clock 
when Miss Magdalen Josephine Thill, 
daughter of Mrs: Gertrude Thill of 
this city, became the bride of Christi- 
an Engelstad, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Engelstad, also of this city. 

The bride, who was given in marri- 
age by her brother-in-law, J. J. Mc- 
Cann, was attended by Mrs. J. J. Mc- 
Cann a* matron of honor, and Miss 
Marie Thill as bridesmaid. She wore 
an exquisite gown of white crepe de 
chine fashioned into a basque effect 

. waist, round neck-line, full skirt and 
long sleeves, and the bridal veil of 
tulle was held with bands of lace and 
orange blossoms in a cap effect. She 
carried a beautiful shower boquet 
of ophelia roses and sweet peas. The 
maid of honor was gowned in pink 
satin, and the brides-maid in green 

. crepe de chine and they carried arm 
boquets of carnations. 

The little flower girl, dressed in 
pink, who led the bridal procession 
down the aisel was Margaret Rae 
Munt. The matron of honor came next, 
and was followed by the bridesmaid 
and usher Maurice Holzhnecht. The 
bride entered last on the arm of Mr. 
McCann, and was met at the altar by 
the groom, and best man, William 
Knox. 

Rev. Fr. A. L. Merth, pastor of St. 
Bernard's church, performer the cere- 
mony, which was followed by the cus- 
tomary rites. The altar was banked 
with a profusion of flowers and light- 
ed candles, and the aisle decorated 
with pink and white streamers. 

After the church services, members 
of the family and out of town guests 
gathered at the home of Mrs. Gert- 
rude Thill, 723 Knight Avenue north, 
where an elaborate 'wedding dinner 
was served at 12:30. 

Both of the young people are well 
and favorably known here, Mrs. En- 
gelstad having attended the local 
grade and high schools, finishing with 
the class of 1O20. At the time of her 



campaign. 

As plananed, the* pool will accom- 
modate a capacity crowd of 1500 peo- . 

, pie; will be 65x100 feet over the pool ! Methodist Episcopal church, 
-* itself, giving a superficial water areatT. Dixon performing the last cere- 
1 1 of 561 1 square feet, and will hold • monies. Interment was ■ made at 
-* 1 133.000 gallons of water. It will have Greenwood, 
a reinforced concrete floor with por- 
ous sub-drainoge and complete drain- 
age system underneath. The pool 



Betty Brandon. 

Betty, the infant daughter : of Mr. 



HlMiraON TO ADDRESS 
i ;:,;., STAtE';WEI4"DRILLERS 

.Howard E.-. Simpson, professor of 
geology in the 'University of North 
Dakofe, will give the 1 address at the 
banquet Wednesday evening, Febru- 
ary 10, which; will feature the .fourth. 
annual convention of the. Minnesota 
Well Drillers' association to be held 
at University Farm, St. Paul Febru- 
ary 9 to 11 inclusive.' Moving picture 
wfliijje used to illustrate the address. 
Thereat Northern Male Quartet of 
St.I&tfl will sing, and R..D. Hughes 
will appear in a group of special 
song*.- Besides listening to a series 
of addresses convention days, the well 
drillers will stage a rope splicing con- 
test and will hold their regular busi- 
ness meeting. Agricultural engineers 
of the university will have leading 
parts on the program. 

"When I die let there be no gloom, 
remember all this chaff, and chisel 
this upon my tomb: "He handed us a 
laugh." Thus sings Philo Brockway 
in his Duluth News-Tribune column. 
Laugh-making is one of the highest 
callings given to man. A good, hearty 
joyous laugh, uplifts as much, if not 
more, than all the serious reflection 
one may do. If you don't believe it 
try analyzing your outlook of life 
sometime after you have had one. — 
Aitkin Republican. 




Tuesday, February 9th 



Girls* Community Club 

■■■ Presents the' Musical Comedy 





U 



."•'"*.,' • With 150* Local Artists ;! . 

Best Show Ever Attempted in T. R. Falls 

Beautiful Costumes, Catchy Music, Artistic Dances, A Whirl of Fun; 
Oodles of Laughs. . f 

A Sure Cure for the Blues: A Guarantee with all Tickets., 



Buy Advance Sale Tickets at 50c and Exchange Them for Best Re- 
served Seats, 

Special Matinee for School Children, 4 p. m. Admission 15c 



will vary from 3 feet 9 inches to 9> and Mrs. J. A. Brandon, died Wednes- 
feet in denth, 77 ner cent beini? wade- day January 27th after an illness of 
aW~ and 100 per cent swimmable. only a few days. She was Ave months 

Commander A. E. Walsh of the and twen'.y-seven days old a t the time 
New Ulm Post reports enthusiastic of her death. Funeral services were 
•cooperation .of all the memhers. and held _ Saturday, Rev. August Bredesoh 
according to the Brown County Journ- officiating, and interment was made 
at, the project will receive the whole- at Greenwood, 
hearted support of the citizens. A i *** 

sale of SB0 bonds drawing interest at i Irene Leone Stenvik. 

5 per cent and payable any time with- ' Wednesdav, January 27th occurred 
in twelve years, one twelfth of the the death of Irene Leone, the baby 
bonds to he redeemed each year, is daughter of Mr, and Mrs. Oscar Sten- 
the financing scheme most favored, vik of Erie. She was three months old 
Committees have been organized to a t the time of her death which was 
inform the people of'the need, the caused by pneumonia. Funeral ser : 
plans, and the cooperation required to viMS were held at Erie Friday. 

secure the swimming pooK' I — ~ 

Detroit Stages Big Dog Derby 

BUDGET MAKING TAUGHT ! Detroits' annual classic, the Ameri- 

IN HOMEMAKERS' CLASS "^n Legi,on Dog Derby, will he stag- 
Budget making, to the end that the !? February 20th. According to J. B. 
family income may be used to the £° u J n H?' Vngam chairman, the De- 
best advantage possible, was one of- f olt > Minnesota dog derby differs 
the principal subjects kept before wo- ? rora "ke events elsewhere, in that it 
men of the state who attended the IB ?? en , ™ a " b °y s of 18 ' or under, 
recent short course for homemakers ' ? nd "eludes even.s for dogs of every 
at University Farm. Mrs. Clara In- type— J>g. Iirfle, homely and cute. The. 
gram Judson ofTchicago, house-keep- ? n]y . st 'Pulation is that the boy must 
er, author and budget expert, led the be . from Becker county, 18 years or 
discussions. | under, and must own the dog he races'. 

Mrs. Judson said the main things „.™= 1925 races brought the largest; 
to be considered in planning a budget £&" S™1 **"$ *""? thr ° I "? ed I . D e- 
were savings operating expenses, £°l\f£^ te - ,^ cent snows have 
food clothing, advancement, and lux- Si 6 , 5 ? ft? 8 fa! *-"P°rts say it is 
ury. "Money is a tool for getting fLl 1 ^ ™ lfi . nnes "ta than in Alaska, 
material things," she said. "Material S! re ™°? i S f ^5,? ,s Sea f D - T M 
things are not so important as spiritu- I™S. ££!* "L* e r £L? !eM 1 of . ou . r »$< 
al. but one can probably.be more KlfS ?°£ Derby ^f IC L s -^ 
spiritual when warm and comfortable tolar^ffi™ ?% °n thB "**"; 
otherwise " declares Chairman J. B. Coumeya. to. 

In making a budget she advised the CouTtv^ovTfcMf *TS *?%% 
class woijien to fool, up the ; total troi' ^«----^ ? " ' ■ ,ed ' , ~ at De *' 
amount jit- the., family, income. *f or the 



Minnesota. 



last five-year period and to base the 
budget on the yearly average of re- 
ceipts. "Money saved and invested is 
money spent in buying 1 an income and 
increasing a sense of security," she 

n^ages^wasintheemp^ofthe g^° »S 2 

try to do everything with it. " 

Poplar Yaluahle. 

Twelve years ago, George Marvin 
and R. Sperling delivered 2,000 pop- 
lar ties- to the Canadian Northern 
railway which were to be treated and 
used for experimental purposes. Af- 
ter the ties were treated they were 
taken to Western Canada and placed 
in use. The experiment shows that af--j 
ter twelve years there are over 80 
per cent still in use. On the strength 
of this the company has placed an or- 
der with the local firm for 50,000 pop- 
lar ties to be delivered this Winter. 
This opens up a new industry for this 
section as there are millions of such 
ties in the vicinity and will use mat- 
erial that had been heretofore practic- 
ally worthless.— Warroad Pioneer. 



Soo Line Railway. 

Mr. and Mrs. Engelstad leave to- 
night for Chicago and various points 
in Wisconsin where they will spend a' 
two weeks honeymoon trip, after 
wh'Vh +h a v will return to this city to 
make their home. 

For Magdalen Thill. 

Wednesday evening the Lady For- 
esters entertained in the parlors of 
the St. Bernards church in honor of- 
Miss Magdalen Thill, whose marriage 
to^ ChrisHan Encrp'stad tooV pl^T- 
this mi mine. At the close of the eve- 
ning that was spent in a social wav. 
a delicious lunch was served. Miss 
Thill was presented with a number 
of very beautiful as well as useful 
gifts. 

Thursdav evening honoring Miss 
Thill and Mr. Eneplstad thfi St. Ber- 
nard's club entertained in tbe church 
parlors. The evening was spent plav- 
ing cards. They were given a number 
of pieces of glass ware. 
*•* ' 

Bennes-Scanlon. 
La=* Saturday afterroon at Crooks- 
ton. Miss Ruby Kn*bleen Pe«ne3.- 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Ben- 
nes, became the bride of PpiiI D. fVan- 
lan, son of Mr. and Mrs. T- D. S"an» 
*lan. The servicer were read bv Rev. 
Frederick Hibbard of the Presbyteri- 
an church in the presence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred T. Scanlan. The' youmr 
couple will make their home in this 
city. 

*** 

T,von T?ehakah Lodge: 
The 1'von R^baVab will pold a remi- 
lar meetinjr at thp T O f\ T7 . b^l 1 
Thursday evening Feb. 11. DanWn" 
will follow the business meeting, and 
each member will be allowed to invite 
two guests. 

**• 

St. John's Aid. 
The Ladies Aid of the St. John's 
Lutheran church will meet in the 
church parlors next Wednesday after- 
noon, Feb. 10th. Mesdames Herbert 
Fuller, G. Adolphs and Otto Geske 
will be hostesses. 

*•» 

STATE'S FIRST BACON 

PIG CLUB ORGANIZED 

Sixteen boys in Mower county have 
been organized into the first bacon 
club in Minnesota by T. A. Erickson, 
the state club leader, and other exten- 
sion workers, writes F. L. Liebenstein, 
county agent. The name, Horael-'Ba- 
con Pig Club, was adopted and officers 
elected. Earn bov obtained; a .nure- 
. bred Yorkshire gilt on a share basis 
from the George A. Horrh'el Co.. 
■which for the first time is furnishing 
breeding stock to boy farmers in or- 
der to stimulate the production of ba- 
con class hogs" for which it is readv to 
pay a premium. For each gilt furnish- 
ed, the coninanv is to receive two 
gilts from the 1926 litters of weaning 
pigs- 




wmm, 



THIS is the month 
in which OUR COAL 
proves its superior- 
ity. If your supply 
is low, order some 
today. 

Coal 77 

Thief Reiver 
Motor Co. 



T ribune want ads bring results. . 

J(mrnextGtf 
should be a 
■BUi(X-"~: 

Far Comforfs Sake 

The Better Bulck offers every 
ordinary motoring comfort; and: 
many that, axe exclusively Buick: 
Easier starting^ h«u^:.hi g Jr. speed 
sttirtmgmntordoestt*. Smoothrun- 1 
ning from the go— Automatic Heat 
Control is an exclusive Buick feature* 
Easier steering— BuickV S-control- 
mrface steering gear is the most ex- 
pensive and most efficient type today. 

For Safety's Sake 

Bulck lurrourids you with "every 
ordinary protection, and then adds 
Buick protection: Buiclc depend- 
ability, which take, yon and brings 
you back t on time, all the time. 
Buick mechanical 4-wheeI brekei, 
with no liquid in them to expand, 
contract or leak away. And Buick 
Controllable Beam Headlights, with 
iteeting wheel control, which make 
night driving apleasnre. 

For Economy's Sake, 

No other car has the "Sealed Chutii" 

and the "Triple Sealed Engine." The 

Sealed Chassis" lowers operating 

costs by enclosing every operating 

Eart inside a dlrr-proof, oil-tight ' 
ouring, while "Triple Seals" dote 
every engine point of entry to dirt 
and the wear dirt causes. 

For Value's Sake ] 

At present prices, Bulck with sal of 
its added comfort, safety, and 
economy, Is easily the greatest 
automobile value in the world. 

If you want finer transportation at 
lower cost, come in and see the 
Better Buickl 



mxe te plica inm J1125 (• 1 

Aauw •*« B«ii mfm ami I 
rfjjol mtid, tn ffZU ma I 



""'■TW15* 

lertntrt Co... 



100 MORE 

MASTER - KEY 

SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES 



Will Soon Be Installed in Our 
Fine Safety Deposit Box Vault. 

Our electrical alarm protected and scientifically constructed 
vault offers greatest safety for your valuable documents against 
fire, burglary or theft. The "Master Key" adds additional security 
against pilfering. ■ * 

A special, very conveniently arranged room, adjoining the vault, 
is provided' for the exclusive use of our safety deposit box cutom- 
ers, which insures privacy in examining the contents of your 
boxes. - 

There is a large demand for these boxes so we suggest that if you 
need one, make reservations now. 



First National Bank 




Economy Of 
Operation 

Electricity Must Be Produced And Distributed 

In Large Quantities 

If The Cost Is To Be Continually Reduced 

Small Individual Plants With Small Distribution 

Cannot Operate Successfully 

A Satisfactory And Inexpensive Method 

Of Storing Electricity Has Not Been Found 

Therefore Each Plant Must Be Large Enough 

To Carry The Peak Load ' 

A Number Of Plants Supplying One Distributing 

System Can Operate With Greatest Economy 
This Company Supplies 41 Towns With Electricity 
Our 7 % Preferred Shares Are A Good Investment 

MINNESOTA ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTING CO: 



•^-•■:^^ii^^ i 







l S'<iJi-Mw50* •"^?-'- , Si'J'f.„ 









TmE^RI^RFAIJ^T^UNE 






Farm Bureau Holds 

7th Annual Meeting 

Wonderful Attendance, Splendid Pro- 
gram and Enthusiastic Spirit Mar" 
Three Days Convention in St. Paul 



\ PUBLICfrORUM f 

j WRIGHT REPLIES 

Editor ''Public Forum" - 
Thief Elver Palls Tribune. 
And The Blow Nearly Killed Father. 
To some of the comments in the 
paper ami otherwise on an article I * 
wrote and which was printed in your fo0 '- 



ing your-Alma Mater ,and I will bet shouldn't we reap big things from a 
dollars to doughnuts that when you show of this kind? 
get dry behindthe ears you won't be i ' This year there can be no less than 
any blood Orange man.. Perhaps it four, car loads of live stock being 
would be almost presumptious .for me shipped to the show for 'exhibition 
to give a wise kid like you advice, but from this county. Hats off to those 
anyhow, try to keep your feet on the boys that will make the sacrifice of 
ground and your senses cool, and re- time and finance, take the risk on 
fuse, though tempted, to play the their good stock to brave this inde- 
pendable winter weather, for the pur- 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, UK. 



The 7th annual meeting of the ilin- 
wUch'wMhSd inT Pau?nn rat r«n' issue ^January 20thT would limply ! A" 1 ! " we, in our feeble efforts, can Jo'sTonfy to let the world know that 
1! 9™ 0-21 was the ?most su^tfui [in say tha ^ on V vho does not follow the If"""* some of those high hatted fel- Pennington county is a live stock sec- 
every way etei L^bv the or?ani z f ? an S"' ; " nd beat< " 1 P>»th-must expect* ° w >> from their lethargy,' or bring a tion and that it pays to raise live 
tJoninthkttatP ! t ? oublelanaI welcome crtiticism, j "We mirth or joy to this cold grey stock in Pennington County. 

The attendance' was far in excess of i e !?? r bl ? e £ °l » tne ™ise. As grand 1 ™ rld ° f .° u «' or" perhaps help some j I could say . a good many things 
last ycarTmeTtiniMd the moSam ? ld Jose '' n ^"amp "««> to say, "The fr °™ «*"■ abysmal -darkness, it will more about the Winter Show. I'm 
wS muth 'hfbeft yet nresfnteH^ i 5 a ,S er ^ hey come ' " he harder they ! not . h . av e b f" "• vain. , . '■ going to close with a few . remarks 

™ annual n?eetin,r There w« not a ■ fal1 " P"«aps I should apologize to And as, for my fnend Trpvaten, about the educational part of the 
dSli ses™o SSI' the three days? ,the "bobbies" and- say I .did , not ' whojf articleappeared in the paper a, show. The show is second to hone in 

The first day's sessions were 



hpM lniean st » that r am sorr y- that I will S!°r time ag0> in whlch he intimated its class in the entire country and on- 
at University i*mn in roniunction never do il a ^ in - and that ia wa « w^i ?% °^ Who ^!i eved *n the ly to the State Fair in size and ira- 



short course and i r,nmW °f„„i^ Cake tobacco °nd not having much to (Ua :'?yal. un-American, not patriotic; educational feature is" even' greater 
and m^Sve^ddresse^re heard I do - Fo ? pCTance ' somc da V l wi « « L? it" dU T d '""'-J™ answer .than the State Fair. One spends a day 

dress of welcome. I ? U S 1 ^! t _, lmdyin!r .! ove ' P?. th .° s ' slush 



■ President J. F Reed, in an able ad- : j£ f^Sufk ionttke "* "^ 



dre.ss, reviewed the work and accom- 



fort on my part. 



s much ef- 



fnl^r f *?. fi« m n« re , a Int' OTs reminds me of Galileo " who 
2&.^f ^i a S.,^:™ «lted .before the authorities for 



P.' H. WRIGHT. 



"Value of Organization to Farm Wo- 



son of Redwood Falls. Airs. Wilson 



BOOSTS THE SHOW 

Editor Trbiune; 



to his pleasure he can take advantage 
of the daily program arranged with 
trained educators along different lines 
of farming," live stock feeding and 
breeding. Then to crown it all, an 
' evening program is arranged for that 



bodies moved. That was in the times | 



me,, was defivereu- by Be» U._ W„- 'Sf J^^^^S \ " V^^i*!^?* £^%^^ZZ& 

■ VrfiSjf »™*OT° si 8°5 - ™ e sbo ; v sa.rit ia an inspiration that given one 
,«« «*,,.« « ti „ _ ^^ magnitude and 

.. t . - — , — ijupuiLumic, in tuc agricultural indus- 

the past two years have been play- try of the Red River Valley, 
ng the leading role in getting the j PA UL ENGELSTAD. 

live-stock industry, namely AIFAL- 1 . 

FA. 



sun oi neuwoou i us,, mrs. ,,i,.son h th t , t . d ft f irs a valley proposition. The show Wit j 3 an inspiK 

also spoke in behalf of the Minnesota;, H „- believing things that were >? a direct asset to the Red River Val- a broade ? view of 
Euitonal association, pledging the , rai)traiy . to the ac J epted B i(Ieas . He : ley. We are a part, of the valley and importance of the 



and recanted, but to a friend who 
tood trembling at the door as he left 



suppor 
to the Farm Bureau. 

Two valuable and instructive J ad 
dresses that day were tl.ose by f^\^^^^Zr^^ 
£•_. H t ar " t ' . P re , slde ^^ °?_9L. }?"!?■ "It moves just the same." ■ 

In one of our training camps -during 
the late world war was a cap- 



Farm Bureau federation, and Thos. P, 
Cooper of the u. S. Department - of 
Agriculture. Ole 0. Sageng, chair- 
man of the Rural Credit department 
spoke for Gov. Christianson, who was 
out of the city. 

The Wednesday and Thursday ses- 
sions were held at the State Capitol. 
On Wednesday the convention heard 
discussions of several important sub- 
jects.* Senator Herman Schmechel of 
Fairfax spoke on Farm Electrifica- 
tion, dealing, with the Burnside ex- 
perimental project being carried on 
near Red Wing. Co-operative auto in- 
surance was the subject of an inter- 
esting address by G. J. Mecherle, gen- 
eral manager of the Illinois Mutual 
Insurance Co., E. A. Tyler of St. Paul 
spoke on co-operative life insurance, 
P. J. Coleman of Slinneapolis gave an 
interesting address of agricultural 
transportation, H. H. Flowers, secre- 
tary of the Rural Credit department, 
spoke on the work of that department 
in making long time loans to the far- 
mers at a low interest rate, and "V. E. 
Anderson, assistant attorney general, 
very ably discussed agricultural legis- 
lation. 

A fine banquet was enjoyed on 
Wednesday evening at the St. Paul 
Athletic Club when State Auditor Ray 
P. Chase delivered a brilliant and in- 
spiring address on taxation. F. W. 
Peck, director of extension, also 
spoke on the harmony and co-opera- 
tion existing in this state between the 
Extension Service and the Farm Bu- 
reau. 

Gov. Christianson, who arrived 
home from Washington Thursday, apr 
peared before the convention and gave 
a very interesting talk on his observa- 
tions at the national capital and 
brought hopeful message that there 
is_ a changing attitude in the East 
with reference to western agricultur- 
al problems. 

A strong set of resolutions, outlin- 
ing the policy of the federation for 
1926, were passed. The Farm Bu- 
reau reiterated its demand for nation- 
al legislation to care for the surplus 
of farm crops. Resolutions were pass- 
ed voicing appreciation for the fine 
support the Farm Bureau has receiv- 
ed during the past year from the Min- 
nesota Editorial association. 

At the closing session President J. 
F. Reed was unanimously re-elected 
for his fifth term and A. J. Olson of 
Renville was again elected as first 
vice president,. Hagbarth Bue of 
Northfield as second vice president 
and Mrs. E. V. Ripley of Menahga 
and John D. Pyle of Madison as dir- 
ectors for three years. 

During the whole convention the 
enthusiasm for Farm Bureau work 
was strongly evident and much satis- 
faction was felt by the delegates over 
•the accomplishments of the Farm Bu- 
reau during the past year, particular- 
ly on legislation and the railroad 
freigth rate fight. Reports from all 
counties indicate a strong revival of 
Farm Bureau spirit and the outlook 
is for an increased membership and 
enlarged work during 1926. 



tain who' was both very 
small of stature. It was 



young and 
standing 



Our fame as an important Alfalfa 
section has spread beyond the bound- 
aries of Pennington County. We have 
been read abouti talked about, sung 
about, until the world has been awak- 



joke with the boys that a little child ] ened to *he f act that there must be 
was leading them, very much to the more , tban just ''hot air" in all this 
annoyance of the captain. .One morn- 1 publicity, and from all this we are 
ing orders were posted for a stiff j su £^ to receive a great deal of benefit. 



march in heavy marching order, 
signed; "And a little child shall lead 
you on a dam good horse." And 
while my; high school.friend who com- 
mented on rav article may be young, 
it is evident that he is there with the 
dirt. 

I will admit that some of the article 
was written in the nature of a jest. 
I am a little bit prone, perhaps, to 
see the inconsistencies, the comical 
and the bright side of life. I was very 
glad to get your criticism, though 
perhaps it sounded more like the yelp 
of a pup than a gentleman of the 
Lincoln High. But I still believe there 
is a" chance for a world of improve- 
ment in your high school, morally and 
educationally. 

Yes kid. you are all 



The management of the 'Winter 
Show at Crookston is proving beyond 
a doubt that Pennington County Is 
the Home of Alfalfa." In it's honor 
they. have erected a similar arch to 
those erected in Thief River Falls the 
past two years. The people of Penn- 
ington have helped in the promotion 
of the Winter Show. It is proved by 
the way they have shared their sup- 
port and respect towards its up-build- 
ing. I have had an opportunity of ber 
ing a close observer of the' activities 
carried on in the promotion of the 
Winter Show and have found that at 
all steps taken the purpose has been 
to create a bigger and better show 
for the Valley as a whole, and a coun- 
ty like ours, situated as we are, with 



right, and I : railroad facilities, a perfect balanc- 
am proud of your courage in defend- ed soil for diversified farming, why 



. HENRY FORD ON THE BIBLE. 

Henry Ford tells, with mechanical 
precision, his view of the case in these 
words: "The Bible is the basis for 
instruction in conduct and justice. We 
learned something in our day that we 
never forget. We learned that you 
suffer if you sin. Maybe someone else 
suffers also, but you, pourself, suffer 
anyway. We learned that no one ever 
gets away with a wrong act. Every- 
thing, sooner or later, is checked up. 
We learned that the universe is so 
constructed that thejvrong thing will 
be discovered before it goes very far. 
Such knowledge is the best part of 
an education, in my judgment.''— 
From "Christian Statesman," Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 



It is a rare thing to find a defect 
in the eye of a rabbit. " 



■ The cotton plant gives off a sub- 
stance similar to one found in herr- 
ing brine that attracts boll weevils. 



A German farmer considers it a 
good omen if. a stork builds her nest 
on his housetop. 



30 NURSERYMEN ATTEND 

SHORT COURSE AT "U" 

The third annual nurserymen's 
short course attracted a class of 30 
at University Farm. Lectures were 
given and laboratory practice led by 
staff men of the divisions of horticul- 
ture, forestry, and entomology. 




San-Tox American 
Mineral Oil 

A scientific corrective 
for constipation. This 
oil is tasteless and of 
highest quality. It does 
not purge— it lubricates. 
Price $1.00. 

LAMBERT'S 
Drug Store 




Get Ready for Spring 

We are, with over $20i000.00 worth of; new, modem 
Farm Equipment already on hand and more coming. 




; McCormiek-Deering Tractor— Power for Profitable Production. 

:Did you ever stop to think that the production" of crops pe»' man is directly in proportion to the 
power that he uses. i . 

(Tractor power and profitable production of crops go hand in hand. The better the power the great- 
er the production, resulting in more profits. The JIcCormick-Deering Tractors have proven their value 
and ; a profitable-investment. Work done better and work done in season. Triple power tractors— Belt. 
Drawbar and Power take-off. " ' . . . 




wiu?»'™ WG ,? ElD CULTIVATORS are the most popular weed Mller and seed- 
dler? nlmovJ;i= t, J" 86 ? lz ? 1 . an £ 1 ?*B er f? r „* ra f- or use - Stlff or S P™« Tooth S 311 ^- Large hard 
pitf™n,SfM^?w Bush ? gs, S. the ? ub -^? Ste,!l P ""»^-High Steel Wheels, and wMe facid tires, 
to" mactunes have n,ade such ra P'<l brides in popularity as has the McCormiek-Deering Field Cultiva- 










!!§§?&? 






Mr ^~^%ijUi 


1 


B5|h# 


dra»«?*wpffep« 





er ik*i sfeadv ^,nSnf"7 Turning; SSkwcran^speed; 4, greater capacity with less labor; S Long- 
nosMo'n- 1lS,,, y "TfS! 7, Visible oiling- system; 9,. Improved offing; 10, Supply tank locked into 
•3K Have f Ml^iif !#* ?l p ?, ly t ? nk »y2,VI»proved tinware-Aslt;fp>Wjtnal ; ion yojir 
fZS? n f? BaU - B «i? ln ff McCornuck-Deenng of the. capicity you need brought out to' your 
nSSn^Sii • ■ Be P ara S'g-yon«ett;. Test the McCormiek-Deering against' any bth'ef. -.The McCormick- 
S 2lL!r.r the g°ff»Wnm™te: to' easy turning andShe long life'you.wiantln a-cream separ- 
ator, we Know the new BaU-Beanng machine will please you.: " >_ 




Thief River Falls, Mirin. 



<3L $QM 



LOCAL MARKETS 



. GBAIN 

Wheat, dark northern ..._ 

Wheat, o. 1 ■ • 

Wheat, No. 2 ..'.„ "~ 

Durum, No. 1 L.1IZ1 

Flax, per bu 

Barley, per bu _ 

Oats, per bu . ;.... 

Rye per bu 



Buckwheat, per 100 lbs ~...1...."Z 

Flour and Feed 
Flour, per cwt ....... . 

Oil Meal .. ; __i._U'Z"" 

Bran ; . _ 

Shorts :._™_ZLZZ, 

Poultry 

Hens, heavy . „ _ 

Hens, light .- ~ !....Z...; 

Heavy springs Z 

Leghorn springs ..; ."'."'"'. 

Old roosters .. 

Geese* .'. ...... 



.1.66 

1.B2 

1.50 

1.26 

2.19 

.46 

.29 

.84 

1.20 

£.00 
2.75 
1.40 
1.40 

.18 
.12 
.19 
.11 
.07 
.09 



GRASS SEEDS • 

Timothy, steady $4.50 to $4.80 

Timothy and Alaike, mixed; 

weak : $4.00 to $4.75 

Sweet clover, W. B., steady, $3 to $5 
Sweet Clover, yel steady 8.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady.... $20 to $24. 
Mammoth Clover sfeady ....$20. to 24. 

Alsike clover, steady $16 to $19 

Common Alfalfa, weak 16.00 

Grimm, alfalfa, steady ._...$20 to $25 
Cert. Grimm, firm _ 35.00 






PRODUCE 

Eggs, No. 1 2$ 

. CREAMERY 

Butterfat, sweet 45 

Butterfat, sour 42 

Butter, per lb _ ,."..!"""! !44 

WOOL AND HIDES 

Wool _ .32 

Wool .... • .36. and .37 

Cow Hides .... .07 



We Want • | 

HIDES AND FURS :: 

Northern Trading Co. : : 

♦ « > * U l l l ' 



AUTO REPADt AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMITHING 
Expert Work G uaranteed 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 



Subscribe to The Tribune. 



Ifir Bntttmhal TrrnnftrttHH 





Af 1CJ25 Chevrolet had 
MwmaZFMt^r its greatest year . 

During that time more than 
50,000 testimonials were sent 
to the Chevrolet Motor Com- 
pany by owners. This tremen- 
dous avalanche of evidence in- 
dicates the public appreciation 
of the car and its performance. 



JtilQJfi Chevrolet offers the 
*P J5 **° Improved Chevrolet 
at New Low Prices—thus giving 
the public in greater degree than 
ever before — 

QUALITY AT LOW COST 

Hie Tooting Car -$510 The Sedan - . -$735 

The Roadster . . $510 The Landau - - $765 

The Coupe - . - $645 % Ton Truck . .$395 

TheCoach . . .$645 1 Ton Truck . .|550 
All prica /.Wfc. Flint. MicUioa 



\^y 



/ 




\ " i 



Local Dealers 



^MMM^^ ^^^ ^&^M ^^^^^i ^^^^^^^^^^^^&M^&^^ 




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1926. 



ST. HILAIRE 



St. Hilaire Lutheran Parish. 
G M- Grimsnid, pastor. 
Thei-e will be services next Sunday 
at the Oak. Ridge church at 11 o'clock. 
The English language is used. 

The Luther League conducts the 
serviced at the St. Hilaire Church at 
8 p. m. -a 

Gubbi Fest. 

On Sunday afternoon, a Gubbe 
Fest was held at the Norwegian 
church parlors. The program which 
commenced at 2:30 consisted of the 
following numbers. 
Songs— Luther League Chorus. 
Reading— R. Hauge. 
Reading— S. T. Espland. 
Piano Solo — Agnes Hed. 
Reading— Lloyd Bilden. 
Reading — Clemens Gigstad. 
Song — Men's Trio. 
Piano Solo— Marie Grimsrud. 

At the close of the program Miss 
Selma Hoff on_ beMalf of" the Luther 
League presented the piano to the 
congregation. Mr. Skatrud represent- 
ing the Board of Trustees accepted 
the piano. From 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock a 
(ielicious luncheon was served. A. Vik 
being chef, and aided by a number 
assistant cooks and waiters. This 
Gubbe Fest proved to be a great suc- 
cess, and was well attended. 



? ;: : ww:W9^^^^^^^^^00^i^m^w: : m 



; ■ TBTEfr ;ft^R^M&s4iroti^# 



PAGE : SEVE& 



St. Hilaire Wins From Goidridse. 

Coach Reirsgord's basketball five 
maintained its place in the lead when 
it defeated the Goodridge quint 38-4 
at the local "gym" Friday evening be- 
fore a large enthusiastic crowd. The 
locals began scoring from the fh*st, 
and even thought the Goodridge five 
were outclassed and far behind they 
fought gamely, and succeeded in cag- 
ing one field goal and two free throws 
The game was featured by swift | 
passing, accurate shooting, and splen- ; 
did teamwork. Aside from the usual | 
line-up, Joe Dann played his first i 
game as "sub". St. Hilaire intends 
to return this game Thursday eve- 
ning. 



was decided: to have six weeks of re- 
ligious school, with Mr. Andrew Tang- 
bakken of Baudette as teacher. 

The Sundatada boys from Erie are 
hauling ice from High Landing to the 
Goodridge creamery. 

The Oak Park Ladies Aid held 
their annual business meeting first 
Thursday of this month at "the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Anderson: The 
following officers were elected; Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Lundeen; secretary, Mrs.' 
Lunden and! treasurer, Mrs. Edwin 
Sivertrud. It was decided to have 
"one month school with Miss Thea 
Omlie as teacher. The Oak Park con- 
gregation has decided to belong to 
Goodridge Parish. Rev. V. O. Aaker 
has served the congregation since last 
summer. ,' . 

Our butcher, Mr. Albert Halvorson 
and family will be moving to Thief 
River Falls 'the first part of next 
week. Mr. Halvorson has rented out 
his butcher ! shop for one year to a 
man from Thief River Falls. K is 
with common regret to see the Hal- 
vorson family leave us, especially will 
MrsL Halvorson's leave be felt in the 
Goodridge Lutheran Ladies Aid, of 
which she has been one of the most 
active members for^many years. 



Annual Creamery Meeting Held. 

The annual meeting of the stock- 
holders and patrons of the local 
creamery and the "election of officers 
for the coming year was held Febru- 
ary first at the village hall. A short 
business meeting was held, which was 
followed by the election, of officers. 
All former officers were te-elected, 
those re-elected being the following: 
President,, J. Patten; Vice President, 
F. Grandbois; Treasurer, W. P. Wil- 
son; Secretary, F. S. Erdman; Direc- 
tor, O. L. Larson. 



Statement of the Goodridge Co-Op 
Creamery Ass'n. Jan. 1, 1926. 

Assets. 

Buildings .„■ $2,500.00 

Machinery and 

equipment 4,000.00 

Supplies on hand 730.50 

Wood on hand ...... 110.00 

Due for butter 
shipped ...: 2,3Q8.25 

Minn. Co-op; Cry's . 
certificate of 

indebtedness .... 293.20 $9,941.95 
I Liabilities. 

Bills payable pa- 
trons for butter § 

Minn. Co-op Cry's 

Ass'n lor supplies 

Halcom Mfg. Co- 
Oliver Reson, dray- 
age .-. 

E. W. Hedeh, for 

WOod ; 

Garden Valley Tele 

Co. .i 3.15. 

Deficit ..:....: 43.87 



Mr. D. Whalen, formerly of this 
village and now of Minneapolis, is 
now visiting at the home of his father 
and brother,. George, who reside south 
of this village. 

Mrs. A. Bilden and son -Clifford, 
were Thief River Falls shoppers on 
Tuesday. 

Martin Loberg left Monday for 
Warroad where he will be employed 
for some time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gust Fellmari and 
daughter Mildred .were Thief River 
rai;s .shoppers Saturday. 

Clifford Bilden left Saturday for 
Dalton, where he will" be emnloyed in 
a creamery. ' 

Lilian Ecklof, Leta Bennett, Ben- 
dekka Hagen, Ruby Susag and Ceceli:i 
Bartholet were Thief River Falls call- 
ers Saturday. 

Mrs. Verner Nelson came Tuesday 
morning for a brief visit at the M. 
Fricker home during the illness of her 
mother. 

Miss Leona Allan and Wendall Cor- 
bet of N'ewfoh'en. '-"en* the week- 
e: : ->t the H. R. Allan home. 

Miss Blanche de Catheleneau, who 
attend the Normal school at Red Lake 
Falls, spent the week end at the home 
of her mother, Mrs. L. de Cathileneau. 

Miss Helga Kalland returned Mon- 
day from Thief River Falls, after 
spending a couple days visiting at the 
home of her sister Mrs. Janda. 

Miss Selma Hoff and Mrs., Sorvig 
and little daughter shopped at Thief 
River Falls between trains Saturday. 

Miss Sylvia Walbeck spent the 
week end visiting with relatives at 
Thief River Falls. 

Misses Dorothy Olsen and Mae 
Kenney were Thief River Falls shop- 
pers Saturday. ■ 

Mr. Norman Patterson left. Satur- 
day for West Concord where he will 
visit at the home of his father. 

Coach Riersgord autoed to Thief 
River Falls Monday evenine where he 
refereed the Thief River — Arvgle 
Game. 

C. Rowe of Minneanolis atended to 
business matters in this village Mon- 
day.'' 

Mrs. "Rarl Jenson shopped at Thief 
River Falls between trains Monday. 

Gimard Lindouist left Tuesday for 
his home at Eveleth, after ..SDending 
the past tw weeks as guest at the V. 
Brink home. 

Mrs. Gunstyn Bergland. who was 
ooera*ed on for appendicitis at Thief 
River Falls a short time ago, is ex- 
ppi^pd bnmp this v-eelc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rov Sumpte*- visited 
with friends at Thief River Falls on 
Saturday evening. ' 



1 GOODRIDGE NTCWS i 



Mr. Anton Kaarstad of Jelle. was in 
town last Tuesday. His daughter, 
Alma, is attending Goodridge high 
school. 

The weather and roads have been 
wonderfully" good up to present day. 
It has been like springdays in the 
later part of the winter. The automo- 
biles are -running like in the summer 
time. How long this elderado will 
last no one knows, of course. We hope 
for a cnuole months of it yet. North- 
ern Minnesota is all right, and there 
is room for many more good peonle. 

The United Ladies Aid of Erie 
Lutheran church held their annual 
business meeting, "Wednesday after- 
noon of last week. The minutes show- 
ed a verv successful year. $173.00 
was taken in daring the year which 
is very good considering that the aid 
consists only of five members. The 
following officers were re-elected: 
TWdent, Mrs. Bratlnnd: secretary. 
Mrs. Lovely; treasurer, Mrs. Rime. It 



2,546.37" 



36.12 
9.56 



29.53 
93.84 



Surplus, or net worth 



$2-/762.47 

7,179.48 



Operating Statement. 

Butterfat purchas- 
ed „ $5,2621.25 

Manufacturing sup- 
plies J. 2,258.78 

Freight and- dray- 



59,941.95 
Disbursement 



age _ 


524.69 


Labor ..;..._ 


1,854.50 




190.22 


Office supplies .... 


51.67 


Rent, insurance and 


-taxes ' 


168.39 


Advertising > 


140.25 




147.47 




34.94 


Wood .../ _... 


771.21 


Investment 


25.00 


Sec. Treas.! and 




directors pay 


190.00 


Incidentals 


17.45 


Notes paid ~ 


4,384.79 $63,380.51 


Income 


Butter and butter- 




milk sold' 561,473.64 


Received from Mrs 




Aarness " (old ac- 




count) 


10.00 


Note to Goodridge 




State Bank 


1,000.00 


Merchandise sold 


23.75 


Refund from bank 




overpaid int .. 


5,55 


Note to First Na- 




tional Bank T. 


' 


R. Falls i...... 


300.00 


Received from T. 




R. F. Creamery 


520.5L 


Refund from Minn 




N. W. El. Ry. Co. 


3.20 



Deficit 



$63,336.64 
43.87 



$63,380.51 



119,610.2 



Founds butterfat 
purchased! 119,610.2 

Butter shipped.... 146,637 
Butter sold locally 3,190 



149,827 
Overrun • 30,217 

Per cent of 'overrun. 25 1-5% 
Respectfully submitted 

OTIS E. RONKIN, Sec'y. 

Wool Co : Op Makes 



Legal Publications 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE BALE 

Default . having' been made In the pay- 
ment of. the su»n of One Thousand/ Two 
Hundred Seventy-five and 16-100 ($1275.18) 
Dollars, which la claimed to be due and la 
due at the date of tats notice upon a cer- 
tain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered 
by F. F. Haynes and Edith J. Haynes; hU 
wife. Mortgagors, to- MaBon City Loan 
& Trust . Company, Mortgagee, bearing 
'date the 24th day of November, 1010, and 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded In the office of the Keglater 
of DeedB In and for' the County of l?en- 
ningtnn and State of Minnesota, on the 
20th day of November, 1010, at 2:30 o'clock 
P. M. in Book 13 of Mortgages, on 'page 
622, , ■ 

Which Bald Mortgage, together with the 
debt aecured thereby, was duly assigned 
by said Mason City Loan & Trust Com- 
pany (uIbo spelled Mason City Loan & 
Trust Co.,) ufortgagce, to CharleB ■ H. 
DeVae by written OBRlgnment dated the 
30th- dny of December, 1010, and recorded 
In the office of Baid Register of Deeds, on 
the Kith day of October, 1025, at 11:00 
o'clock A. M., In Book 75 of Mortgages on 
noge 3S2, and nu action or proceedings 
laving been Instituted, at law or other- 
wise, to recover the debt Hwurert by sabl 
Ifortgage or any part thereof, except that 
an action has been heretofore Instituted in 
the Mnnicipal Court of the City of Thief 
River FallB.-ln the County of Pennington 
nnd State of Minnesota to recover - upon 
six $30.00 past due Interest coupons, a part 
of the debt secured by Bald, mortgage and 
that said action has been dismissed and 
discontinued and except that ah action has 
been heretofore I nut I tilted In the ' District 
Court of Pennington County, Minnesota to 
recover upon the principal note of $1000.00 
with interest since Its maturity, a- part of 
the debt secured by said mortgage: that 
Judgment has been rendered therefor in 
Bald Court; that an execution baa been Is- 
sued upon paid judgment and that said 
elocution has bptn returned wholly unsat- 
isfied. 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of the 
power of.eale contained In unld Mortgage, 
nnd pursuant to- the statute .In such case 
made and provided, the said Mortgage will 
be foreclosed by a stile of the premises de- 
scribed In nnd conveyed by said Mortgage, 
vts: 

The West Half <W%1 of the North West 
Quarter (NWH* of Section Twenty-two 
(22), In Township Onp Hundred Fifty- 
three (153) North, of -Range Forty-five (45) 
West, of the Fifth Principal Meridian, in 
Pennington County and State of Minnesota, 
with the hereditaments and nnnnrtenahces : 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff of 
said Pennington County at the front door 
of the rnnrt House. In the City of Thief 
River Falls in said Connty and State, on 
the 12th day of March. ntfifl. at 10:00 
o'clock A. M.. of thnt day. at public ven- 
due, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt . of $127!Urs. and interest, and the 
taxes. If any. on said premises, and Fifty 
Dollars. Attorney's feee. br stipulated -In 
and by said Mortgacre In ease of fore- 
closure, and the disbursements allowed by 
law: subject .to redemption at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, as 
provided by law. 
' Dated Jnnnary 2flth. A. D. 1028. 

CHARLES H. DeVOE. 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
PERL W. MABET and 
H. Si. CHOMOTE. 

Attorneys for Assignee of Mortgagee. 
Thief River Falls Minnesota/ 

(Tan. 27 Feb. 3-10-17-24- Ma.r-3) 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATK MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS. Default has been made by 
the mortgagors In -the conditions ■ and 
covenants of that certain mortgage duly 



' HOttTGAOS' rOBECLOSDRE SALE 

Default* having' been made In the pay' 
meat* of the turn of Fifteen Hundred 
Forty Dollars, which la claimed to be due 
and Is dinfatthedateotthla notice, upon a 
certum Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by John Morgan and Hllma' Mor- 
gan, bis wife,. Mortgagors, to Albert 8. 
Llebcrman, Mortgagee, bearing date the 
15th day of September 1023, and with a 
power of sale therein contained, duly' re : 
corded la the office of the Register of 
DeedB In 'and for- the County of Penning- 
ton, and State of Minnesota! jii the 28th. 
day of September 1023, at o'clock A. M- 
In Book SI of Mortgages, on' page 2B3. 

Which said Mortgage - ; together with the 
debt secured thereby* was duly assigned 
by said Albert S; Lleberman Mortagee, 
to Peter Dorn ny written assignment dat- 
ed tbe 29th day -of September 1023; and 
recorded, In the office or said Register of 
DeedB, on the 2nd day of February 1024, 
at one o'clock P. M.. in Book 65 of 
MortgageB on page 2fl0. - 

AND WHEREAS, The said Peter Dorn 
tbe Assignee, ..and Holder of 
said Mortgage has duly elected 
and does hereby elect to declare 
the whole principal sum of said 
Mortgage due and payable at the date 
of this notice, under the terms and con- 
ditions of Baid Mortgage and the power 
of sale therein contained; and. whereas 
there 1b actually due and claimed to be 
doe and payable at the date of this notice 
the sum of NInteen Hundred Ninety-three 
and 08-100 ($1003.08) Dollars, with inter- 
est thereon at the 'rate of Beven per cent 
fer annum from the Oth day of January - 
026, and also 7280.37 taxes for tbe year 
1024 paid by assignee, and whereas the 
said power at sale has become operative, 
and no action or proceedings having been 
instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover 
the debt secured by Bald Mortgage, or 
any part thereof; 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by virtue of the 
power of sale contained In said Mortgage, 
and pursuant t" tl-e -statute ii such case 
made and provided, the Bald Mortgage 
will be foreclosed by a sale ■■" rh<- premis- 
es described In and conveyed by Bald 
Mortgage, vis: 

Lot numbered Nino ID) -if Block 
Thtrty-elx- (36) Original Townsite of 
Thief River Falls according to the . 
plat thereof now on file and of re- 
cord in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for said County 
in Pennington County ami Stat? of 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments nnd 
appurtenances; whlcn *ale will be made 
by the Sheriff of laid Pennignton County, 
at the front door of the Court House, in 
the City of Thief River Falls In said 
County and State, on the 27th day of 
February 1026, at ten o'clock A. M., of 
that day, at public veudue to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay -Bald debt of 
Nineteen Hundred Nln->ty -three nnd 08-100 
Dollars, and interest, and the taxes. If 
any, on said premises, and seventy-five 
Dollars, Attorney's fees, as stipulated In 
and by said Mortgage in case of fore- 
closure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law: Bnbject to redemption at any 
time within one year from the date of 
sale, as provided by law. 
Dated January Oth S. T). 1920. 

PETER DORN 
The assignee and^pfesent owner 
of the tald mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP and 
H. O, .BERVB. 

Attorneys, Thief River FallB. Minn. 
• (Jan. 13-20-27- Feb. 3-10-17) 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON PETI- 
TION TO SELL, MORTGAGE OR 
LEASE LAND. 
■ESTATE OF Dellys Rutb Gibson, Mi- 
nor. Ward. \ 
State of Minnesota, 
County of Pennlngton-^ss/ 

,IN- PROBATE COURT. 
In the Matter of the Estate of DellyB 
Ruth fiibson, a Minor. 

The%ate of Minnesota to Edla U. Gib- 
son,. Henry A. Gibson. Hulda.M. Gibson. 
Ruth A: Gibson, Hlldur E. Gibson 
George F. Gibson, E. Leontln GibBon, 
Dellys Gibson and" all " persons in- 
terested in the sale of certain lands 



executed and delivered by John KiiBmnfc' 
and Anna Knsmak. his wife, mortgagors, 
to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee. 

hearing dat" the 17th day of October. 1023. : , -,-.- — 

and. with n power of sale therein contain- belonging to sold ward. The petition of 
ed. duly filed, for record In the office of * T ""' "* *~ * T "'** 

the Register of Deeds In nnd fnr the 
Conntv of Pennlncton and State -of Minne- 
sota on the 10th dny of- October, 1023. at 
nine o'clock A; M.. and duly recorded 
therein in Book "77" of Mortgages, on 
pace 41 thereof: 

AND WHEREAS. Said default consists 
In the failure of said mortgngors to " on* 



Anna J. ErfcBon, rformerly Anna J. Gib- 
son, as representative of the above named 
ward, being duly filed In this court re- 
presenting that It Is necessary and for 
the best Interest of said estate and of 
all interested therein that certain lands 
of Bald ward described therein be sold 
and praying that a llcenBe be granted to 
Anna J. Ericson. formerly Annn J. Gib-, 



the spmi-annrial installments of amortised jwn, to -sell the same, 
principal nnd interest, each amounting to | Now. Therefore, You and each of yon 
One Hundred -Forty Dillnrs and six- are hereby cited and reqnlred to show 
ty-three cents (?140.63). which bernme due [cause, if any you have, before this court, 
and payable on the 17tb dny of October, at the Probate Court Rooms, in the Court 
1024. tlte 17th dny of Anrll. 1925. and the, House In Thief River Fails, County of 
17th day or October. . 192Q, . In accordance . Pennington, State of Minnesota, on the 
with the terms nnd conditions of said i 11th day .of February, 1026. at 10 o'clock, 
irtgnge.. nnd to pny the.genenil taxes on I A,- M., why the prayer of said petition 

rl mnrrffitcort nrnmlcm fnr tha . Tenr flhntllrt nnt hp trrnntnrt 



snld mortgaged premises for the ■ year 
1023. which taxes the State of Minnesota, 
mortgagee, in default of snld mortgagors 
to pay the same, pnld on the Oth dnv of 
May. 1025. to-wft: the Bum of Two Hun- 
dred Thirteen Dollnrs nnd seventy cpnts 
(?213.70). whlrh default bns continued' to 
this dntej 

■ AND WHEREAS. By renson of Baid de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and. con- 
ditions of snld mortgage nnd aa^nnthorized 
hv law, the Department of Rural Credit, 
on behnlf of tbe Stnte of Minnesota, the 
mortgngee nnd owner and holder of snld 
mortgnee. hns exercised nnd does hereby 
exercise itn option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the ^vholp of the lonn secured 
by snld mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS. There Is actunUy due 
nnd claimed to be due and pnynble npon 
■wild mortgnee nnd the lonn secured there- 
by, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Four Thousand 
Fonr Hundred Six Dollars nnd thlrty.-elght 
cents (S4.400.3S), unamortized nrlnclpal. 
together with Interest thereon from the 
17th dny of October, 1025, at the rate of 
five nnd one-fourth (5^1 per centum per 
annum and Fonr Hundred TwentyHine 
Dollnrs and eighty-nine centa ($421.80) 
amortized principal nnd Interest, with in- 
terest on M40.03 thereof from October 17th. 
1924, at seven (7) per centum per annum. 
*-i t-r - land Interest on S140.0R thereof from Anrll 

Good Year 8 rLeCOm 17th. 1025, nt seven (7> per centnm per 
UUUU XC<tl S rM3Wllu nnntlCl , and interest on $140.63 thereof 



The Minnesota Co-operative Wool 
Growers association, which was re- 
organized a year ago under the Min- 
nesota standard Co-op. law, made a 
surprisingly 1 fine showing of business 
in 1025, according to reports submit- 
ted at the annual meeting in 'St. Paul 
this month. , 

The receipts of wool pooled through 
the association's Wabasha warehous- 
es, jumped from 250,950 lbs. In 1924 
to 533.606 lb:. i n 1925. The average 
price returned to growers for 1924 
fleece was 40.44c before final re- 
turns are made. The association had 
1013 members and 1674 patrons in 
1925. 

A feature: of the 1925 wpol sales 
was the demand for the "medium, or 
Yx blood, grade which commanded a 
price above Jthat of the use of this 
grade in the manufacture of "rayon" 
(so-called silk substitute) was the 
cause of this new preference for 
medium wool. 

All the old officers and directors 
were elected again- and Carl Bohlan- 
der of Little Falls was added .to- the 
board. Alex Huddleston is president 
of the association and R.'E. Jonesis 
the general] manager. Their head- 
quarters are at Wabasha. 

Art instruction has been undertaken 
by 10 ruratschool districts in#West- 
moreland Cfanty, Pa., under a special 
supervisor, j 

Enrollment in 4 summer high 
schools and]. 13 .summer elementary 

schools of* T^WlfHeTnl*''> " . f-^n«, 

in three yeats* from 8,000 f 18.000. 



from Oetohpr~l7th, 102-1, In nil the snm of 
Five Thousand One Hundred Thirty-nine 
Dollars and thirty cents (»5.130.301, in- 
cluding the nmount paid for taxes, as 
aforesnldj 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of snld de- 
fault, the snld power of sale contnlned In 
said mortgnge bns become and Is' oper- 
ative.- nnd no action or proceeding having 
been Instituted nt law or otherwise to re- 
cover the debt secured by said mortgage 
or any part thereof: ' 

NOW THEREFORE. -Notice is hereby 
given, that J>y virtne of ^he power of sale 
contained In snld mortgnge. and pursu- 
ant to the statute In such case made and 
provided, the said mortgnge will he-fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises deBerlbed 
in and conveyed by said mortgage.. situate, 
lying and being in tbe County of Pen- 
nington nnd State of 'Minnesota, to-wlt: 
The Southeast Quarter (SEy.) of 
Section Twenty-four (24), In Town-* 
ship One Hundred Flfty-fonr (154) 
,. North, of Rnnge Forty (40) Weflt. con- 
taining IflOvacreH, more t>r lrss v record- 
ing b» the fiovernment survey thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenanc- 
es, which Bale, win be made by the Sheriff 
of said Pennington County, at the front 
door of the Court House in the City of 
.Thief Biver Falls, In said County and 
State, on Thursday, the 11th day of March. 
1P20. at t£n o'clock" A. M. of that day, at 
public vendue to the highest hldder for 
cash, to' pay and satlBfy the debt then due 
on said mortgage: - including the taxes 
paid on said premises, and .the costs and 
expenses allowed by: law : -subject to re* 
demption-at any time within' one vear 
from the date of sale, ei provided by law. 
Dated Janunry 2flth. 1026. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, ' 
■_,.■.'- _ Mortgagee, ; 
By Department of Rural Credit 
OLE O. SAOENQ. ,(ThaInnan. 
(SEA?) eftr H ' H " * LOWBR8 ' Secretary. 
.CMFFORD L. HILTON, 
Attorney General.- V 

TATDVIG GULTvICKRON, ' 

AsBistant Attorney General. . 

Attorneys for Mortgagee. ' 
ftw H-wnm Bnlldlng.™ 



should not be granted. 

WITNESS, The Judge of said court, 
nnd the seal of said court,- this 14th day 
of January, 1021. 

■ LARS BACKE. 
Judge of Prubate Court. 
(COURT SEAL) 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb.-3) 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON FINAL 
ACCOUNT AND FOR DISTRIBUTION 

STATE- OF MINNESOTA, 
COUNTY OF PENNINGTON— ss. 
IN PROBATE COURT. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Nela 
Peter Nelson, also known as N. P. Nelson, 
Decedent 

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA. TO Au- 
gnBta K. Nelson, Jesselyn Sophia Nelson- 
and all persons Interested in the final ac- 
count and distribution of the estate of 
said decedent: The representative of the 
above' nnmed decedent, having filed in this. 
Court bef -final account of the administra- 
tion of the estate of Bald decedent, to- 
gether with her petition praying for the 
adjustment and allowance of said final 
account and for distribution of the real-' 
due of eafd estate to the person thereunto 
entitled. Therefore. %QV, AND' EACH 
OF YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you have, before 
this Court at' the Probate Court Rooms 
In the Court House In the City of Thief 
Klver Falls. In the County .of Pennington, 
State of Minnesota. o» the Ifith day of 
February. 1020, at 10:00 o'clock A. M.. 
why snld petition 'should not be granted. 

Witness; Tbe Judge of 'said Court, and 
the Seal of Bald Court, this 2lBt day of 
Jnnnary, 1018. 

LARS BACKE. 
(SEAL) Judge of Probate Court. 

PERL W. MABET and 
H. O. CHOMMIE, 

Attorneys for Petitioner, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. . 
(Jan. 27-Feb. 3-10) 



ORDER UMITING TIME TO FILE 
CLAIMS, AND FOR HEARING 
THEKEON. 

State of Minnesota . ' 
County- of Penuiugton^BB. 

IN PROBATE COUBT. 

In the Matter of, the Estate of Llna J. 
Osnesa. Decedent. ■ 

Letters of Administration this day hav- 
ing been granted to Casper Osuess. 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time within 
which all creditors of the above nnmed 
decedent may present ' claims against her 
estate In this Court, bo, ana" tbe same 
hereby Is, limited to Biz months from and 
after the date hereof;- and that .Tuesday 
the 27th day of July, 1828, at tea o'clock 
A. M„ in the Probate Court Booms at 
the Court House at Thief River FaUa In 
sold County, be,- and the Same hereby bj, 
fixed and appointed as the time and-place 
for hearing: upon. and the examination, ad-.i 
JuBtment'and allowance -of such claims .u 
shall be presented within the time afore* 
said. . '. ■ ■- ■-; " .- '" i '■ ■' 

Let notice' hereof, be- ftven by tha publi- 
cation of this order In fTnief River Falls 
Tribune",* weeklyi newspaper as provided, 
by law. 

Dated January 19th, 1020. 

(COURT SEAL) . 

'LABS BACKE; 
m«™« ««. - Jnd*e of Probate Court. 
THHO. QTJALB, ', C 
Attorney fo> Administrator. ' 
.- ., . < Jan, 27 r Feb,,3) : 



NOTICE OJ'BEALESTATE MORTGAGE 
.^ FOBJBOLOSUBE SALE . 

WHEREAS, Default Has been made by 
the mortgagor' In the conditions- and cove- 
nants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Nels B. Swauson, 
widower, mortgagor^ to the State of Min- 
nesota, mortgagee; bearing date the 4th 
day of February, 1024, and, with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly filed for 
record in- the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Penning- 
ton and State of Minnesota, on tbe 18th 
day of February, 1924, at eight o'clock 
thirty minutes A. dt, and duly recorded 
therein In Book "77" of Mortgages, on 
page 148 thereof; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
In the failure of ' the said- mortgagor to 
pay the semi-annual Installment of amor- 
tized principal and Interest, amounting 
to One Hundred Eighty-seven Dollars and 
fifty cents (?1S7,50), which became due 
and payable on the 4th 'day of August, 
1025, in accordance with the termB and 
conditions of said mortgage, which default 
has continued to this date; 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to tbe terms and con- 
ditions of said -mortgage,' and as author- 
ised by law;, the Department of Rural 
Credit, on behalf of the State of Minne- 
sota, the mortgagee and owner and 
holder of said mortgage, has exercised 
and does hereby exercise Its option to 
declare, and hereby does declare, the 
whole of tbe loan secured by Baid mort- 
gage to bo due and payable forthwith: 

AND WHEREAS, There 1b actually due 
and claimed to he due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and the loan secured 
thereby, at the date of this notice, by 
reason of said election, tbe Bum of Five 
Thousand Nine Hundred Seven Dollare 
and sixty-one cents (J5.0O7.61). unamor- 
tized principal, together with interest 
thereon from the .4th- day of AuguBt, 1025, 
at the rate of five and one-fourth (5*4) 
per centnm per annum, and One Hundred 
Eighty-aeven Dollars and fifty cents 
(S187J50) amortized principal and interest, 
together with Interest thereon from the 
4tb day of*Augunt ,1025, at seven (7) per 
ci-uturu per annum. In alt the sum. of 
Six Thousand Two Hundred Forty-three 
Dollars and- twenty-eight centB ($0,243.28) ; 
AND WHEREAS, By reason of Bald 
default the Bald power of sale contained 
In said mortgage has become and Is op- 
erative, and no action or proceeding. hav- 
ing been instituted ; at law or otherwise 
to recover the debt secured by said mort- 
gnge. or any part thereof: -i 
NOW, THEREFORE, Notice Ib hereby 
glveu, that by virtue of thp power of sale 
contained lu^ aald mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided; the said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described. 
In and conveyed by said mortgage, slttf- 
ate, lying and being In the County of 
Pennington and State of Minnesota, to- 
wlt: 

The Southwest Quarter (SWVi) of. 
Section Thlrty-Bix (30). In Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range Forty-four , (44) West, con- 
taining 160 acrea, more or lesB, ac- 
cording to the Government Survey 
, thereof. 

with the hereditaments and appurten- 
ances, which sale will be made by the 
Sheriff of said Pennington County, at the 
front door of the Court House in the 
City of Thief River FaUa, In said County 
and State, on Thursday, the 4th day of 
March, 1026. at ten o'clock A. M. of that 
day, at public vendue to the highest bid- 
der for cash, to pay and satisfy^ the debt 
then due on said mortgage, . and - the 
taxes, if any. on said premlseB. and the 
costs, and expenses allowed by law, sub- 
ject to redemption at any time within one 
year from the date of sale, as provided by 
law. 

Dated January 10th. 1020. 

STATE. OF MINNESOTA. 
„ _ ■ . Mortgngee, 

By Depnrtraent of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAGEXG. Chairman. 
Attest: H. H. FLOWERS, 

(SEAL) : ■ ' Se T tary - 

CLIFFORD-L. HILTON, 

Attorney General! 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON. 

Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee 
(>W Hainin Building, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

(Jan. ^0-27-Feb. :i-10-17-24) 



. MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALS. 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Two Thousand Fivsr 
Hundred Ninety-six. and 25-10& ($2£96V25) 
.Dollars, which is claimed to be due and 
is due at the date of this- notice upon a 
certain Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by F. F. Haynes and 'Edith. J. 
Haynes, his wife, - Mortgagors, to 'Mason 
City Loan & Trust Co., Mortgagee, bear- 
ing date the 8th day of AuguBt. 1010, and . 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded In the office of the Regis- 
ter of Deeds In and for the County of 
Pennington and State of Minnesota, on 
the 10th day of August, 1010. at 130 
o clock P. M., in Book 58 of Mortgages, 
on page 630, and no action or proceed- 
ings having "been instituted, at law or 
otherwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said Mortgage or any part thereof, - 
except that an action has been heretofore 
Instituted In the Municipal Court of tbe 
City of Thief Klver FaUs, In the- County 
of Pennington and State of Minnesota to 
recover upon^six SfiOtOO past due Interest 
couponB, a part, of the debt secured by 
said mortgage and that said action has 
been dismissed and discontinued and ex- 
cept that an actlou. ha& been heretofore 
instituted In the District Court of Pen- 
nington .County, -Minnesota, to recover 
upon the principal note of {2,000.00 with 
Interest since Its maturity, a part of the 
debt secured, by said mortgage; that judg- 
ment has been rendered therefor In said 
Court; that an execution has been Issued 
upon Bald Judgment and that said execu- 
tion hue been returned whoUy unsatis- 
fied. 

Now. Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of tbe power of saleVon- 
tained In aald Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, tbe Bald Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
in and conveyed by said Mortgage, vis: 
o- Th £ §? ath Ea8t garter (SE&) of the 
South East quarter (SE%) of Section 
Eighteen (18) and the West Half (W%) 
of the South West quarter (SW>4) and 
& e „^ ou ^ ¥*** Qiartt-'C <SE>4) of tbe 
Snnth West quarter (SWfc) of Section 
Seventeen {17), aU In Township One Hun- 
dred Fifty-four (154) North, of Range 
Forty-four. (44) Weat, of the Fifth Prin- 
cipal Meridian, In Pennington County and 
State -of Minnesota, with the heredita- 
me . ntB and appurtenances; which sale 
will be made by the Sheriff of said Pen- 
nington County at the front door> of the 
Court Hoifse, In the City of Thief River 
FaUs in said County and State; on the 
ipta day of March. 1026, at 10:00 o'clock 
M.. of that day, at public vendue, to 
._.- highest bidder for cash, to pay aald 
debt of 12,500.25 nnd interest, and the 
taxes, if any, on enld premises, and Sev- 
enty-five Dollars, Attorney's fees, as Btio- 
ulated In and by said Mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements al- 
lowed by law; Bnbject to redemption at 
any time within one year from the day 
of Bale, aa provided by law. 

Dated January 23rd. A. D. 1028 

MASON CITY LOAN & 
TRUST CO., 
PERL W. MABEY and Mortgagee. 

"l O. CHOMMHfl, 

Attorneys for Mortgagee. 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
(Jan. 27-Feb.-3-10-17-24-Mar.-3) 



DR.LRTWETE 
Veterinarian 

Phone Res. 80 Office 597 I 
; ; (South of Ogahmah Hotel) . • ' 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 
» M * I M I t i I M t> U * I * * It > > i- 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO MAKE AND 
FILE PROOFS OF CLAIM 

WHEREAS, I, A. J - . VelgeL Commission- 
er of Banks of the State of Minnesota, 
buve taken -possession of tbe property and 
business of the Goodridge. State Bank. 
Goodridge, Minnesota, and am liquidating 
Us affairs pursuant to the laws of the 
Stat*- of Minnesota. 

NOW THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN,. That all persons who 
may have claims agnlnBt said bank shall 
make legal proof thereof nnd file same 
with me at my office in the State Capitol 
at St Paul, Minnesota, on or prior to 
Monday. May 17. 102C and I hereby di- 
rect, that this "notice be published wcekl'v 
for chree successive months in the Thie'f 
River Falls Tribune, a weekly newspaper 
published at Thief River Falls, Penning- 
ton County, Minnesota. 

A. J. VEIGEL 
Commissioner of Banks of 
the State of Minnesota, 
(Feb. 3->M- Apr. 28.) 



STATE OF MINNESOTA 
COUNTY OF PENNINGTON 

IN DISTRICT COURT 
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT 



State of Minnesota, by Clifford L. 
Hilton, Its Attorney General, Petitioner, 

v.' 
Jacob FiBher. deceased, the un- 
known heirs of Jacob Fisher, 
deceased. Bnrbnrn FiBher, Frank ' 
Fleher, - Mndllne Fisher. Charlie 
Fisher. Joseph Fisher, Polly Stan- 
gle. Mike Stnngle. Anna MeMulh, - 
Dewey McMnth, Err.mn Flola, John 
Ftola. Mary Novntnv, Frank Novat- 
ny, Charles F. WIsner, Win. G. 
Porter, deceaaed, tbe unknown heirs 
of Wm. G. Porter, deceased, Viron 
M. Porter, deceased, the unknown 
heirs of Viron M. Porter, deceasel, 
•Lottie W. Patten; James K. Pat- 
ten, Olive M. Moore. Charles H. 
Moore. Nels P. Nelson, dlartha 
Comstock. F. L.' Comstock, 
Lawrence Mortgage Company. a . 
corporation. First State Bank of 
Thief River Falla, a corporation, 
Carl ChriBtopheraon and Halvor 
Rhodeganrd, co pnrtners doing 
business aR Carl Christopherson 
and Company. Martin C. Roetotnd 
arid Caroline E. RuckBtad; also all 
other persons inknown claiming 
any right, title, estate, interest or 
lien In the real estate described In 
the petition henln,. 

Respondents. 



IN THE MATTER OF THE CONDEMNA- 
TION OF CERTAIN " LANDS FOR 
TRUNK, HIGHWAY PURPOSES 



Notice of Filing of Report 

TO THE PETITIONER AND TO THE 
RESPONDENTS IN THE >ABOVE EN- 
TITLED ACTION: 

Yon-and each of yon will hereby take 
notice thnt we., the undesigned, dnly ap- 
pointed in the above entitled action, as 
commissioners, have completed our services 
and filed our. report in the office of the 
clerk of district court and that onr fees 
and compensation as such commissioners 
have been paid. . > 

■ Dated at Thief Hirer Palls, Minnesota, 
June Oth, 1824. ' \ . 

. DANrati SHAW 
. PHIL I. ZEK - 
aVFVHAYNBS 
Commissioners 
- ( Feb. M0-17V 



I. ' Tan. '27 Feb. ^10 : 17-24-" Mar^8) ; 



Yonh* Pine Lodge No. 223 

Marti eviry . Ttiesdjy nlftht «t 8:00. 



The Tribune has a first class job 
department Brinj? ua your work. 



llrtEO: QUALE 

. . ", .; ■'':■- -Lawyer 
Practice in. AH Courts and Be- 
■- fore U. a tand Olftoa \ 
..-•-. '' MeGtnn BnJUfoff 



SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 405 Knight Ave. N. 

Thief River Falls. Minn. 

Phones : 

Hospital & Office, 360. Res., 48S-J 

A. W. Swedenpnrg, Ph. G, M. D. 
Physician and Surgeon 

Special attention Ear, Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses 

MINA R. SWEDENBURG, a N. 

Supt^ Hospital and Anaesthetics. 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Surges? aad 

the Diseases of Women amd 

Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bids;. 

Phones: 
Office 128. Residence 99 




Northern Lodge No. 236 
A. P. & A. M. 

Stated Communications 
First and Third Thursdays 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED EMBALMS 
AMD. UNDERTAKER 



Luioa Furniture Ompus 
TUrf Binr F«Ua 



n 



Nick GUI 148. 



t t iti i mni i ii i iitt iii ii i 

DR. C. M. HAUG 

Dentist 

Office Over First A Peoples 
State Dank 
Telephone No. U , 

i lMIIHIIMI I III I III IIll 



IEFKW 

DR. a F. HELLBT 
i Rre, Rat, Now and Throat 
DR. a W. FROBHUCB 
3wg«rj and ObatttrJav 

OFFICE J 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDJNr, 




PAGE EIGHT 



AGAIN 









TmEF Bll^EAIJATRIBtrNEl 




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,192*. 



Wil,MHlE;; YQE, TO- COME 



Frn«i*W^Kft^l^ffil«ii ^If^osMvelyioses Satoidaj| February 6. 
X lUaCLJl 'OllUt^ OlUTtSfc: - ;^faTO»re.feamains have ifeenfaidedF > ! 



BBCSa 



CLASSIFIED WANT ADS 



FOR SALE— Fordson Tractor and 

Plow and cedar posts and poles. W. 

E. Baker. 27-tf 



FOR SALE— Popple cord wood J5.75 

a cord. Please drop a card to Hal- 

vor Olson 120 Markley Ave. So. 4B-2t. 



FOR SALE— Player Pianos. 1 Gul- 
branson, 1 Kimball and 1 Whitney, 
a bargain if taken at once. H. A. Ol- 
son, St. Hilaire, Minn. 47-2-p. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE FOR STOCK 
— 6-cylinder Buick Touring car. In 
good condition all around. Joseph 
Vorlicky, 107 Kneal Ave. S. Thief 
River Falls, Minn. 50 



FOR SALE— Fully equipped Restaur- 
ant at St. Hilaire,. Minn. Will trade 
in car, horses or. stock. Must be sold 
at once. Write or call G. L. Dokken, 
St. Hilaire, Minnesota. . 47p 



FOB RENT— Modem furnished room. 
801 Main Ave. No. Tele. 899. tf 



FOR' RENT— Garage. Call 183 46-4t 



FOR RENT— Four-room all modern 
flat in Dudley building. Will be va- 
cant February 1. 45-tf. 

FOR' RENT-^ furnished room, mod- 
ern, centrally located, 801 Main 
Ave., phone 339. 44-tf. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOUND— A pair of glasses. Owner 

may have -same by identifying and 

paying for this ad. 47- 



, FOR SALE— Whi'.e Holland Turkeys 

. (quantity limited) 3 Toulouse Geese 

(first §10.00 offer buys them) and 

, several White Wyandottes cockerels. 

L. A. Westphal, St. Hilaire, Minn. 3tp 



FOR SALE— Team of work mares, 
sound and true; -good set work har- 
ness; team weight 2,680 lbs., 8 and 9 
years old, both mares in foal. Must 
be sold at once. Terms or cash. Write 
H. A. Olson, St. Hilaire, Minn^ 46-2 

FOR SALE— 3-burner gas stove ?5. 
Fine new violin and case ?20. Good 
17-23 Ford radiator SB. One 1892 
Winchester 25-20 rifle. One 43 cal. 
rifle. One 22 calibre Stevens rifle. 
James Havel, 407 Arnold Ave. So., 
City. tf 



FOR SALE— 560 acre improved farm 
on north side of Clearwater River, 
about 7 miles northeast of Plummer. 
About 300 acres under cultivation; 
good set of buildings; well and wind- 
mill. Soil is a splendid productive 
"black loam with a yellow clay subsoil. 
Owner is living in the southern part 
of the State and cannot look after it 
to advantage. He offers this farm at 
the very low price of- $30.00 per acre, 
on easy terms. For full particulars in- 
quire at the office of The 



FOUND— Fur back gauntlet mitten, 

near Auditorium, Owner may have 

same by identifying and paying for 

this ad. Inquire at Tribune. 1 



FOUND — Orange colored handker- 
chief containing 25c in change and 
neat cud of crewing gum. Come and 
get it at the Tribune. tf. 



Car load i of horses and some mules 

due to arrive in Thief River Falls 

about February 5. All are broke and 

guaranteed: to work. At Fisher Barn 

Ben Echuster. 47-2 



fel""'/^^^'* 5 '" i=^"«m^rc n e C 'oWS 

This is one of the most important Sec 6 
offices in Waltonism, ' ' ' 



F. L." ChristehSOn District ■ eral state . and Territories from mak- 

'■•■ Counselor of I W I^ao-no "* or enforcing laws or regulations 

vumiaci mui l. w. league not inconsistent with the provisions of 

■; this Act, or from making' or enforcing 

F. L. Christenson, .local hardware laws or regulations which shall give 

dealer, this week received notice of further protection to large and small 

lus appointment as district counselor mouth black bass. '' 

'" ^al^wS 1 ,. 8118 ^".Si". 01 ,. See-* . Nothing in this Act shall 

Izaak Walton League. Xte in- be construed -to -prevent the shipment 

«. * -live fish , 

stocking 

. . This Act shall become ef- 

.„ . , giving as it fective immediately upon its passage 

does tremendous, opportunities to aid and approval. 

in. the accomplishment of Waltonism's • 

dream to make Minnesota an outoaor t „-~» r> i r tt mi ^ 

paradise. Large Cast of Home Talent 

The district of which Mr. Christen- i - in "Hello There" 

son is a counselor includes chanters /<-•„ v m »»~»v 

at Audubon, Crookston, Detroit? East > JS.Z '"? e i f f m f ge on< \>. 
Grand Forks, Mahnomen, Sternum ?w B "ft tb& - «ok, and Jimmy 
Perham, CUmaxTTwin ValleyT^d of Weber's handy man, phUosophrze on 
course Thief River Falls. ?y ',^ e ? sthe X5 ee '-" The „ re '.* ™» h 
Mr. Christenson in a katotnt t„ sln P?? md dancing. Cupid finally 

blooded American.sportamen the hW k [ P ' WeVrt&^me well known 
",, - people who have been chosen with the 



bass bill now before the House 



^ZftfZ%^T^J^K^P^K^ »> qualifications to 



who are interested in protecting this SiTal X^w 

fish write or wire their representative i Grace Tov e& p *>, t> - 

in Washington to;support P House bill j Sfwe^f Stl Zf tlra^er 

A copy of the bill follows; SWeber^iiriAgn^Tanaberg 

t AbUl regulating the Interstate i Chaperone .... Lilian Arnold 

SEE? ° f B,aCk BaSS 8nd f ° r ° ther M MatnildZ."Z::rAnn n jotason d 

_ ?S it enacted by the Senate -JlSSl!!^^^* 1 ^ 

Lost^-Somewhere between Catholic ! ^"Itte,, tfAW t?Tn"l the Uni " Billy O'Donnelly, ;....John Hendry 

i,n.i. i, n =i m «„f o^j «,„ m t nr. I tea ptates of America m i Coiigress as- Father Weber. _ Morris Bye 

Parson Smythe: _...Fred Scanlan 

Jimmie Hughes....Norbert Holzknecht 

Prof.- Birdwell Millard Mvrom 

Soldier Boy...._. — ......Clifton Conner 

Names of -some.of the choruses are: 
Valentines; Widow and Bachelor; 
Spanish Dancers; Cooks; Sunshine 
Girls; Kewpie Dolls, Baby Dolls and 
Dutch Dolls. 

.''Miss Buddy' Berg,' instructress - in 
.the_Knox school, is playing the piano 
accompaniment, and orchestra music 
is heing. furnished by the Miniowis 
orchestra. 



church basement and the M. T. Me' ^Med That S^ZVST^ ** 
Farland farm, one registered Holsteinl^f^^U^^'^be known 
hull ^«if i.. ,- n f„^,=K™ io.j,-„™ t„i5' tne snort title of the "Black Bass 



bull calf. Any information leading to ' p'^Jt 1 "^ °i' e ■"} *** Black Bass 
the where-abouts of this calf will be ! "S~ ctl ™ A«- . . ' ■' ?i 

- - N. W. Tarrant, I Sec -. 2 - That for a period of •- five 

47 y ?? IS "eEmnm? with the passage of 

- this Act, it shall be unlawful to ship; 

„„„,. ' ~ transport, or carry, by any means 

EXPERT ELECTRIC WORK— Re- whatsoever from one State, Territory 



liberally regarded, 
City Auditorium. 



jnember the telephone number ._ 
100 when you want real service on 
electric work. Always get the man 
that knows his business. He'll save 
you money.! If you desire to have 
your house wired on monthly payment 
^lan we ran d" it We give prompt 
service on all calls. Alex Welch. 28th. 



Land Company of this City. 



NOTICE. 

Bids accompanied by certified check 
of 5% will ;be received up to Febru- 
ary 15, 1926 by A. J. Veigel, Commis- 
Haynes i sioner of Banks, St. Paul, Minnesota 



47-3p 



FOR KENT 



FOR RENT— two Tooms, suitable for 

light house keeping. See Wangen- 

stein. the jeweler. 47 



FOR REN'IV-Modern House at 811 
LaBree Ave. N. Rent verv reasonable. 
C- W. McDanieJ. lp 



for the sale |of the following described 

real estate, ; to wit: 

Northeast Quarter of Section 
31, Township 153, Range 43, al^o 
SVj of SW'% W% of.E% Sec- ( 
tions 13 154 44 Pennington coun- 
ty, Minnesota. 
For complete details see Mr. Hall, 

Farmers & ^Merchants State Bank, 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 

,2t. 



Pioneer Passed Away. 

'O. M. Abrahamsen died at his home 
near Gatzke, Minn, on Dec. 17th. 

Mr. Abrahamsen was born in De- 
corah, W-innesheik County. Iowa, on 
March 20th, 1860. His parents were 
Peter Abrahamsen and Larine Abra- 
hamsen-Hegg. He -spent his boyhood 
<Iays with his parents in Decorah un- 
til his mothers' death. Later he left 
for North Dakota .where he was en- 
gaged in farming in Ransom county 
for about 18 years. He then moved 
to Marshall county, Minnesota, oh the 
farm he now resided. He was a mem- 
her of the Moose River congregation. 
His funeral was held on Wednesday, 
Dec. 23 at the Moose River church, 
where a large crowd gathered to pay 



their last respects. 

All his children, were present at the 
funeral, namely:. Clara,. Mrs. John 
Henning, Martin and Alfred Abra- 
hamsen and Louise and Tina • Abra- 
hamsen, all of Gatzke, Minn. Lizzie, 
Mrs. Ed. Du Bois of New Richmond, 
Wisconsin; Ella, Mrs. Walter Collins 
of Hunter^ N. D-; Agnes, Mrs. C. J/ 
Sorenson, Hunter N. D., Also his sis- 
ter Mrs. Bell -and son , Leonard of 
Kathryn, N. B.. and. her daughter, 
,Hilda Bell of St. Paul and Mr. and 
Mrs. Anton! Hegle of Lisbon, N. D.. 
Mrs. Hegle being Mrs; Abrahamsen's 
sister. 

Mr. Abrahamsen was indeed a hard 
worker as well in his congregation as 
in his home. He will be missed by 
all who knew him. Blessed be his 
memory. — Warren Sheaf. 



bass intended for stocking or breed- 
ing purposes, and bass caught on hook 
and line which are in the actual or 
constructive possession of the angler 
catching them or receiving them as a 
gift. 

Sec. 3. t That any person, company 
corporation, association, or common 
carrier, violating the provisions of 
this Act, shall, upon conviction thereA 
of, he punished by a fine not exceed 7 
ing $500 or imprisonment for a term 
of not more than: six months, pr hy 
both .such fine and iniprisppment for 
each conviction, All pjppk bass so 
taken, shipped, traTfspqrted, parried;, 
or possessed contrary to the provi- 
sions of this Act shall be forfeited and 
disposed of as directed by the court 
having jurisdiction. 

Sec. 4. That nothing in this Act 
shall be construed to prevent, the seV- 



y 



Going to Build? 

"Buy Here ! 

LUMBER OF ALL KINDS 

Hardwoods and Pine 

LATH, SHINGLES, ROOFING 
PLASTERBOARD, 
FLOORING and SIDING 



or District to or through another 
State, Territory or District, or to or 
through a foreign country, any larger 
mouth black bass. (Mieropterus sal- 
moides) or any small-mouth black 
bass (Mieropterus dolomieu) intend- 
ed for sale, barter, exchange,' or anyf 



A special matinee is announced for 



n u. n . -«™™ _-• i ^ . r> «, oM^-'ai matinee is announced lor 

other commercial purpose, except live Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, for 



which 15 cents will be charged. 

Selvig to Tell of Penning- 
tons Alfalfa Record 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Iy well represented at the Winter 
Shows next week. Three car loads of 
cattle, two of horses, and a large ship- 
ment of- jrrains, grass"seed and com 
irill be shipped the latter part of this 
week. 

The Shows this year wi)I eclipse all 
former records according to entries 
received, is the infqrmation that Sec- 
retary O: If, lfy'ser 'gives. Over 600 
head are entered, There .will be 17 
different' I^olstein exhibitors. IS 
Guernsey exhibitors, one Ayrshire 
boy club exhibitor, 7 different Shortr 
horn herds, S An?us. 3 Hereford. 3 
.baby beef club exhibitors, 5 Chester 



White herds, 6 Poland China, 10 Duroc 
Jersey herds, 2 Yorkshire, 2 Berk- 
f"™. 1 Hampshire, 8 pig club mem- 
bers, 7 sheep club members, 9 different 
Shropshire flocks and over 30 horses 
by 9 different exhibitors, making a 
total of over. 100 different exhibitors, 
each one coming with from one to 25 
tead. . 

This is a lar cry from the 62 head 
shown at the first Valley Winter 
Show in 1917 by 8 different breeders. 

A great array of speakers, the big- 
gest and most forward-looking men 
and women ever secured for a Valley 
week will be " present. Visitors to 
Crookston are urged to secure admis- 
sion ticket for the evening address as 
soon after their arrival as possible. 

A large number from this communi- 
ty are planning on- attending one or 
more days next week, according to 
the interest, that is being shown. 
\ 

Boy Scout Week to Be 
Observed Here Feb. 7-13 

(Continued from page one.) 
remarkable growth. The following 
figures tell the growth of scouting in 
the United States: 

1925 1926 

Boys and Officials 700,015 784,496 
Scouts 544,143 614,815 

Scoutmasters and As- 
sistants ' 38,247 41A33 
Troops 22,214 24,282 
The above figures show the growth 
of the organization for 11 months, 
during which. 2,068 troops were or- 
ganized with an increase of . more 
than 84,000 boys and officials. Nearly 
3,000 officials were added, and these 
are all volunteer officials who under- 
take the work because of their inter- 
est in boys and service. ■ 

Next Sunday, February 7, is nation- 
ally known as Scout Sunday; Monday 
Anniversary Day; Tuesday. Scouting 
and School Day; Wednesday, Scouting 
and Home Day; Thursday, Scouting, 
arid Service Day; Friday, Scouting 
and Patriotic Day; Saturday. Scout- 
ing and Good Health Day. 

George J. Johnson, deputy scout 
commissioner and instructor in the 
liigh school, spoke in the interest of 
scouting before a meeting of the W. 
C. T. U. held in the Presbyterian 
church last night. Short talks were 
alsd made bv several other teachers. 
Increased .interest in scouting in 
Thief River Falls has been taken the 
last six months, -there being three 
active troops at present. 

Trial of Cases Under Way 
In District Court 

( Continued from page 1) 
Theo. Underdahl, issuing check with- 
out funds; were dismfssed on motion 
of the State. 

Other results of yesterday's court 
session are aB follows: 

Robert R. Howell vs. T. R. Box 
Factory and Wm. Korstad, answer 
with-drawn, stipulation made for 



r Let Us Estimate Your 
Building Costs! 



OUR AIM; 
TO SERVE 
YOU WELL 
AND 

■FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 




flfiATIOMWtOE 
i. INSTITUTION- 



Ca 



DEPARTMENT STOKES 
Thief River Falls' Basiest Store 



WHERE 

-SAVINGS 

ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUOUT 

THE YEAR 



Ginghams 

Toile-Du-Ndrd 

Plain, Check, and Novel- 
ty Patterns 

27c 



ILC.jS. Ginghams 

Our own brand 




A Pupil's Idea of 
What Is a Creditor 



Buying on credit instead of paying cash 
apparently has its ludicrous side in Prague 
as well as in this country. 

According to the "Humoristicke," a com- 
ic weekly printed in Prague, a teacher ask- 
ed a young pupil "What is a creditor?" 

The pupil quickly drew from his observa- 
tions at home and replied 1 , "A man who must 
be told that my father is not at home." 

Paying-cash-as-you-go has no attending 
embarrassments. It assures a life of inde- 
pendence. ■ . . 

You are permitted to buy where you will 
and where you can get the most in quality 
and satisfaction for. what you pay; ; 



judgment against box factory but case 
dismissed as to Wm. Korstad; Crooks- 
ton State Bank vs. F..F. Haynes, con- 
5 n - U t I consen t; Thine Rustad vs. 
rTichard company, court case to come 
up; Edward Singer vs. Stephen Sing- 
er, court trial; Wyman Partridge Co. 
vs. Smger Bros., dismissed by plain- 
tiff; Hans C. Juhl vs. Citizens State 
Bank, continued by consent; J. A. Mc- 
Enelly vs. American National Bank of 
I £ au i ^ T'-F 1 and Pe °Ples State 
l? nk J 0f J T ^, ef Rlvcr Falls ' J" 1 ? trial; 
Standard Oil company vs. R. McGinn, 
continued by stipulation of both at- 
torneys; State vs. Leonard Erickson, 
to plead today. 

. -The case of State vs. William Stock 
on a charge of selling and furnishing 
intoxicating liquor to a -minor will 
probably come up *for trial some time 
next week. It will be remembered 
J\hat the defendant last year 'was con- 
victed but was granted a new trial. 

Hon. Andrew Grindeland of Warren" 
is the district judge presiding. 



Today's Better Way. 
"Make a better mouse-trap than 
anyone else, and the world will make 
a beaten path to your door." But 
that's old stuff. Make a better road, 
and the world will drive to your door 
and buy everything you've got. — Win- 
ona Republican-Herald. 




Attractions 

At The 4 

[^yceum 

FRIDAY And SATURDAY 

"Go West" 

with 

BUSTER KEATON 
The frozen face Comedian 

and 

Brown Eyes 

A beautiful trained Cow . 
"Buster" as a . Tenderfoot Cowboy 
is funnier than ever 

Added Attraction 
CLYDE COOK 

"Moonlight 

and Noses" 

Saturday matinee 2:30 

Admission 10c and 20c 



MMMMHMHHH » HM » M 



SUNDAY AND MONDAY 




The wild Horse* 



Blackfyclone 



This amazing picture is not . only 
unique and novel but is splendid en- 
tertainment, you will be amazed over 
the almost human intelligence of 

"TheBlack 



k 



L. 



^^^TTrSvT^^^^^^^vf'^S^WHHW'^^^T'P!! 






I 




Vol. 25JNQ. 48. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 10. 1926 



WINTER TERM OF 
DISTRICT COURT 
WILLENDTODAY 

Jury Dismissed Yesterday. 

Complete Court Cases 

This Afternoon. 



Stock Found " Guilty — Stay 

Of Sentence Granted 

Pending New Trial. 



$2:00 a Year in Advance* 



Geo. Dalton Injured While 
Switching at Devils Lake 



*&, 



!**5i 



*fcn| J^^viJs Lake 



With the completion of several 
court cases, expected to be finished 
this afternoon, the February term of 
District Court, which has been in ses- 
sion here during the past week, will 
be closed this afternoon. The petit 
jury was dismissed yesterday after- 
noon after the verdict in the case of 
the State of Minnesota vs. William 
Stock, had been read. Stock was found 
guilty of giving liquor to a minor. 
Sentence was postponed by the court 
pending a request for a new trial. 
The offence is a felony and calls for 
a maximum penalty of five years in 
the penitentiary. 

In the case of R. A. Werner and 
Carl Hohner, in which they sued. each 
other for damages to their cars caused 
by a collision last summer, the jury 
decided that each party should pay 
his own repair bill. 

In the case of J. S. Arneson vs. the 
Tribune, to recover certain items 
which he claimed had not been 
mortgaged and were exempted in his 
bankruptcy proceedings, the court di- 
rected the jury to find a verdict in 
favor of the dependent. 

Leonard Erickson pleaded guilty to 
a charge of having a "still" in his 
possession and was sentenced to serve 
sixty days in jail and pay a fine of 
§210.00. 

The jury awarded C. H. Fuller a 
( Continued on page 8) 



hospital' a B i, m ^ Ki 9fy 

tained last weekTu^ " *' 

while he was switching on- «,.„_, , 

and Fordville line near Devils Lake, 
N. D. 

It seems Mr. Dalton was standing 
with one foot on each running board 
between two 'cars and was about to do 
something with the brake hose when 
the corners of the cars in rounding a 
curve came 1 close together catching 
and twisting? his body and injuring 
one of his hips. He was taken to a 
hospital at Devils Lake, as stated 
above, where it was learned that no 
bones were broken but that he had 
suffered a bad bruise. Mrs. Dalton 
who returned Saturday from Lwlfs 
Lake reports that her husband is re- 
covering rapidly and that in all pro- 
bability he will come home next 
week. 

Mr. Dalton has been in the employ 
of the Soo line as brakeman for three 
years. 



Tallakson Heads 

District in Drive 
For College Funds 



AUTO LICENSES 
NEEDEDAT ONCE 

Thousands Have But Few 

Days Left; February 15 

Is Deadline. 



AIMFAWORTH 
$34 PER TON TO 
BOSTONCOMPANY 

Greenwood, South Carolina 
Man Writes for Prices } 
of Seeds, Hay. 



Inquiries Indicate Home of 
Alfalfa Has Been Widely. 

Advertised. 



Scores of Pennington county, auto- 
mobile and truck owners are risking 
penalties or from 25 cents to. $10 on 
state motor vehicle registrations, for 
failure to obtain new 1926 license 
plates before the eleventh hour and 
because the state legislature is not 
now in session to extend the iron-clad 
time limit fixed by law. 

Only immediate applications 
allow penalty escapes. 



Something worthy of more than 
passing interest is the fact that the 
Thief River Falls Hay Shipping as- 
sociation this week received a com- 
munication from a Boston firm of- 
fering §34 per ton for Pennington 
county alfalfa hay, f. o. b.. Boston. 

An inquiry also was received from 
the city engineer of Greenwood, 
South Carolina, asking for prices of 
alfalfa seed and hay on car at Thief 
River Falls. 

The freight on hay shipments from 
Thief River Falls to Boston amounts 
to §21 per ton. This leaves $13 per 
ton for hay at Thief River Falls on 
an offer of $84, that made by the 
Boston concern. The association, it 
is understood, has written the con- 
cern offering to make shipments for 
S36 per ton f. o. b. Boston., 

The question naturally arises, 
"How xan Boston concerns pay even 
$34 per ton for alfalfa hay?" Surely 
it is something for farmers of Pen- 
nington county to think about. If. 
farmers in Boston can pay $34 per 
ton for alfalfa hay, isn't it worth just 
as much and much more to Penning-- 
will ' ton fanners ? 

I Much already has been learned of 
the value of alfalfa to this section of 
the country, and although some skep- 



METALENT 
FARCICAL PLAY 
WASAjCREAM 

Neariy 700 Peopfe Attend 

Presentation of "Hello 

There." 



Community Girls Organiza- 
tion Adds $155 to 
Treasury. 



But 107,430 out of nearly 600,000 
motor vehicles in the state were re- , - . . 

gistered up to Feb. 1, and applications : tlcal few ma y remark occasionally 
were being received .at the rate of that "this alfalfa stuff is way over- 
less than 5,000 daily, according to an ! done," indications seem to strengthen 
official report from the office of Mike ■ the belief that the more Pennington 
Holm, secretary of state and registrar l county people talk alfalfa, raise al- 
of motor vehicles. At that rate, it ; f alf a, and advertise the county as 
was said, penalties were in prospect ! "The Home of Alfalfa," the better 

i Qn more tna - n j^jf t ke autos- and j off they will be. 

Seven representatives from the ter- j trucks. The : total registrations were j The fact that Massachusettes and 

ritory extending from Pennington j little larger proportionately than last South Carolina have made inquiries 

County to the Canadian line were i year when the legislature .was forced^ this week indicates that knowledge, of 

present at a meeting held here Mon- j to extend the. delinquent date. . This ' Pennington .county is known else-1 

uay to make plans for a drive thruou! ivear there can be no extension, it was j where then within its own boundary. 

the district to raise funds for Luther- 1 explained, and owners will wait until ■ 

an colleges of the northwest. The \ the last minute at their own risk. 

campaign is part of a nation-wide ef- 1 Pennington county owners are 

fort to raise §1,275,000 to be divided j warned accordingly to apply at once 

among the following schools, Luther and save the penalties at 25 cents a 

college, St. Olof College, August- i day. 

ana College anad Concordia College. "The delinquents are always the 

Rev. S. L. Tallakson is chairman of same ones,", said one registration 

this district and according to the ar- [agent. "' ' " " " ' 



Warren Youths Pay $150 
in Fines for Liquor Law 
Violation February 5th 



A crowd of nearly 700 people at- 
tended the farcical comedy "Hello 
There" presented at the city auditori- 
um last night by the Girls Communi- 
ty club under the direction of the 
Rosella Zura producing company. 

Such remarks as "it was a scream 
from start to finish," "that was the 
best show ever staged in Thief River 
Falls", "Fred Scanlan as the parson 
was the funniest thing I ever saw", 
"the cooks certainly were a whole 
show in themselves", were heard from 
many sources this morning as com- 
ments on the* performance. 

After all who would not be sur- 
prised and amused to see some of the 
city's distinguished citizens dressed 
up in. funny clothes and crawling 
around on their hands and knees in 
front of a large audience ? 

The^ Girl's Community club, in re- 
cognition of the assistance given 
them, has asked The Tribune to ex- 
press for them through this medium 
their sincere thanks to all who con- 
tributed iniany way to the sucess of 
the play. The Club netted $155 after 
all expenses were paid. The city do- 
nated the use of the auditorium and 
'many merchants co-operated by ad- 
vertising in the programs. Miss Bud- 
dy Berg also donated her services as 
accompanist 

There being more than 200 charac- 
ters in the cast it is impossible fcn 
mention, each individual, but this 
much may be said, that members of 
the choruses, without an exception, 
and principals of the cast, did all and 
more than was expected of them. 

The principals who took part are: 
Elra Porter, Ruth Peterson, Agner- 
Sands, Lylian- Arnold, Ann Johnson, 
Anna" Erickson. Mrs. Mauritz Hokk- 
neclit, - John Hendry, Morris Bye, 
jFred \Scanlan. Norbert Holzknecht, 
Millard Myrom. Clifton Conner. 



Ruth Turnwall Champion 
Speller of This County 

Ruth' Turnwall of District No. 26 
will represent Pennington county in 
■the district spelling contest to be held 
at Crobkston, Friday, February 12 in 
connectioin with the Winter Shows. 
Miss Turnwall scored 90 1-3 at the 
county contest held in the city audi- 
torium last Saturday afternoon. Mrs. 
Belle B. Erickson is teacher of Dist- 
rict No. -26. 

Theona Folkedahl, Dist 14. scored 
871-3, winning second place. She 
will be the second representative of 
this county. Miss Fern Davis is 
teacher of Dist. 14. 

The next two in line who will act 
as alternates, in the event the others 
can not attend, are as follows: 

Bernice Gilbertson, Dist. 51; score 
87^4; teacher, Miss Ella Causin; and 
Anna Austad, Dist. 39; score 861-3; 
teacher, Miss Ruth L. Roy. 

Thirteen counties will compete in 
the district contest. 



POWER FARMING 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Fun, Films, and Facts That 

Please the Entire 

Family. 



Thursday Is Thief River 

Fall Day; Many Boosters 

To Attend. 



With the largest attendance since 
its organization the Red River Valley 
Winter Shows are well under way 
and -programs are being carried out 
as advertised with some of the best 
talent in the state as headliners. 

Yesterday was farm crops day. The 
list of winners, however, is not avail- 
able as The Tribune goes to press. 

Harry, Woolson won seven prizes on 
his exhibit of Shropshire .sheep. He 



date whicih has been set for May 16. 
The diive will be completed 
in one week. On the afternoon of 



pected to attend. Members of the local 
committee are I. T. Simley, Maurice 
Bye and Robert Lund. 



. . _ Rudolph Lundgren, 16, and Everett 

. .„ i. ■ - Check of 1925 and 1926 Usts ' Carlson, 21, both of Warren, were ar- 

rangements the entire district will be j of delinquents would show duplication ' rested last Friday night during the 
organized and rallies staged in dif- 1 of the majority of names. They are basketball game by Sheriff Dile, and 
ferent localities prior to the opening the habitual waiters — and they pay were brought up in municipal court 

for their delays. here, the next morning where they 

"People given the extension last plead guilty to maintaining a nui- 
, . year are inclined to laugh and say sance in having liquor in their pos- 

Jebruary 22, a meeting will be held it hey will take a chance again this year session for sale. The booze was kept 
here of delegates from all the Lu.her- j wnen warned to avoid the dead line, in the car the boys were driving, ac- 
an congregations in the district and | Bu t there will be no extension now— cording to the sheriff. 
JL25 ^?^?°^5u^K^^; **.» case of getting in 'An time ori A fine of $75 was # m each , and 

paying a penalty." _ , s the amounts were paid by a gentle- 

Registration officials pointed out. man from Warren who accompanied 
also that only a limited number of . the boys, 
applications can be handled daily and 
suggested that the" fact be kept in 
mind by those delaying. 



More Paving Asked For 
in Petition Presented 
to Council Last Night 

That there is a possibility of addi- 
tional paving beoing laid in the city 
this year was indicated last night 
when Math Barzen appeared before 
the city council urging the considera- 
tion of a petition of the property 
owners along Riverside avenue to 
have that street paved south from the 
Great Northern tracks for about three 
blocks to the point where trunk high- 
way No. 32 joins the avenue. The 
council wilil consider the proposition 
but no definite announcement can be 
expected at present. 

George Wilson appeared in. behalf 
of the cemetery commission of which 
he is president to ask that the city 
bear the expense involved in quieting 
*he title to a certain strip of land 
bordering Greenwood cemetery on the 
east. 

Dr. J. T. Bowers, representing the 
city health department, and Mrs. L. 
G. Larsen, representing the Child 
Welfare Board, appeared to disciuss 
various matters pertaining to their 
organizations. 

Dance permits were issued to the 
following: Royal Neighbors lodge, 
baseball club, John Malafa, Rebekah 
lodge and O. Engelstad. 

The councilmen adjourned at & 
o'clock to attend the show at the audi- 
torium, re-convened again after the 
entertainment, and after a short ses- 
sion adjourned until next Friday eve-^ 
ning. 



Strong Mcintosh Team 
to Meet Legion Monday 



Suffers Broken Leg. 
Charles Shirley, Jr., 9 years old, 
suffered a broken left leg last Satur- 
day noon in a most peculiar accident. 
The lad with his father, Charles 
Shirley, was walking. down the rather 
steep approach to the river just north 
of the Bridge street bridge on the 
Mr. Shirley slipped and 



An hour and a half of intense ex- , 
citement is looked for next Monday ' west side. 

evening when the powerful Mcintosh fell on the youngster's leg with the 
- ■ basket artists are slated to meet the ' most unfortunate result. The bone 
to i oca i American Legion gang at the was fractured between the ankle and 
city auditorium. The announcement knee, 
was made today by Doc Haug, who 
claims that the visitors will give his 
men the hardest fight thus for this 
year. 

What fan is there here who can af- 
ford to miss : seeing Lars Thune get 
fouled, lose his temper, and shoot the 
old leather for six or eight points 
while he is cooling down! And Sig 
Liefer, Matt Barzen, Kid Holzknecht, 
Russell Olson, and "Beany" Bennes — 
who doesn't get a thrill anticipating 
what these big boys will do! 



Many Attending Auto Show. 
Many Thief River Falls folks are 
taking advantage of the low fare 
rates to the Twin . Cities this week 
to see the auto show. A few have 
left by automobile, the roads having 
been reported in good condition. 



Base Ball Benefit Dance. 
The Knight Hawks and Hens will 
stage a dance at the Auditorium Mon- 
day, evening, February 22. The pro- 
ceeds of the dance will be used to 
complete the payment ori the base ball 
uniforms for the local team. 



Pastors Will Circulate 
Petitions Asking Council 
To Abolish Sunday Movies 

At a meeting of the local Pastors 
Association held Monday morning it 
was decided that petitions would be 
drawn up asking the council to abolish 
Sunday movies, and that these peti- 
tions [would be circulated in the 
churches. It is the desire of the pas- 
tors to make unnecessary the expense 
of a referendum vote by securing the 
names of a majority of the people. 

Former Business Firm 

Locates at Long Beach 

Announcement was received this 
week that Mr. and Mrs. A. Lein, who 
left for California last November, 
have located in Long Beach and are 
conducting a ladies' ready-to-wear 
business known as the Lein Popular 
Priced store. 

Mrs. Lein was proprietrix of the 
Wold ready-to-wear store in Thief 
River Falls from 1911 until 1917 
when she moved to Grand Forks to 
enter a similar business. 

Mrs. Lein is the mother of Mrs. 
Henry Melby of this city. 



Interesting Exchange of Letters 
in Which Math Barzen Presents 
His Opinion on Beet Production 



Power farming entertainment and 
tractor school will be held for all pro- 
gressive farmers who are interested 
on Feb. 18, at Thief River Falls by C. 
G. Gustafson and Son, the local Mc- 
Cormick-Deering dealera. 

m The entire day will be spent in the 
discussion of power farming problems 
and in the showing of a number of in- 
structive motion picture reels. 

This is a real opportunity for every 
■tractor owner and every man interest- 
edin farming for profit t learn some- 
thing about how the power farmer 
saves time, eliminates much hard 
work for himself and his family, and 
makes a more substantial profit 

Modern tractors are not considered 
complicated but there are many princi- 
ples of construction that the tractor 
owner should know about. Being 
familiar- with how the tractor operates 
will enable the owner to get the most 
satisfactory service out of his tractor. 

The man who is thoroughly famil- 
iar with every, part -of a tractor will 
be able to prevent delays by remedy- 
ing many difficulties before they get 
serious. He will know from the way 
his tractor is operating just what to 
look for and how to fix it. With trac- 
tors, as well as with other machines, 
care is very important and we suggest 
that if possible you attend this tractor 
school. 

The school is held by the Interna- 
tional Harvester Company and it will 
be thoroughly practical in every way. 
Instrutors are men who have been 
handling tractors mai y years and not 
only know tractors from the stand- 
point of theory but can operate them 
and give you the benefit of their 
practical experience. 

Farmers are asked to come prepar- 
ed to ask questioins and learn all that 
they can. 

Feb. 18 also is the annual special 
Cream Separator service day. At 
this time everybody is welcome to 
bring in their cream separators for 
general overhauling, no matter what 
make. Its all. free, only for such new 
parts as may be necessary to replace. 
This will be. taken care of at the 
office of C. Gustafson & Son by com- 
petent experts. 



LOCALFARMERS 
WIN PRIZE AT 
WINTERSHOWS 

V 

Roark, Woolson, Williams 
and Halsa Among Win- 
ners Announced. 



LEARN THIS YELL I 



I 



Tomorrow (Thursday) is Thief 
River Falls Day at the Show. A 
large delegation of boosters will 
attend in a body, leaving on the 
special train at 9:10 a. m. Pen- 
nington county visitors will wear 
badges advertising the fact that 
this is the "Home of Alfalfa." 

And here is a suggested yell 
which must be sang allegro con 
spirito: \ 

A-L-F-A-L-F-A 

RA, RA— RAH, RAH, RAH 

YO-YA— YO-YA 

HAY! 



got two second prizes, one 4th, three 
5th and one 6th. In view of the fact 
that twice as many sheep were shown 
there as last year, this is a very good 
showing. The championship, for both 
ram and ewe, went to the A. Marsden 
& Son herd, at Hendrum.Jn Norman 
bounty. Practically all the sheep on 
exhibit are Yorkshires. 

Pat Roark and Clarence Williams 
exhibited horses and Koark was given 
a 2nd prize for his mare, Ruth Lucille, 
and a third prize for another mare, 
while Williams secured 1st prize for 
a mare in the 3-year-old class. This 
is. the. first time horses have been 
shown there, and a very creditable ex- 
hibit is reported. 

Thief River Falls scored 1,057 in 
the livestock judging contest. The lo- 
(Continued on page 8) 



Plans For New Church 
Going Forward Rapidly 

Plans for the, erection of the new 
Trinity church took a rapid stride on 
Monday afternoon when the trustees 
and building committee of the church 
met with Thorwald Thorson, archi- 
tect of Forrest City, Igwa'. 

The architect submitted several 
sketches of proposed plans for the new 
structure, giving the building com- 
mittee every opportunity to make de- 
jsirable changes and ultimately get" 
[exactly the kind of building to their 
■liking in every detail. 

The session opened in the basement 
of the church at 3 p. m. At six 

o'clock supper was served, following 
which disicussion of plans continued 
until 11 p. m. 

Actual construction will go forward 
at an early date. 



By the permission of Math Barzen, 
The Tribune reprints the following in- 
teresting exchange of letters between 
Hear Governor Lowden. j Mr. Barzen and Ralph H. Canady, as- 

Several carloads of people from j sociate editor of the Zenith Magazine, 
here drove to 'Crookston this afternoon | a hardware trade journal published 
to hear Governor Lowden of Illinois, j by the Marshall Wells company. As 
who is scheduled to speak this eve- , the .first letter explains, the subject 
ning. Judge Andrew Grindeland, who ! under discussion is the profitableness 
is presiding over the present term of ; of growing sugar beets, a subject of 
court, is a school mate of Lowden's ■ considerable interest to the farmers 



and is one of those who is making the 
trip by car to hear him. 



Mrs. Froehlich Presides. 

Mrs. H. W. Froehlich of this city, 
will preside at a meeting of the 
Women's Club at Crookston tomorrow 
afternoon. The speaker of the day 
will.be Lieut: Governor W. I. Nolan. 
Mrs. Froehlich is chairman of the 
committee service department of the 
State Federation of Woman's Clubs. 



of this community. 

Dec. 23, 1926. 
Mr. Math Barzen, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 
Dear Sir : 

"State. Commissioner O. H. Smith 
advised us that you are better post- 
ed on the sugar beet situation in 
Minnesota than anyone else. The 
manufacturers, from their office in 
Denver, have prepared for us an ar- 
.ticle qn- this industry, and in connec- 
tion with this, we would like to am- 
plify it somewhat with the opinions 
of others relative to this industry. 

There is a good deal of question' 
in the minds of many of us whether 



Doc Penney at Dental; Meeting. 

Dr.. 6. A. Penney is attending the 
annual meeting of the Minnesota 

State Dental {association which is be- 

ing held in Minneapolis this week. He 'this industry needs any longer a tar- 
expects to return Sunday. His of- iff protection. What is your opinion 
fices are closed, for the balance of on this? Do you think, for example, 
this week but will re-open next Mon- if the tariff is removed that the rais- 
day. | f } ing of sugar beets will become un- 



profitable for the Minnesota farmer? 
Another question that concerns . us 
also is, "Does the raising of beets 
increase the average revenue per 
farm ? 

"Any data or information that you' 
could give us relative to this industry 
would be greatly appreciated, and for 
your convenience in replying we en- 
close a self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope." 

Yours very truly, 

R. H. CANADAY, 
Associate Editor. 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 
Dec. 26, 1925. 
Marshall Wells Company, 
Duulth, Minn. ~ 

Attention Ralph H. Canaday. 
Gentlemen: '.'"■ 

"Your letter of December 23, rela- 
tive to sugar beet culture and the su- 
gar beet industry at hand* 

"I have raised sugar beets for a 
number of years; In order, to irjaise 
sugar beets successwully good fertil- 
ization, preparation of ground, and 
intensive cultivation during the grow- 
ing season are absolutely necessary. 
This naturally^ leaves the land in ex- 
cellent condition for the reception of 
(Continued on page seven.) 



Murphy Slated to Address 
Valley Development Assn. 

On Friday morning, Feb. 12, at 10 
o'clock, at Crookston's Armory, Frank 
W. Murphy, Wheaton, will speak at 
a meeting of the Red River Valley 
Development association on the re- 
cent Des" Moines Agricultural Con- 
ference. This will be a very impor- 
tant meeting dealing with the sub- 
ject of a government export corpora- 
tion to handle our surplus crops 
about which there is so much discus- 
sion at present. Mr. Murphy will de- 
liver a Lincoln day address the same 
day at 3 o'clock. 



Divide Shoe Department. 

Announcement is made in this 
issue of the establishment of an ex- 
clusive women's and chilidren's shoe 
department at the Oen Mercantile Co. 
In the past all shoes hare been hand- 
died in one department and under the 
new arrangement men's and boys' 
shoe will be a unit of the men's furn- 
ishing department and women's and 
childrens shoes will be' handled separ- 
ately under the management of John 
Ness, formerly of Fargo. A re-ar- 
rangement of the shelving has been 
made and. new furniture is being in- 
stalled. Mr. Ness was i-» the employ 
of the R & G Bootery.ax Fargo for 
several years and was foromerly a 
clerk In the shoe department of Mar- 
snaU-Keld i>f Chicago. He is married 
and has one-son and-will establish hie 
home .here as soon as weather permits 
theTinoving.- ..,.. 



Pays Fine for Assault. 
Pat Keatingpaid a fine of ten dol- 
lars in Municipal court after pleading 
guilty to a charge of assault. He was 
arrested for striking O. fl. Wasbotten, 
Soo Line baggage man, in an argu- 
ment over room rent. 



New Store Opens Friday 
The Consumers Wholesale Supply 
Company, a chain grocery store or- 
ganization operating thruout the 
northwest, will open its 87th Minne- 
sota store here Friday morning in the 
building formerly occupied by Gart- 
land's Cash Store, located between 
Langseth's Shoe Store and the Amann 
Clothing Co. The store will be man- 
aged by E. J. Ward, who has been in 
the employ of the company several 
years. He is married and will es- 
tablish his home here in the near fu- 
ture. The store is established here 
under the direction of P. M. Sahd- 
strom, district manager, who express- 
es the belief that durnig the next few 
years this community will enjoy a 
healthy growth. It is his opinion that " 
Thief River Falls is destined to be- 
come one of the best business points 
in the state. The organization, which ■ 
is five years old, did a business of 
over five million dollars last year, he 
said. 



Legion and Auxiliary 

Meet After Ada Game 

A joint meeting of the Legion and 
Auxiliary will be held this evening- 
in the club rooms immediately after 
the basket ball game between the lo- 
cal Legion team and that of Ada. 

Losing teams in the recent mem- 
bership drive will entertain the win- 
ners at a banquet after which danc- 
ing and cards will follow. 



HEAR THE SCOUT PROGRAM. 

A Boy. Scout program will! be" 
broadcast from the Grand Forks 
station tomorrow (Thursday) 
evening, in honor of the sixteenth' 
anniversary of scouting, in Amer- 
ica. Similar programs will be 
given in cities throughout the 
United States. 



.•"r--"-^"- 1, ^'■ : i-- K ^*^ ^:^:^:Jy ^:-._._^ 



f- j -^i^ 



PAGE TWO 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY Id 132« 




Mrs. Hope of Grygla spent Friday 
of this week in this city shopping and 
visiting with friends. 

Miss Cecelia Bartholet of St. Hil- 
aire, spent Saturday in this city shop- 
ping and visiting with friends. 

Miss Ethel Modahl and Miss Han- 
nah Boe motored to this city Saturday 
and spent the day shopping and visit- 
ing with friends. 

Dr. C. M. Haug left last night for 
Minneapolis where he will attend 
dental convention. He expects to be 
gone about a week. 

Miss Dagne Bergen spent Thursday 
in this city shopping and visiting with 
friends, returning to her home in Mid- 
dle River in the evening. 

Ernest Rude of this city left Friday 
evening for Minneapolis where he will 
spend a week visiting with friends 
and attending the auto show. 

Ben Mellum motored to this city 
Thursday and spent a brief time visit- 
ing with friends. He returned the 
same evening to his home at Middle 
River. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ericson will leave 
this evening for Minneapolis, where 
they will spend a week visiting with 
relatives. They will also attend the 
auto show. 

George Erickson will leave this 
evening for Minneapolis where he*will 
spend a week or ten days as the guest 
of friends and relatives and attending 
the auto show. 

Iver Aasby of this city left Satur- 
day evening for Minneapolis where he 
will attend the auto show. He will 
return to his home here the latter 
part of the week. 

Mrs: C. E. Hellquist of this city left 
Thursday "morning for Rosewood, 
where she attended the funeral of 
Even Anderson. She returned to 
her home here the same evening. 

Dr. G. A. Penney left Sunday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis where he will at- 
tend a dental convention. He will also 
visit with his son Arthur who is at- 
tending the University of Minnesota. 

Miss Mary Pickar, who for the past 
year has been nursing at Oakland 
Park sanatorium, left Friday evening 
for St. Paul where she will be the 
guest of friends and relatives for an 
indefinite period; 

Miss Isabelle Sagmoen, Mrs. James 
Johnson and Johon Hellquist were 
among the-local people that motored 
to Rosewood Thursday afternoon to 
attend the funeral service held for the 
late Even Anderson. 

Miss Benora Engebretson, instruc- 
tor at the Lincoln high school, left 
Saturday morning for Red Lake Falls, 
where she will spend the week-end 
as the guest of friends. She returned 
to this city Sunday evening. 

Miss Martha Boyer, instructress in 
the school at Newfolden, arrived in 
this city Friday evening to spend the 
week-end here aft; the guest of her sis- 
ter. Miss Bernice Boyer. She returned 
~t Newfolden Monday morning. 

Jack Ness arrived in this city last 
Monday from Fargo, and will have 
charge of the women's and children's 
shoe department of the Oen Mercan- 
tile Co. Formerly he has been in the 
employ of the R. & G. Booterie at 
Fargo. 

Mrs. John Sagmoen and little 
daughter. Verna arrived in this city 
Friday evening from their home at 
Rosewood, and will spend a week here 
visiting et the home.s of Mr. and Mrs. 
Helmer Ostrom and Mr. and Mrs. R. 
Sagmoen. 

"Miss Aerial Kinghorn arrived in 
this city Thursday to spend a short 
time as a guest at the home of her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. H. W. King- 
horn. She will 'return Wednesday to 
Grand Forks, N. Dak., to resume her 
work at the University. 



Albert Westb'y of Middle River 
motored to this city Friday evening, 
and spent a short time visiting with 
friends. 

E.| Norbeck and P. N . Peterson 
were among the Holt people who were 
in this city Saturday attending to 
matters of business. 

Every portrait made at Borry's 
Studio is as good as first class work- 
manship, artistic training and long 
practice can produce. Adv. 

Mrs. Billy Olson spent Monday in 
this; city shopping and visiting with 
friends, returning to her home in St. 
Hilaire in the evening. 

Miss Myrtle Groshen returned to 
her home in' Holt Saturday, evening 
after spending the day here shopping 
and visiting with friends. 

Herman Aakre of Goodridge spent 
Saturday in this city attending to 
matters of business, returning to his 
home the same evening. 

Dr. C. E. Snyder motored to this 
city: from his home at Middle River 
Saturday, and spent the day attend- 
ing to matters of business. 

Herman Jepson and Guy Maualsby, 
both of St. Hilaire motored to this 
city: Saturday, and spent the day at- 
tending to matters of business. 

Steiner Dahl of -Newfolden spent a 
few, 1 days last week in this city as a 
gest of his uncle John Dahl, proprie- 
tor of the Central hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Aga motored 
to this city Monday. They will spend 
a brief period visiting with friends 
here before returning to their home in 
Warren. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mauritz Brink of this 
city left last evening for Minneapolis, 
where they will spend a few days vis- 
iting with friends and attending the 
auto show. 

Mr, and Mrs. Christian Engelstad 
will return to this city to-morrow 
after a weeks visit with friends and 
relatives in Chicago and various 
points in Wisconsin. 

Emil Larson, county commissioner, 
returned to his home in this city Mon- 
day morning after spending a week 
in Minneapolis, where he was attend- 
ed a commissioners convention. 

AJ W. Clay, druggist from Middle 
River, spent a brief time in this city 
Monday _ enroute t Minneapolis, 
where he will attend the auto show, 
and visit with friends for a week. 

J. J. McCann, county agent, left 
Saturday afternoon for Crookston, 
where he will attend the Winter Show. 
He expects to return to his home in 
this city the latter part of the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Harms and chil- 
dren, who formerly have been resi- 
dents of Goodridge, left Friday eve- 
ning for Worthington, Minn., where 
they, will make their home in the fu- 
ture. ~ 

Edwin Haug resumed his duties in 
the men's department of the J. C. 
Penney store Monday morning after 

weeks vacation which he spent in 
Bemidji as a guest at the home of his 
parents. 

Mrs. Gunhild Lindberg of Red Lake 
Falls arrived in this city Saturday 
morning, and spent the time between 
trains shopping and visiting with 
friends, returning to her home in the 
afternoon. 

Miss Katie Jonas, who has been 
confined to her home for the past 
three weeks with an attack of the 
grippe, has now resumed her work in 
the ready-to-wear department of the 
J. C. Penney Co. 

Mrs. J. J. McCann and little daugh- 
ter, Kathleen left Saturday morning 
for Red Lake Falls to spend a few 
days visiting at the home of her aunt, 

' Mrs. Peter Hansel. 'She returned to 

iher home in this city today. 

i 

I Mrs. Peter Hansel and daughter 
Marie, who were in the city to attend 

■ the wedding of Miss Magdalen Thill 
and Christian Engelstad last Wednes- 
day, returned to their home at Red 
Lake Falls Thursday morning. 



Mrs. Luella Fladwed. milliner of: Mr. and Mrs. Hokon Olson, em- 
■this city left Fri('av evening for Chi-iployees of the Oen Mercantile Co., 
■cave where she will spend ten days ' left Saturday evening for Minneapolis 
en r. buying trip. She tvill also spend} where they will do a great deal of 



?. brief timo as the gurst of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Gardner in Minneapolis be- 
fore returning to her home here. 

Miss Verna Mu.iig arrived in this ! 
city last Friday evening from Mylo, 
N. D., where she has spent a week 
visiting with friends and relatives. 
S-'he was the week-end guest of 
friends in this city leaving Monday 
morning for her home in Hibbing. 

Mrs. George Dalton of this city left 
Friday morning for Devil's Lake, N. 
Dak-, to visit with Mr. Dalton who is 
in the hospital there having been in- 
jure! when his body was crushed be- 
tween two freitrht cars. She expects 
to return the first part of the week. 



One Minute Interviews 



WHAT IS YOUR NAME? 
Elmer M. Bennes. 

WHERE WERE YOU BORN AND WHEN? ' 
Nicollet county, Minn, July 14, 1882. 

WHEN DID YOU COME TO THIEF RIVER FALLS? 
Christmas Era, 1915. < 

WHAT IS THIEF RIVER FALLS' GREATEST NEED? 
True co-operation among its citizens, boosting for the' things we 
have; and when that it done, other good things must naturally fol- 
low. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE GREATEST NEED OF THIS 
SECTION OF THE STATE? 
An actual farmer on eyery section of our tillable land. 

WHAT IS THE EARLIEST THING YOU CAN REMEMBER? 
When I was abont five years old my father's yoke of oxen ran away. 
It 1 made a lasting impression on me. I'll never forget how scared 
I was. 

WHAT IS YOUR HOBBY? 
Discussing insurance. By the way, how are you fixed for protec- 
tion? You know when you ta^e out an insurance policy you ac- 
tually create an estate for that amount, etc., etc., etc, etc — 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE' CLOTHES OUR YOUNG MEN 
ARE WEARING? 
Satisfactory. 

YOU MEAN THE BELL BOTTOM TROUSERS ARE SATISFAC- 
TORY?'. 
There's too much cloth in them. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF A COLLEGE EDUCATION? 
It's a fine thing. On an average it is wiorth much more than it 
costs. . 

DO YOU THINK THE YOUNGSTERS OF TODAY ARE WORSE 
THAN THEIR PARENTS WERE? 
On a whole, not. I really do believe city life is worse. 

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE STAR? 
I have none. I'm a poor movie fan. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE PRESENT NATIONAL ADMIN- 
ISTRATION? 
Satisfactory. 

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE PRESENT STATE ADMINIS- 
TRATION? 
- It is 0. K. But I certainly would like to have seen Governor Christ- 
ianson approve that bill for school aid. 

DO YOU THINK THIS COUNTRY SHOULD JOIN THE WORLD 
COURT? 
I don't know. I'm a poor politician. 

DO YOU THINK PROHIBITION 'HAS BEEN A SUCCESS? 
Not as much as I would like to have seen it. 

YOU ARE DRY THEN? 
Yes, I'm dry. 

WELL, I'M SORRY. I HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER YOU. 
WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO ? 

Think — and then do what my conscience tells me is the best thing 

to do. 

WHAT IS THE MOST EMBARASSING SITUATION YOU WERE 
EVER IN? 
When I left on my honeymoon from the southern part of the state 
we got on the wrong train, and after riding about five miles had 
to get off and ride across country to catch a train for our destina- 
tion. 

WHAT ARE THE TWO GREATEST THINGS YOU ARE THANK- 
FUL FOR? 
Good health and a happy home; 

.DO YOU FAVOR SUNDAY MOVIES? • 

I don't think it would be practical for a town of : this size to shut 
out Sunday movies. 

WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU LIKE THE BEST? 

I like the old time stuff. Many's the time I have sat and played 
the old quadrilles, waltzes, etc on my cornet. 



Mr.-and Mrs. Martin Evenson drove 
to Crookston today, where they will 
spend several days visiting at the 
home of their daughter Mrs. B. 0. 
Sampson, and attending the winter 
show. 

Miss Camille Warner who is em- 
ployed as teacher in one of the rural 
schools near Middle River, arrived in 
this city Friday evening to spend the 
week-end as a guest at the home of 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. War- 
ner. She returned to her school Sun- 
day evening. 

Mrs. Helen Montgomery, who has 
been in this city for the past week as 
a guest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ed. Lacy left Saturday morning for 
Warren. From there she will go to 
Crookston to spend a few days with 
her' sister, Mrs. William Murphy be- 
fore returning to Noyes, Minn., where 
she is employed. 



Mrs. T. D. Scanlan accompanied by 
her little granddaughter. Beryl Scan- 
lan, left Thursday evening for Minne- 
apolis where they will be the week-end 
guests of friends and relatives. They 
returned to this city the first part of 
the week. 

Mrs. A. G. Quammenand son Paul 
arrived in this city last evening from 
Detroit to'be the guest for a few days 
of their daughter and sister. Miss 
Margaret' Quammen. They expect to 
leave tomorrow for Crookstonto visit 
briefly before returning to their home. 

S. Harris Brown who has spent the 
past week in this city, left'Friday af- 
ternoon for Williston, N. Dak. He is 
in the employ of the Rosella Zura 
Producing Co.. and had charge of the 
musical comedy "Hello There" which 
is being given by the Girls Communi- 
ty club. His place was taken by Miss 
Rosella Zura. 



i 



\ 



+ t M H I H I H H M M M M M t M M ♦ ♦ M ♦ M M » ♦ M ♦ H H I H H » 



their spring buying. They will return 
to their home in this city Sunday 
morning. 

Mrs. George F. Dalton returned to 
her. home in this city Saturday eve- 
ning following a brief trip to Devil's 
Lake, where she went to visit Mr. 
Dalton who is in a hospital at that 
place as a result of an accident occur- 
iug ; last Tuesday. 

& 

Mrs. Dargen, who has spent a few 
days in this city visiting at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Gertrude Thill, 
left Saturday for Red Lake Falls to 
be a guest of Mrs. Peter Hansel for 
a brief time before returning to her 
home at Nashwauk, Minn. 

Mr<. Ann Kre»zschmar of this city ; Miss Elizabeth Keating returned 
ie.:. «n:iay afternoon for Red L=ke to her home in this city Sunday after- 
Fall,:., u-horc she will spend the week- noon after having spent a week in 
ord as a giu-sl of her sister. From Grand Forks, N. Dak. She will remain 
thi-i- she will go to Crookston where here until the first part of April when 
A,- ill attcnu the winter show, re- she will go to Grand Forks again and 
*.!-" -ii;- to !*?,■ l-mic here the- latter resume her work at the Union Com- 
part :-f thn wee''. mercial College. 




THIEF RIVER GROCERY BRANCH 

Nash-Finch Co., distributors 

i 

For Sale at all Grocers 



Valentines 



The like of which was never before seen 
in Thief River Falls; 

That bring forth exclamations of sur- 
prise at their cleverness; 

Which are suitable for every member of 
the family— also sweethearts; 

Moderately priced from one cent up to 
a dollar and a half. 

To See Them Is to Buy Them 

LAIRD'S 



II MIHHIHIH II HI II MIIIHIIIHII II IIIMIHIMHH 




1* 



WE do not want to pack a single Overcoat 
away this year. So we are going to give 
you one more chance. Every Overcoat in the 
hoase will he sold, for one week only, 

AT HALF PRICE 

(Nothing reserved) 



BUY A 



50 



.00 



. SIR. 1 

Overcoat for J^^j 
Overcoat for 



00 



4-U' Overcoat for £\j' . 



jy* Overcoat for |J)' 



$moo 
$25.00 



Overcoat for 



$1C00 



Amann Clo. Co. 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



Just Installed! 



Come in 
and See 



■The New Sioux Electric Valve Re-facing Machine- 



It enables us to turn out the same perfect valve grinding , 
job that the factory does. 



All Work 
Guaranteed 



Borry's Garage 



u 



.^'.•Vi„ 






i^^..-^ ^^Afi B &£ 4;-''i "'.■'.; aj asajijk' ^^ ^sa4s^A^.i^fc^^ ■.'..^■"•b.'.v.v-. 



™M^?W 



MHW 



w*w> 



^^P^^^^^P?^Pp^iPPPE?5^??i^ 



1 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 1926 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 




Women's Club. 

Monday afternoon, February 15, the ' 

Women's club will hold their regular 

meeting at the Commercial club , 

rooms. Mrs. Morris Bye will speak on, 

public health. Music for the program , 

will be several piano selections by 

Miss Violet Rhodegaard, Mesdames H. 

W. Froehlich, L. G. Larsen and E. F. 

Dolan will be in charge of the social 

hour. 

•*• 

Radio Party. 
Sunday evening Mr. and Mrs. C. M. 
Hoverstad entertained a number of 
their friends at their home east of 
town. The evening was passed listen- 
ing *o radio concerts and in a social 
manner, and at midnight a delicious 
lunch was served by the hostess. 
**« , 

Rebekah Dancing Party. 

Following the regular meeting of 
the Rebekah lodge Thursday evening 
the members and their friends will 
enjoy a social time, dancing and canis 
forming the diversion for the evening. 
Refreshments wilil be served at mid- 
night. 

*** 

Dinner Party. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Larsen enter- 
tained a group of their friends at a 
6:30 o'clock dinner Saturday evening 
at their home at 610 Bridge St. A red 
and white color scheme was used 
throughout. Covers were laid for 12, 
and the evening was spent playing 

bridge. 

*♦* 

Entertains at Bridge. 
Mrs. C. M. Haug was hostess last 
Wednesday evening when she enter- 
tained a number of her friends. Bridge 
was played at four tables. W. W. 
Prichard, Jr., was awarded the high 
prize, while Mrs. E. 0. Mogenson won 
the consolation prize. A delicious 
lunch was served by the hostess at 

11:30. 

*** 

For Mrs. Montgomery 
In compliment to Mrs. Helen Mont- 
gomery of Noyes, who has been her 
guest, Mrs. Ed. Lacy entertained a 
number of friends at her home Thurs- 
day evening. The hours were passed 
playing whist, and at 11:00 a delicious 
lunch was served. Besides the guest 
of honor and the hostess, the guest 
list included, Mrs. L. C. Pope, and 
Mrs. A. Dorn, Misses Sarah Vaughn, 
. E3na Larson, Carolyn Melby. Esther 
Gjertson, Alice Stapleton, and A. 

Willsv. 

*** 

Auxiliary to Meet. 
The Women's Auxiliary to the 
American Legion will hold a regular 
meeting Tuesday, evening February 
16th in the Legion club rooms. Mrs. 
Emest Rude and Mrs. Alfred Sten- 
berg will be the hostesses for the eve- 

ning * *« • 

Card Party. 

The Women's Benefit Association 
held a card party in the Masonic hall 
Monday evening. Whist was played at 
12 tables and the high prizes were 
won by Mrs. M. Sehmitz and Otto 
Halldin. A delicious luncheon was 
served to the guests at midnight. 
*** 

Community Club. 
The Girls Community club will hold 
a regular meeting in the legion club 
rooms next Monday evening, Febru- 
ary 15th. It is requested that as 
many members aspossible are in at- 
tendance. 

*»* 

Surprise Party. 
Mr. nnd Mrs. Roy Ericson were 
.pleasantly surprised last Saturday 
evening by a group of their relatives 
who ga + hered at their liomp to helo 
celebrate their wooden wedding anni- 
versary. The evening was spent in a 
social way, anil at 11 a delirious lunch- 
eon was served. Mr. and Mrs. Ericson 
were presented with an end table. 
*** 

Ladies Aid. 
The Ladies Aid of the Swedish Mis- 
sion church will be entertained Thurs- 
day afternoon, February 18th, at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs: A. y. Brodine, 
424 St. Paul Ave. So. An imitation 
is extended to the public. 

Miss Melby Entertains. 
Miss Carolyn Melby was hostess 
last Friday evening when she enter- 
tained a group of her friends honor- 
ing Mrs. Helen Montgomery of Noyes. 
Cards formed the diversion for the 
evening, and at 11 o'clock a delicious 
lunch was served by the hostess. The 
guests were, Mrs. Helen Montgomery, 
honor guest, Misses Christine Clausen, 
Aneta Dahlquist. Sarah Vaughn, Ed- 
na Larson. Esther Gjertson, Alice 
Stapleton, A. Willsy. and Mrs.- E. T. 
Lacy and Mrs. A. Doin. 

Birthray Party. 
A group of his friends pleasantly 
surprised Ben Holm at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Bergstrom last Sat- 
urday evening the occasion being his 
29th birthday anniversary. The eve- 
ning was spent playing cards and 
dancing, at the close of which a de- 
licious lunch was served. The guest 
list included Mr. and Mrs. Ben Holm, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Malafa and daugh- 
ter Mable, Mr. and Mrs. L. Knadle, 
.Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lasell, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Jordahl, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Kel- 
ly, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Geske, Mrs. 
Carl Erickson, Mrs. Woolridge, Her- 
man Holm, Hans Heckne, and Wallie 
Wendt. 



For Miss Edith Larson. 

Misses Lena lonson and Lillian 
Eide were delightful hostesses at a 
parcel shower in honor of Miss Edith 
Larson at the home'of Mrs. E. K. Aa- 
sen, Monday evening. The time was 
spent playing progressive whist, hon- 
ors being awarded Mesdames P. L. 
Vistaunet and A. ;P. Robinson. A de- 
licious two-course luncheon was serv- 
ed at 11 o'clock by. Mrs. Aasen, as- 
sisted by Misses, Eide, Lonson and 
Loken, in rooms made beautiful with 
valentine decorations. The bride-to- 
be was presented with a number of 
beautiful gifts. Besides the honor 
guest those present were: Mesdames 
P L Vistaunet, J. E. Nelson, B. Hoi- 
um, Roy Morgan, A. P. Robinson, Eva 
Angell, Carl Whiting, Ben Erickson, 
E O. Iverson, H. Grindahl, Bertha 
Lonson and the Misses Sarah Houg- 
lin, Josephine Nelson, Lillian Burud. 
Olive Lonson and- Loken. Miss Larson, 
who has been employed with the 
Thief River Grocery Company as 
stenographer for: the past four years, 
has resigned and will leave for her 
home in Thorhult in the near future. 

For Mrs. Belcher. 
A number of her friends gathered 
at the home of Mrs. Roy Belcher Mon- 
day evening and pleasantly surprised 
her. A delicious lunch was served at 
the close of the evening which was 
spent playing cards. Fifteen guests 
were present. 



THE CHURCHES 



Trinity Lutheran Church, 
S. L. Tallakson, pastor. 
Graded Sunday school for any and 
all, 9:45 A. M. Morning worship with 
Lenten sermon, 11 a. m. 

English worship in the morning. 
Evening service with sermon-lecture 
in "The Christian and the Dance." 
Dorcas Tuesday 8 p. m. 
Bible and Prayer hour (John 2) on 
Wednesday 7:45 p. m. All welcome. 

Methodist Episcopal Church 
Sunday, February 14th — 10 a. m. 
School and adult Bible class. 6:30 Ep- 
worth League. (For all from 10 years 
and up) , 

Public Worship: 11 a. m. Subject "The 
Church's Lord Without" 7:30 p. m. 
Subject, "The Eternal Presence." 

Wednesday — 7:30 p. m. Class meet- 
ing for prayer and Bible study. 

Persons desiring the pastor to visit 
them will kindly; leave name and ad- 
dress. In cases of sickness report to 
the Pastor or some of the officials of 
the church. 

Rev. J. Thomas Dixon, pastor 

Goodridge Lutheran Church, 
V. O. Aaker, pastor. 
Sunday, Feb. 14. graded Sunday 
school to which a» children are wel- 
come at 10. English services at Good- 
ridge at 11 a. m. and Norse at Erie at 
2:30 p. m.- English services at Jelle, 
Wednesday, .February 17 at 11 a. m. 
The confirmation classes meet as usu- 
al. 

*«» 

Christian Science. 
Regular Sunday services are held at 
11 a-m. in the church at LaBree 
Ave. and First street Subject Sunday 
February 14, "Soul." Sunday school at 
10 a. m. Wednesday evening meetings 
at 7:45. Reading room open from 3 to 
5 p. m. Wednesdays. The public is 
cordially invited to these services. 

Augustana Church. 
_ Albin At Larson. 
Swedish services next Sunday at 
10:30. 
Sunday school at H:45. 

St. John's Lutheran Church 
' E. H. Kreidt, Pastor. 
Sunday School 9:30 a. m. English 
service 10:30 a. m. Rev. C. Glock of 
Goodridge will preach. Tuesday eve- 
ning at eight o'clock. Rev. 6. H. 
Brauer of Mahnomen will lecture at 
; the Church for the Temple Guild -on 
| the subject: "Why, and How, observe 
[Lent?* You are cordially invited. 
Lunch after the lecture. 

Goodridge Luther League meets in 
church Wednesday, Feb. 3rd at 8 p. 
Everbody welcome. 



Swedish Baptist Church. 

Rev. A. Alfred Engdahl of Karl- 
stad, Minn., will come to Thief River 
Falls and preach in the Swedish Bap- 
tist church, Sunday, Feb. 14th.- Morn- 
ing services at 7:30 p. hvBoth ser- 
vices in the Swedish language. All 
welcome, 

*** 

Scandinavian Ev. Free Church. 

J. O. Jacobson, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 a.m. Special 
mission services to be held Sunday, 
; Feb. 14. Morning worship at 11 a.m. 
i Lunch to be served after the morning 
i service at the church basement Con- 
jtribution to be used for missions. Af- 
■ternoon service at 2 p.m. Evening 
: service at 7:30 p.m. Prayer meeting 
■ on Thursday evening at George New- 
j land's residence, 420 Crocker Ave. N. 
Everybody welcome. 
*** 
Zion Church. 
Aug. Bredeson, Pastor. 
Sunday school at 10 ajn. Services 
will be held by Rev. Hovland from 
Grand Forks, in the Z ion church at 
11 a.m. in the Norwegian language 
and at 7:45 p.m. in the English lan- 
guage. He will preach in Rindal 
church at 2 p.m. 

Ladies Aid will he served by Mrs. 
Dena Evenson and Mrs. Aug: Brede- 
son, Thursday the 18th. Young Peo- 
ples society meets in the evening. 

A business meeting will be held 
Tuesday evening the 16th for the pur- 
pose of selecting a minister. 
*** 
Sw. Ev. Mission Church. 
O. J. Lundell, Pastor. 
Sunday, Feb. 14: Sunday school 10 
a.m. No services. Tuesday prayer 
and Bible study 7:30 p.m. 
*** 

Presbyterian Church. 

E. H. Lorenz, Pastor. 
Tne Father's' and Sons'' banquet 
will be held in- the church basement 

1 Friday evening at 6 p.m. 

! The men's Bible class meets with 
the Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. 

! The topic for the morning preach- 

; ing service will be "An Oft-forgotten 

[Spiritual Law." 

I Christian endeavor at 6:45 p.m. 

j William Froehlich, leader. 

! Preahcing service 7:45. Topic will 
be "A Review of Principal Stearns' 
'The Challenge of Youth." Theer will 
be several violin numbers. 

i The School of Missions will be held 

.Wednesday evening at 7:30 to study 
the fifth chapter of the book "Peasant 
Pioneers.'' The stereopicon lecture 
will be "The Tribe of God in Ameri- 



PAGE THREE 



Funeral services were held from 
Bethlehem church on Sunday Feb. 7, 
at 3 p. m. Rev. John Hjelmeland offici- 
ating. Interment in the Bethlehem 
cemetery. 

Iver L. Krogstad was a good neigh- 
bor, a hard working and loving hus- 
band and father, a good worker for 
the church. Foreign and inner - mis- 



sion and above everything, a true 
christian. — Contributed. 

•** . 

The mileage of surfaced roads in 
the United States is nearing the 500,- 
000 mile mark. In addition to sur- 
faced roads, a considerable mileage 
has been graded and drained according 
to engineering standards. 



Mrs. Ellen Dyrud. 

Thursday morning, February 4th, 
Mrs. Ellen Dyrud passed away after a 
brief illness. She was born in Minne- 
apolis February 14th, 1898, and was 
the wife of John Dyrud of Newf olden. 
Funeral services were held Monday 
afternoon at Newfolden. 



AUTO REPAIR AND 
MACHINE SHOP 

BLACKSMTTHING 
Expert Work Guaranteed 

SUND BROTHERS 

Successors to Aga Bros. 



Mta&t 



T. L. Krogstad, 

T. L. Krogstad, pioneer settler of 
central Marshall Co., who came here 
and^settled in New Solem township in 
1884', passed away at his home, Feb. 1, 
at the age of 76 years and 3 months, 
and,2 days. He was boni Oct. 30, 1949 
in Ringbo, Guldbronsdahlen, , Norway. 
When he was 3 years or age, his 
parents moved to Northern Norway, 
where he grew up to manhood. He 
worked for nine years as a fisherman 
at Lofoten, after which he spent a 
year in Northern Russia where he was 
employed as carperter. He then 
bought a farm in Norway where . he 
lived for two years. He sold out and 
imigrated to America in the spring 
of 1882. He worked for a year near 
Marcus, Cherrockee County, Iowa. 
The next year he came to Crookston, 
Minn., and in the spring of 1884 took 
up a homestead in New Solem town- 
ship, Marshall Co., where he has lived 
ever since. Deceased was married in 
1883 to Miss Anna G. Bergstrom. This 
union was blessed with seven children 
all of whom are living' and mourn his 
fatherly love and kindness. 

To mourn his loss are his seven 
children, namely Hawken R., Lars, 
Karl and Gilbert of Smiley. Sask., 
Mrs. Ed. Kamphaug of Battrum, Sask. 
and John M. and Mrs. Gilbert Grinde- 
land, -New Solem, and 17 grand chil- 
dren. His wife died nine years ago. 



Announcing the Opening of 
Our flebv 

Shoe Department 



Featuring Ladies' and Children's 
Popular Priced Quality Shoes. 



This addition gives the women of Thief River Falls and vicinity 
an exclusive department which will cater not only to the demands 
for up-to-the-minute novelties, bul also will carry at all times a 
large variety of conservative models. All the latest styles for 
spring have been ordered for immediate delivery and will be dis- 
played upon arrival. 



Special for Friday and Saturday 



In order to make room for the new 
stock we are placing upon bargain 
counters many shoes which formerly 
sold as high as §8.00 a pair — to be 
closed 1 out Friday and Saturday at, 
per pair _. 



CN/4E 

tHEBIGSTOREj 

THIEF RIVED FALLS. 



HRIFTY PEOPLE 

MINNESOTA 



++ M t MHMHMMMMH t MnH 4 MM t M » MH > Hm tlttl M »i.«-> +++++♦+♦• 




Please Bring Your Bill 



\\TE SUGGEST that you 
V V bring your telephone 
bill when paying at our offioe, ■ 
or inclose it when paying by 
mail. That will nelp yon 
and us. 

If your bill always aceom- 
panies payment, either at 
our business offioe or by mail, 
it saves time and makes sure 
that proper credit Is given. , 
When yon do not bring 



tie bill, you have to wait 
until a duplicate is made 
- out. This,' of course, takes 
your time and delays others 
who may be paying their 
bills. 

' Our constant effort Is to 
'provide the best possible 
service at theloweet possible 
coat to bar patrons, and 
every little bit saved helps 
to this end. 



pTho interests of the public, of our em- 
ployees and oar investors are the same. 



Northwestern Bell! 



® 



Telephone Cohpamy 



hi i m i i i i nnimimt nii ii nim i H i iimHUHn ii tiiiiti 



There Is Nothing Mysterious jj 

about the. benefits derived from eat- j 
ing Whole Wheat or Graham Bread. 1 




Whole Wheat Bread is 

A Health Food 

Simply because it is 

A Healthy Food 

It provides the necessary roughage 
to keep you physically fit. 

As a Reducing Diet 
It Can't Be Beat. 



For Purity and Uniformity Insist on VIVO 

Order it from your Grocer. 
The two local Bakeries use Vivo. 

vr 

Hanson & Barzen Milling Go. 



" » * >iiiniiinrii) i inimi > i > . > u . 1 1 ■ . . 1 1 1 1 1 j, ( j j j •, j j j ; ; ; ; ; ; ' , \ ♦ » 



- — ! •.V.v.iV.-i'-.-i.yX- ■ ■■■f.,l.-\.v. a;' .■■^-.-.Vrfl.. ■ .. , . ,; 




^^^^ ^ ^ MM^^M^&M^^-aj^^^^ 



*?* 



r-^H^m^r(^0W- h '- 



fAGE FOUR 



THIEF MyEB FALLS TRIBUNE 



Thief River Falls Tribune 



Published Every Wednesday 
Established 1001 



IiUDWIG I. HOE - 

WILLIAM E. DAHLQUIST 
H. S. SNYDER - - 



President 

Editor 

City Editor 



. Official Paper of Pennington County 
Entered as second-class matter at the 

poBtoffice at Thief River Falls, Minn., 

coder the Act of March 3, 1870. 



SUBSCRIPTION U.OO.rEK YEAR 




"The strongest bond of human 
sympathy, outside of the family re- 
lation, should be one uniting all 
working people, of all nations, 
tongues and kindreds. Nor should 
this lead to a war upon property or 
the owners of property. Property is 
the fruit of labor; property is de- 
sirable, is a positive good in the 
world. That some should be rich 
shows that others may become rich, 
and hence is just encouragement to 
independence and enterprise. Let not 
him who is houseless pull down the 
house of another, but let him labor 
diligently and build one for himself; 
thus by example assuring that his 
own shall be safe from violence when 
built." . ABRAHAM LINCOLN. 



up in a more concise manner, nor 
with greater logic. Mr. Barzen has 
grown beets on his farm. He knows 
what his cost has been in raising this 
crop and he knows what profit they 
have made for him. He intends to 
continue to grow them, not .because 
he figures they are profitable in dol- 
lars and cents but chiefly because they 
improve his land. As long as they 
pay a small margin of profit he is 
satisfied that they are a good thing 
for the country. But if conditions b 
come such that he can no longer 
grow them at a profit he will quit 
growing them. So will thousands of 
other beet growers. The industry will 
stagnate and gradually die. Beet sug- 
ar will go off the market and the con- 
sumer ivill be at the mercy of the 
importers. We would have a dupli- 
cation of the present rubber and 
coffee monopolies. 

The beet sugar industry in this 
country, needs protection now. Ameri- 
ca cannot afford to become dependent 
upon a foreign source of supply in this 
important commodity. There may be 
some truth in Mr. Canaday's charges 
that the protection is not being passed 
on to the grower of the beets. But 
certainly an industry wholly within 
the jurisdiction of the United States 
can be regulated more fairly than 
an industry entirely outside of that 
jurisdiction. 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 1926 



The Observation Post 



LINCOLN TRIUMPHANT 
(By Edwin Markham.) 
Lincoln is not dead. He lives 

In all that pities and forgives. 
He has arisen, and sheds a fire 

That makes America aspire. 

Even now, as when in life he lead, 

He leads us onward from the dead; 
Yes, over the whole wide world he 

bends 
To make the world a world of 
friends. 



. FOUR CENTS 
If there exists in Washington a 
serious ; desire to aid agriculture it 
seems that that desire could find tem- 
porary expression by raising the duty 
on butter from eight to twelve cents. 
Four cents a pound would mean mil- 



lions of dollars to the northwest, but.^g (j ays w k os | 



Having shot the city, papers full of 
holes in a series of articles in the Out- 
look Don C. Seitz turns his attention, 
or should we say he turns his sights, 
toward the country press. At. the out- 
set he makes the small town weekly 
feel less. small by including under the 
heading of "country press" newspa- 
pers in such villages as the Twin Ci- 
ties, Milwaukee, Cincinnati* Cleveland 
and Detroit Which is the New York 
of it. ■ 

In his opinion the country weekly 
tends to become colorless, as far as 
controversy is concerned, because of 
the desire for financial success. He 
finds ''the country weekly still unchal- 
lenged in its field, though it would be 
hard to prove it has progressed intel- 
lectually. The tendency has been 
away from efforts at influence, and in 
the direction of a closer chronicler of 
local news. Here i it is invincible and 
invaluable. If it has lost in ability, it 
has increased in prosperity, ' small 
communities are sensitive and resent 
criticism or suggestion, such as the 
local editor once felt more free to 
give. The result is that he has become 
purely commercial in all but rare in- 
stances. A few charges against the 
local windmill usually sobers the most 
valiant young editor." 

It is undoubtedly true that commer- 
cial caution has taken much of the 
pepper and vinegar out of the coun- 
try press. It is als true the editor 
has learned greater good can^be se- 
cured for a community by leading 
than by driving, by constructive effort 
than by attack. Isn't it possible the 
present-day country editor wields a 
more positive intellectual and moral 
influence by being "a closer chronic- 
ler of Ipcajfnews" than does the one 
who uses battle-axe methods and neg- 
lects the first function of a newspa 
per? If he will adjust his sights Mr. 
Seitz will find the better class of 
country weekly wielding' more actual, 
positive influence today than it did in 



dealer" that is commonly alluded to 
as the "Painkiller," while "Bladder" 
: is often opprobrioysly applied to the 
weeklies in many towns. I " do hot 
know why this is so, except that small 
towns contain more 'condensed cussed- 
ness than big ones. The newspaper fs 
loyal to the community and everybody 
in it, but nobody feels any sense of 
loyalty to the newspaper. 

"A good newspaper means a good 
■ town — if the people only knew it. The 
I towns expect the editor and the 
clergy to uphold its morals, but is shy 
about co-operating. The editor's in- 
! nate sense of loyalty keeps him in the 
I community's service, whether proper- 
ty rewarded or not. He is true to his 
subscribers." 

**« 

The writer in The Outlook rightly 
concludes that the country' field holds 
many opportunities. "There must be a 
reaction in favor of more people and 
better living in the small towns and 
away from the city congestion. In 
this the country paper will reap its 
deferred reward for doing so much for 
a community that the community is 
unable to do" for itself." 

L. I. R 



... . . . — — — j" -...u.j., jjuoamg llc laments 

more than that, it would. mean in- [This because it has established finan 



ose passing he laments. 



POLITICAL GOSSIP 

. With F. H. Peterson of Moorhead, 
Lou Benshotf of Detroit and Hon. 
Marius Waldal of Plummer, out for 
congressman from the Ninth District 
one might be lead to believe that 
someone is after Congressman We- 
fald's scalp. Peterson was a candidate 
for congress two years ago, Benshooff 
has been taking some hot shots at 
the present congressman during the 
past two years, and Waldal is a farm- 
er, so, there you are. Whoever wins 
the Republican nomination is going 
to have a tussle with Congressman 
Wefald at the general election.— Nor- 
man County Herald. 



creased diversification and less need 
for the formation of export corpora- 
tions to handle the surplus of small 
grains. ■ 

MAKING IT PAY 

L. O. Lawson farms twenty-five 

acres of land a mile northeast of town 

and makes it pay. Last year this 

small tract was divided as follows; 



THE SUGAR TARIFF 
Math Barzen presents an interest- 
ing argument in favor of the continu- 
ation of the import duty on sugar in 
his letter to Ralph Canaday, reprint- 
ed in this issue. After pointing out 
that beet production at the present 
prices does not yield any too great 
a profit, he states, "The import duty 
on sugar is around $1.72 per hun- 
dred. Take this duty off and crlarge 
it to the farmers and where will 
their profit be? Gone! He will 
surely quit raising beets as there are 
cheaper methods for cleaning and im- 
proving land. With this, of course, 
goes the industry. Their product 
would be off the market. Competi- 
tion from this source gone, result, 
higher prices for sugar instead of 
cheaper sugar." 

The problem could not be summed 



cial independence, is. recognized not as 
the necessary evil of the old days but 
as a community institution that could 
not be spared, and because it has 
learned how to impress positive pol- 
icies upon its cinstitutency through 
all departments of the paper. 
♦*» 
Observation that ".small towns con- 
tain more condensed cussedness than 
big ones" will cause an appreciative 
.,.,,. , , chuckle in more than one editorial of- 

ix acres of alralta, live acres of wheat fice, even though the truth of' the 
4 acres of clover and timothv, six statement is not granted. It^frould 
acres of pasture and timber, one-half , seem * hat ^^ is not mor <= condensed 

an acre of nnrirops -ind i anrdpn ' cu , ssedness ln a small town, but that 
an acre ot potatoes, and .a garden |what cussedness there ;,. in a ;smalI 

patch in which were grown carrots, i town is more condensed. Meaning that 
cabbages, beans, etc. Three cows i within the narrow limits of llain 
and the poultry made a living for ! Street and a few residential streets it 
Mr. Lawson. From the three cows \f a ]Z?Z *° avoid the cussedness and 
a. *™«i l l u 'easier to be influenced by, it every 

more than $300.00 worth of butter- 1 day. The city editor does not person- 
fat was produced. Turkeys alone ' ally get the reaction of his readers, 
brought over $100. The five acres j The country editor is made ti? ; ; ifeel 

of wheat yielded 138 bushels and ^'fZl *} 7 'Jf£J^?vi 7 U "IP"*' 
, ... Ainnnn a j *cnnn his ideas are liked or disliked whian he 
brought $1<J0.00. Around $50.00 makes a trip down Main Street after 
worth of cabbage was sold" . Other the Great Family Educator has rfach- 
vegetables, hogs and eggs, brought in ? d its. readers. Often the experience 
more money: This twenty-five »™; w- disheartening. -■ -*'-• 



Mayie Lutheran Church 
E. O. Sabo, Pastor. 
Services Sunday, February 14 in 
Zion church, Germantown at 11 a. m. 
The confirmation class will meet af- 
ter services Sunday. Services in Mavie 
at 3 p. m. 



F. Allen of Sazel motored to this 
city Friday and speni'the day attend- 
ing to matters of business. 

Walter Wendt arrived in this city 
from Warren last Friday evening, and 
is spending the week here as a guest 
of his mother, Mrs. Margaret Wendt, 



% 




Automobile Manners 



The office pessimist has another grouch. 

"Why is it," he snarls, "that folks lose their 
manners when they get behind a wheel? 
If I bump into a fellow pedestrian on the 
sidewalk we both smile and say, 'I beg your 
pardon.' . But if a fellow autoist turns a 
corner unexpectedly in front of me on the 
highway I show my teeth and bellow, 'Hey ! 
Look where yer goin'." 

The trouble with the office pessimist, as 
with too many other autoists, is that his car 
doesn't function properly, and he's worried 
when he should be free from all concern. 

Pyramid Motor Oils and Gasoline take the 
grouch out of the driver because they make 
driving a pleasure and leave the autoist in 
a happy frame of mind toward all fellow 
travelers. 

Our trucks make daily deliveries out in the 
country. 



, . ,. , ,. i There is also more condensed 

farm is making its owner- a good llv- friendliness in a small town. There is 
ing and he is satisfied. -■ ' more of actual, active loyalty to a 

This does not indicate that all DaDer ™ hen !t works for th * opbuild- 
farmers should farm only twenty-five , mg of a comn " ln ' < )3i 
acres. Many farmers who are making | Here are some thoughts by Seitz for 
money on larger tracts might starve , the expression of which all country 
on this small piece and it might be editors step i modestly- aside and let the 



that Lawson would starve on a half 
section farm. But is dees indicate 
that it is not absolutely necessary for 



former! business manager of the New 
York World speak: ;\ji ! 

"The small towns, as a rule, dg !not 
respect the local papers as "they 



a farmer to own half the county in | should. The little locals are sniffled at 
order to make a living. It certainly ! ^ ea °- nte ? ,p - t - S, ? nB V Lmes ?«» " 
speaks well for the country. i- .. 



in designating the useful pub- 
lications. I know an excellent "Plain- 




El 



Our Grocery Prices Are Right 



By that we mean that they are as low as they can be made. 
We do not mark some items low and others high. You can ;buy 
your groceries here with the assurance that the price will be fair 
on every item purchased and that in the aggregate you will have 
saved money. . ; 

Our Overhead Expense Is Low 

No matter what store you patronize, you must pay your propor- 
tionate share of the overhead expense of that store. The fact that 
the overhead expense of this store is divided among large depart- 
ments, enables us to sell our merchandise with less overhead ex- 
pense charged to each individual sale. 
■■ , i ' 

Quality Considered — Our Prices Are Right 

Phone, Grocery Dep't 169. We Deliver. 



Finer Texture 

J and 

Larger Volume 
in your bakings 



I Same Price ■ 
for over 35 years i 
►25 Ounces for 25 c 




! ! ! ! ! ! !l! !!!»""III II I I IMMHIM I »MM IIII H III MIIMMIHM I MMMHMHM t 
"HI IHIMIIII I MM I UtMIIIIIIH I MIIMIHIIIMmit »' 



B :::: 




L 



ffinmriLE 

1HE BIG STORET^TllRIFrY PEOPLE 

THIEF RIVER FAUS.V " 




MINNESOTA 



XX 



IT'S STRANGE how little things will 
sometimes liven us up and re-furbish our own 
opinion of ourselves. 

FOR INSTANCE, writing out a neat 
personal check — a check which whispers, 
"Here's a trust- worthy, businesslike man, a 
bank customer"— instead of digging into purse 
or pocket for commonplace coins or currency! 

YOU'LL FIND a trim check-book await- 
ing you at this bank, and a courteous, accom- 
modating man who will look after the open- 
ing of your account. Why not today? 



FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK 



♦ » m m m t > i u 4 1 » « t . ♦ \ * » * f ; * > * * * ;; j t ; i j > « > t » 1 1 1 1 < 1 1 1 1 j ; j it j > t » t ♦ ♦ > » » j j 1 1 1 1 1 1 r t m t ♦» 



omm t tum i in i u Mi ti i l fUMii i MMmt t tiM ttii Hi i i i t l l l l l M lii t i mi i ii 



'MM.HI HHMH II IMMMI»MM I ) I IIMM II MitMI>IMi li 'M' l 4M'M ; M l it l 1h l UMH' i MltH I MIM»IHMM l i l lMHinMMH1 l tHMM 

Call for JUNG'B 1VIGTORY" BREAD 

l.. ies .! ,a M lJP . t0 . ast andard ' np f D0WN t0 a P" c<? - "h Quality WeWrast" JUNG'S QUAUTY BAKERY. For sale by all grocers, : : 

M I I I I I I MIMIMMMiriM I I I I It ! n-t u nt i*| -| m il i . "ttltll t"tttmtttttt1iiHI I I I I I I I H I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H I 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 H 1 1 1 ' ' ' ' " ' ' ' ' ' H 1 1 f I t M I t I I I I I I I II I I I III IU 



i ''-" 


I ' " '"■ "'" 


1 


I 


ii: 


. •; vwi'ii 


-^JiVr 


:;>/-/ >;.;V; 


'"■•• ;:'? \ iv 


'>.V>- J -A>. ; -iA i^A-^e: 


i«-'l^ 


»afSi»» : K!i^iils£. 


:.-*..- . . •• 


,;:;■-?■ 










;,-k 




..j 1 


1 
I 










1 




1 

! 




■ 'II 1 




* 


| 
















1 






















' 1 



3-jrt >£.*■■> i-&$^?y$fift\?tf5ti?".\ 






WS!| 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 1926 



THIEF RIVER ^AtCSTRIBUNF .TH^If! 






County Officials At 

^ . State Conferences 



.Local Commissioners and Highway 

Engineer Take Part in Annual 

Meetings. 

Pennington county was represented 
by Commissioners Emil Larson and 
Andrew Ness at the annual meeting- 
ol the Minnesota association of coun- 
ty board members in Minneapolis last 
week. All the meetings attracted 
representatives from the majority of 
counties and were held of great prac- 
tical value. The local officials return- 
ted the latter part of the week. 
1 Better roads were the concern of 
the engineers* meetings and also fea- 
/tured some of the commissioners' se- 
f sions. Charles iL Babcock, state 
' hignway <-OinmioSionei", spoKe to botn 
gatherings and gave the county of- 
ficials the big share of any credit due 
for highway development in Alinne- 
soca. He urgeu tnem to inaKe spe- 
cial efforts to keep the public fully 
. and correctly informed of all road 
plans and 'aims, saying that the bet- 
ter the good roads movement is un- 
derstood the \ greater progress will be 
made. 

Best " methods of handling public 
road construction and maintenance 
were general subjects of discussion 
along most practical lines ; the offi- 
cials reported. Many phases were 
considered at round-tables where pro- 
blems were outlined and solved in the 
light of experience. 

The majority of commissioners and 
engineers expressed the common opin- 
ion that the road using public is be- 
ginning t better realize the economy 
which will result from meeting the 
demands for better roads without 
necessary delay that present day tax- 
payers may share in the benefits of 
roads which must be constructed 
within a few years at most. Toward 
encouraging this sentiment commis- 
sioners and engineers pledged redou- 
bled^ efforts to give most value and 
service for all public highway funds. 



Bell Company Expands. 
For improvements, replacements 

and extensions to its systom in Min- 
nesota during 1926 the Northwestern 
Bell Telephone company plans to 
make an ; expenditure estimated at 
$3,500,000. The expansion of indus- 
try, the growth of business and popu- 
lation, and the increasing use of tele- 
phone service all are contributing 
factors tof the 'need for improving and 
extending^ the company's system; 

Minnesota Grange 

Planning Come-Back 

Farmers' societies may come and 
go, but the old time Grange seems to 
go on forever. Founded way back in 
1867, the : Grange has had many ups 
and downs but still survives with an 
aggregate membership of 800,000 in 
the United States. 

Delegates from the few scattered 
Granges left in Minnesota met at Uni- 
versity Farm recently and elected 
Fred K. Wilson of Linden Hills Sta- 
tion, Minneapolis, master, and a full 
compliment of state officers. Plans 
were made for a campaign to build up 
the membership and influence of the 
order in Minnesota. Years ago it was 
a positive factor in the community 
life of Minnesota, the county of Hen- 
rnepin alone having at one time 25 ac- 
tive Granges. 

The membership is composed princi- 
pally of agriculturists, but teachers, 
physicians and ministers are eligible. 
Among its objects, the building up of 
home communities, co-operation, and 
social advancement. 



Warren Spoils Perfect^,. 
Record of LocaF Team 



Like a mighty thunderbolt from the 
sky came the Warren high 
basketeers last Friday to humble the 
local aggregation and haul them 
[down from the exaulted position of 
having gone through the season thus 
far without a single defeat. 

The local coach did not enter his 
strongest lineup at the beginning of 
the contest, evidently believing that 
\^arren would not be so hard to put 
away. A load was piled up the first 
half, but it was not sufficient, for the 
Warren bunch rallied in the last quar- 
ter and overcame the locals by three 
field goals, the score ending 13 to 19 
in their favor. Thief River Falls did 
not. make a single score during the 
second half. 

"It was an off night for our boys," 
is the opinion of many local fans, but 
too strong praise can not be given the 
visitors who gave an exhibition e-f 
fast and furious basketball and show- 
ed good sportsmanship - throughout 
the entire contest- 

And who knows but what the sting 
of defeat will materially strengthen 
the locals for the district contest next 
month. 



State5s Flax Acreage 

Should Be Maintained 

Maintenance of the 1925 flax acre- 
age in Minnesota the cominig season 
is recommended by farm crops arid 
farm management men at University 
Farm. Approximately 40 millions of 
bushels of flax are used annually in 
the United States for crushing pur- 
poses. In 1024 only about two-thirds 
of the flax needed in this country was 
produced here. In 1925 the difference 
was even greater because of the de- 
crease in acreeage in North Dakota 
and a lower yield per acre. For sever- 
al years in Minnesota the farm value 
per acre of flax has been higher than 
for most other crops. 

A. C. Amy of the farm crops sec- 
tions at University Farm says that 
losses in yield caused by wilt can be 
obviated entirely by using only certi- 
fied seed of such wilt resistant varies 
ties as Winona. Chippewa and N. TJ. 
R. 114. Early planting, either the lat- 
ter part of April or the 1st part of 
May, usually means higher yields per 



Library Notes. 

The library will be open for read- 
ing from 3 until 5 p. m. on Friday, 
but will be closed in the evening. 

For our Story Hour last Saturday, 
Junior Prichar.-l gave a tnlk on " A 
trip to the bottom of the sea" il- 
lustrating his remarks with shells and 
other curios found on the Florida 
and California coasts. This was fol- 
lowed by Maud Lindsays' storv of 
"Giant Energy and Fairy Skill" told 
by Miss Hattie Goldsmith. 

There will be more stories next Sat- 
urday. 



ion Aim Is ttAServe. 

i of the LegioVjs to \ 



Legio] 

"The aim of the Legio^Js to serve 
American in the nation, the state, and 
the community; and to help its com- 
rades whenever possible", declares 
Joe O'Hara, State Commander of the 
Minnesota organization. 



»'£..; . ttGSIS PIGS. 
&:if the following story were true a 
Streamer headline across the first 
page of this.paper reading something 
Jffie "this— "Pig Thief Killed By Ac- 
school comptioe"— might nave oeen us€( j t n j g 
week. 

■But the story <fs not true. 

It has been going, the rounds' of the 
western part of the state for the past 
month, the location of the "tragedy" 
being moved to the locality in which 
it is supposed to have taken place in 
each case, and reached McLeod coim- 
tyjast week, this time a Glencoe farm 
being the "scene of the tragedy." 
'•; There is never any change in the 
story— it doesn't need any embellish- 
ments-*- it s'thriller enough as it is 
to cause much conversation when it 
liits any community. 

But here's the story — and there's 
not a word of truth in it: \ 

Two thieves were supposed to have 
gone to a "farmer's pig pen on a night 
in the recent past to steal his pigs. 
The farmer kept his pigs in a little 
low pen covered with straw. The door 
to the pen was made for pigs and not 
for men, and was but two fest High. 
-The weapon of slaughter was a four 
pound rock hammer. One of the 
thieves went into the pen and quietly 



He Should Know Better. 

Handy Man: — "Ah's sorry, boss, 
absolute, but a mule done kicked me." 

Boss: — You should have been 
here an hour ago, anyway." 

Handy man: — "Mebbe ah wudda 
have been den, only dis here long- 
eared critter dun kicked me in de ud- 
der direction." 



When a Norwegian liner from the 
United States steams into Bergen, 
the passengers gather on deck and 
sing the Norwegian national anthem. 



Superior Features of the 
IOWA" Cream Separator 



66 



SWINGING BRACKET— The patent- 
ed swinging bracket, on which the 
supply trank rests, can be swung out 
of the operative position, without re- 
moving or emptying the supply tank. 

SUPPLY TANK— Placed down low- 
easy to reach. The special anti-splash 
design of the supply tank keeps the 
milk from splashing. No seams — 
drawn from one piece of steel. Rolled 
edge. Heavily tin-plated to prevent 
rusting." 

FAMOUS CURVED DISC BOWL— 
i The patented Curved Disc Bowl, used 
f in the "LOW A" Cream Separator, is 
the world's closest skimming device. 
The "IOWA," with the Curved Disc 
Bowl, but-skimmed all competing 
--Separators in. . the. official skim- 
ming -tests at the last 'World's 
Fair, San Francisco, 1915. The 
Curved Disc Bowl of the "IOWA" 
Cream Separator gets all the butter- 
fat under all farm conditions. 




Buy One on Easy Payments 

Christenson Hdw. Co. 

We Give S & H. Green 
Trading Stamps. 




Unbroken Service 

All Users Of Electricity Must Be Sure Of Having 

All The Current They Want At All Times 

Some Plants Of A Distributing System Can Be Run 

Continuously And Others During The Hours 

When There Is A Big Demand 

Reducing Cost And Giving Better Service 

Than Where 6 Plants Supplying 6 Towns 

Would All Have To Be Run Continuously 

In Order To Give Service To Each Town 

The Result Is Better Service And Lower Cost Of 

Production 

Constant Improvement In The Operation 

Of Electric Light Companies Makes the 

P re f erred Stock A Desirable Investment 

Monthly Dividends At The Rate Of 7 % Per Annum 

To Holders Of Our Stock 

MINNESOTA ELECTRIC 
DISTRIBUTING CO. 



Operated By 




viiifci-'iu .the- jj'eji : "drove the'laat victini 
out, he said to his partner, "Here 
comes : _the.la4Uone." Here is where 
the blunder came in, the man outside 
thought he meant another pig was 
coming. He waited with hammer 
readyand when he saw a black form, 
let. drive. He then waited for his 
partner and: when he failed to come 
out, lighted a match and found that 
the last pig was his fellow thief, and 
that he was stone dead. 

The story started around Brecken- 
ridge and the killing was supposed to 
have happened in that vicinity, but 
when no farmer who lost pigs nor any 
dead men could be found in that 
neighborhood the scene of the disas- 
ter was^ moved east gradually and 
landed in McLeod county last week. 
Glencoe now refuses to be the scene 
and some other town is in line for 
publicity.— Hutchinson Leader. 



CHANGE OF HEART 

At last someone has a good word 
to say for the Jews. Henry Ford in 
a recent interview made the statement 
that the Jews have been a good in- 
fluence on America. If our memory 
serves us correctly, tis but a few' 
short years ago that Henry was criti- 

r ,.. _, ,, cising and calling the Jews all the 

awakened'the pigs and sent them out names he^could lay his tongue to, and 
of the pen one by one, and the other [now he makes the statement that he 
tapped them-of the head with the has been too severe in his criticism of 
hammer as they came out. As the the Israelites. — Truman Tribune. 



=3£ 

Card oi Tha^ka, ; -.-' &t '■ 
"We wish to express our sincere ffrr 
preciatiori and thanks to thb'se whb4|§ 
kindly assisted us during the sickness,, 
and death of our father. — Hawtoen 
R. Krogstad, Lars K. Krogstad, John 
M. Krogstad, Gilbert Krogstad, Mf. 
and Mis. Karal Krogstad* and family, 
Mr. and Mrs; Gilbert T, Grirideland 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Kamp- 
haug and family. 

. . -A_ 

- Francis Darwin, son of Charles 
Darwin, recently died in England af- 
ter many . botanical experiments,, 
among which was the measurement 
of the amount of weight lost by a. 
gourd when the leaves were trans- 
piring freely. 



Buy for Cash 

and SaveVi 



.00 



9x12 Gold Seal 
Congoleum 
Rugs • ■ • 

HICKS FURNITURE AND 
UNDERTAKING COMPANY 



$12 




AL CARLOADI 



ECIBHHamBHL 

Thirt St., 3 doors east of FirstNational Bank. 



r O 



GROCl 

DIRECT TO CONSUMER 



WHOLESALE SUPPLY GO. 



BRANCHES IN 
PRINCIPAL CITIES 

YOUR ADVANTAGES 

Highest Quality Food Products 
Lowest Possible Prices 
Prompt Efficient Service 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A NEW METHOD 
IN MERCHANDISING 

OUR ADVANTAGES 

Enormous Buying Power 
Low Operating Costs 
Rapid Stock Turnover 
No Credit Losses 



Grand Opening Sale 

Friday and Saturday 

Feb. 12-13 

Thief River Falls 

We Greet You 

We are proud to announce the opening of. 
our new store in your city, which brings to you 
the economic advantages of an organization dis- 
tinctly different in its scientific method of 
operation. 

Here you will find an appealing display of 
the highest gra'de food products the market af- 
fords. Standard, well known brands with 
which you are so familiar and yet priced so 
amazingly low that- you will wonder how it can 
be dbne. 

It's The Development^ a Wonderful Idea 

Five years ago N. M. Constans,. president 
and founder of the company conceived a plan 
whereby it would be possible to reduce the wide 
maragm of distributing cost between producer 
, and consumer. Beginning with only one store 

and three employes he gradually put his plan into operation, increasing the 
number of stores until today the company occupies an enviable position, oper- 
ating a chain of 87 stores in 46 different cities, employing 300 people, doing 
an annual business of oyer five million dollars. 

The unprecedented growth is due entirely to Mr. Constan's unswerving 
policy of Strictly High Quality Merchandise, Lowest Possible Prices, Fair, 
honest Dealing and Prompt, Courteous and Considerate 'Treatment to the 
customers at all times. ' 

IF YOU ARE A THRIFTY BUYER you know the great saving possible 
by buying m large quantities. We help you furtKer to decrease the 'cost i>f 
combining this feature with low operating expense, no credit losses and rapid" 
stock turnover. * 

We cordially invite you to come in and inspect this new store and' obtain ". 
the benefits "bfc our progressive methods. 

lISIlBQElISflttSIOIEnBE!! 




N. M. CONSTANS, President 




^^^■^i^iiSs^^iSi ^ssssSi^ t&^siBai^B^l^^e.. 



w 

* 



i$ f /'Sgit-W J ii-.V-4*. ^3 ^>^4> /'^;.:^;-. ,-. _ 



^W^w^^^jj^j^g^^ 1 ^ 



■n^w^'-i?''^* 



.V,^,.,:.-A-- I - X ' .- I v 



8PW 



PAGE SIX 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



I 



\fflB 




gunttu Correspondence 



ST. HILAIRE 



r Le; 



Luther League. 

The Luther League of the Norwe- 
gian Luthern church held its regular 
meeting in the church basement Sun- 
day evening. The meeting was called 
to order by president Selma Hoff. Af- 
ter the short business meeting an in- 
teresting- program was given, the 
greater part of it pertaining t our 
large mission field— China. The topics 
taken up in regards to this subject 
were : 

Vastness — Alice Maakrud. 

Population— Helga Vik. 

Natural Resources — Ruby Susag. 

Religions— Bendikka Hagen. 

The remainder of the program con- 
sisted of songs by the Luther League 
chorus, reading by Leta Bennett, and 
piano duet by Mae Kenney and Marie 
Grimsrud. The Luther League Broad- 
caster, containing news of the local 
church, peculiarities of China, and 
miscellaneous items was read by 
Bendikka Hagen. In closing the doxo- 
logy was sung by the audience. 
m The Luther League will hold a so- 
cial meeting on Friday evening, Feb. 
12, in the church parlors. 

Sewing Club Meets, 
The Handywork club winch was 
formerly known as the Gold Medal 
club has re-organized for the coming 
year under the able leadership of 
Miss Virginia Westphal. The first 
meeting was held last Wednesday 
evening at which the following offi- 
cers were elected: President, Virginia 
Westphal; Vice President. Mary de 
Cathileneau; Secretary and Treasur 
er,. Mae Hackett. At present there 
are eighteen members enrolled. The 
club will hold their meetings ever 
Wednesday evening at the school- 
house. 



Theatre Party. 
Saturday evening members of the 
local faculty enjoyed a theatre party 
at Thief River Falls, the party being 
in honor of Miss Bartholet's birthday 
anniversary. Following the theatre 
.party lunch was enjoyed at Thomp- 
son's cafe. Those present were: Ce- 
celia Bartholet, Lillian Ecklof, Leta 
Bennett, Bendikka Hagen, Ruby Su- 
say, and Envin Reiersgord. 

Mrs. L. Holmes Entertains. 
On Sunday evening, Mrs. L. Holmes 
entertained a number of her friends 
at her home. The evening was spent 
in a social manner and at twelve 
o'clock a delicious luncheon was serv- 
ed. Those present were: Lillian Eck- 
lof, Leta Bennett, Bendikka Hagen, 
Ruby Susag, Cecelia Bartholet, Myr- 
tle Gigstad, Mildred Fellman, Edith 
Dahl and Francis Hovet. 

Dr. 0. Werner and Lester Holmes 
were Thief River Falls callers Friday. 

The seventh and eight grades and 
faculty members enjoyed a sleigh 
ride party last Friday evening.. After 
the sleighing party lunch was enjoyed 
at Hacketts' restaurant. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Hanson of Thief 
River Falls accompanied by Hans 
Wilson of this village autoed to 
Crookston Tuesday to visit at the J. 
La Plante home. 

Misses Alice Skottem and Gladys 
Severson, tw of the local camp fire 
girls, hiked to Thief River Falls on . 
Saturday, where they spent the day 
shopping and visiting with friends. i 

Rev. and Mrs. C. M. Grimsrud auto- i 
ed to Thief River Falls Monday, where j 
they attended a banquet given at the ' 
Trinity Lutheran church. - I 

Mr. James Kenney who has spent I 
the past month taking part in the icr : 
events at Winnepeg came Friday to ; 
spend a few days with his family. j 

Mr. Westphal and daughter Adeline 



jwere Thief River Falls shoopper s on 
(Tuesday. 

Rev. and Mrs. S. Tallackson and 
j children of Thief River Falls spent 
; Tuesday visiting at the Rev. Grims- 
Irud home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gullickson of Middle 
j River autoed to this village Sunday, 
• where they spent the day visiting at 
the home of their son, L. Gullickson. 
| Miss Tomina Hanson returned Wed- 
nesday from Thief River Falls, where 
she has been visiting at the home of 
' her brother, Fred Hanson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Borgie and lit- 
tle daughter . Pearl Elaine of Grand 
Forks, spent .Sunday at the E. Peter- 
son home. 

Miss Hazel Dann who teaches at 
Hazel, spent the week end at her par- 
ental home. 

Mrs. H. H. Olsen and daughter Val- 
erie, spent Monday at Thief River 
■ Falls, where the latter had dental 
work done. 

j Rev. T. Dixon of Thief River Falls 
: was a business caller in this village on 
Tuesday. 

Prin. E. Reiersgord autoed to Men- 
tor Monday to attend a meeting of the 
Atheletic Association of which he is 
Chairman. This committee will ar- 
range for the. date of the district 
tournament. 

Mr. A. Bilden. wh is emloyed at 
Hibbing came Sunday evening for a 
weeks visit with his family. Mrs. Ver- 
ner Nelson of Thief River Falls, came 
Monday to spend a few days at the 
home of M. Fricker. 

The local W. C. T. U. will meet 
Wednesday, February 10, at the Rev. 
C. M. Grimsrud home. 

"Pat" Roark of Thief River Falls, 
transacted business in this village on 
Monday. " 

Mr. P. Bergh left Saturday for 
Brandon, where he will attend to busi- 
ness matters. He will return Thurs- 
day. 

"Pat'' Hall returned Tuesday from 
h's three weeks business trip in 
Florida. 

Mrs. Hannah Prestebak of Mizhpa. 
came Saturday and will spend some 
time here as truest at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. P. Bergh. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Jenson and Mr. and i 
Mrs. R O. Burkee were Thief River 
Falls callers Thursday. 

Wendell Corbet and Leonn Allan 
autoed from New Folden Sundav to 
spend the day at the H. R. Allan 
home. 

Mi«=s Tvanptte Wilson who attends 
Normal at Thief River Falls spent the 
week end at her parental home. 



1 GOODRIDG E NEWS ' 

*~ ; — ♦ 

Rag Doll Social. ! 

The junior class of the Goodridge 
high school is staging a rag doll soci- 
al, Feb. 12th, Girls bring a rag dolt 
and lunch for two. Boys come prepar- 
ed to choose your doll. A good time is 
assured. 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 192S 



How to Take Shine / 

From Seams and Hems 



Young Peoples 

The newly organized young peoples 
society, northeast of town, held its 
second regular meeting at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Eills on Sunday. Af- 
ter the program of music reading and 
talks, a light lunch was served. 



Yoemen Basket Social. 

Together with their regular meet- 
ing the local unit of the Yoemen lodge 
sponsored a basket social Friday eve- 
ning. All those present report a good 
time. 



Mr. Isaacson returned from Grand 
Meadow, Minnesota last Monday, 
where he was called by -the death of 
his fa&er. He reports that their is 
a great deal of snow in the southern 
part of the state.. 

Johnnie and Julian Marcuson, Jo- 
seph Poppenhagen and Mable Marcu- 
son, motored to Thief River Thurs- 
day morning to attend a session of 
court. 

Stuart McLeod and Donald Thore- 
son left Friday evening for Crookston 
to attend the winter shows, Mr. Mc- 
Leod shipped a number of cattle for 
exhibit. 

Miss Marget Huseby made a busi- 
ness trip "to Thief River Falls last 
Wednesday evening. 

Mr. Melvin Hanson of the War 
Finance corporation arrived last week 
to take charge of the corporations 
business here, since the closing of the 
local bank. 

"Queen'- a high grade guernsey 
heifer, the property of Albert Poppen- 
hagen was shipped to Crookston Fri- 
day evening to be exhibited at the 
winter shows. "Queen" has won a trip 
to Minneapolis and a scholarship at 
the Crookston agricultural college 
for her owner. 

Mrs. L. P. Poppenhagen returned 
from Thief River Falls; Tuesday 
morning, where she had spent a few 
days visiting with relatives and shop- 
ping. • K 

Tom Harms has been loading his 
personal property prior to shipping it 
t Noble county, Minnesota where he 
and his family will make their future 
home. 



Shiny seams often appear on wool 
ly garments after they have been 
I cleaned and pressed. Much of this 
, ehininess can be avoided if the right 
I method of pressing is used, says M. 
; Lois Reid, extension specialist in 
clothing with headquartaers at Uni- 
versity Farm. 

"To press wool one should place a 
woolen cloth on the ironing board and 
then lay the right side of the wool 
j material on the cloth," she says. 
j "Place a heavy piece of muslin cloth — 
.the heavier^ the better— on top of the 
wool material. A piece of canvas is 
! excellent because it can be dampened 
| evenly and without wrinkling. It may 
• he dry for pressing damp wool, but 
•when used for pressing seams, hems, 
[and finishes it should be dampened. 
' Never leave the iron in one spot; keep 
:it moving. Do-not press entirely dry; 
if pressed until dry the seams will 
; probably shine. ,Hang the garment 
j where there is good circulation of air 
.until it is thorouoghly dry. Fold plaits 
;and pin each plait to ironing board. 
J Remove pins and press again to re- 
move pin marks. 

"To remove shine from garment, 
sponge the parts with ammonia wa- 
ter (one tablespoon of household am- 
monia to one quart of water). Place 
the right side of the garment on the 
cloth, cover with dampened canvas 
cloth and brush the garment" with a 
stiff brush to raise the*nap. 

"Bagginess at knee- of trousers 
and skirts or at elbows of coat may be 
shrunk out by spreading the garment 
flat on a' board, placing a well damp- 
ened canvas cloth .on the baggy por- 
tion and pressing until the cloth is al- 
most dry. '' 



LOCAL MARKETS 



GRAIN 

Wheat, dark northern 1.50 

Wheat No. 1 _■ i 46 

Wheat, No. 2 . 

Durum, No. 1 

Flax, per bu . 



Barley, per bu . 



1.44 

1.21 

2.19 

.42 

.28 

.79 



Scouting- 



St. Hilalre Loses 12-11. 

Last Friday evening the St. Hilaire 
High school quint journed to Badger 
and met defeat bv the fast team there. 

The St. Hilaire team started the 
scoring when : Hackett dropped in a 
field goal. Badger however, evened the 
count a few minutes later and' in this 
manner the score see-sawed until the 
final whistle blew. Due to the close 
score a very rough game developed, 
and not until one of our men was hit , 
on the head giving him a larp-e cut j 
over the eye did the referee call a ! 
foul. 

The summary: 

St. Hilaire, Badger 

Hallmark ; F Christensnn 

Beebe F Goodwin 

Hallstrom ; C ..'. Osell 

Nelson G :...Erirkson ! 

Hackett G Venaas 

Field goals.. Osell 5: Goodwin. 1: 
Nelson. 2: Hackett. 2; Beebe, 1; Free j 
throws, Hallmeck 1. . ' 



A loan fund to amount to not less 
than ?10.000 ,for assisting students in 
four Class A 1 norma] schools in Al- 
abama, has been established by the 
Birmingham News. The fund is to 
be administered by the presidents of 
these institutions. 



(By George J. Johnson.) 
Sunday morning, Troop 3 attended 
the Presbyterian church in a body. 
Next Sunday will be "Scouting and 
the Church" Sunday in the Trinity 
Lutheran church. The objective of 
this special day is the stimulation of 
the appreciatioin on the part of the 
Scouts and the communitiy that home 
and church are the cornerstones of 
the nation. 

Feb. S, Anniversary day, Troop 3 
met with Troop 4 recommitting them-, 
selves to the scout oath and law. The 
daily good turn and the twelfth scout 
law, "A Scout is Reverent" — two 
principles every member of the scout 
home as well as each individual, 
should live up to; the scouts' obliga- 
tion to be faitliful to the scout law 
and oath in his home life were em- 
phasized in the talk given by the 
deputy scout commissioner. 

After the recommitment short pa- 
trol meetings were held in which 
members of troop 3 assisted in show-, 
ing the method and use of the roller 
bandage. . An intertroop signaling 
contest was staged which was won by 
the troop '4 team, none of whose mem- 
bers are yet second class scouts. Con- 
gratulations to troop 4. A spelldown 
on scout facts — "Skin the Snake"— 
team from each troop, lock tag .and 
a novel signaling, game completed the 
program. 



The Tribune has a first class job 
department. Bring us your work. 



TWO LIVE GOLD FISH 

In a glass globe with sea weed, pebbles and plants. 



FREE 




FREE 



With a purchase of one tube of 

NY-DENTA TOOTH PASTE 

at the Regular Price 50 cents. 
On Thursday, Friday and Saturday Only 

FEBRUARY 11, 12, 13 



Get yours early. 



Only one outfit to a customer. 



Lambert'* Drug Store 

■■ We Sell Specially Prepared Fish Food at 10 Cents Per Package : 



Oats per bu \ 

Rye, per bu „ 

Buckwheat, per 100 lbs 1.10 

Flour and Feed 

Flour, per cwt 5.00 

Oil Meal 2 .75 

Bran ••• '-.—„_ 1.40 

Shorts : 140 

Poultry 

Hens, heavy „ ig 

Hen3, light 12 

Heavy springs _ . .18 

Leghorn springs .12 

Old roosters „ 07 

Geese : „ ,09 

PRODUCE 
Eggs, No. 1 20 



CREAMERT 

Butterfat, sweet . 

Butterfat, sour :. 

Butter, per lb. 



1 .44 
.41 
.47 



I 



Wool . 
Wool .... __ 
Cow Hides . 



WOOL AND HIDES 



.36. and .37 

GRASS SEEDS 

Timothy, steady $4.60 to ?4.80 

Timothy and Alsike, mixed, 

weak ...... — _...$4.00 to $4.75 

Sweet clover, W. B., steady, $3 to $5 
Sweet Clover, yel steady 3.00 to 5.00 
Med. red Clover, steady.... $20 to ?24. 
Mammoth Clover steady ....$20. to 24. 

Alsike clover, steady $16 to $19 

Common Alfalfa, weak 16.00 

Grimm, alfalfa, steady .....$20 to $25 
Cert. Grimm, firm 35.00 



«** ** > 

\ We Want | 

I HIDES AND FURS 

I Northern Trading Co. : : 

*** M MM MM It t 



Girl Scouts at Willraar 
Meeting jointly with the Legion 
Post, Willmar members of the Legion 
Auxiliary provided a fine lunch, had 
the boy scout troop reviewed in a 
body, arranged to form a girl scout 
troop, and planned a banquet for Feb- 
ruary 12th. On their part, the post 
members adop'^d a 1926 budget total- 
ing $1696.50, laid plans for a Willmar 
Legion Drum Corps, a Fourth of July 
celebration, a home-talent vaudeville 
show in March, a motion nicture show 
in June; concessions at the Kandijohi 
County Fair in September; a home 
talent olay in October, and a movie in 
November. 



Tribune want ads 
Try one and see. 



bring results 



%**' MM * ) mn 



DR. GEO. E. SPOFFORD f 

OPTOMETRIST 

WiU Be At 



Warren, Sunday, Feb. 14. 
Argyle, Monday, Feb. 15. 
Red Lake Falls, Tues., Feb. 16. 
Lahcastser, Wednesday Feb. 17. 
Halma, Thursday, Feb. 18. 
Winger, Friday, Feb. 19. 



Hallock, Sunday, March 7. 
Oslo, Monday, March 8. 
Viking, Tuesday, March 9. 
St Hilaire, Wed., March 10. 
Newfolden, Thurs., March 11. 
Erskine, Friday, March 12. 



Office at Leading Hotels 

Glasses complete, $3.50 and up. He offers you 
the best there is in Optometry at a price you can 
afford to pay. Established in your city over 
twenty years. 



MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM » 



FREE POWER FARMING ENTERTAINMENT 

AND TRACTOR SCHOOL 

Feb. 18th, 1926 

Tractor School To Start At 10 O'clock Sharp In . The Morning. . 




An All Day Educational Program, With 
Free Movie Show in the Evening 

EVERYBODY INVITED 

Please register at our office at 9:30 in the morning on February 18th and 
get the details of the place of school and movie and program for the day. 
Here is an opportunity, folks, for everybody to learn 
more about engines and tractors, their construction, their 
care, and their operation. You cannot afford to miss it. 
We will have trained men on hand who will illustrate, 
demonstrate, and talk on questions every up-to-the-min- 
ute fanner is vitally interested in. The moving pictures 
will be entertaining and instructive. There will be fun 
and excitement aplenty. Your neighbors will be here 
and we want you, too. 

Make your plans npw to attend our day of. Power Farm- 
ing Entertainment. Remember the date— -Feb. 18th. 

This is also our annual Cream Separator Service Day, 
and we will have experts on hand at our office to give you 
FREE service on your Cream Separator. No matter 
what make of machine. You only pay for new parts that must be replaced.- 

Yours for Service, . 
GOOD EQUIPMENT MAKES A GOOD FARMER BETTER 




. 



C. GUSTAFSOJV <3L SOJST 





i^^^^M&^^i^^Sii^^^M&S^Mi^^M^^M^M, 



/ 



WW 



4i-'M4 L 



■1 S^v*J^i^.' *— *:■ 



m 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 1926 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



PAGE'SEVEW 



— I 



Interesting Exchang of Let- 
ters in Which Math Barzen 
Presents His Opinions on 
Sugar Beet Production. 

I Continued irom page 1) 

o'Jier crops to follow, consequently it 

improves me cwinces ol a greater 

average income lor the tarn) where 

" sugar oeets are raised. 

"ine protitaoleness of raising su- 
gar beets ol itsell would be but little 
ii it were not lor this tact that it 
improves the land for further crops. 
To illustrate. The average ■ yield of 
beets rn our territory is around eleven 
tons per acre. The cost of foreign 
labor (no domestic can be had), is 
$25.60 per acre. To "Jiat would have 
to be added the cost of preparing the 
grounu, seed, cultivation, and hauling 
the beets to market. This would run 
up the to*.al cost of production and 
marketing conservatively to $411.25 
per acre. We are receiving for our 
beets this year $5.50 per ton in this 

territory or ib0.50 per acre leaving ^.n^ge,, ana „„,,„ ani i bolttnr of said 
a profit for the farmer of ¥11.25 per nlortRHge, baa exorcised and doeB hereby 

acre The beet tops are worth some- ""•"'•- "■ -»"»" •» -wi«i»- "i»i terebv 



Legal Publications 

NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
j FORECLOSURE SALE . 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagor in the conditions uml coven- 
ants of that certain mortgage duly execut- 
ed and delivered by Louisa UrnchlU, a 
wlilow, 'mortgagor, to the Stute of Mlnne-. 
Bota, mortgagee, bearing date the Oth day 
of November, 1023. and, with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly filed fur re- 
cord In the office of the Register of Deeds- 
In and for the County of Pennington and 
State of Mtuncsota, on the 8th day of No- 
vember, ,1923,^ eleven o'clock thirty min- 
utes A. , M., and duly recorded therein in 
Rook "77" of Mortgages, on pnge til there- 
of; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
in the failure of the said mortgngoi' to 
pay the semi-annual Installment of amor- 
tized principal and Interest, amounting to 
One Hundred Twenty-one DollarH and 
elghty-olght cents ($121.88), which became 
due and payable on the 5th day of Novem- 
ber, 1925, in accordance with the terms 
and conditions of said mortgage, which 
default has continued to this date; 

AND WHEREAS, By reason of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditions of said mortgage, and bb authorised 
by law, the Department of Rural Credit, on 
behalf of the State of Minnesota, the 



thing of course on the average diver- 
sified tarm where stock is raised. 

"Our beets in this vicinity are ab- 
normally rich in sugar content run- 
ning up *o 22 per cent on my farm, 
however, beets are not being paid for 
en a sugar content basis at this time 
but understand ihey will be in the fu- 
ture. 

"The import duty on sugar is 
around §1.72 per hundred if I am cor- 
rectly informed. Take this duty off 
and charge it to the farmers and 
where will their profit be ? Gone. 

"He will surely quit raising beets 
as there are much cheaper methods 
for cleaning and improving land. 
With this of course goes the industry. 
Their product would be off the mar- 
ket. Competition from this source 
gone, result, higher prices for sugar 
insteaed of cheaper sugar. 

"The foregoing is the way I see 
thi smatter and from a practical 
standpoint and the farmers' view I 
am sure I am right," 

Yours very truly, 

MATH BARZEN. 



Dec 30, 1925. 
Mr. Math Barzen, 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 
Dear Sir: 

'•It was very good of you to write 
us at length on the beet sugar situa- 
tion, as you did in your letter of the 
26th. 

"Perhaps a word of explanation 
would be in order he:-e, with refer- 
ence to our letter. In one of these 
questions we asked youif you thought 
an import duty on raw sugar was 
necessary. Your reply would indi- 
cate that you do, and we quite agree, 
that right now would be a bad time 
to change the tariff, due to the un- 
usually large crop in Cuba at the 
present time. What prompted us to 
think that perhaps a duty was, or 
soon would be, unnecessary, was the 
fact that the Great Western Sugar 
company, for the past two years, has 
paid dividends on its common stock 
at the rate of 32 per cent. It has 
also piled up a very large surplus in St. p 
addition, and this year paid an extra 
dividend. It seems to us that the su- 
gar companies are so strongly in- 
trenched in our interior that even 
with no tariff protection they would 
be able to compete successfully 
against import sugar, as the freight 
haul cost from the sea coast to our 
interior points would be quite consid- 
erable. Of course, if the tariff is re- 
moved, and this amount charged up 
wholly to the farmer, that will be un- 
just. As it is, our large consuming 
population is being penalized as it 
were for the benefit of the beet sugar 
industry. 

"We are thoroughly in sympathy 
with anything that will help the 
farming sections of our great north- 
west, but we are compelled to wonder 
if this tariff is really being passed on 
for the benefit of the farmer. The 
financial reports of the sugar com- 
pany would indicate to us that stock- 
ohlders in this corporation are receiv- 
ing the direct benefit. 

"The above are our reasons for 
■writing you as we did, ' and if our 
conclusions are not correct we would 
surely appreciate it if you would 
point out ,the weaknesses in our ar- 
guments, to us." 

Yours verv truly, 

R. H. CANADA Y, 
Associate Editor. 



exercise Its option to declare, and hereby 
dues declare, the whole of the lnnn secured 
bv Bald mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith : 

AND WHEREAS. There ia actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon 
said mortgage, and tin? hmti secured there- 
■bv, at the date of this notice, by reason of 
said election, the sum of Three Thousand 
Eight Hundred Eighteen Dollars and 
eighty-six cents (f3.818.8fl), unamortized 
principal, together with interest thereon 
from the nth day of Noveinher, 1025, at the 
rate of five and one-fourth per centum per 
annum, and One Hundred Twenty-one Dol- 
lars and eighty-eight cents- ($121.88) amor- 
tized principal and interest, together with 
interest thereon from the 5th day of No- 
vember, 11125. at seven nor centum per 
annum, in nil the sum of Three Thousand 
Nine Hundred Ninety-five Dollars and 
thirty-four cents ($3,(195.34): 

AND WHEREAS. By reason of said de- 
fault the said power of sale contained- In 
siiid mortinige has become and Is opera- 
tive, and no action or proceeding having 
bti*n instituted nt law or otherwise to re- 
cover the debt secured by said mortgagee, 
or any part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE. Notice 1b hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of sale 
contained in said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute in Btieb case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said mortgage, situate, lying 
and being In the County of Pennington 
and State of Minnesota, to-wlt: 

The Northeast Quarter (NEW) of 
Section Tbirty-sii (36), Township One 
Hundred Fifty-four (154) North. of 
Range Forty-one (41) West, of the 
Fifth Principal 'Meridlnn in Minnesota, 
containing 160 acres, more or less, ac- 
cording to the Government Survey 
thereof, 
with the hereditaments nnd appurtenances, 
which sale will be made hy the Sheriff of 
Bald Pennington County, at the front door 
of the Court House in the City of Thief 
River Falls, in said county and State, 
on Thursday, the 25th day of March. 102R. 
nt. ten o'clork A. M, of that dny. at public 
vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, to 
pay and satisfy the debt then due on snid 
mortgage, nnd the tares. If any. on said 
premises, and the costs and expenses al- 
lowed by law, subject to redemption nt 
any time within one year from the date of 
sale, as provided hy law.. 
Dated February nth, 11)20. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, Mortgagee, 
By Department of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAGENG, Chairman. 
(SEAL) 

ATTEST: H. H. FLOWERS, Secretary. 
CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 
Attorney General. 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON, 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
010 TLmuJi Building, 
1. Minnesota. 
(Feb-10-17-24-Mar 3-10-17) 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default having been madfe In the. pay- 
ment of the sum of One Thousand Two 
Hundred Seventy-five and 18-100 ($1275.10) 
Dollars, which is claimed to be due and 1b 
due at the date of this notice upon a cer- 
tain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered 
by P. -P. Haynca and Edith J. Haynes, his 
wife, , Mortgagors, to Mason City Loan 
& Trust Company, Mortgagee, bearing 
date the 24th day of November, lOlfl, and 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded in the office of the Register 
of Deeds in and for the County of Pen- 
nington and State of Minnesota, on the 
28tb duy of November, 1019, at 2:30 o'clock 
P. M. in Book 13 of Mortgages, on page 
522, 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 
debt secured thereby, was duly assigned' 
by said MaBon City Loan & TruBt Com- 
pany (also spelled MaBon City Loan & 
Trust Co.,) 'Mortgagee, to Charles H. 
DeVoe by written assignment dated the 
BOth day of December, 1010. and recorded 
in the office of said Register of Deeds, on 
the lllth day of October, 1025. nt 11:00 
o'clocfc A. M.. in Book 75 of Mortgages on 
page 382. nnd no action or proceedings 
having been instituted, at law or other- 
wise, to recover the debt secured by said 
Mortgage or any part thereof, except that 
an action hBB been heretofore instituted In 
the Municipal Court of the City of Thief 
River Falls, In the Connty of Pennington 
and State of Minnesota to- recover upon 
six 530.00 past due Interest coupons, n part 
of the- dpbt secured by said mortgage and 
thnt^sald action hiiB been dismissed and 
discontinued and except tbnt an action has 
been heretofore instituted in the District 
Court of Pennlngbin County, Minnesota to 
recover upon the principal note of ?1000.00 
with Interest since Its maturity, a pnrt of 
the debt secured by said mortgage: that 
Judgment has been rendered therefor in 
said.Conrt: that an execution has been is- 
sued upon Bnid Judgment and that- snid 
execution has been returned wholly unsat- 
isfied. 

NOW, THEREFORE. NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN. That by virtue of the 
power of sale contained in Bald Mortgage, 
nnd pursuant to the statnte In such case 
made nnd provided, the said Mortgage will 
be foreclosed hy a sale of the premises de- 
scribed In nnd conveyed by said Mortgage, 
viz: 

The West Half (W%) of the North West 
Quarter (NW^l of Section Twenty-two 
(22t, In Township One Hundred Fifty- 
three (153) North, of Range Forty-five (45) 
West, of the Fifth Principal Meridian, in 
Pennington Connty and State of Minnesota, 
with the hereditaments nnd nppurtennnces: 
which sale will he made hy the Sheriff of 
said Pennington Connty at the front door 
of the Court Hnnne. in the City of Thief 
River Falls In said Connty and State, on 
the 12th dav of March. 102(1. nt 10:00 
o'clock A. M.. of that day. at public ven- 
due vO the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt of $1275.15. and Interest, and the 
taxes. If any, on said premises, and Fifty 
Dollars. Attorney's fees, as stipulated In 
and by snid Mortgage. In case of fore- 
closure, and the dlBhnrsements allowed by 
law; Bnbject to redemption nt any time 
within one year from the day of snle, as 
provided hy law. 
Dated January 2fUb. A. D. 102(1. 

CHARLES H. DeVOE, 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
PERI, W. MABEY nnd 
H. O. CHOMMTR. 

Attornevs for Assignee of Mortgngee. 
Thief River Fnlls Minnesota. 

" (Jan. 27 Feb. 3-10-17-24- Mar-3) 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Fifteen Hundred 
Forty Dollars, which is claimed to be due 
and is due at the date of this notice, upon a 
certain Mortgage, duly executed and de- 
livered by John Morgan and xiilma Mor- 
gan, his wife. Mortgagors, to Albert S. 
Lieberman, Mortgagee, bearing date the 
35th day of September 1923, and with a 
power of sale therein contained, duly re- 
corded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds in and for the County of Penulog- 
ton, and State of Minnesota, m the 28th. 
day of September 1023. at o'clock A. &L, 
in Book 51 of Mortgages, on page 203. 

Which said Mortgage, together with the 
debt secured thereby, was duly assigned 
by said Albert S. Lieberman Mortagee, 
to Peter Dorn by written assignment dat- 
ed the 2flth day of September 1923, and 
recorded In the office of said Register of 
Deeds/ on the 2nd dny of February 1024, 
aT; one o'clock P. M.. In Book 65 of 
Mortgages on page 200. 

AND WHEREAS, The said Peter Dorri 

le -Assignee, and Holder of 
said Mortgage has duly elected 
and does hereby elect to declare 
whole principal sum of said 
Mortgage due and payable at the date 
of this notice, under the terms and con- 
ditions of said Mortgage and the power 
nf sale therein contained ; and whereas 
there is actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this notice 
the sum of Ninteen Hundred Ninety-three 
and 98-100 ($1093.93) Dollars, with inter- 
est thereon nt the rate of seven per cent 
per annum from the Oth day of January 
and also $289.37 taxes for the year 



Mr. Barzen made no reply to Can- 
ady's second letter, chiefly because, 
as he expressed it, he did not wish 
to become tangled up in a controversy 
of this nature. He did, however, ex- 
press himself to The Tribune report- 
er to the effect that, while he had no 
reason to doubt the accuracy of Mr. 
Canaday's statement in regard to the 
profits of the sugar company, he felt 
that a reductioin in the tariff would 
not have the tendency to reduce 
those profits, but would rather have 
the effect of putting, the beet sugar 
industry out of business in this coun- 
try, thus eliminating competition, and 
as a result enable the sugar interests 
to raise the price to the consumer. 



I SLEEP GOOD NOW! 



Says New York Man. A Healthful 
Bladder Does Not Act At Night. 



Mr. J. A. Davis, East Setauket, N. 
Y. t says, "Lithiated Buchu has cor- 
rected my bladder and I do not have 
to get up at night. You may use my 
name and I will be glad to tell or 
write my experience." Lithiated Bu- 
chu cleanses the bladder as epsom 
salts do the bowels. It isn't a patent 
medicine as the formula is on the la- 
bel. The tablets cost 2 cents each at 
leading drug stores. Keller Labors-, 
tory, Mechanicsburg, Ohio. Locally 
at the Lambert Drug Store. 

Good Bad News. 

7 "What's the matter, Dorothy, you 

1 look so happy." 

V "Oh, you know that Mrs. Van Riper 
that lives next door? Well, I just 
heard something terrible about her.'" 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALE. 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagors In the conditions and 
covenants of that certain mortgage duly 
executed and delivered by John Kusmak 
and Anna KnBmak. his wife, mortgagors, 
to the State of Minnesota, mortgagee, 
hearing date the 17th day of October. 1023, 
and, with n power of sale therein contain- 
ed, duly filed for record In the office nf 
the Register of Deeds In and for the. 
County of Pennington and State of Minne- 
sota on the 10th day of October, 1923. at 
nine o'clock A. M., nnd duly recorded 
therein in Book "77" of Mortgnges, on 
pnge 41 thereof: 

AND WHEREAS. Raid default consists 
In the failure of said mortgagors to pnj 
the spmi-nnnnal Installments of amortized 
principal and Interest, each amounting to 
One Hundred Forty Dollars and six- 
ty-three cents (SU0.63L which became due 
nnd pavnhle on the 17th dny of October. 
1024, the 17th day of April. 1925. and the 
17th day of October, 1925. In accordance 
with the terms and conditions of said 
mortgage, and to pay the general taxes on 
said mortgnged premises for the year 
1023. which taxes the State «f Minnesota, 
mortgagee, in default of snid mortgagors 
to pav the same, paid on the 0th day of 
Mnv. 1925. to-wit: the sum of Two Hun- 
dred Thirteen Dollars nnd seventy cents 
(S213.70i. which default has continued to 
this date: 

AND WHEREAS. By renBon of said de- 
fault, and pursuant to the terms nnd con- 
ditions of said mortgage and as authorized 
hv law, the Department of Rnral Credit, 
on behalf of the State of Minnesotn. the 
mortgngee nnd owner nnd holder of said 
mortgage, has exercised nnd does hereby 
exercise its option to declare, and hereby 
does declare, the whole of the loan secured 
bv said mortgage to be due and payable 
forthwith : 

\ND WHEREAS. There Is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable npon 
•inld mortgage, and the loan secured thore- 
hv. nt the date of this notice, by renson of 
said election, the sum of Four Thousand 
Four Hundred Sir Dollars and thirty-eight 
cents (S4.4O0.3S). unamortized principal, 
together with Interest thereon from the 
17th day of Octoher, 1925. at the rate of 
five and one-fourth (5^) per rcntnm per 
annum and Four Hundred Twenty-one 
Dollars and etchty-nine . cents (S421.R9) 
amortized nrinripnl and Interest, with In- 
terest on S140.63 thereof from Octoher 17th. 



1926, mu uiau «^w,iii luira iul iue icui :-'-.' '." _ .... _ ,.„„ _-_ r . r . r ,„m 

1924 paid by assignee, and whereas the-l^Va' ***** * «K «?„«^ p ^m S 
said power of sale has become operative, and ,m £™ 8t ° n WW-"* thirenf 'from April 
and no action or proceedings having been 17th. 1925, at seven (7) per wgtnn .per 
instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover Jnnnum. and interest on ««■*' thereor 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or from October 17th, 1925. In all Hie Bum 



any part thereof: 

NOW. THEREFORE, NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That by virtue of the 
power of sale contained In said Mortgnge, 
and pursuant t" the statute in such caBe 
made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will be foreclosed by a sale nf the orcmis- 
es described In and conveyed by said 
Mortgage, viz: 

Lot numbered Nine '0) «»f Block 
Thirty-six (30) Original Townsfte of 
Thief River Fnlls according to the 
plat thereof now on file and of re- 
cord in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for Bald- County 
In Pennington Connty nnd Rtato of 
Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances; wblcn s-nle will be made 
by the SherifT of said Ponnlgntnn County, 
at the front door of the Court House, In 
the City of Thief River Falls In said 
Connty and State, on 'the 27th day of 
February 1028, at .ten o'clock A. M.. of 
that dny. at public vendue to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay said debt of 
Nineteen Hundred Nlnoty-three and 1)8-100 
Dollars, and Interest, and the taxes, If 
any, on said premises., and seventy-five 
Dollars, Attorney's fees, ns stipulated in 
and by said Mortgage In case of fore- 
closure, and the disbursements allowed 
hy law: subject to redemption at any 
tune within, one year from the date of 
sale, as provided by law. 
Dated January Oth A. D. 1020. 

PETER DORN 
The assignee and present owner 
of the laid mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP and 
H. O. BERVB. 

Attorneys. Thief River Falls. Minn. 
(Jan. 13-20-27- Feb. 3-10-17) 



If you have anything you wish to 
sell. Tribune want ads will sell it 



THEO- QUALE 

Lawyer • 

Practice in All Courts and Be- 
; fore U. S. Land Office 
MoGlnn Building 



Five Thousand One Hundred Thirty-nine 
Dollars and thirty cents (S5.139.301, In- 
cluding the amount paid for taxes, as 
foresaid : 

AND WHEREAS. By renson of said de- 
fnnit. the said power of sale contained in 
Id mortgage has become and/ is oper- 
ative, nnd no action or proceeding having 
been Instituted nt law or otherwise to re- 
cover the debt secured by said mortgage 
or any part thereof; 

NOW THEREFORE. Notice is hereby 
given, that by vlrtne of the power of sa" 
contained In Bnid mortgage, and pursu- 
ant to the statute In such caBe made nnd 
provided, the said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
in and conveyed hy snid mortgnge, situate, 
lying and being in the Connty of Pen- 
nington nnd Rtnte of Minnesota, to-wit: 
The Southeast Quarter (REH> of 
Section Twenty-four (24). In Town- 
ship One Hundred Fifty-four (154) 
North, of Rnnge Forty (40) West, con- 
taining lfiO ncres, more or less, nccord- 
Ing to the Government snrvey thereof, 
with the hereditaments nnd appurtenanc- 
es, which sale will be made by the Sheriff 
of said Pennington County, nt the front 
door of the Court House in the City of 
Thief River Falls, In said County and 
State, on Thursday, the 11th day of March. 
1P20. at ten o'clock A. M. of that day, at 
public vendue to the highest hlddcr for 
eaBb, to pay and Batisfy the debt then due 
on said mortgnge. Including the taxes 
paid on said premises, and the costs and 
expenses allowed hy law: subject to re- 
demption at any time within one year 
from the date of sale, sb provided by law. 
Dated January 20th, 1926. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
Mortgagee, 
By Department of Rural Credit, 
OLE O. SAGENG. Chairman. 
Attest: H. H. FLOWERS, Secretary. 
(SEAL) 

CLIFFORD L. HILTOV, 
Attorney General. 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON, 
Assistant Attorney General. 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
010 Hamm Building, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

, (Jan. 27 Feb. 940-17-24- Mar-8) 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 

We, the undersigned, for the'purnose of 
forming a corporation underhand pursuant 
to the provisions -of Chapter, fifty-eight 
(58), General Statutes 1013, . and laws 
amendatory thereof and supplementary 
thureto, do hereby, associate ourselves to- 
gether- as a body 'corporate, and adopt the 
foUowlng Certificate of Incorporation: 

^ ARTICLE 1. 

The name of this corporation shall be 
"RAPID HIVBR HOMES COMPANY." 

The general nature of Its buifliirsu shaU 
be to buy or otherwise acquire standing 
Umber or logs, to manufacture the same 
into lumber and building materials, to 
erect houses or other buildings from such 
lumber and building material, and to seR 
the same Id the Bhape of Improved proper- 
ty, either to stockholders or to other buy- 
ers; * 

To purchase, own, acquire, Improve, en- 
ter Into and hold all forms of real and per- 
sonal property, nnd to maintain, develop, 
improve, encumber, trade, tranBfcr, Bell, 
grant, bargain, lease, convey and dlBpoae 
of the same In any lawful manner whatso- 
ever and to the same extent as natural per- 
sons might or could do.- 

To make, execute, enter into, own, ac- 
quire, hold, perform, assign and otherwise 
dlBpose of all manner of contracts Inciden- 
tal to the business of -thlB or other cor- 
porations, public or private, with any per- 
Bon, Arm, association or corporation and 
without limit as to the amount. 

To own, acquire, lease nnd operate saw 
mUIs, planing mills, logging camps, lum- 
ber yards, logging roads, and to carry on 
other logging and timber operations of all 
klndft. and generally to do any nnd all 
things necessary, usual nnd convenient to 
do to carry on In a lawful manner the 
whole or any part of the business herein- 
before enumerated, and to exerclBe all the 
powers necessary or convenient In and 
about the conduct of such business as fully 
as natural persona might or could do, and 
to exercise and enjoy all the privileges 
granted or powers conferred by the Laws 
of the State of Minnesota npon corpor- 
ations formed under the above designated 

The principal place of transacting the 
business of this corporation bo nil be In the 
Ct|y of Thief River Falls. Connty of Pen- 
nington, Suite of Minnesota. 

ARTICLES II. 
The time for the commencement of this 

corporation shall hr> March 1st 11)20. and 

the period of Its duration shall be thirty 

years: 

ARTICLES III. 
The names and places of residence 

the persons forming this corporation are: 
Lewis Andrews. OskalooBa, Iowa 
Roy C. Rich. OskalooBa, Iowa, 
J. W. McGilvrey. Thief River Falls, 

Minnesota. 

ARTICLES IV. 
The management of this corporation shall 
b vested In a Board of Directors, com- 
posed of not less thnn three and not more 
than seven members. The names and ad- 
dresses of the first Board of Directors are: 
Lewis Andrews. Oskaloosa, Iowa 
Roy_C. Rich, OskalooBa. Iowa. 
J. W. McGilvrey, Thief River Falls. Min- 
nesota. 

The first officers of this corporation BbaU 
be: President. Lewis Andrews: Vice presi- 
dent. Roy C. Rich; Secretary, J. W. Mc- 
Gilvrey and Treasurer. J. W. McGilvrey. 
AU of the above named officers and direc- 
tors shall hold their respective offices afore- 
Bald until the first annual meeting of the 
corporation to be held March 2nd, 1026. at 
which time and annually thereafter, a 
Board of Directors shall be elected from 
and by the stockholders of this corpora- 
tion. The annua! meeting of this corpora- 
tion shall be held at Its principal place of 
business on the 1st Tuesday la March In 
each year. Immediately after the election 
of directors, or as soon thereafter as 
practicable, the directors shall meet and 
elect from their number a president nnd a 
vice-president, and from their number or 
from the stockholders a secretary and a 
treasurer. Any office except that of presi- 
dent and vice- ores! dent may be held by 
one person. The directors and officers of 
this corporation shall bold their respective 
offices until their successors have been 
duly elected and entered npon the 
charge of their duties. The first meeting 
of the stockholders and of the Board 
Directors shall he held nt Thief River 
Falls. Minnesota, on the 2nd day of March. 
1B28, at 10 and 11 o'clock, respectively. 

ARTICLE V. 
The amount of the capital stock of this 
corporation shall be FIFTY THOUSAND 
DOLLARS .vhlch shaU be paid in. in 
money or property, or both, in such man- 
ner, at such times, and in such amounts as 
the Brard of Directors shall order. The 
capital strfck shall he divided Into 50,000 
shares of the par value of One Dollar eacn. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The highest amount of indebtedness or 

liability to which this corporation shall at 

any time be subject, shall be the Bum of 

FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS. 

In Testimony Whereof. We have hereun- 
to set our hands and seals this 29th day of 
January, 1926. ' 

In the Presence of: 
LOUISE WINNEMORE 
LOUISE WINNEMORE 
THEO. QUALE - -. 

LAURA BROWN 

LEWIS ANDREWS (SEAL) 
ROY C. RICH. (SEAL) 
J. W. McGILVREY. (SEAL) 
STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
COUNTY OF PENNINGTON— sb. 

WOn this 3rd day of February, 1020. per- 
onally appeared before me J. W. McGil- 
vrey to me known to be one of the per- 
sons named In and who executed the fore- 
going Certificate of Incorporation, and 
acknowledged that he executed the same 
as his free net and deed, for the uses and 
purposes therein expressed. 

THEO. QUALE, 
Notary Public. Pennington 
f County. Minnesota. 

My Commission expires Feb. 23, 1028. 
STATE OF IOWA. 
COUNTY OF MAHASKA— sb. 

On this 1st day of Fehruary. 102fi. per- 
sonally appeared before me LewiB Andrews 
and Roy C. Rich to me known to be the- 
persons nnmed in and who executed the 
foregoing Certificate of Incorporation, and 
each acknowledged that he executed the 
Bame as his free act and deed, for the uses 
and purposes therein expressed. 

LEROY E. CARLETT. 
Notary Public,. Mahaska Connty. Iowa. 



NOTICE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE 
FORECLOSURE SALS 

WHEREAS, Default has been made by 
the mortgagor in the conditions and cove- 
nants of that certain mortgage duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Nels B. Swanson, 
widower, mortgagor, to the State of Min- 
nesota, mortgagee, bearing date the 4th 
day of February, 1024, and, - with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly filed for 
record in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Penning- 
ton and State of Minnesota, on the 18th 
day of February, 1024, at eight o'clock 
thirty minutes A. UI., and duly recorded 
therein. In Book "77" of Mortgages, on 
page 148 thereof; 

AND WHEREAS, Said default consists 
In the failure of the said mortgagor to 
pay the semi-annual installment of amor- 
tized principal and Interest, amounting 
to One Hundred Eighty-seven DoUars and 
fifty cents ($187.50), which became due 
and payable on the 4th day of August, 
1025, in accordance with the terms and 
conditions of Bald mortgage, which default 
hBB continued to this date; 

AND WHEREAS, By renson of said -de- 
fault, and. pursuant to the terms and con- 
ditlous of said mortgage, and as author- 
ized by law, the Department- of Rural 
Credit, on behalf of the State of Minne- 
sota, the mortgagee and owner and 
holder of said mortgage, has exercised 
and does hereby exercise its option to 
declare, and hereby does declare, the 
whole of the loan Becurcd by said mort- 
gage to be due and payable forthwith; 

AND WHEREAS, There is actually due 
and claimed to be due and payable upon. 
Baid mortgage, and the loan Becured 
thereby, at the date of this notice, by 
reason of said election, the sum of Five 
Thousand Nine Hundred Seven DoUars 
and sixty-one cents (S5.907.61), unamor- 
tized principal, together with interest 
thereon from the 4th day of August, 1925, 
at the rate of five and one-fourth (5%) 
per centum per annum, and One Hundred 
Eighty-seven Dollars and fifty cents 
(S187.50) amortised principal and Interest, 
together with interest thereon from the 
4th day of August, 1925, at seven (7) per 
centum per annum, lu all the sum of 
Six Thousand Two Hundred Forty-three 
Dollars and twenty-eight centB (50,243.28) ; 
AND WHEREAS, By reason of said 
default the said power of sale contained 
In said mortgage has become and Is op- 
erative, and no action or proceeding hav- 
ing been instituted, at law or otherwise 
to recover the debt secured by said mort- 
gage, or any part thereof; 

NOW. THEREFORE, Notice Ib hereby 
given, that by virtue of the power of Bale 
contained In said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale. of the premises described 
in and conveyed by said mortgage, situ- 
ate, lying and being In the County of 
Pennington and State of Minnesota, to- 
wit: 

The Southwest Quarter (SW%) of 
Section Thirty-Blx (36), In TownBhlp 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range Forty-four (44) West, con- 
taining 160 acres, more or less, ac- 
cording to the Government Survey 
thereof, 
with the hereditaments and appurten- 
ances, which Bale will be made by the 
Sheriff of said Pennington County, at the 
front door of the Court Honse in the 
City of Thief River Falls, in Bald Connty 
and State, on Thursday, the 4th day of 
March, 1926. at ten o'clock A. M. of that 
day, at public vendue to the highest bid- 
der for caBh, to pay and satisfy the debt 
then due on Bald mortgage, and the 
taxes. If any, on said premises, and the 
costs and expenses allowed by law, sub- 
ject to redemption at any time within one 
year from the date of sale, as provided by 
law. 

Dated January 19th. 1B26. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. 

Mortgagee, 
By Department of Rural Credit. 
OLE O. SAGENG, Chairman. 
Attest: H, H. FLOWERS. 

Secretary. 
(SEAL) 
CLIFFORD L. HILTON, 

Attorney General. 
LUDVIG GULLICKSON. 

Assistant Attorney GeneraL 
Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
010 Hamin Building, 
"' Paul. Minnesota. 

(Jan. 20-27-Feb. 3-10-17-24) 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made In the pay- 
ment x.t the sum of Two Thousand Fire 
Hundred yNliiety-six and 25-100 ($2,596.25) 
DoUars, which Is claimed to be due and 
is due at the date of tble notice npon a 
certain Mortgage, duly executed aud de- 
livered by F. F. Haynes and Edith J, 
HayneB, his wife. Mortgagors, to Mason 
City Loan A- Trust Co., Mortgagee, bear- 
ing date the 8th day of August, 1910, and 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded In the office of the Regis- 
ter of Deeds In aud for the County of 
Pennington nnd State of Minnesota, on 
the 10th day of AuguBt, 1019, at 1:30 
o'clock P. M., In Book 58 of Mortgages, 
on page 630, and no action or proceed- 
ings having been instituted, at law or 
otherwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said Mortgage or any part thereof, 
except that an action has been heretofore 
Instituted in the Municipal Court of tha 
City of Thief River FaUs. In the County 
of Pennington and State of Minnesota to 
recover upon six $60.00 past due Interest 
coupons, a part of the debt secured by 
said mortgage and that said action has 
been dismissed and discontinued and ex- 
cept that an action has been 1 heretofore 
instituted In the District Court of Pen-' 
nington County,' ' Minnesota, to recover 
upon the principal note of $2,000.00 with 
interest since Its maturity, a part of the 
debt secured by said mortgage v- that judg- 
ment has been rendered therefor in Bald 
Court; that an execution has been issued 
upon said Judgment and that said execu- 
tion a haB been returned wholly unsatis- 
fied. 

Now. Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, the said Murtgage wiU be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described ' 
In and conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

The South East quarter (SE%) of the 
South East quarter (SE&) of Section 
Eighteen (18) and the West Hatf (W^) 
of the South West quarter (SW%) and 
the South East quarter (SE&) of the 
South West quarter (SW%) of Section 
Seventeen (17), all in Township One Hun- 
dred Fifty-four (154) North, of Range 
Forty-four (44) West, of the Fifth Prin- 
cipal Meridian, In Pennington County and 
State of Minnesota, with the heredita- 
ments and appurtenances; which sale 
will be made by the Sheriff of said Pen- 
nington Connty ut the front door of the 
Court House, in the City of Thief River 
Falls In said County and State, on the 
12th day of March. 1926, at 10:00 o'cloek 
A. M.. of that day, at pubUc vendue, to 
the highest bidder for cash,- to pay said 
debt of $2,596.25 and Interest, and the 
taxes, if any, in said premises, and Sev- 
enty-five Dollars, Attorney's fees, as stip- 
ulated in and by said Mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements al- 
lowed by law: subject to redemption at 
any tune within one year from the day 
of Bale, as provided by law. 
Dated January 23rd, A. D. 1926. 

MASON CITY LOAN A 
TRUST CO., 

Mortgagee. 
PERL W. MABEY and 
H. O. CHOMMIB, 
Attorneys for Mortgagee. 
Thief River Falls. Minnesota. 
. (Jan. 27-Feb.-3-10-17-24-Mar.-31 



♦ M M M O M IJ I MMM I M II! 

DR. L. R TWETE 
Veterinarian 

Phone Res. 80 Office 597 

(South of Ogahmah Hotel) 

THIEF RIVER FALLS 

♦ ♦ n m m »»♦♦»♦♦»»> Hnmi 



STATE OF MINNESOTA. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 

I hereby certify that the within Instru- 
ment was filed for record in this office on 
the .1th day of Feb. A. D. 1026, at 10 
o'clock A. M., and was duly recorded In 
Book T — 1 of Incorporations, on page 057. 
MIKE HOLM, 
Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS 
Connty of Pennington, Minn. 

I hereby certify that the within Instru- 
ment was filed in this office for record on 
the Sth day of Feb. A. D. 1026 at 8:00 
o'clock A. M. nnd was dtilv recorded in 
book "K" of Misc., on page 300, 

FRED D. LORENTSON. 
Register of . Deeds. 
fFeh. 10-171 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON FINAL 
ACCOCNT AND FOR DISTRIBUTION 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, 
COUNTY Of' PENNINGTON— sb. 
IN PROBATE COURT. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Nels 
Peter 'Nelson, also known a8 N. P. Nelson, 
Decedent. 

THE STATE OF MINNESOTA. TO Au- 
gnstn K. Nelson, Jesselyn Sophia Nelson 
and all persons Interested in the final ac- 
count and distribution of the estate "of 
Bald decedent: The representative of the 
above named decedent. huving-4iled In this 
Court her final account of t»e> Administra- 
tion of the eBtate of said decedent, to- 
gether with her petition praying for the 
adjustment and allowance of said final 
account aud for distribution of the resi- 
due of said estate to the person thereunto 
entitled. Therefore, YOU, AND EACH 
OF YOU, are hereby cited and required 
to show cause, if any you hnve, before 
this Court at the Probate Court Rooms 
in the Court House in the City pf Thief 
Rivet Falls, in the County of Pennington. 
Stnte of Minnesota, on the 19th day of 
February, 1920, at 10:00 o'clock A. it., 
why said .petition should not be granted. 

Witness. The Judge of Bald Court, and 
the Seal of said Court, this 21st day or 
January, 1026. 

LARS BACKE, 
(SEAL) Judge of Probate Court. 

PERL W. MABEY and 
H. O. CHOMMIE, 

Attorneys for Petitioner, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
(Jan. 27-Feb. 3-10) 



SWEDENBURG 
HOSPITAL CLINIC 



401 to 406 Knight Ave. N. 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 

Phdnes : 
Hospital & Office, 350. Res., 488-J 

A. W. Swedenburff, Ph. G, M. D. 
Physician and Surgeon 

Special attention Ear, Eye, Nose 
and Throat and Fitting of Glasses. 

MINA R. SWEDENBURG, R. N. 
Supt. Hospital and Anaesthetics. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA 
COUNTY OF PENNINGTON 

IN DISTRICT COURT 
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT 



State of Minnesota, by Clifford L. 

Hilton. Its Attorney General, Petitioner, 

v. 
Jacob Fisher. deceased, the un- 
known heirs of Jacob Fisher, 
deceased, Barbara Fisher, Frank 
Fisher, Madllne Fisher. Charlie 
Fisher, Joseph Fisher, Polly Stan- 
gle. Mike Stnngle. Anna MeMuih. 
Dewey MeMath. Emma Fiola. John 
Ftola. Mary Novntny, Frank Novnt- 
ny, Charles F. WIsnor, Wm. G. 
Porter, deceased, the unknown heirs 
of Wm. G. Porter, deceased. Viron 
M. Porter, deceased, the unknown 
heirs of Vlron M. Porter, decease-!, 
Lottie W. Patten, James K. Pat- 
ten, Olive M. Moore. Chnrles H. 
Moore. Nels P. Nelson, 'Martha 
ComBtock, F. L. Com stock, 
Lawrence Mortirage Company, a 
corporation. First State Bank of 
Thief River Falls, a corporation. 
Corl Christopherson and Halvor 
Rhodegaard. co partners doing 
business n* Carl Christopherson 
and Company. Martin C. Rockitad 
and Caroline E. Rockstad; also all 
other persons unknown claiming 
any right, title, estate, interest or - 
Hen In the rent estate described In 
the petition heroin. 

Respondents. 



LICENSED EMBALMS 
AND UNDERTAKER 



Lama Furniture Compass; 
TUaf Rtr«r Falla 

NIkIu (UI 1« 



NOTICE TO CRKTHTORS TO MAKE AND 
FILE PROOFS OF CLAIM 

WHEREAS. I, A. J. Velgel, Commission- 
er of Banks of the State of MInneBota, 
have taken possession of the property and 
business of the Goodridge State Bank, 
Goodrldge, Minnesota, and am liquidating 
its affairs pursuant to- the laws of the 
State of Minnesota, 

NOW THEREFORE. NOTICE IS 
HEREBY GIVEN, That all persons who 
may hnve claims against said bank shall 
make legal proof thereof and fUe same 

with me at my office In the State Capitol „„ __ -. — 

at St. Paul, Minnesota, on or prior to gO JTHB PETrnON gR A KP TO THE 
Monday, May 17. 1020, and I hereby di- 5S^ONDENTS IN THE ABOVE EN- 
rect that this notice be published .weekly TITLED ACTION: 
for throe successive months In the Thief "" J *" "* 
River . FaUs Tribune, a weekly newspaper 
puhllshed at Thief River FaUs, Penning- 
ton County, Minnesota. 'i 
A. J. VBIGEL 
Commissioner of Banks ' of 
the State of Minnesota. 
(Feb. 3-UI- Apr. 28.) 



IN THE. MATTER OP THE CONDEMNA- 
TION OF CERTAIN LANDS FOR 
TRUNK HIGHWAY PURPOSES 

Notice of FIUdk of Report 



f M M »» H M t M I H M M I M H 

DR. C. M. HAUG 
Dentist 

Office Over First & Peoples 

State Bank 

Telephone No. 14 





Yamv Pine Lodge No. 221 
T.O A.F. 

Veeti ersry Tnwday nfeht «t Srf*. 



Dr. J. T. Bowers 

Special Attention to Snrgeiv aad 

tile Diseases of Women and 

Children 

Offices: First National Bank Bide. 

Phones: 
Office 128. Residenc M. 




Northern Lodge No. 236 
A. F. & A. M. 

Stated Communications 
Firot and Third Thursday! 



CARL B. LARSON 



^^,,mmm^ ^^^afeM u^ ^ m^^M^^^mMmm 



PAGE EIGHT 



: ►!*S^>«,:$SH#l!!. 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10 1926 



CLASSIFIED WANT ADS FORMATION OF 

HOMESCOMPANY 

IS ANNOUNCED 



FOR SALE — Farrand upright piano, 
Al condition. Inquire L. A. Bab- 
cock, 717 Atlantic Ave. N. 48p 



FOR SALE— Fordson Tractor and 

Plow and cedar posts and poles. W. 

E. Baker. 27-tf 



FOR SALE— Popple cord wood $5.76 

a cord. Please drop a card to Hal- 

vor Olson 120 Markley Aye. So. 45-2t 



FOR SALE— Flayer Pianos. 1 Gul- 

branson, 1 Kimball and 1 Whitney, 

n bargain if taken at once. H. A. 01- 

. son, St. Hilaire, Minn. 47-2-p. 



FOR SALE— Two cows. Buyer may 

have pick of herd of five. All good 

cows. Inquire at Ole Eggerud's at 

east end of Bridge street. 48-1-p 



FOR SALE OR TRADE FOR STOCK 
— 6-cylinder Buick Touring car. In 
good condition all around. ' Joseph 
Vorlickv, 107 Kneal Ave. S. Thief 
River Falls, Minn. BO 



FOR SALE— White Holland Turkeys 
(quantity limited) 3 Toulouse Geese 
(first 510.00 offer buys them) and 
■several White Wyandottes cockerels. 
L. A. Westphal, St. Hilaire, Minn. Stp 



FOR SALE— 560 acre improved farm 
on north side of Clearwater River, 
about 7 miles northeast of Plummer. 
About 300 acres under cultivation; 
good set of buildings; well and wind- 
mill. Soil is a splendid productive 
black loam with a yellow clay subsoil. 
Owner is living in the southern part 
of the State and cannot look after it 
to advantage. He offers this farm at 
the verv low price of 530.00 per acre, 
on easy terms. For full particulars in- 
quire at the office of The Havnes 
Land Company of this City. 47-3p 



FOR RENT— 160 acre farm 4% miles 
- northeast of Viking,'90 acres under 
cultivation, and about 30 acres ■ hay 
land; good- buildings. E. D. Hicks, i 
Newfolden; Minn. 48-p. ' 

FOR RENT— I have" a. good. ,4s" Sec. 
for rent, two miles' from' St...Hi)aire 
with good home arid plenty barn room, 
school busj'goes by the door: inquire 
P. O. Boz 273, St.- Hilaire,' Minn.; 48^2 ; 



MISCELLANEOUS 



. W. McGilyrey, Former 
Real Estate Man, Mem- 
. ber of Firm. 



GIRL WANTED— for general office! - ' : — i 

work, Experience not necessary, T . , »«■•„ ->* •*' ._, 
O'Hara Dray and Fuel Co. 48-1-p. -Lumber Mill May Be El'ect- 

ed Near Rainy River in 
Near Future. 



HOUSEWORK WANTED— .Perman- 
ent position with private .-family, 
preferred. Inquire at Tribune. 48-2 



WANTED— 2 partly furnished rooms 
in modern home. Call Mrs. Leonard 
Hanson between 6, and 7 p. m. Tele- 
phone 308-R. 1-t 



FOUND — Orange colored handker- 
chief containing 25c in change and 
neat cud of crewing gum. Come and 
get it at the Tribune. tf . 



Car load of horses and some mules 

due to arrive in Thief River Falls 

about February 5. All are broke and 

guaranteed to work. At Fisher Barn 

Ben Echuster. 47-2 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Modem famished room. 
801 Main Ave. No. Tele. 899. tf 

FOR RENT— Garage. Call 183 45-4t 



FOR RENT— Four-room all modern 
flat in Dudley building. Will be va- 
cant February 1. 45-tf. 

-. __^_ \ 

FOR RENT— furnished room, mod- 
ern, centrally located, 801 Main 
Ave., phone 339. . 44-tf. 



FARM LANDS WANTED— The de- 
mand for land is beginning to pick 
up a little. If you have an improved 
farm for sale at prevailing prices, 
see the Haynes Land Company, Thief 
River Falls, Minnesota. 

48-tf. 



EXPERT ELECTRIC WORK— Re- 
member the telephone number is 
100 when you want real service on 
electric work. Always get the man 
that knows his business. He'll save 
you money. If you desire to have 
your house wired on monthly payment 
"!an we can Ho it We give prompt 
service on all calls. Alex Welch. 28th. 



The dental office of Dr. G. A. Pen- 
ney will be closed for the balance of 
this week while he is in attendance 
at the annual meeting of the Minne- 
sota State Dental association in Min- 
neapolis. 48 



Winter Term of District 

Court Will End 

Today. 

(Continued from page 1) 
verdict of ?7,000.00 in his suit against 
Dr. H. W. Froehlich to recover for the 
disability of his left hand which he 
claimed was due to the negligence of 
Dr. Froehlich. The case developed 
rut of r.n injury which he sustained on 
the evening of February 1, 1023, 
when he severed the tendons of four 
£i»?**vs while cutting up a hog in his 
kitchen. Dr. Froehlich was called 
and according to "Fuller, treated the 
hand but said nothing about the ne- 
cessity of having the -severed tendons 
sewed together. He claimed that he 
had called at th doctor's office several 
times afterward but was told that the 
hand was doinp* nicely. The def3n™ 
contended that Dr. Froehlich had told 
Fuller of the necessity of having the 
tendons sewed together and directed 
."him to go to the hospital the next 
morninig where, with trained assis- 
tants and proper sanitary conditions 
the operation could be nerformarl to 
the best advantage, and that Fuller 
failed to appear for the operation or 
for further treatments. ?nd. in not 
following the instructions, had reliev- 
ed ihp doctor of further responsibility. 
The defense sought to prove; by the 



admission of Fuller that he had 
stopped payment on the. check he 
had given in payment for the doctor's 
call, within three days of that call, 
on the grounds that he was dissatis- 
fied with the treatment, Dr. Froeh- 
lich's employment was terminated and 
that Fuller-was negligent in not 
seeking treatment elsewhere, and that 
this negligence on his 'part was the 
cause of the disability. 



Articles of incorporation were fil- 
ed' this week for the Rapid River 
Homes company, in, which are associ- 
ated as. partners, J. "W. McGilvery of 
Thief. River Falls,. and two Oskaloo3a, 
Iowa men, . Lewis Andrews and Roy 
C. Rich. Business will officially \ com- 
mence with the first meeting of the 
directors here March 2. • 

Mr. McGilvery has been a resident 
of Thief River Falls for a' number of 
j years and until about three years ago 
[was engaged "in the real estate busi- 
ness.- Recently he'became interested 
in the timber business in the ' Rainy 
River district' situated midway be- 
tween Thief River Falls and Inter- 
national Falls which culminated in 
the formation of the company of 
which he is secretary and treasurer. 
, It is the intention of the new con- 
cern to erect a small mill at the point 
where timber is available, ' manufac- 
ture lumber, and deal' in lumber ma- 
terials generally. It is understood a 
specialty will be inade pf furnishing 
cut lumber for houses which need 
only to be assembled to make a cam- 
plete structure. 

The new corporation is capitalized 
at $50,000. and the officers are as fol- 
lows: __ .- Vt 

Lewis Andrews, president; Roy C. 
Rich, vice-president; and J. W. Mc- 
Gilvrey, secretary-treasurer. ■ The 
mincipal place of transacting, the 
business of the company is ;Thief 
River Falls. / 

The articles of incorporation "appear 
on page seven of this issue of The 
Tribune. • 



Loc^l Farmers Win Prizes 
At Winter Shows. 



Commercial Club Meet Postponed. 
There will be no . meeting of the 
Commercial Club this week due tff 
the Winter Show which is being held' 
p*- Orn^'ptp" Thur^av hue bepn de-' 
signated as Thief .River Falls day at 
the show and many of the club mem- 
bers will attend. 



Mrs. G. A. Penney accompanied her 
husband. Dr. G. A. Penney to the 
Twin Cities the first of the week. Mr. 
Penney after attending the annual 
meeting of the Minnesota State Den- 
tal association will return to this city, 
but Mrs. Penney expects to remain in 
the cities for a month or six weeks 
visiting friends. 



Fathers' and Sons' Banquet Friday. 

A fathers' and sons' banquet will 
be given in the basement of the Pres- 
byterian church Friday night, Feb. 12, 
at 6:15. This is an annual affair and 
lone which is exceptionally well at- 
tended. The chief theme in the pro- 
igram for the evening will be "Scout- 
|*ng." , 

| ■ A similar banquet will be given in 
■the Trinity Lutheran church later in 
the month. 



Better Farm Equipment Week. 
The week' of March 15th to 20th 
bis been set aside as "Better Farm 
Equipment Week*" and C. Gustafson 
& Son, local implement dealers, are 
making special arrangements' to pre- 
sent to this community the value of 
better farm equipment as an import- 
ant factor in community prosperity. 



Elks to Stage Cabaret Dance 
The local order of Elks announce a 
cabaret, dance to take place at the 
club rooms Friday evening, February 
12._ Each Elk has the privilege of in- 
viting a non-member and a lady 
friend. 

' ' 'f 



(Continued from page one.) 

cal farmers club, w^s- represented by 
Albert Johnson, H.s.Woolson and 
Stuart McLeod." If the score had- been 
made" a year ago it would have won 
first prize, but this year the five 
teams from Kittson county all went 
far past that figure', the Joe River 
club, of St. Vincent, winning by a 
score of 1,126. The individual score 
of the local men in Johnson 307, 
Wbolson 377 and McLeod 373. The 
highest individual score made in the 
contest was 399, by Carl Davis, a 
farmer near Crookston, and by Wes- 
ley Sutherland, of Hallock. 

Fisher High school won first place 
in the high school livestock judging 
contest; Fosston was second; Warren, 
Third; and Detroit, fourth, Herman 
More of Fisher High school had the 

highest score. ' 

In the farm cropslftow'.A. P. Lind, 
Detroit, won first in the open class oh 
rye; Clifford Hedin, Hazel, first, in 
the open clasB on flax; Ole Halsa; 
Thief River Falls, first in. the open 
class on alfalfa seed; 'and Emit Wag- 
ner, Ada, first in the "open class of 
sweet clover seed. ... 

A number of samples of. Gopher 
oats, the new variety ' originated by 
the University \ f Minnesota' Plant 
breeding section, were on exhibit, and 
much higher yields than of. the "ordi- 
nary vanties in common use - are re- 
ported in the" Red River Valley. Go- 
pher oats also showed the ability to 
.stand up on rich soils where many 
other vaiities- lodge, said exhibitors. I 
Splendid herds of Yorkshire hogs 
exhibited by Schermerhorn Farms 
Mahnomen, and \v. O. Clow, St. Vin- 
cent, serve to emphasize the growing 
importance of bacon hog raising in 
the Red River Valley. North Dakota j 
farmers have made a first class start 
in this line of farming and it is only 
natural to expect that the Minnesota 
Red River Valaley farmers will like- 
wise take advantage of their ability 
to finish a type of hog,, which is meet- 
ing with highest approval on the live- 
stock markets and which they can 
develop on alfalfa pasture, oats and 
barley. 

Schermerhorn Farms, Mahnomen, 
won all the championships in the 
Hereford classes. Earl Naugle, Ada, 
showed senior 'and grand champion 
Aberdeen-Angus bull; Albert Paradis, 
Brooks, junior champion Angus bull; 
and Schermerhorn Farms, won all the 
Aberdeen-Angus female champion- 
ships. ' 

_ In the Duroc Jersey swine division, 
Riverside Farm, Stephen, Minn., won 
the senior and grand championships 
both sexes. A. A.. Marsden & Son, 
Hendrum, showed the junior champion 
boar, and C. O. Quist, Crookston, jun- 
ior champion sow. 

About 55 members of boys' and 
girls' club exhibited livestock, corn 
and potatoes. Included in their entries 
were 32 dairy calves, 3 baby beeves, 
15 cheep, 12 pigs, 14 entries of corn 
and 10' of potatoes. Donald Dobias, a 
member oifj the Angus boys' and girls' 
club showed an exhibit of honey and 
beeswax. The Angus .club under the 
leadership of Mrs. Forrest Oberg of 
Angus is one of the most active 
clubs in northwestern Miinhesota. 

John Gehrig, Barnesville, won the 
junior com sweepstakes with a ten 
ear sample of Minnesota 13, and Law- 
rence Harstad, Crookston, won reserv" 
sweepstakes. They will be awarded 
free trips -to the farm boys* camp at 
the State Fair next fall with all ex- 
penses paid. The first two winners 
in each variety of corn will get a 



free trip to the Junior Short Course 
at the Northwest School of Agricul- 
ture, March 29 to April 2. They are 
George Gehrig and Lawrence Braa- 
^• n l^ B t arn ^ syilIe J Clarence Hielke, 
Kichville; Chauncey. Johnson, Detroit: 
Lawrence Harstad, Crookston; Gar- 
win Lundberg, Kittson County; and 
Pehr Branquiat, Lancaster. 

George Spangrud, Karlstad, - won 
potato sweepstakes in the club: divi- 
sion with a sample of Early Ohios. 
while Clarence Hielke, Richville,' won 
reserve sweepstakes on Russet Burr- 
banks. They will receive free trips to 
the farms boys* camp at the State 
Fair with all expenses paid. Casper 
Spangrud, Karlstad, won first on 
Irish Cobblers; Earnest Wickerstrom, 
Badager, first.on Bliss Triumphs; and 
Benney Burke, Brooks, first on Green 
Mountains. 

Further announcements will be 
made next week when the judging is 
more complete. 



BORN— to Mr. and Mrs. James S. 
Prichard of Minneapolis, a son, Sun- 
day, February 7. ■ v 



Youth of Nation Tops Death 

List in U. S. Auto Fatalities 




Club to Re-Elect Feb. 18. 

The annual meeting of the Thief 
River Falls Commercial club will be 
held at the club rooms next week, 
Thursday, February 18, ballots hav- 
ing been sent to all paid up members 
last week. 

The directors whose terms expire 
at this time are: Dr. H. W. Eroelv- 
lich, president; Math Barzen. second 
vice president; J: J. McCann, secre- 
tary; H. A. Brumund, I. T. Simley 
and F. H. Herrick. Those holding 
over another year are: Vive President 
Daniel Shaw, Treasurer Theo. M. 
Thronson, E. M. Bennes. Dr. O. F. 
Mellby, Albert Lonson and C. L. Han- 
sen. 



You save both by 
exercising the lat- 
ter in buying COAL 
from us. Close 
market prices, fine 
quality, dependable 
delivery. 

Coal 77 

'i 

Thief River 
Motor Co. 



OUR AIM; 
TO SERVE 
YOU WELL' 
AND 

FAITHFULLY 
—ALWAYS 




l4(VATION-W/DE 
J INSTITUTION- 



enney 

DEPARTMENT STORES 



Co 



WHERE 

SAVINGS 

ARE 

GREATEST 

THRUOUT 

THE YEAR 



Thief Rboer Falls' Busiest Store 



.i yoL'TIi pays Hie heaviest lull in anuuul automobile fluidities. From five 

*» lo flfteen years is the period when the greatest number of fatal accidents 

ocnxr, for hoth sexes. The chart shows the age jdlstrlbution of automobile 
deaths for men a